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TuE Shakopee Argus. 



Hy HENRY HI N' f 

OFFICIAL PAPER OF SCOTT COUNTY. 



SHAKOPKE, MARCU 6, ISiiS. 



Mrs. SPEcraTOR ajmits that we told some 
trutli.s iu our Liatory of tLat Appeal. W« 
had itatcJ tbat our wise county attorney 
had toM what bo kucw Tvas not true in 
«tatirg he could procure evidence lo reduce 
the amount of our claim, or else he had 
nsglected his ofHclal duty, na he did not 
produce any evidence against U3. ^V'e iu- 
fer that Mrs. Spectator adaiUd both alter- 
natives io ha true, aad we prcuauao slie it 
ccrrcct. 

lie went over to Minneapolis, on a no- 
tion to sot aside tho jud;4me:it, but goi b^at 
bcc.iuse ho h:id iK;,'!ecto I liis bu-jiuos3 at 
the p.-opcr time. V>'c hope sue!i a l.uy 
»\ixx\k will rciigii, sr a: l;ait p.iy hIms-.-lf 
the large bill of cost-. I'lr? county h-\i in::i:- 
rrel by rca:-.o:x of Li;i iijnoranca and nc;;li- 
gcace. 

But, icaiRni, you an? much ra'stutca in 
ftaviug thai '.be county audlior pai.l ud soo.: 
after tba ju.'.j^msnt in the Court w.is rcn- 
»lerc-'. Th'3 law rer^uires him to issue an 
order for the amjuut of a judgment upou 
ijlliig a transcript of the judjmeut lit hia 
oSce. I3at le delajed for over il^-'^yt^o 
days before doin,' no, ariJ «:>'/ "^"tJ l"^ 
order when wo w^^rJ a'jout to serve him 
■wiih a n;aadaT«u5 f.-or.i the C<iurt. 

To-ito;:sovi- 13 "he last day of the presint 
8'.Mjioa of iho Le^i»laiur«j. V/h'.Io la; j 
hiive not doue much f^ool, taoy have uot 
hccumpUjhid as nri^jh evil ui ihcir prodi.- 
Uccessor:!. We shall soon pul/.iiu the lawj 
iii full. Tliert'r;>ro seud ia your iubjcrip- 
iio:iii lo the Ar.uc i. 

New Evsxixu Daily. — Tlio St. Tuul 
P.ets thlukd that city had reached a posi- 
liou iu poiut of popuiuiiou ai d wjalii". Jif* 
Colently advanctd to support a new ilvoa- 
ju^ Daily, a:id iherefuro tuey com.nan:ed 
the publicatioji of one, cillsi '* Tke Ilvfii. 
i:ig J'reit." The first naruber v.a3 liaaud 
Mjnday, Maieh iid. The subicri.ilija prio,* 
Im o.'i'y ab>iat half ai much ai» the iloriiiu^j 




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Vol. 7. 



SHAKOPEE, MiXNESDTA, TilURSDAV, MARCH 5. IBliS. 



No. 7' 



MIIL'TESOTA LEGISLATURi:. 



SENATE. 
Saturday, February 2D. 

SSNATG BILLS TASSED. 
To amcn-1 section 1:>'J, chapter 11, ;jen- 



!\ r.;oi; \ I K CM! bill 



(jTATi: or >rT\\.:«)TA.\ 
CouMtr lit .~c >tt. I 



lid. Luit fall, Baxter was .ii'.' ou'y m:ui | 

in hid town who voted for the Ilailro.id | 

Bond swindle and we are not disappointed ^^ ^^^ ../,/'"," -7 -"eflLfc qfktrah A. ruribau:! <ind 
ito Cad him .till nthiso'.d Iricl.crv. ir„rn< Firi-uu:/: 

I Ilnrrl^r F.iri •»«'». Uirirn III ft S.ir»!i A. F.irlhi'i^t 
mi' I iliir I't l" iriti.iiU. Ii iviui? prc<oii»(»'! to ih- J'r»»mre 



Cross Plowslil. Gajermana, 



DEALER 



I N 



Democratic State Committee. 



eral statutes. r^-Iatini,' tu to Uie redempiloa , 'pj.e Democratic State Committee now 
of iaadi. Yeas 12. 

To iimeiid section 5, chapter TO, crenorvl 
stat.ilei. ri-J.iliiu' to ft-Oi. Void 12, nays 1. l"';^ 'i"d .i.m as foi'o.V: 



consijla of one from euvli hfenaiorial Di-i- 



A r»:tition of about siity of our citlie:;* 
^ cf the village of Lelle I'hiiiio, had beta 
prebeuted to the Le^'islature prayla;,' i-o be 
incorporated into a L'orouirh. We uj ::ol 
like the name I'orou^^h for a a iacorporatLid 
\r.'.a;;e, and we are iiicliiicd to believe lliat 
our Delle riaino people will iOja gel tired 
cf Lot!) the n.nma uad charter. 



To nmead sociiou S, cir.ijiler 2^1, session j 
lawi ot IbUT, cnlhit'd an act to iacarporat- | 
iu^ savings. Yeas lij. nays 1. I 

To amend section 3(J, chapter 57, r^eneral 
st.itiitcs, relating to the sales of land by 
executory and i^uardians. Yeas 10. | 

To provide for tlie lilia;^ of service of | 
underlaUings instead of bonds, in ceitain i 
cases. Yeas 1-1 , nays 2. 1 

'lo amend .fetioa bi, chapter 11, relating ' 
to laxi-s. Yens 15. j 

To authoru:- raiiroud companies to issue i 
mortjruifes and deeds of trust, and to pro- 
vide I'ur recording the same. Yeas 10. 

To regulate tlie fees of jurors in jusiice'i 
courU' leas 1 !• 

To amend chapter -19, ijencral statute-!, 
relating to probate courts, and repealing a 
po.tioa thcuof. Yeas 15. 

To Hinend section 0, chapter B6, of gen- 
eral statute:*, relating to appeals iu civil 
ac^iop.i. Yeas. 

HOUSE Q:<' nnpilLSENTATIVES. 

UOCiE BILL3 PAi>Si:D. 

A hill to amend an act catitled an act to 
locate, survey and tjtablish a Slate road 
f.uiu Uwlie riai;;e to Young America. Yeas 
35, nay.i 1. 

The House then (at 1 o'clock) tuoli a 
reccjj uuti! 2:3 J p. m. 

ArT£?»::ooN sE.ssio:r. 

IIou«c tact at 2J o'clock. 

bLNATK DILL t>A£S£D. 

A bill for an act to provldo fur supplying 
each bonrd uf hchool di.Urict olhceis with 
the ''iliurrsotji Teaelier ami Journal of 
tdueaiion." Yeas 32, nays 4. 

SKNATK. 

Monday, ilareh 2, 18iS. 

8E.\AI» HILL TAH'^ED. 

For the protection of railroads arid per- 
iou4 traveling thereon. 

UOUSa BILL VIS^Z'S. 

To ir.corvorate the borough of 3el!e 
Plaine. 



Ist District — J. H. Hrlsbin 

2d District— J. N. r'asile. 

;;d District— A. J. Uee 1. 

4lh Districl — Wiliimi Docliren. 

jih District — (.'harles K. i-'iandrau. 

t,th District — A. C. Uiggs. 

7 ill District — Segvave .">!nilh. 

8th Disirict — G. »V. liaxier. 

'Jth District— J. C. I'ierce. 

lOlh District — V.". B. ;jutic. 

lilh District— J. J. CJreen. 

12l!i District — \V. L. Brec!;iivrl J^c. 

DlLa District— E. D. H.i>'ll. 

Mth District— \V. 11. Edwards, 

lotli District — .\.. S. Everest, 

loih District— H. J. Wall. 

17th District— J. C. \Vi,c'. 

iMh District — William lle.:ry. 

. I'Jlli District — E. St. Juliea Cos. 

20ih Disirict— LJco B. Kii»ij-,lcy. 

2\st District — Fred. DuToii. ' 

22d District— :i. !l. I'caJor-as'. 



C"irt"f ilie «'«ni'av«'i Siv>»f .iM I ?t it'- «f Mmi'iim>'« 

a l'.i;t'<> I I'O u wl.l'li It i|i(M'nri t" t'"' I' 'Urt t'l.i' It U 

„.,...^,,rv f'. . the Voiiii vv.'rit ii'i 1 liT •>! ilip N i-«rt 

«'.•-• <|ir r • r ■■( -n.r .?! 17. r-w i^liip 110. I" lU'^c !.•» . 

til • .N'<i ti W -t (J i-trtT " '■> ■ Noti :'. >t iniiicr^i 

:^i. Ion l.".l, r-.w ■•■'^Ji' Ilf. Itansp 11: the <i.u"i :<;i*' 

([■1 ,rt ••■ ••! \'ir'iikV--t Ml nil- . ,(• I I',- Vi. fi| inif r.( 

.> ,u'li tr.-,i qin't.''' "I l!iL'~iii''i Ktst 'Ci 1 ■ r Ml ••,,. 

*« . t'l VVfSt I I 'TriT "f -^••■■!i ••! fi. T'>«ii-!il|> !•>.>. Ui II .-.• 

II, s'l'i it..-; !•> Hie <J»n'it>- of \v'it!a-!i i. •llnie^ita. an i 

!.<•:> 1 :iii 1 I iii'l tii« S<Mi|!i W.-' tci;i-t<-r "I f II- 'V'iMi 
I fCisi "'iirie-. ml th* N""i:i U'..<f q i .-ti r ••! I'l ■ '■'outli 
1 W«st n i.ir 'T "if ."•'■if'iii -1. I'l v.|-i!i|.i l*i. Ittii-.'"' 3'. iliL- ] 

■ iiiiu licl'i.- t'-' pr>«r"'-'r ••( th" sill S.ir.iti A. K.irl-I 
i bant: i-i I !...» I, i i <■• I <> i .11. 'fi I (.••» s in <••• t ! "i r/i, | 

'! Mwiylil I HI. I;aiii.»l.'i. I'l.' -; -I'll Hn-. q'l rter "• til? ■ 

.^•...tii :; s..,....io.-..,s.ti.,n2.-.. ';,'*'':;,' V'.'r-JV,'.'.fn Mai'.I'ww ai'i' .Slorc, Shrikopce. 

1 >. t'l" N rf 1 Kct ri.i'"t T I' >i-"tl'>ii Xi I'l l.iw.i«'iip J *^ 

til, i(.iti.'i. 1'.. .f I I ti. .\..rtli W.-st iriiiltr-i' Sfiti:iiii 

I 3l, i:i ro-.VM^M|) m.'liMi;.. 1.-., »ltil ili-l ii ili- C'iii:i y{ 

IO lilt > I'm-, ^l^llll■ Ota; Mii'i tiw iir ip.-riy uf tliP salJ 

ui'ii'..', llir !• t (••..rl'-ii"t. 



T r i E p ; : ii ii i n'k c ri0.s^;-PLO ws 

Are f^r Sti'.e by 

Jo n IcMiiUcn, 

At hit 



Thor ere male of Ilirlenol CAST STKEL anU 
It l« l'1-.ji..f t'l I. rel fist t!i~npxtnr kin of !»!<• OK::MAN SIKKL. >)■ C. «... I'U t..lMi, at ll;e Miiiuti 

a'hi(l>l>n- is I lie 



DRY GOODS, 

GEO CEBITS, 

Boots & Shoes. 



BE.- 1' ru)w i.v Tin: would, 



I till wir's S11-..I1 A. Kiiril'd-llt a-iil Uirr!-l K ir'.li itilt, 
• an I nil i.iT^'iis lMt':-.-ii' I I'l tu -'ri'-t iti'. i;>P'">r '•*'i"«* 
I 111.' i'p.'ntu (;.."Kt lif thi'Ciiu iiy "if Sooti in 1 StiiHor| 
I >IIriii.'-(iru, at I'-n "VI «o'.- In Itp' li.r-iumti of tli<» Iltli i 
I il.iv ',( \iri!. in fie vpir ISi'.h, nt t"ie »m •(• "f t\ii> 'inl.-i; 1 

' l>f I'l lib It- of li.ti.t l.'il.iMi V of .*1>>M, ;•! I 111- Coll! I Itoli-v I 
In Slirtiioio:!-, Ill gill I'oii'ily, 10 ►how t iiiisi- wl y ii| 
L!.-.-ii>H *:io;il 1 not iK! ,';a!»t< I f 't l.i-} *aIo o" »al 1 le- . Ant will L V^ P frjni iwu to three timet looser 4li«n 
MTibt' 1 re i'slati-. I . ,, ,..,,,. 

A. I'l It U fiir.liT'i l»rBl l">;it noti-cof t'l." liMr'n,' ] "-'J u.ui.rii'W. 
nf!-!''! polifoM li»-avei| ly Mi- iniMicntioti i>f Vm' 
forefiitii ii-liT '11 i.'ir S'iiif.>nvt Aign*. .1 iiMr-|ii|> r 
nrlM'i' I unl tiiiS'Ulir.l at rt'iikopi—. ii 4 li I (' ointy of 
S ott, ("ijf far jU.cea-.lva w.".'Ks, the ! ist -if wUlfli piiii 
I'liMoiiN »;:j11 bi-iit l:i«t r.>urie.:'i aiiyt bcfuie the d..v 
oi 'leariiia. 
i».l« ! F--jriiary I-Olli. IS6S. 

L. r.. II \w!;tv.?, 

III! 4i .'» t.r • .1!" .' ..tulo. 



riti>i5ArE XO.TCE. 



. , I 



^OTICK OF MOiiTUAGE ."-ALE. 



ErsciAL o.tons. 

The tlirre bilU bc-lcr-? tlie Senate appri- 
pr.:iling o'J.^.OOO acr-js of Internal Improve- 
men; Uiiids lor the liijuidation of ail iudebt- 
ediicsi connected witli the Miniieiota St-ttc 



t^" At a caucus of th« German dtlt* 

gu'.c* to the State Convention, Mr. Duuaud, 

of this County, waauominaled by them as 

\}.«ir choice fur Elector, by about & two- 

tiiird Tote. But IriciiPry w*5 rc^oricd to to 

•viur«*il"T>.4 i.onilu»»llou. Al";vr the caucus , . ... 

, , ,. , , ' 1 i I 1 i went into com imitoa oi tae whole upnii tu* i 

Y.-A adjourned, uad mai>j oele^rutcs hud j ^.^,_^^^ ^j^_ j_ j^_ Armstrong iu tlie chaii. | 

left, it was agatu calk-d. and the pr.vjous i 'Piia bill i.iUoduced by Jdr. Dut;iels was 

*iCkioh reconsidered ia the ubseuce of many j ilr.^t taken up 



li.iiUoad Bonus, having been made t!ie 
spci.il ordir for eleven o'clock, when that 
Lour arrived, 

On tiiotion of Mr. Daniclii, the Senate 



Nam'S cf Mor.TGAOoi:i.—J times Kgiin, ni.d 

Marv Euan, his wiii , of Siblev tJouaiv. "*<'><d 



PTAi'K Olf MIYXKSi -A.) 

• 'oiiiily of Sc'i:|. / K*. 

I'l '••rjbit'- Ciiirl— .■'■><;c1jI Term, Fe^runry 21st, A. 

P. liOi. 



Miniicyiila. 
NAiti: OF .MuKTOAiJEK— Mathia-. .Matty, ti'cu 

III' .\l<iiirii'-, \Vi>coii.-ii. 
Dat;: Of .MuuTUAiih— .\ljy :{0;!i, A. D. It^Ol] 
6xii> Ali»r>TGAGi': v»aj recorded in the otli.c 
of the Kcjtis'er of Deeds of Seoit 
County, at eleven o'ckudv in I lie lote- 
nuon ot l!iol!ii ti.iy >>f .Jiiii-.-, in tiie 



Oil ri- I lln:.' atil Q 1 'g l'i> jiefl'ln-i nf rj"! 17 n.M!flia'l 
of I'll. I .\vo <.f llt>:(>'i». Ii t'l" '.'iii'i'V (if >C'- iii'l 
.Sat.' ol >liii'!<-s'.t , s'ltn; t,r|l« ;i 1 I iri>i-; 10,- nn- 
^> s I'l,' .r: 1 >r ,l'. I, -ill' '.ft " •■I of \ Till llHtr.t' '!! Il'l 

111-- ;'lj-.ir • 01 t 1^ ml I »V|' ii .1 ^^l••'l i. •. I it" ■■! I'lt" ci'jr 
of Qiiiiiry, III lii.. .-t.to .11 il.io.iii, li-.c ;».•!, m .y I, • 
triiil'-l all Hj'te i to lU-.i.y 1.. illoliae:, br')!l.or o: 

S.ll'i '••<•.• I.. 1. 

It is 'rlursi 11 «t Si'iir I IV. IU'! 2I<». I ir of ^f.ir.-h. 
.A. P. M-,S. ii i.-ii .*,|ii.''; Ill I >,; i'ir.>-!ii'i-i, iit III • I'ltl •• 
• il III.' Jil l::rf <»:' I'r.rt. i»« I't ti«>!fat II 1 i.ie l'< ^'i (Kn 
|i •!.'. Ill l'i'<ii-l iinl V ..f .S-ott. li.^ a>»'.'ii.' I f T t'l' 
Mi'iiioj III .<ilj i>.'riMo.|. .1 !.| till' I'l" l|.-li-- il l.iw It' 



y.ar ISGJ, iu J>i*oli "E'' of .\lort 'a 'es. ! tie«'iii iie <•^^ «. .ni uiiofiiT j.^rs-i- int •■• -i-m 'a 

. , r 'T o » I ii„. 4,,| I e<t»t ', .irtj liurcoy iMiifle 1 .. 1.' f iht -.i 10 !>.• 

pa^C 1 10. pi-fs -lit at ..li t 't'lif a 1 I I'.ace t.^ sh >«• cau«',.'l any 



I'aa D;;scitu'Ti'>x of t'li; m irti-i^'.i iir-ms- 
es is tlie .South Hall of Ine .Sout'.«\'St 



til y liivc.ktiy i.i ; ,>riy .r 01 a ii 1 i<et!liun slijill I 1101 
be .'liioti' I. 
All Ii !•. firliiT (>r.|er«f I. tli.it nollci' of t'le liearlii? 
<l..i.4.ii. .1 ..: .1! >.i 'i'..i> .... I .1 . »• ...1 ' of * il I ii«-tl ioi li>^ '.'i>e 1, 1'V ii.ibll..'i''r.; a <• )i'»' of t!il?, 

^laart'jr tl nictun len, aiiil ihe bouth „r,.'r i, ' .v. ,'.....,.•« .i.y«'. a wi-kiy n. w.i..p..r, 

\\ e->t Quarter of the Sou'h East Un.ir- i-i-i'i'' ' "'i i rmnMi-i at .<iiakopi..., 1 1 ,ai i Cium. ..| 

, _ ,J^ ,• »!• II- .,. ,• ,> 1 ."N.-ott, l-'r Ihr -e »ii.-ivi»-iive v.'.'i-* iiutu;* lUl.'ly .iroiei- 

tcr 01 .";j.;tJo:i ten, all in »o\vii>liip <Jne injiiicti h'iu-i for »a; i iiearnu. 

Hudufcd and Fourteen, of Kangi* ' 

'i'wenty-oiiO, containing o;i? hun ire-! | 

ai.d twcnlv acres, .siiu;iie Iving nti I i»e- • 



i>4t.'J Kcjuiry Jlit. l.iiJ.r. 
iiC- 



L. I!. ir.\v.-:civ-. 

.In I.- • ■,•! »'r .'jjt''. 



i'lc ri.ii.m ('ir iti G.;i;"vr DUPvABlLI'. Yarc:— 

It. TheEXTilEME IIAUD.NESS of th'. 
Steel fr.iin winch it is inaile. 

2L The TllIiJIC.NES.S i STrJCXGTil 

of ihe CipO-scd par. 3. 

3d. The woo 1 w..rk Is of the UEST WHU'E 
O.vK liiiBEU. 

i'liCM qita'.it.'ei 11 a!;t 1 tli.' 

CHLAl'R^T PLOIV 

la tSo >^r>r;'', i;* 'Acil ts K.X.f /?/-.■•. .Jast »i sure«-« 
lacrw is c stiiii 1/ Ih p.<i'li:s six tluil^ii. u:.t.c, it.iu<t 
l.ijii i1v'« tw, ai« tiv-> or t..i er t;iu«a vv:,. 
lit ^r<.*.ii aarJiiaai c«ut -• li to 

S C O U li 

la tue iii'iKt i^'Tli:'..:: sol'., wUea all eih«r plutva fall, 
iiiow: i'luwa ar« 

VVAKIiAXTED TO CLEAN 

In diiy ki:i l»i Soli, or l^t uioiiey will be refuudeJ. 
i( iilJ'.vi il any 



D 1: P 



II 



F.-*."a fni t.-) twelve iiiiUrt, ami \rj;i lura uuicr 
<rai-, uac-as aui ntubble.coiupliftely. 

FOR iSALU BY 



I\ PUOiiAl'E COUIU'. j 

SC >TT C )I:NTV.— SiKClilTt-rm.Fe' rtJiry ::tli, !«-<. I 



iiig in tlie County of Scott al'oiesaiiJ. 
SAia il Jitrii.v'JK was iiiid.; t') .s-curw- tlie 

payment of the .snm of Eiglity Dolh.rs, ;„ ,,„. „,„,^ ,.,. ,j^^ ^..^,^ ,^^ j^^^,,^. a.UiitifJAS. 

Willi iu teres* at the rate oi I'VcIve p n nerasnl: 

cent, nor annum, navable in one vear I "'• '"■:''''',''"'.""''- ''','''"""■'"'' •''^^'■'' '"'»'■'"■"'• 

r ' II - • i "f ■"'linii/ /-.I'i". I 1 I'll* < i;r.t>- -if -<,-.i't, ai.l St.it'oi 

jrom ( ate, accoi'iiin.' to llio iti'oiiiis>u:v i Mi'im'-on. it-vIu: r»r r-.isnK i .-fiii »ai"i tint 



JOHN l£cMUI 



\2^, 



at.^ 




ps. 






YANKEE NOTIONS 

Oiieensware, 

Oto, OtO. OtC. 



mm f^'{^n\\m 






note of the 5aM James Kgii^ iiayuli.e I V;?.'.'?.,"!, V.:'.';''''''''' ' "" 



Is. 1.. I .., hiin, t'.\ 



Krtlt ' 

i! i !• 



■ if til" s.i 1 
>r t; I.-:-' IT in 



Aj3at, ilifckop32, Minn. 



rC tf 



to til.' said Malhio.'? Marty, anj bcurni'' l> u 'rtTi-j tut *it in.*-. •-»• v«v«.ii.-flr.t i.iv ot 

.,,•.,,, ,1 1.:. ut't, r..; 1 M ,.1,,.,. " plir.-'i, n.t-i. It In • •.' -ti • : I-I t ii-:if-t>r.iooii at til-' 'iitl:'; 

c\eii (late «iili tai.l .Morlgag.-. [ „, ,;, .' 1 , 1 ,. „r ;> i-, ,,. »,.-, .,: ^i. .ii» .- j,. 

ActH'.v or nroceedings liave been i.isti- ' *'<\* '-"" '•' '• ' V' • '• ' ' =' '. ' '' ' "'■'-' ;"' •-"•' y ;'. •!•' > 

' " . a I r : I II t 1 • I 'in .1 • V •> "1 • "ci 1 i-*- • i.- i. It a"v 

lUi.'-.'.! at law, or otLcriv:.-o, to ico iver •■•••i<! b.;. aii i;i utiii-r i>«-jim inU'r'^'i'i li t'ii'<aii 

n.'.. fcj.n ^LLUlc.l i'j s-.a .IK. ig.ige or ■„,,..,•„,.,„ ^. '...,,. -Y,. I 1 ,,-.,«, wjy -.ii- :.rt/.r 
uiiv part thereof. • or .is 1 .K-ir 1 m > 1 • 1 .t ii- .- ,iit • 1. 

; Am -ua r claimed to be due on said not-? i ...Vl 1 :.h '/."V; Ti'vl a''- W- Vfyi.-:',^: 'o^i^ oJ , ..„ 

a: ilie d..ti' of lii;s i.nliee is tlie .•^tim «if • ''•« •>'^'"' '■• '"■'. -^ •.«».•»'< ;»''-'-/i .jr./M.i..-» '.v.-ohiv I of October A. t». t.-m. '",;'',,•'; V"',i.'','.'J'"J" ,Pf,'','''.."v' 

. IT 1 t ■. 1 , I 1 , , . il-.iSV .11 1 I T ■» "J " ' " ' " ' "'" 

(. U 11 111 r . .1. U .1 -\ I O la:s lll'l I'dCy 

< c!iL-, t'j,r-:aur with liio sum yf iVn 



N'o 



; Xi:CL'TJO.\ SALE. 

X'lTICU li) iiiTeby (;iv<-u that I bJ>a Icvlc 1 npiti tV-' 
f I'lowiii:; '•' H-'i'.n-'. i<'.it .-.vt.:!'-, a- 'In* iir<i|nTly of I'.-h' 
I'l-ikli.in-. Ill-Ill" aii'l '-y v;r!ii'''l .iii .-Xi-.iirto:i »»i!i- : 
oni of all I It I'l'-r 111-- si-a; "I ;mi' DSil.-t r.-urt .1; 1 1 i- 
St t.' 'if \llini»o:«, Int'ii' Kotirlli .linlLl.il nu'iit I 
;j-il for till' rotiiiiy of il«l!^opill. to t!i. .>iii.i-iii -if ;;,r 
r-iimty ol -i-wil nirpctcl an I -i-.l.'-r'.l an. I bi-iri-, 
ilit« tin- 13'Vi 'Uv of l)-'C"nili I S. 1> isr.7. i.-'ilrh sa'.l 
M.\'"''l-'on w.'> U-iit; I itin'ii a -'nl;iiii'!i r'-ii-l-rfil in 
iit^trict lA'urt In i!i« %.t\.\ K uirti -in .b-lil I>l.il'ijl li 
„„,;j,ir»aKt loiiity of ;;eiin''!J'n. • I'"'" iliirto mb .lav 



tl^lcgHtos I'his is lL» way iLs ihlnj w.ii 



^jt' On Friduy lust the Li-gijlalur* took 
A wild goose C-Tcuriija to Si. Anthony and 
^iliiinfapolis. The pubUe business they 
>»i.-re attending to was a good .;pree .-.t the 
jiabl.'," expense. 






Lcn cf Adoptod Ciilaeas. 



I ti4 J I i!:-tif 1 »t -! ta:;.>|«ir... i I .^ji'l - vrlii-ri-'lii Jroraiirs L Uarrili. lien y W. Iviiif.", I'.iliiicr \ . 

I i-\-. t I' fi • -J ri;i"j-.-»iv-' <Vi'e«s t •«..»• JUtiiti' jirc- i Ki-l;ii';i ami .'olm .-. I'r-iili-'. .Jr.. lo n-.r iia-'l'ii-..* a-. 

- 11 1; I 1 -ail! h -i-t •■(. Uirrt-tt, Kin^ .V Co.. iro ',it iiii!;il", .iii-l •-■lo-' l','c;.'i 'in Ik 

... lit • I K- i-.i I'V 27iii, l-itH. I a-lVii I Oil. !'• fi^-'i" of *-'i-l liliinilirs an I 1 aii.s' salil 

Dodar.t solictors leo secured ll» be ..ij5» 1. l. il\»V.;\S .in !.'.» -.r r- . . t? I .le-,-..., hmt, l.ir f.-- s-nn ot . in-' o inn l-."l :-'jf'y n-ilars 

n;-i < b ' V ...i ..,or,.-l"e — ^' an 1 l-Il^bty i.lti.-Ci'nls: w'li.b »al.| in ■-.rm'-nf w .s.l..i k- 

Mr. l'ot..r oiT.rcd a substitute, which | :;J r::^^, ;;::;^ZS^l hereby civen. i WT ^ VT'^'^ ! c".*;.l.^^v'.V^;'oi;':\^:Mrnn^':!a^:f'l\^^X" a!;x 4^' 

w'.nT.'l-v till' Slii-r.fl' ot Sil'l rolilit.' of -.-O'l U 0011-. 
Ill :ll Ir i lo «,-Hl»ry lb-' sa*'l Jii lui' 1 I I oi:t . f 'i.c i.^r-on 
II iir-in -rtv o. t'-.p <.ill Ju Ifiii'iit 



The f-jllowiag resolutija wa3 paiscd at 
ih* Democratic State Cjavonlion : 

Rrtuhed, That we ii.oignmiily rij.'Ct the 
prii.ci'i'le, (Jraiva from iho feut;al syitei::, 
that the masses of the people bel-,)ng to the 
j^'ovtrtments under which ihcy livi-, wl:;ch 
iit anotlif-r form is contended for by the 
anonarohios of J-urope, inchnliiig Great 
l^riia.u, that once a cuhject, alwtiys a sub- 
j»ct. ^\'e, on the coutiary, nmintaii. that. 
i»n individual can, by einigr.kton to and 
re»lucuce in ."^noiher country, i"or->v.iMr his 
^rtV-ous Hih-^ianc.', and be tidmitied into 
Mil the ci'iil and poiiiical rights of his new 
lionic ; that American citizens liy adoption 
Hiid t^aturalization ara caiiilcd to all the 
righ".*, as bitv.eea the United States and 
lor*ign power-), which cuii be churned !•>• 
I i.r own nalixe bora ciiiicus; and it is the 
<Juu cf the Fedt-rai gover.im.;iit lo protect 
• nu maintuia th«:!u by cvtry means wiihiu 
•*s rov.tr. 



i!r. Cav«:.itugh, ("Our Jim,") 
I>«pr(«cutativo froai Montana, has iutro- 
ductd ill Congress a bill to provide for 
le.all eervico between I'ort Abcr. rotable, 
X^ahota Territory, and Helena, Montana. 
liefcrred to the Postofficc Commiitee. 



Delc.':at3s to KaUcnal Tcaecratic 

conventicn. 

A. G. Chntfield, of Scott countr. 
w nmes J. Green, of Winona county. 
W. A. Gorman, of Ramsey county. 
^Viulhrop Young, of Hennepin county. 
v.. A. ilcMaLou. &f tJlmi»tcd county. 
O<o. D. Saow, of LeSucur county. 
E-aac Stnples, of Washington county. 
TLoc-.aa V> ■ Shetdir, of llanis"'- countr. 
Al.TEttXATES. 

('. C- Crah.tm, let DiUrict. 

raul Fabtr, 2d District- 

J. y. GTarrt', Cd District. 

J, I. Lewis, 4ih District. 

i:. S. Everett, i>th District. 

wudge Jas. A. Brown, Gth, District. 

.ludgc Evatia, 7th District, 

U- W. Pratt, at large. 

rp.K.-iMi:;7iiL klectoks. 
A. C. Cl.alCcid, of Stott county. 
Euthtr Desrhc^rji, of Rice con ,ty. 
C. lI.Licnau, ot" Uri-'i^sey county. 
y,'. Vr, Phelps, of Ooodhut' county. 

A CoKREtiioN. — Wtjii-otice In ilio J'C^A*- 
i'jU a sluteiscut that M. Ucss Dunand u.*^ 
4iiiJ county, v\a.«„ with other eminent pcr- 
8(ins, dcftatcd before ihe Siato Couvention. 
Ttiia If .1 Uiistahc, as 3Ir. Danani's iiaui^ 
was not btfora the couveuliju as a Candi- 
da :«? for ativ position. 

H^The iiptcUitor has fo'ir editors now. 
T«o r«pub'ic.\n, one semi-democratic and 
\iU9 fttma'o,— a'! hatchcJ t:i the Uazz^rd'i 



w::? aloptod, aui aft '--r wards, on motion, 
^r Llastcr rccymmeud'.-d lo be Li4 on \l\j 

table. 

^ir. Biiitol'i^ bill on the stme subject was 
then taken up, and ^Ir. i.'aiii.-ls movL'd Iu 
amend by sub-:iiiiting his bill for tlni same. 

.Mr. Danitds a-lvjcaied tiiepissiige o! his 
bin us mcriluiious, a:id hop -d if Senators 
had objection i t-> it. tlt.-y v.rald state them. 

Mr. Bristol ilioii/ht ids iil-.m wuald work 
mur-j hortno:'.ii.»us!y. 'Stli h^i had lio oh- 
j'jclions to .Mi. Daniel's hi'.!. 

Mr. Ba.\tcr obje-v't.d to the idils of .Messrs, 
Bristol and I)a:iicls, and f^iyorid the '•Di.da- 
110 bill," 0.1 the ground that it took tlie 
seLlleinent ol tiie bonds out of the hands of 
lac State oili-jers, and out of politics. 

Mr. Smiiii moved as a suboiitiite ths bIM 
introduced in tiie House by Mr. Furbcr, 
proposing an a-n-'u l-iunl to t!ij c:)nstitu 
tion, so Ui it the imjiroveinent lands can 
1 ever b^j dispensed of c^j.-pi by a vole of 
the people. 

Be wanted the land^ plaeed beyond the 
control of the Eegishiti >•'.•, and tlie proceeds 
of the same forever hel I inviolato for the 
dischar;re of the bond debt. 

Mr. Daiiie'.s, in reply to Mr. Ba.vter, said 
tiiiit to leave tiii.T seiiienienl wiili the State 
ohievrs was just jiivci-sely where it should 
be left. He predicted that to turn over 
this matter to individu;ils the .Suite would 
never rctllze anything woi-ih naming, whiU* 
in thi end thu people would be comp..Mied 
to pay by la.xaliou every dollar of the boads, 
principal and iulerest. 

The aul.^l'.iuie ollcred by Mr. SmIkh was 

The substitute offered by Mr. Dauiel-a i 
was also lost. 

The conii.iittec then recotamended that 
the origiaal Liii [the Briatoi billj lav ou the 
table. ' i 

The Delano bill was tlicn taken up by | 
iha ooniniitice. I 

Mr. i'cttit moved to amend the bill by ' 
providing for the payment of the chilms oft 
t-riiham «L McDonald, and EIu, Grinddl ic 
Keepers iu the general settiemcul. Witu- 
drawn. 

An amendment was adopted, offered by 
Mr. Smith, prescribing that in aciecting 
hinds iVir cancelling bonds from lime lo 
time, one half selected ^hali be from iLo-ic 
of the least value. 

Mr. Eolsom thought the bill provided for 
partial repudiation. He was therefore op- 
posed to it. 

The committee recommended that the 
bill be engrossed for a third reading, which 
with the other recommendatloiu was adopt- 
by the Senate. 

HOUSE or r.EPKESE:*TATlVES. 

BILLS ISJUODfCED. 

By Mr. Ucnry- An act to incorporate 
the borough of Belle Plaiue. 



that liy Vi 
lain -d iu >uid 



Aii, notico i.s hereby given. • 'A^ *-^i '^'^■ 
ii liio of u po*vcr of taii; cnu ', * 



mo: I 



.lire a il 



4VCO 



lilcti 



therewith aiid of ihj jTiovis.ons of lie 
St.itule in sich case made and (intvi 



•< Oii^n tn.t: 



• ^V''. 'i-.rifi's 

T? Ilto .'Jinie.'* 



t'.c'!, the said 



mortgage v,-ill I.c f ». 



Tt ->-.t\'nH iv.!r MOT 

-I IV » .1 li •'. li ' II l-'' 

•I-. .Ill I. I .i»-j.i 1 1' ' V iiitjirit'-i w.i I nmr-t'iiii 
l"! ! ff'i; "ivi 1 4r • I *' «."! a't I vi-»i '. an I .1 M.-rlir.-, i<f flu. 



t.ior not pni»iit pi 
Irnm -x'Tiiiiof wiliilii In; »i'i •''•'■ itv of Si-ott,'-r it 
»'i'ib' •lit |o'i «<>•«! 11- >nr«y 'Mill! 'I t '•.- I'liiio !. fn-n 

.,.,. .,f t%.- r,.al -.r, r>.-rt " 



-.t ..\-' 



•I i.t r- 



tluSed liy a sale of sad imn'i,: ueij 

lireini.-e.5 to be in:nlc by tlie S:ieri:l' ot «iiib 'Inc n".*. ';■•. .. , -. 

* .,,. . !• c- .. . -1 I ' !' 1 i;! t<-'i ' I- \ I 1 ! ' i. U irriv'iv, (5e'-.{.-.ii"iv-. 

tui'l Lounty ol Scott, at put^iiij vjn l.i.^ ^ Vinni ^li.i.-.. r . 1 1 ;.-.» .;iy. .m-l '*a cin um i:.-v!.i 

nt Iho front do-.r of the Court Huusj ■ i.-i^.;M.;..;;;':M;-r;^.,.,^ »,.... r^u .r.ii..is,..i.* ...i'. 
ill .Shakojx-'J 111 .said County oi ccott. , in ov r.- »•• li-t • a i.i "iinhy d>.'i'>>i iVaimT, aai 
Stale id\.Minn.-s..ta, at ten oVIoek in ' "•',|;^. V;^^;;.y';:,y-;-;,[.\',',l,'i,v ^n i-umei a-ii pmii-m 
the lorcnoiin of ihj l-:rii n\y uv Ai'iiiL. m'M.m i..t.i... iro,* ii-neriiiy u m iMtts ..f I'n* 

. ., ,^r^ 1 . , !• ciiiMi*. la lie bv-it biilt'jf Ili-J klii I i 1 t?-.o i.ii,;li>M 

in I Ik; year IbG^J, aa.i tai: p-occe is ot ,j.,^.,j,,,u. 

){a(;l| .silt; will bcsj;;;!icd to l.'i; iiayment j Do not b»? l)«-cciM«l « 

of the s^niii tlicii duo on siid iioie and i 



X'-i-Mtloi III 
.^-li-.rlntJl.'I.Mi'il-^rolifnn.i ml.l .-ou'ilv ot Sooi t •• I in'.-ioi.' Ifl-. 'M 1 1 • = -..i.i.t .ly I.IO: 
.( ir..tvi,.» i.:it.'». 01 •,-..»! p.- ..itlii! ilaywlie-i aabl J'l isiiioiii n s ^o .l.x'.-nti'.! a 

' iiivp-all. "I- at any tim 




Cor. rirat and Lcvric Streets, 

Shakopee, Minn. 

DEALER IXj 
irr.rtlwarc, 

Cutl.'iv,' 

Tin Ware, ■& 
Sheet-Iron. 



J^ Repairing neatly and promp.- 
\y executed. 



• •Illf/ Kl'/.'l >. 



t 'N W 



<• .. 



|i|i. -..-i-trr. \ vi> Til IT I, 
J I. 1*11 Ihoiiin*. 'Jlierlll f il'li'i'i ly of -t'otr.^it -,.„ 
..-.•iocii 111 ibi' lorii-'oii of i-i" II '• 'I y -If /<»r«-'', 
U,\ at till' fr-.nt -l-or ■ f'-" ''-vrl IToii.i. In .<hi.| 
..i-iiV." <'f<i-ott. w-ill »e'l 11 tbw liulip-t Ml li-r. lie I 
f .11. -vine lip* rlli"-I ri'al .t -i-. ''.nin''r''a ui le -crll-ea 
At fi.l •«■«. t'l "H : , ., , . 

!l -'..■iiKiliic-il a I 1 nt "I 'l^'" es»' '"" "' 'loliilOl dt'ei-t ; 
iiii'.'jY'i't i-ir'li f>f !'i--oi •«•-«» •■•r.,».rr.i IHock No.< I 
'1 • 1- • n t\i- ir'v on n 'I'le ii-i-all<>' w I'l ilii- iiorMi lin | 
ifxil'l Il'm-!: I'nfol, 'iH'ii- nort'iwnr'llr on I'lolln, 
i,.,.v.^P,! T.oi^ ■> 1-1 I .1 In -J ijI '»'..-'.• ^'i■. f-.'t. ili^iic 
■r.^st \-,T-il\ -•" I'll... iiit'i "■"••' t'l" V'l.-y I":t n.r'i .-III 
It ...-•• 1-1' "ret to ">,\-.\< % -f ■■ • t.-«n.! t'-K"'- <■ ■;-Ht'in-ann' 
11, •' east line of II I ••?•« -■H' n -MS' f^ft t.i ■ 



r^^'fim 






*^r ^*^f\ii.\\\\^^ ' ■ 



inoilgage, and the ejsis and cliarges ol" , ,5.^, „,,,.,.;,., -j..,, -« ,ri „.-n , ,',i, .-.n nnnn Iir.-er 
Iiivcliu-.'11'O and said ^^.ll tif ten diillars I tv 1. ,t ii *ir-tt ■«• -i- vii...tn'.i :.i:..«. i.#i.i."i.iy— iiy 

....... .. , I ., . Ill til 1; I >t:-;or i.iii t 1 1 I t 11' 1-1 ;i'»i;—t ••{!>•.• til' ii'i- 

.soIie:tor> li e-s proviucu by sanl inur - i„-.<i,i .ki.,- h ii u .i- -iiti-i. u '1 1< l-«!\tn 

gage to he p .id .ui of the piy-eo i. "f : ,:^:';jvVi Tt^:' n'i"i':;':iri''.'.' 'r::.;!;';.:.^;?:-':^ 

\ • -'U 1? V ■< 1 II ■ I ' • 1; < 1 • • _• I t..' iv j.t.i • 1. 1 (> liiii o f tUi' 
\jiir,'tiif rlili m l>r ml s. 

i r-M.'i.'r«. .■ 1 1'.; ii-i. :; .;! -• 1 Ci Try ne'i. KaniiiTS. nml 
' eru-r.jeli ! iVi-'i-i till t-i«ij-n.'|- f n- i iii< wo'lv l.olli 
I |il.'i*.i-it lilt m;riitiv« •••iiii!->y 1.; :t. ■'"H I lor circu- 

i 1 1.^, «iVI ..• 1.1:1 },.»: t v'lli ir-<. t-T-ll*. 'C . '■• 

1 .•.3. «^.Air»» V ■ . . .1 ii ; I'nlili.s'icrj. 



/::;:.:';: v:?::"i;;;;;:«:^ ".':«• ".i'^yv"::.; i^^T: -i<--- ..."tor -^tivo..-^-,. 



.Mien »:il '. 
Date J Marca 2d 13C.8, 

MA fill AS MARTY, 
IIkvry IIim).-^, M >iiga.4Co. 

Attorney lor .VSui i^ageo. 
JACOB TIIO.MAS. 
uT-Tt SlKiiif of S--ott Coutity. .Mi.n. 



:'.i d i. ol I, i;e, iarer<>J li.- !"r. J. il. s» --itf.-iuic, 
.' 11.14 Jv V ; a. tj ... u Jc.i io i -ulve ;ho u!..\ a 1 J 
. -.8 a li-. o -Il n'?, I'.ip -rttpr ..-<•«; o. d if»-.ia. li-. 
■»'«*ti^ llie )ion;s?;» nliti £-h.-a''t'» yi.if-.vc 
W'a, llio T'D f- f.i3a re.'lr.riia ih,- nx^^itii-.-, e.i i oc.: 
!i li c • ''i c. ..J c..:-ju wC.cr; •^.-^^ .i •.•.•. 1. I .• t -. . 

Ciaiair.p 'on rjpriit bi e'.:r?l j.-3 '■.'ic'.'' : 
mo.ilc S) r^p uaicssllie tlorrft^-ti 11.1.I liver ii i... :. 
i.c.i'lliy tt.id t'uO 5pr.:;;.o rci'.ciro!, b?'j4:3 I'.io T. .1 t 
and P.iii «u»? re ji; ;vj ia ar."_-.r e-er.-c*-.. o. fi- 



a T>.'-t of U'orlt \o, 4. 
«• nl'.f of sh il 



1,1 <-ti!l..,l 111 ttl* :i'.-t Ci^nitvi., ...OL 

. - iittif •'ii-i-'ii • in-*!'-! r-.-it'lor^.wlt'iosla. 
I),t - 1 liTi.-«- ^-t^h. ;^.'.^. 

K mi- .<;• iT.'i, .TurTin TTinxtAn, 

\tt'T3 f-T'" •'• "ira, 'JhcrtiTnr -c-'tt Oiantr. -'I* 

ii.Vi 7i 



1.6-C: 



12.) Avvlti ,1 



J S 



(u:i ? 'u-j. A li'L' C:fT:-ji t. jl: Oi a; 

TON I C a.-t J ; !i.-;.-c cr ;'o:ir Iwxi; 0. ;?t3 II \ :; i T. \ ' ". 

TILLS nil! cure iia-.- o.'ina.v carj o.' ,5 vi ;■ «. 

L'r. Sc:i.':N-a.- riu'i-j p-3'c>s'ai r v s^;* ji S. v 
Yu.-'.:. i;*i«.i, r.ii.! a" Ii:^ pi-;ii.''pi' O^V.vP .t I'li •*.!,;.- 
jit.'i o.'cr/ woui. bee du'.ly pr.po.".< o. C.VJJ ? ir«.«, oi 
III.. i:a;uyU.ol oa coijuiup.io-a lir li.* tia. . .-r »ktl.a. 
li»a. 

iVa-e <^^->^.r•.•e. wlr. .i p-^rr'ir.rns, iLi' .ti ' xyr'i i;)re- 
i:o.'.c33 of ihj Dictor, 0..O wliou in the .^a ».a.:3 cl 
tosiy;:. j.ija. r.'i J tlio s:!:—- a> \ii ati'.v i«, iu 4M..oct 
hci til, a.'ooa l!i3 l"io.'i;rai; c-.l f!av. ;>. 

8 ltd by no I.>ra>";'ita r.hI liua er.-, '.c'es tl.V) p?r 
Lo.llo. or .-I-iT..":! Iho hii;>tloz..'n. All ictt.Ti ar u-iw «•.? 
(liouM LO aJIiC.^-ci to Or. S.'URN'jr.'a I'.- .t.- ; •. 
O.iice. No. 1.") Nsirtiii^tU sires', r.ii:«Sf p'l %, p». 

Ge.ii.rai V."Us;c.no. e Ai.-e'ju ; Perixj Ujri-.cj h Cr^,. 
X. v.: 8. e. liarco. Ualtiiojie. ill.; J„^ li" 
V&i)i.r>. 0;nc'.nit;ii, tjaio: \Vi.k.-r A 'i'«.-.Or. Oji. 
COrfO. lit.: Coa'A* liitM., Si Luuta. Mo. 

Cln >r. - 



^Vf'c r.'/vv, D.f. u. i};i>..i 

In my Card of Nov. 1, 18G7, I st.-^ted t -ar. 
••rurlln' jnif i>oM' of i:i«ro I'lilJy wiinvty- 
liiu IIm- \%atit>^ ol' tlio {tiitkllt', at><t III 
onJor to »>r<'vi'Ht iiii«n'i*tii>Jl!o!is «Ti.a5ors 
frum pttliiiii:;; oil' tiii<'rior iiiid \vi>rt!i- 
IcikM s'xxi'* i*" tli«^ .'^lortoil 4>nl«] I'riiH, I 
Mhall IJcreivr:«T Moll no aoou« JSt nlioii-- 
•ulc e.vcopt t:i»l) to tliily api>oliit«'<l jt:»d 




NOTICE OE EXKCUTiUN SAi.i:. 

Xiiti.'.'Oi i.s hjiony giv.'n. ihul oii t'le fcili 
day »>r I'e^iruary, A. D. Ibtiij, I levied upon 
tae f •lluwiii;,' deseriiied real cslale, lyiu;r and 
j iieiir^ ill the (.' ".iiity of Scoit, Stale of .Mm- 
^k S-A.1^23, j acsoia, as liie jjroii.rly ul James Arnialro'ii:, 



ill 



CERTAIN, 

Speedy Curo 

A.vn ALL 

NERVOUS 

DISEASEC. 



aiitiiorlzfd .\;;eiit<>,*' etr. To this plan 
VALLUV r.OAU Ettinr. j j ^^^.^ ^^.^^^ .t^i^tly adhered. 

The special committee to arrange amend- | In acccptins Afccnts. rrrcat care has lior-n 

mento to the ahuve hill, reported amend- exercised to uppoint those wlio, by lous- 

ments wherehv the road is to pa.ss ou the continued fair dealinK- have aoquirua a 

easi side of Ih 3 Minnesota river, but are r«pttution for honesty, responsibility, an 1 



Its /:/>>c£» aro 
Magical, 

It \* the CNKMI.ISO R'^MEDT In all C:1S-S Ol' .••Hral,'i: 
K.tlilU, olti'ii t-Uecil'i',- il .1.1 'l.'.:! .■ ir.' li :••« llii ' 
tn'L' iiy l-iur liour». frmu lUe att of iiu uure tawiiTW 

ou TItKltK I'.LI.K. 

N-i .>! I •!• for II of Xi.'a'jt.;l4 or ^.'cvuus Diaijil • ha> 
failuU i'l yii'iii Iu lata 



WO.VDSTtV'CL ;iSM -D'AL AJEVT. 



Trrn 'n t'l- «'rore<t c m"! T OSr nic "''•t.'^.iii;' •- •!• ' 
roller 1 1 T'-v itl» ' -- • 1 ••• n i»«, — -f -n '"v r» -.-' ' nT ii ' 
I I ',— ii'lp -'I'l.' t'l ■ 1? u!r-» -y-it-ii. ''» '!«• f •- I "•f l.tvi 
or ;• r-'v w •<>' « tt 'S-' I'.n !«•, I'uravii irf)-!*''!" 111 v^ 
i^t >'iN-ili-.i r-'lpf, in! v>r.- 'itf f .'ul.sto prjino. n 
CO nn'-'" -t-i 1 •• T I ■1 '-it .■!;-'*. 

!• .: iit.ii i> 'IO 'ri :< ,r it'i T -iiit?-liU 1--I "is «II;!it 
t'st I",— •• 'il'iri-MlK. "VfH n ;he .lusl lel.cilB «.-'»Ip:ii. 
4:1.1 can L-.tAH iia IS- ; A :th 



V^l.TKC: fATElX. 

It li.«t lonK hita til cont'a'U nie ' y ma- y o'our 
MJ5T EMIMI.N'T PHYSICI^^N-''. 
whii giTt il their uniTilm-iiiR •1 1 'iniail'AoJ appro 

Ti»l 
t^eiit l.y mall on receipt -if prlco, tnl jiot'^ns 

i>iic pa-knpp. $1 on, l«o»t i^c r. c^nt*. 

8 .\ pic^inC'S. i."", •' 71 " 

Tivilvp iiitli-ceR. 9.K"i, *' ii " 

It ln<ol 1 liy all ivliol .Hal.' aiol ret ill ileilcrs la ilni;;s 
aii'l iiH-'Mcint-s tlir-i ^'lifi'it Ilii> T'lilt* 1 .-^t I'.fii, ai"' liy 

TUE\:{£Pi 4 C3.,S(}fePpoprlc;ors, 



-iii'lcr and l>v viniiC ot an e.\ecu ion is-iici. 
out tjf an I uud-.'i liie <eal ol tlie Supro in 
(!ourt, of ilie Slate of liiniiesota, lieariiio 
:ate 0.1 ine U-jih d ly o! .Eimi ny, X. D, i«i')^. 
to I lie Siiir.tf of I lie C'>uiily ol .Scoll af.irc- 
.»:iid, d reded and ilelivered on the ^I'l da} 
»f Ecbriaiy, A. i>. I8GJ3 ; wnicii said exe- 
mitioii xv.isnSiU'd iiito.\ a j idjmeiii leiidercti 
in s.iid S ipiomo t..'onrt of tne State of .Min- 
nesota., on the Eleienta d.iy ot Ucto!ier, in 
Ihe year lb(i">, ill an aciion therein peiidino 
.((.'tween James Ar n-tniii^, iespoiid"n! tiinl 
.lumy HiiiiJ-, ujiifjl.aiii, inl'u^o:' "f t-^lil 
ip,R-l!ant a^t 1 u:;.iiii3t .s.tid roop.>nd.-.it, let 
i.e .sa u of Tiiii ty: lU:! .hi.iir-* and e;;r;,iy.(ivi' 
v.il,-; wMea s.i.d jud^.nc it was lioeketcn 
•.V. !i liio 'Jl.;:i< iji lue Kisu'iuC iJu'l.'l ot llie 
Fillii J'liiciiii D..->lricI, i.i and ftr the L'oun 
v i)f Scot .il.uojai I, oti lie iTia J-iy «». 
J.iiiu.tr , in tiie year. IbGtJ, liy wliieii .-aiii 



A[ekcii.\ntTailok, 

Fia.'.T Smun^. Shakopee,. Mink. 

.\. now and splendid st< ih of Clo- 
thing. Cloths, and Gents' Ei.rnishins 

riooiis, 
FALL !. WINTER STYLES, 



f-S" Clotliiii' made to ordpr. 
Shahopeo, March 14th, 18G7. 



i^^i [iieiiiii 

FIRST ST., SHAKOPEE, MINN. 

— DEAlEn IK — 

Dvv Goods 

Grcccries, 
lioot.s ct' Slices, 

Hals and Caps, 
Crockery, ax*. 



g@r The hii^htgi price pat d /or 



HiMtt is c-jiinn.i.ed ij sati-t. 
jii lirmenl with ii»lere.-Ht and cost.-? out of tiie 
iicr.-'.onal property ul tiie .-iaid jud:,'iriCnt 
icoior n./l ".venijil from e.\e<;utJoii within 
the .sa;d Oonnty of .Sott, 01 if suilieieni 
p -r^iinai ji;0|icriy eo'iM iinL t>c loijnd, then 
■ lUl lit ihe real property not e.'v'.-nipl iVom 
'.•.i'.'cution ill said Coanty of Soutt, belon>r 



l.tiuiity oi . (;o,,.,,/,2^ Product-. "-%:^ 
\' the t;:i;J ! 



0. Kaivelage, 

m.' 10 liiO .^aid jiidtrmciit dehtoi on Ihe dly ' SkalCOPCe, MlYin. 

when the. s.iid judgment "as .s-j docueted as •*■ ' 

'Dealer in 

IHY 600BS 



afiires-iid in tiie .said County ot Scott, or at 
any linie tliereafter; 

Noiv, therefore, fnrtlicr nullcc is hcrehy 
oiven, that Uider and liy virtue of said e.\.s 
C'Uiiiii. I, Jaooh Thomas, ^irjiiil of said 
(Jounty of Scott, at ll>ijehi.;U in the fore- 
noun of the 25ru day o? March, iii the year 
ISOH, at t!ie front door of ihe Court II0U5C, 
at .ShakoMoe, ia -s.iil Coutiiy of Scott, Will 
SLdl to ;he hi^liesl biider, liic real cslale eoi'tS-^*— a cii ^^_ 
levied on uml-.-r and !>y vinue of of said |-OOOtS &ShOeG, 
execution, which is d Ncriii -d a> f t'l i\v?. to 



Climaxi Clihaxii 

Page's Climax SalTO, a Familj 
blessing for 26 eents. r 

It heals without a scjir/ No 
family shonld be withont it. 

We warrant it to cure Scrofula 
Sores, Salt Rheum, Chilblains, 
Tetter, Pimples, and all Ernptionti 
of the Skin. For Sore Breast or 
Nipples, Cuts, Sprains, Bruises, 
Burns, Scalds, Chapped Uandji, 
&c., it makes a perfect curo. 

It has been used over fifteen 
years, without one failure. 

It has no parallel— hariug per- 
fectly eradicated disease and 
healed after all other remedies had 
failed. It is a compound of Arnica 
with mau^ other Extracts and 
Balsams, and put up in larger 
boxes for the same price than any 
other Ointment. 

Sold by Drtifgist* everywhere . 'WTjit« k UowUz^L 
rroprictors, 121 Liberty Btrtet. New York. 

NOTICE OF :uORTGAGE FALE. 

Navi^.^ cf MonTCAGOBE— Fiodiick I.abf- 
n-.an and Sop! ia Lnlirman, hiswilf, ftf 
Pcott County, Minnesotn. 

NAMr <;F Mcr.TGArr.n — Mathias ilartj, ILn 
of Monrr.p, AVi.-consin. 

Date (f Mor.TOACE — Novenabcr lib, A. 
D. 1803. 

Said MoHtn.'.nE wcs recorded in the cC5c» 
of lJ:p Kop'i.'-^tcr c>{ Deeds of Scott 
Cnrnty, nt one oVlorh in the aficriioon 
cf thi' 20th tiny of Novomhrr, in th* 
yonr isfi.'}, iu Uock "Pi" cf ilortja^w, 
pfcc 108. 

The DKsrnirTiox of the Mor'paj'od prrmia- 
es i.^ the West Half of the North \Ve«» 
Q'lurifr of Peel ion Twenty-one it; Town- 
«;l-ip One Hundred 1 hirleon of Itnnf« 
T'.vt pTy-two, conl.Tiiiingr eighty •crf«, 
biuiafc lyirp .".nd being in the County 
of Scott tifoie?aid. 

Said Moutgage wr.s innde (o fpccm tK« 
pnymcit of the Funi of One Hon- 
t-rod Dollars, with interest at tb* 
rale of twelve per cent, pcrannnin.puj- 
uhlc in obo year from ri.ife, m .' 
rot'diii.q; to the promispoiy rote of th« 
.si.id lieriek l,ahrir..nn, pi'Vnble to th« 
mid N!iitl.i:.s Mr.rty, aiid bearing etea 
<]n»c vvi!lif.-itid inortjrcjro. 

No AcTio.v or proceediiU'S hnvo been initl- 
luteti at law or otherwise, to recoT«r 
thr sum seeurcd by taid rDorlgage or 
!u y pnit tlioreof. 

The A.viif.vT ciaio t d to be due on said not* 
1.1 the diitf of this notice is the sum of 
Ore liiirdrcd and Fifteen Dollai -. to- 
gether TvjtU the 6um ot 'ieii dollam 
solicitor'.s L\- tituicU to be paid by ti.Id 
n^ortpago. 

Now 'i'liKKKForE notice is hereby frivci .that 
by viitiie of n power of 5;de ei.iitiiitid 
in saiti morlgogeand recorded iht-rc^Mlh 
and of tie j rovii-ici.s cf the Statute in 
fueli ea>e n:a(]e and jwovidtd, the k«<id 
n:iMt};r^'e v.ijl be foreclosed by a m!* 
of .'i.id mortfrnped pren i.<es to be n ade 
by tl P SliriCff f .caid County of Scott, 
it ] nldic MidiK-fit II e front door of 
the C< nrt liousein SI ukojite in said 
Ct-nnty tf Scott, State of AIii;i;esotB, at 
ten o'cIccK in the fC'iencou of the 2tTM 
T-AY CF MAniH, in the yer.r IfcC^, nr.d 
li.e jn^eicd.s cf M.ch .^ale will be upplitd 
lo the pnyniciil of the sum then due oa 
said note and niortpii{:p, and the coiH 
iuid cbnp.cs of foreclf'.<;f,re and paid «cr» 
(if ttn doiliir.'i ."solicitor's fee.« jro Tided 
by sai<l niortt-afrc lo be paid out cf tb« 
I roeeeds of '■iieli tale. 

Dated Fclruiiry l.^th, 1&C3. 

MATHIAS ilAKTT. 
IIknry ni.vi."=, Mortgaget. 

Attorney for Moitpagcc. 

JaCOU TliO.MA.«-, 

Si.tiili" of Scclt CouLtr. Minr, 

NCI UK OF A OivTaAOE SALI'_ 

NAvrs or Mor.TGACor.p — Charles I!crtmfna 
ai-d Ann lisirtn ar.n, bis wife, of Scott 
Counly, Miuiesota. 

N'AyE ( F >itj.iGAci-i. — Catl.ariua SchraLtp, 
of Seoit County, AliiMicsota. 

Datf. tiF }i;c:::cAJE— Ci-toLcr ICth, A. I). 

Saii> .MunoAGT; v.ns rccrirdeJ in the ofTiCO 
01 the llegi^tcr of Deeds of Sioit Ccun- 
iv. «d lonr oVIoek in the nflcrnoon of 
the- 19ih day of October. A. 1>. \h%l, 
in Dook 'K' of Mortgajie.--', en i.'iAc 3C3. 

The DtstitiFTiCN oJ the n ortgt.gcd picniist-a 
is Lot Three in Dlo< k 'Jhrec, ia (he 
j.lat uf Shukopee City, on liio m tb» 
I Ciee of the Ri'ghstcr of Deeds of the 
Cotiiily of Stott, State of Miiiiicjit'tB, 
fiUiate lyirg^ iind being la the tiia 
I'cnuty ot Scott. 

S-Air Mei.-jCACK \va.s nint'c to foctira the 
piiM:.ciit cf the f-i!"i cf One Hundred 
lioiiiU's, with iulevcbl at the r.'tn d 
tv, the per cent, per annum, payable iu 
(I.I, year fieui cute, tccortiirg to th« 
jrnifttiy r.utc of tL^ Fnid CimrltB 
J'aitn.sin, pjuble to the tj^ld Cjitha- 
lii n Selinniz, hnd beuiirg cTcn dtte 
ui.h fiiid niorlgagc. 

No AfjKi.N cr fjioteedincra l.nvn been irRtl- 
mttti i-t la.v or oihenu^,t to ucorer 
t e 6Uin t( cured by ftid ocrlgugt or 
any purl ihereoh 

Tat A.vii.NT clain:cd to le «'uc on ttW 
cuii).r^-.e id the diiic cf this notice is 
the i.t 1., tif Five Iftirdrcd and 'j'wenty. 
tv.r. I'ol.'ars and Fifty Cents. to;;cther 
with the ."-inn of ten 'dollat.s iiolxitor'n 
kefecnicd to be jiaid by sttid noitgnge. 

Now 'i i:i:i.i:roi.F, riotiec u heri.hy giv^.n. thnt 
by Til tue of a p t-v.er of tale rcntaircd 
in .'•aid ii:ort<:{)ge tnd recorded tl er»wi:h 
HFid of the provisions cf the Statute in 
KHch Ciiie n.'iide and provided, the ."-aid 
in<'rti:»ge will be foiecltiged by a fide of 
taiii h erijr.tjred jTCinises tu be ffadc by 
the Sl.crifl' of said County cf Scott, nl 
)iul.!it viiiuue at the iVuiii duor of ih-j 
Ccnrt Hon.'* in Shokopt^e iu said (.'oun- 
ly fif Scott. State of AJii.nojota, at ten 
o'clock in the forenoon of the If in jat 
<,r AriMi-, in the year IK'JH, utid ih« 
jroceed.<of buch sale will be applied lo 
ihe payment of the sum then due ah 
siiid note iicd mortgage, and the cos!.< 
and charges of foreclosure and said Kom 
of tcii dollars solicitor's fec3 prorided 
by said nii'Ttgagc to be paid out cf th^i 
l-ioeeet!» of »uch sale. 

Dated Mureh 5th. 1££8. 

«;ATHA11INA fcCnPANTZ. 

IIe:ij;y Wi.nj>:„ Alortgjge-*': 

Atton*' y for jlortgagee, "^u'-Tt 

JACOB TilUilAS, 
Sheriff of Scott Couuly, Minnesota. 



DEAFNF.SS, CATAKKH 
TIO;V. A.M; C'ANCUK t 



to mil a track to the bank opposite St. 



probity -men in whoao wci-d the publ.c 

1. , I ,1 /. , , I. :i I have learued to pl^tce ccnfic'.euco. Tbeso 

1 eler, and ine Loinijany are to buil-J u. .. ^ , y ^ .i-i, _. 

J ' , , , * , . • .1 . Agents have agreed to keep n full assert- 

depot anU keep the iracK in r.pa.r thereto, ^^„^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^j ^^ .^^ ^j,^^ ^, 



my 



Tlio Llinncscta Hols* 



1* 111 ftC'I't. I 1 itll I. .-1 • ^.l.ll 

l jndi iieiil a. I I f.\ cuu n. 



, CONSUMI'. 
'UKD. 



ypIF! WWi M Tiinf »,iu /■"' i-v-'. '",- '■•";r^--;;": QUEER'S WAKE \^^^^^^^^S^S;::^^,^,..,i 

• ' ■■=• •'"• "», 11 a t s a.' C a 1) s . ' " ' """' 

\i\\\i COS y. * 7 



' and al.'^o pay St. i'eter .-^lioiOOO towardd the ^ p^i^iigbed rrrces. 'Thus Vhepubilc are sui^ At Shakop-e, v.iil bu HDl.h CJ...ii'.^ 
finMiut-UjH of a bridge across the river, ' pjigd by them with just such rena na they or L"..Al»i:-iJ FOU A K>(-:. it i-t ai 
§2,--"*-iy of whieh is to be paid each year, ' vr:.nt, either as to v/ritinrr or price, and f,ct l.'.r;j.: Iiotu!, ne-%'iy ti.ii.sli- I, in a 



D ;ti-d. I''ij I 1 .I'k- liiii, iSJ.S. 



I 



until the entire amount is car.ctileil. ! a full eQuivati-nt for the motley pnid. 

On tiiotiou of Mr. Miner the rules were No ag^nt ia fiopo.nted to trav.-l frori 

I susjiended, tnid the bill lelieving ibe Vallev ; placo to pl-vc?, '.r canvass the cuulrir, 

Itaiiroad Ci^iupuiy from crosoiiig the river i "» ^^''^ *'*■" '**"■"■ wnnt a Trortou GoH Pen 

at SU i'ctor, wai read lue third time and ' tanfit r^: it trcri tne Local A£0;.t or fiom 

passed. ' beT<1q.Ti''rtcra. 

,,., ', .,, r 1! J r . 1 r, -I Non^ iictl apply for the Afreicyexcirt 

ihe bill waj liualiy do.e.-.ted. Bat the jn conformity to tho bovo. the liber.".! ..Un- 

nest day Baxter, the biizzjiij, moved & count "To Cluba" teciiis«'jL2»cioat indues- 
re conjlicrutiou. ^shcn rt ^-a^ .'»7:iia defeat ! «"^'^^ **» *^ oti»«rfc ^ JJQ^iTOIT. 



cation, has a ^.'oo-l Stone it.ir.i. Itirge y.irl.l 
a good well of water, and a tj.ic ni.i of 
eiiston. linpiire nt thi.s otVice or r>f ihe 
owner, JA.MK.S iv1-:a i.^FV. 



l.-.vijy MiMW 

V' ■'! ^ 



\<: 13 



'(' 



M»dAS. 
■ I'l I'v, din: 



— AND— 

Millinery Goods. 



•r^oii. 



W 



ANTED. — Tk v(7uki:s. SruoK.vTS. 

11 I il'i r I t IM.' - it M-ii .1 . I W . :i'..i. !-, 1 
1,-1.; 11-.^ .' I.-'.' ; 3.11 It 1 S.'.>1 ,..■.- il'int'i 1.. 
1 iirliu.: ill .Illy. t«. iurf UU.^. .i -..ir.'** 
> 7*l\il.iM, SlcCC'iU^V ^ \u\t., Lomiu^ Blivu. chlwxo. I 

i 




c V L -: 



r ,11. ;■••>-. 
►'AlliltAXKI*. .»:{': .\'l,i5rPA ST. 

... - :•■ ■ ■ " i' I I. .. 
>i41J SOD .Market .-.I . bt ii. L:\xi 



Alarsreand well selected assort, 
inent of 

B ''^ O K S & C . . 

always on hand. 



7;7- Cfif'i piiid ffr nil hliult oj ' 
Oovnirg FrvJu«, ^^^i .. I 



L.t;ir friiiii l...l.f rt MfMur^ly, Q. D„ L. 1.1 P-. <^r«r<« 
iTiUircj. lira nil tncaiiiprjcal of U. J>„ ai,a K-ll«>.' of 
till- ".^ ."tlonai rrei-nu-i^uu."' 

.\»v, TokK, Si-i-;. n, i«67 — Dr. J«iii.l*»!V •■• !■ 
ci.^.rie I.I orncL- Cl^unli IIoiipt»ji Ai<rx»n.'r!». \ ».i 
(111- 11/ t ..- wiir. I fr«qM.-ui' Union liaily. fv? 
iiioiil .», yi.it.-.l tlif ll...i,:tal. ft,i ha'!«'\--) ric.niof 
k'ntMi.p t-iM i,.|,utRtl<-.ii f'/r rtflilfK'T «n.! HKiU.. !• 
wajDt thojnost trc-inta' ,f ^^^,,,r,<t«'*. Mil! >i'» «'ji-eM« 
x.VV,';^, ".'■""'"■■"' ^'' J «tienu WB* t.«aarkal<:r.-.-.ii*t 

-J.L!i'?.'" J'heenr, Is n>; r'treMptd^, rfrrn.^ i$l»nc''-0 
, rf f.f ''"^ '"""' »''' «""'■;« fX'-it ITtonii to ».car 

I """'"-iiy «t rlmr.'li «n<l •■utilio h..t«aii.;>». rkU f.- 

'"•'">«ri«iit Milloltoi) iifoUui-erKiftltj <,n o#l inlrnrv-^tf 
I «t).l liiil.-1-.J 111 mvs\ tMui uf ICi,. .;.,.■>. « J"<f^Ml«.l-' 



lMtcaPi*>» ■ 



:,x^s&-'^^"^- 



i>V«l>5* 



jisaa^ 




jldy)^ 



>»w 



The Shakopbe Argus. 



By HENRY HlN'r>S. 



OFFICIAL PAPER OF SCOTT COUNTY. 



SHAKOPEE, MARCH 6, 1868. 



Mbs. SrECiaTOR ajmits that wc told some 
tnulis ia our history of tlaat Appeal. We 
liad atatcJ tbat our wise county attorney 
had told what ho knew ivas not true in 
ataticg he could procure evidence to reduce 
the amount of our claim, or else be had 
nsglected hid official duty, na be did not 
produce any evidence against as- ^V'c in- 
fer that Mrs. Spectator aduiltd both alter- 
natives to ba true, and we prcsauie she ia 
ccrrcct. 

Ue we:it over to Minneapolis, on a mo- 
tion to ael asidft tlw jud^'meiit, but goi baat 
because he bad uf^'lec'.ed his buaiuoss at 
the proper time. ^Ve hope such a huy 
glcalk will reilgu, or a: least p.iy hhns-jlf 
the large bill of costs ihe county has inrir- 
rrel by reason of hu ignorance and ue;jli- 
geuce. 

But, nsadnni, you are ranch raistukca in 
statluK that the county auditor paid ud soon 
after the ju.'.f;mant in the Court w.is rcn- 




Vol. 7. 



SIIAKOPEE, MlNxNESOTA, TilURSDAV, MARCH 5, 18()8. 



No. 7* 



MIN2I£SaTA LEOISLATUEE. 



eJ. La.sl tall, Baxter wiis .Ik.- onl y m:iii j 
in hia town who voted for the Uailro.id \ 
Bond swindle and we are not di^iappointed 
to Cud iiim ilill at his old tricliery. 



IN IMOi: \\V. COUU'l 



SENATE. 
Saturday, February 29. 

■SKATE BILLS PASSED. 

To amend section 132, chapter 11. gen- \ 
cral iitatules, rudating to to the redemption | 
ot liuidi. Yeas 12. ^ ' 

To i.meiid «ectioi) 5, chapter 70. jreneral 
stutulei. r.-.l.iti.i,' to ft-.is. Yo li 12. nays I . ; ^"Ct, and ar^j as lol.o-.v:J : 

To amend SLCiion 8, chapter 2:J, session i \^^ District— J- V>. Brisbin 
laws of IbBT, cnlilied an act to iucorporat- ' 
in;; savings. Yeas lo, nays 1. 

To amend seeilou 3G. chapter 57, c^enenil 
statutes, relalinc' to the sales of land by 

Yeas 19 



STATi: Of MINNKSOTA.\ 
Cuuiily of ■-£ if». > 

ll^ iKt M'lt'er "f 'lit Kitatc (J Sur.ih A. 
irtirriel FJri'MU't : 



Furibau^t and 



Cross Fiowsli?. Geyermann, 



I 



Democratic State Committee. 

The Democratic State Committee now 
consists of onu from cadi tsLMialorial Dis- 



executors and gtiardians. leas 

To provide for the filing of Bcrvice of | 
Tha law renulres him to issue an i underiaUii.gs instead of bonds, in ceitaia ; 

cases. Yeas H, nays 2. 

To amctul .cttiou bl, chapter ll,rclatln£f | 

to taxes. Yeas 15. 

To authoriz..^ raiiroud companies to issue i 

mort^ajfos and deeds of trust, and to pro 

vide lor recordiiijr the same. Yeas IG. 



tlerc'-' . 

order for the amuunt of a judgment upou 
filing a transcript of the judgment in his 
office. But Le delayed for over tl^'-'J- two 
dav3 bcforj doia,- no, auJ c^'/ "■•"^^ ^"<^ 
order when wo w*^ about to aerve him 
•with a aiaaJa^us from the C^urt. 



Toiioi:aow is the last day of the present 
aesiioa of iho Le^i»lalur<4. Whlla ihtj 
hiive not done uiuch Rojl, they have not 
hccoiupUshed as much evil as their prodt- 
dccesaors. Y>'e shuil soon pu!/.Iiu the lawj 
ia full. Thereford sead ia your iubscrip- 
ilou. to the Aauci. 

New EvfisxNii Daily. — The St. Paul 
r.eta thinks that city has reached a posi- 
tion in point of population aid wealth smI* 
Cciontly advanced to support a nev/ Er^n- 
in;j Daily, and ihercfyi-o they coia.n3n,;cl 
the publication of one. cilltfd ''Tie Evfti. 
tng I'rcit.'' The first nauiber was iisuod 
Mjnday, March 2d. The subicrii)tija price 
'is only aboal huh" as much as the iloriiitig 



Beiic Plaiao Cliartcr. 

A Ptlition of nboul sixty of our citizens 
^cf ihe village of Belie IMaiue, has been 
prvicnted to the Legislature prayin;,' to be 
incorporated into u Borou^^'h- We Uo not 
like the name Borough for aa incorporated 
-village, and we are iiicIiticJ to bclitvc that 
•our Dello Plaine pcop!:: witl sojn get tired 
<.f Lot'.i the nasua uad charter. 



y.^ At a caucus of th* German dtU- 
gu'.c* to the Slate Convention, Mr, Da-oaiid, 
of this County, wai'Mominaled by them as 
vL«ir choice for Elector, by about a two- 
third tote. But Iritjkpry w*s rcaorled to to 
•^u'Wl~i>>4 bumiutttlou. Aftvr the caucus 
h.d adjourned, and many delegates had 
left, it v.as agaiti tallfcd, and the previous 
iicviun reconsidered in the absence of many 
^•.legates 



Ibis is tL» v,-.»-- ih-j ihiiij w.ii 



^ir Oo Frjduy Inst the Lfj,njlaiur» took 
ft wild gooiie exc'urjijii to Si. Anilior.y and 
Minneapolis. The pubao Lu-iiuesi they 
vfvre attending to was a good spree at the 
public expense. 






iici; cf Adopted Citlaeas. 



The fjllowiag resohuioa was paiscd at 

lh« Democratic State Convention ; 

Rrtoived, That we ii.di;rnnnlly riji'Ct the 
priicil'ie, drawu from iho feudal syilen:, 
th;it the msiics of the people belong' to the 
j^'Ov«riiments under which liioy iivv, which 
iii anotlier form is contended tur bv the 
monarcbios of Europe, iiicludi:ij» Great 



To regulate tlie fees of jurors in justice's 
conns' Yeas 1-4- 

Tu amend chapter iO, ;jencral statutes, 
relating to probate courts, and repealing a 
po.tioii tlicreof. Yeas 15. 

To amend aection G, chapter 86, of gen- 
eral statutes, rLdatin^ to appeals in civil 
actions. Yeas. 

HOUSE Qi<' P.EPliESENTATIVES. 

uoust liiLLa PA3St:n. 

A bill to amend an act entitled an act to 
locate, survey and eslabruh a State road 
f.om Belie Plaiue to Young America. Yeas 
33, nay.i 1. 

'i'iiu Houso then (at I o'clock) took a 
rcccjs uiilil 2:3 J p. ui. 

AFTEIl^'OOX SE.SSIOX. 

IIot:«e met at 2} o'clock. 

bKKATU DILL rA^S£D. 

A bill for an act to provide for supplying 
each board of school diilrict olhceij with 
the ''MiuiosotH Teaciier aii<l Journal of 
Educailon." Yeas 32, cays 4. 

SENATE. 

Monday, ilarch 2, 18*8. 

8S.\AT» klLL PA:4.'1El>. 

For the protection of railroads arid pcr- 
aOU4 traveling thereon. 

uors'i SILL PAssec. 

To incorporate the borough of Belle 
Pialne. 

crECIAL O.'JOuS. 

The three bills before the Senate appro- 
pnaling 500,000 acres of Internal Imj)rovo- 
nient lands for llie li;iuidation of all iiideb'.- 
ediiesj connected wiili ilie Miiiiicsota Slnte 
K.iilroad Bjikis, having been made l!ie 
special order for eleven o'clock, when that 
Lour arrived. 

On UiOtion of Mr. Daniel.=!, the Senate 
v;eril into tommlitoe of the whole upon th« 
banie, Mr. J. L. Armstrong iu the chair. 

Thu bill iijtioduced by He. Daniels was 
fir.U taken up. 

Mr. Potter ofTfred a sabslUuto, which 
w\3 adopted, and afterwards, on motion, 
'^r Baxter rccuiameuded to be lai4 vn Uvj 

table. 

Mr. Biiitol'^ bill on the stme subject was 
then taken up, and 2slr. Dani.-ls moved to 
amend by substituting his bill for the same. 

Mr. Daniels a.lvjcaied tiie passage ot his 
bill as mcrilo: ions, and hop -d if Senatori 
had objection i to it, tl:?y v; »uld state them. 

Mr. Bristul thon^'ht his pian Would work 
more harmoniously, 'i^ui he bad no ©b- 
jeclions to Mr. Danird's bill. 

Mr. Baxter object.d to the bills of .Messrs.. 
Bristol and Daiuels, and favored the ''Dela- 
no bill," on tlic ground that it took the 
Belllement o! th.r bonds out of tiie hauls o{ 
llic State ollicer.s, and out of politie.s. 

Mr. Smith moved as a suboiitute tlis bill 
introduced in liie House by Mr. Furber, 
proposing an anKMiLnMil to tlu onstitu 



2d Dislriet— J. N. <:aslle. 

:i 1 Di,-,tiicl— A. .1. Ueed. 

4lh District— William Docliren. 

5ih District — Charles E. Fiandraa. 

Clh District — A. C. Kiggs. 

7 ill District — Segvavo .-^mith. 

8ih District — G. W. Baxter. 

'Jlh Distriet — J. C Pierce. 

lOlh District — W. B. Lutz. 

11th Distriet — J. J. Green, 

12lh District— W. Fj, Bix-ckinrld^c. 

l:Uii Distriet— E. E. Bneli, 

Mfh District — W. R. Edwards, 

loth District — A. S. Everest. 

loth Distriet— H. J. Wall. 

17th Distriet— J. C. Wise, 

l^ili District — William lleury. 

.rjlh District — E. St. Julien Cox. 

20th Distriet — Geo B, EiiJjjaley. 

2lst Diitrici — Fred. Du Toil. 

22d DloLriel— -M. li. Pender;,'as'. 



TTIE Pi::UU.N*K CFtOSS-PLOWS 

Are fwr 8a!e by 

Jo .. aa JIcI;2 ilQU, 

At hit 

Har UTai'c Store, Shakopce. 



I Harriet F.irl ■.•iu!f. Uinrll iti of S.irnli A. Furlhnlt 
■ Rii'l ll.irl'l l:":iriliiiill. liiviiiR prfiiMifcl I'l I'l" I'T^'lmte ] 

C'lirt'if ilie riin'il-V"i Sotf «n I St.it-'of Miii-ips.'«, I 

a l'.i;ti<> 1 "■'> u 'vJ.liti II intioarn t" !'■•■ I." -"rt t'l.ii it »•• 

„» ,rv t"< 'the VoiiH \v.'<t ifi I iiT <>1 iliP ."'■'•"♦ri 

w..-' «|ir r ' T 'r -pft: .ti I". r.'W i»i»ii) no. rnisjcis. i 

til • \i> til W.-<t q'lnrt'T >■■ ''i • No'-t'i :; .^t qn irier "I ; 

."'f Ion a». r.WM* ij(i Iin. flange 11: tlip •<<.u"i Kk' 

qt|irt'-'>t Vi.nh rt'r-t .Ml irtf. .1. I t'.n N\>:t!i lifHf ol 

> ,tlHi IVi'-l i|ii I'f.T .n I tiiL- >..il''i Ktst •I'"-" I" "'f'' 

S.i.t'i VVi'st •! ■ 'rrifr "f -'•• ti "1 rt. Tiwii-iiii) I.W.l.ui.-.- 

II RliiiiitH.i 111 f.!i«d»niit>-Mr U"<liar!i I. ■•Ilii les'ila. Mil I 

l.<':.i 1 .'III I I liiil til**»iiiitli \V..<T n'Ki-tiT 'il tu- \->n\\ 

iCim .ni.irle'-. ;inl tV \"> i:i W"<r f, i ,'t. r "i i'> • =outli i 
I W«st q i:ir -r <>r .S.-ci<»ii .1. r..A-.n!>i:. 118. ISiii,-*' 3'. I tic ] 
1 •iiiiii u-i'i.. t"'.- pr*''"-'r "f til" sill S.i.-.ili A. Kart- 
I ba-rt : fi I '."t I, i:i '«■• I i>.l .11. 11 I l.'.t S In <.>.t! >•! -1", | 
I 'I ruviiylilii lil. Kanif !.'j. I'l.' S.-i'liKut q'l rter "f t'l* 
> St.'itli K s' f/;iiilei-''t'.-'. otion M. r.>»iiHiii. 112. Ui'','.- 

I.'i. t'l" N' rt I f:,l^l ri.!--! T )!' M"-tl">l aii'i ToWllSllIp 

»ll,lta!i-e l-^. -ri I li- .\.«rtli AV.-.st nlulir.)' SfUl.m 

.it. Ill ruw:!,!.!!) Ill.itiniiH I.-|. -ItilH. I li ili" C'iu:i v 
I o- il«> I'm •. ■vii-iiir-dta: mi'l the )>r'l>'T"y "f tl'f S'lia 
, ui'ii...-, Il.rl- 1 K.irl'..iH't 
It 

«ili wir-s fin.Ii A. Kurii'.i'iU ji-mI ilirrl-i I'lrllmilt, 
' «ti I all i.iT>'>iis l-itt.'r.-'if 1 i'l th •!r''-tit>'.ii>P''iir iK't.nti 
I «li.. I'r^'riti; (:..ii(-t uf thrCiiaily of Scott .ml Stitpof) 

I Mlillli'^Tii, at t \-l'>,-'.- Im I'll- |or"iH>ni« I'f ttx* !It!l I 

; flavor \irll. ill tie vpir I.Si'.s. »t t^ie I'ffl -f '.lt!n' 'mU'c | 

iir'i'.iibitcof !iai.i(,\),>iilv ..| .«\i,!(.."l tli»- Coll It Iloil.^<> i 
' In Slinkoojp, til s;il I Ooui.ty. to chew rniisi- wty u| 
Lli-'-iivH s'.ioul I not iHj ,'raiil«.l I' -r tlu sale o" nail <Ie- . AnJ will LV;srfroni ivru to ttiree timei looser ^han 

AM'litls mnli-r'. J»rBl t'liit n.>t!-oof th- licflr'n- "•'! o.ti<-rii^w. 

of»i'.| iiftifoH lie'X've'i ly tlii- u'lliUcitio!! of t!ic [ ■ ■ ■■ 

for«;.iiii,' o-.l.-r 'ii liir S'lnLoive Aignt. n n mit'!. .p r 

prl-rcl uM'1 iiii!.M»tie.l»t tf^^koj I. « il I ( Miniyof 

»■ olt, lor r.ir yu;r.e|.ilva wr.'-Miri, Itie t isl of wiiirli j»u!i 
Ikt'lMtK •lull bL.j»t IS4«t fjuricj'iaayii before the J.iv 
of 'uriirliiB. 

D.Ut February 20th. 1S6.,. ^^^ „ ,,^j,,^.,, 

ti6 4t .Iu l4- ."f l*''>t>iH». 



They sre ina Ic oi il ir.lene 1 CAST STEEL and 
It 1« VliV-'lrrir'. i>riVre"i fMt rti-nfxtor Mn "f the OEu.MAN SPKEL. 'jy C. ii. r£.l..lNE, ai the MUiue 

•po'.i. V jw I aciory, 
TUisPiivv is tlie 



Bi:.-V|' PLOW I.V THE WORLD, 



lie rf.i^i 



• {or iti G.IKVT DU.IADlLI'.Yaro:— 



PIlOnATE XO.TC.'E. 



'r::=2rr:=^ -. ■ . ,-- ' STATK OF M I"»VF.<«) rA.I 

I I'oiiiitr of Scort. I BP. 

.NOTICE OF MOlil tj.ltiE t'ALE. ; j., ;To!>at.- C>url-.^:i..clal Term. Fe.,ru.iry 21»t. a. 

T 1. 1 ^ '*'^^- • 

NaM'-:.S of MORTGAOOItS.— Jlitne.s hgan, ni.d /^ /^« Matter .-.rOu I'^tHc v \r.U;am Michael. Df 

Mary Egan, bis wife, of rfiblev (Juuniv, o*"***^- 

\lli.,,i.vi,"ti * * I <»n r^ilinu'.in.l ai >B t!iM.cU.loi.ir;i'nrv n.Mlchs'l 

.UJiine .iit.i. ,, ,. ,, oft'u- I -wii .f llo>.i». )i fi!' C'.iMiy of -ci-' .ml 

X iilK OK .MiiKTOAr.BK— Matija'S .>taitV, then .S;ali'ot .Mo vt , s.-tfii: firih nil :iriyl-l i.i.Tva- 

• ,1 ... IV, ,,,,;,, " <o s Hi,. .- 1 ,t ,t'.> I. •,|i' '.e'.f-< of X 111! listrU' -n on 

ui .Uoiiii.e, U i.-(.oii.-l 1. iiiM ;-U-.it. -oi t -.^itl ui; u .1 Mi-'ii.'. l.ti. .I' I'l.'ii'y 

DaTK Oi' .\loRTlJ.\«;h — .\ljy :W;!l, A, D. \^\j'i ' of t}iii..ry, U r;..- ••'■<!o - il.it.oU ■l(v.'..H.I. iji.y I.- 
, ,, "^ 1 1 • .1 .,. i!r.iiii.-l a-i.J issiiei to llcury I;. Mlohac:, brolher o! 

OAIU MoKTUAGK Was rcconku in tllO Oth.C saM l-!!-.-!-.-!. 

(if tlm kei.ier of Deeds of .Sm't' " '* 'r lurs i t iit .Si'uriiy. ttii; 21-it i .yof M.ircii. 

0( Lit Iwt.Uel OI I'CUls Ul .-iLO.t .A.n. ir.S. I' i.Mi Alo-'; ,11 t)i.- i-.r.-!ovi. ,.t th- .m-.- 

Uoi'.nlv, at eleven o cloeK in tlie lore- ' oi iii.- Jn i,-.- <i; i'r.n.|teiii t H'^-u t ii > i<e i'» !»'i»ko 

.. .V,. ■ V «l. . ii'. .1... ..r I,>i. :. »i !'■>-•. I'l lU.' Hii.l (? unity .»f ,>utt, lis a»>ii-.'ti.!l f >r tii> 

noon ot tho iin tit) <>( .June, lu tlio '„..:„i„. „t .•..id f,-;itio,i. .,i.i th..' Hi^ h.-ir.ai law .r 
yjar 18G2, in Book "E" of .\lort 'ajes, ! »''*»«'''. '•»'•"•■•• •>" uhoHht i.-rs-. w h.i- >i....i ta 

paire 1 1 J. ; pivs -lit at ..i'l t iImk- a 1 1 I'.jce to .slviw o.ias'.il any 

TUK Dicscmi-Ti.^s of the n» irt','a,'ed in-.-ms- 'J; ^,^^.^^^{, •"''-' '•'-' '"■''^"' '" *" ' *"='""•" •"'•'''''' ""^ 

es is the rioUth llaif uf tlie SoUfiWest i a"'.'| n i. fort her Or.|erel.t!iat nolle? of tlie ht'.trliic 
/, . I ■• .: »p ., . 1 .1 t. .1 ' of ml 1 Oct! lo'i l.rt Ti.e i, liy [•■ililK'ilos a c Jiiv of l!il;> 

Viaarter ti »eclion ien, and tlie south : ..ru^r in tin; sui'.niM. Ai-ju>. a w.-tiy u. w-pipir, 
\\e.it Quarter of the 8ouili East t»uar- ■ on-iteia-n .•iii.iisii...i at .•<i.ako.,j;.., ii ,..11 Couuiv oi 

tcr 01 s^'Otion ten, all in lowiHlnp <Jne i.r: Humi n.-nt.- 1 i\>r »a. 1 tiearut.:. 

Hundred and Fourtocii, uf liangi* ' - ■■• - -•- 

'i'wcnly-OiiC, containing 0:1? bun ire. I 

aj.d twenty acres, situ.ite lying nu 1 Oe- j 

ing in the 'County of Scotl'a!oivs;ii.l. • IN PllOB.\.rE Ct)CLir 

CAta iJoBXii-iuB was ni^»do to .svc:irj the 



1 t. The EXTilEME HARDNESS of tbv 
btecl from which it i.s iiiutie. 



21 The THDJK.VESS & STRENGTH 

of the C-CpOaed par. J. 

3d. The woo I w>.rk Is of the BEST WHITE 
OAK liMBEii. 

i'Ucfe qnalitie-' 11 a!:« 1: th^< 

CULAt'R^T PLOiy 

la the Vory, a# w<il «« thp /?A.N.,Just ii sure*-' 
l:ifr« Is tf v>ti>r iv lu {'vtyliig SIX (toil.<ta u:it.r, riiluvr 
t.iaii (tv« (|.j, .ir« two ur t..i er time* wVc. 
1;( ^rdt aardiioas cau*.-« ll lo 



nt- 



L. R. !tA\V:ClV5. 

.Ill 1.- • ot t'r .ijato. 



, , ....-,, I, 1 SOnTClfNTV.— SiKClilTrrm.fa- rtury rth, ISAV 

pMymeiil of the sum Oi i.iglity Dollars,' ;„ ,;„ „„,„^ „,• ,,,, ^,,,,^ ,j J^^^y oAiiJt^fJjy. 
Willi interest at the rate of twelve p n Deceisni: 
cent, per annum, nnvable in one war ,^J V' ",'1'' '/''.'!'*','' .'•;'''''J''4'''r'"'Ti^2/.lV,",- 

I 1 I • " of Wiirlii/ /.ak'., ll tlie I'mity of s.-o't. noil >t.it'oi 

fr.):n I'ute, aceoi'iiing to tho i)roinis.'-o:y \ii!iiiu<ot:i, i-fvinr o.r ri-.i»>ii5 1 i-r'^n i»:at-ii ihit 

not.^of the said Jatne« Kg.iu, payable :,;::::';:^nU';:Vu:'V;';:'\.nV,,^i:'.:Jf i^*.; il^t^lVi^lV 



t5 U O U U 

li soil, wheu All eiber plowf fall. 



Ia t'ae most ;in< 
; iicM i'lowe «r« 

WARRANTED TO CLEAN 

Id itiiy ii'.u loi Roil, or liia money will be refuudeJ. 
It |>1 >wt j,l any 

DEPTH 

F.-*.'n fni to t»-e1ve inrhcs, aiid vrill tsra uaitt 
Sraf% v\euus aiiJ Ktubble.coiupletely. 

FOR HdLE BY 
Aj3iit, tlifckop33, Minn. 



DEALER IN 

DRY GOODS, 

GROCERIES, 

Boots & Shoes, 

Hats &. ^aps. 

Dress Soods, 

YANKEE JfOTIONS 

Qaeensware, 

O XT ^2j E3 H. "X" 

©"tc. oto- oto, 
SUAKOPEE. M!S:v. 






nC If 




ti*v *.r.j^ '^' 



: XECUTION .SALE. 




a liictl Ifiif liis i.iil !■.' i.j llit» .iiiiii ,,r t "It oler la t'i.» Hit i-t* «•«'•// .«(•■/ 1M..1 weekly 1 oi ociol.er A. i>. yni. In a:i a'ti 

ft. lilt U.ai 01 lll.S Mil.cc US till. Mini <i[ ,„.,,..,. ... ,.,i ^,4 .,,.li*Mi«t S laU.*,,*.,. I i .-.III 1 vrlnTLlu toraurs L Uaii.tl. Ucn y « • Kiiiv. I'.ilm.-i \ . 

CU H inlr. i aid ."5 .\ l.'O la.'-S and tor.V ' ... rr.^-. 1.' t.v .•i.-is<»n- <»tfetsl.-t.ii>.-4Utii;>' pu-i KiI.o.-^' «n.l .lol.n .-. IT-ml-. .'r.. Ic ''•/ "a^lnc..* a, 

1 -.u ,1 .. .1." ,. . Ii 1' fi •*.! ' ll ll ••/. n.rrett Kiiijr .t' Co.,:irp pi iliiiill, .I'll '■••Ic4 rfc.ti H)! I.« 

i.eiii.^. logctuer with thu sum ot ica ;'„".;:,' J,.. .•.,., vntniwi I .\V.v.'^,tiM.i m f.vor of ;..i.i piaiiiiiir* .uii a.in^ 

DoiUr.! S.dic'.tor's leo secured to be '.<i5» 1 . .l. li \«-.»lXS. JiiU-e ofl'-,-, to | ,ip;V:ilant. lor f.- «ini 01 1 l.r. c liio?.-.-.l X,|,y l).il,.rs 



lic.ior s lec 
p;;iJ by >.j.'A i!iorig*ige. 
Now 'I'tiKurroivB, notice \a hereby given, 
that l)y virinc of a power of tae con 
lain d iu s^uid moiijiago «• d ivci'lded 
therewith and ni thj pi'ovis.ons of aio 
Statute iu such case niatJe and piuvi 
I'.etl, the said uiort.;age v.ill be f*. - 
closed tiy a sale ipf sad nitii'i.j;io;ed 
preini.-es to bo iimdo by the Sueiid' ot 
said County of Scott, at publie v.':i i.ie 



W 



r \.\-TEO. 



" Dicll »n-.irt 



r tUo alble." 



ft ■•■iiti''is ovdr wa i-' '-t-lv :irlnt(j'. '1<»tfi;'i rolifnn. 
c'-l IV 1 ii;-., i.iii .u'v- '• «ir.>ty(.i? pi tt<.<, 01 u..o 1 p •• 
,,.r k I I 1. 1 .|i,->' u- • V |i:iuirit'' 1 w.ii iiior-l'iiii 
211 ?'e'i; ■ ivi ur . 1 .■«' cl an I »••.> ', an I a kcTlcs of tin-', 
aulli • iiic '1 1 >*, 



t «•»• •«. II 1 rriv'iv, Ge • 



It -O ll} l<t.H 'll • \ 1 

\ iliril ili.t •■>•, ft »i i.-M-'hy. ati.l ,i a f 
• Tl.i'iir -i 



Ml IV, 



iiii 



at tho front (:o-.r of the Court Housj • i>^'^ ;;</.;.';^;;.';- - -.^.,^ »ii.i.. r^u t, h.iwp-ii»ii.i-: 



.M 



ii'lu i;..>;!o 

Wp-lisil'l'' 
11. 1 4i:itiy 5i;ho»r Toaouer, nii I 



in .'-!haki>iieJ ui .said County 01 ^ieoit. , to ov r.- 

.Stale of .Minili-Sjta, at IC.i o'tl.ieU in ' "Vi is V^iu'' jouui'i iVl bv «11 iHanel anl emlifnl 

the lorenuot, of the ISr.i »av of Ai-itiL. J-;!;-',^^;- ^:;ri :';r:f Uw wniTi J'tl" i-;:.u::: 
in thL' war IbGa, aud tau p"V'-ve is ot ,j.,^..j,.e 



i}!ii;ti .« lie will be i;j;j,'!icd to l.'io payineiit i 
of the snin tlicii tln^; on "iuiA iioie m;i'I 
nioitgago, and the cjsts and chai-;<es of 



Do not be Drdcl< t<l ) 



l>f.in.'ii»»e .«.;;>••••?'»?■/ pi.u'ir tv of t '!h W ■ 
^ r-ni'l Kir'ii'i iii-iii.f.i'.ft Ml I •••li»> f >.-:>■».'>' f ' 
• 0^1- ~ ■' o I 6.ti) i^aii-*. :i li J.. I rff >rl ll- I I 1 I'll* .-o!! iirv in lii-;er 

l'.)reclo...'iro and said Mi.n of len .b. liars 1 iv-.t 1 1 x.rc/ "■•■•■"'•••"'■••'.*■.':■'• ''*;;;';■ 

III iKi'i ; 1 ' I ■ ti-r "J >i t 1 1 I t ll" 1*1 ; I •1.1. — t 1 ■<'»■ 




solicitors l> OS pioviueu by sanl nior.- , u.- -<i.ii •«<! v ,1. i> u .i- -nri .i. it Un i^ntJim 
p.o.,'e to be pi:d oUl of tne piotcj.:, ol , ;;;/,^; j,,,; ^\. k,lU-x eiit; .. -h jhuo i,o>, i.-.e. 



Mil the ci\il and political ri^'hta of his new 
liorac ; that Atueriean ciiizejis by adoption 
Hud LHturalizaiion are eniiilcd to all the 
ri^hl«, as betv.cca the United titates and 
lor»i;^n powers, which can bo claimed l-y 
I ur own nativu bora citizens; and it is the 
<iuij of the Federal gover.mivUt to protect 
«<iU mrtintuia lh«iu by every means within 
lis povfcr. 



Mr. Cavur.iiugh, ("Our Jim,") 
Iliprteeutativc from Montana, has intro- 
^ucid in Coc£rc83 a bill to provide for 
luall servlco between Fort Abcr..roiabie, 
Dakota Territory, and Helena, Montana. 
Xicfcrred to the I'ostoiljcc Coiniuiitee. 



CO. 



I r'oiiit -v. >« > 11 • ifii* ».v u I icivji-lai t.i pi:iuof tlii- 
iji«r^ii/e Hifim for Mill*. _ _ 

i r'.fT...-*. .••! \! iM, :l.fl-.J CiTrr iKfti, FurnnTS. nnd 
I i-li-r.;«..ti -• .V.'i-i III! tin •-' -M.-y f .r t inn wo' k t.otli 
i |il,. i».t;t III I la'.ral.ve <.iin!'iy T! it. .'<»ti I lor firtu- 
i ii.', liivi ■_• iil.l part OU' ir", I.Tol*. Ks . '•> 

.<. S. >^..i«t'»> V ■'. it'<: I'liblin'ien. 
lA-^i !?; Ani'i ,1 .-^i , II. r. ■•■ ■. "•oiiii. 



an I Kl'litv tilm-tJiMils: w'lbh ».il<l Ju ■•-'iii'-Mt w iK.loi k- 
piolwrni ih.-CU-ik«fiiie 'M-l.-t ij.intlT »";' •'"■'',' •" 
c.n'ivof .<.ott.oii tlie ISt'i ilayof OotoLc- A.D. ;s«8 
WoitA.v th.' SliiT.n" "I mill <-"ill't' of •lO't Uroii. 
■ 1, n lei tos.ilUiv tti.- .sai.I Jii luiiiiit out < ( i 'm- i.^r-on 
II iiroii'nvo; t'-e«iM Ju liimiit i-i.ior iiol t.xflnpl 

troll. ■.x'-viiiioi. witiiii.i.o sill o.-iitv ■'f/;;"»«-;;VJ 

yi'ilo -lit 1.1 uiin-op-.r'y oiiM M I 'o- lom. I . tiiiTi 

„i. ..ft',- o.-al or.prrt i-t iv- lot f- '•;' -x-nitlo. In 
»,|,l.-ou-itvol Sc.tf.loiivt.'v-IOiiMI I I'opil.lel.tO: 
»'.. the .lay wliP', iai.l Jn l^liioiii v .» ^o .locrt.-.l a;, 
'lore-all. I..- at any tlm- t!.«--.t<.r. \xi> tuvtI. 
J„«l. Iho-iia., •Jlierlll f -.iilo.i ty of -. -.tt, it f-n 

..•■•.kUhi ihi' lor I i« of 111- 11 '. .1 .V of Marc.. 

U;;. at i:..i front .loor •/"■••'"","", '•?",'.", "/.",'" 
■ ,,,i'.t.- nfs.-.itr win «p'l •• t'l" I'uliosf l.lllrr. he 
f.H.>-vii.c .ie«iril.-I r-al .t'o, t.onn'U I'aul le -crllieil 
iH fi.l 'Ws. to wtt : , „ , . 

'I ■i.'ltiiiliie-«t 1 1 '-nt ..n 'h.' cs*« "i>" "f Ilolmei gtrert 
in;\',r...t 1 or'hof t'l-.-.u ' w** -r-frr.t Block No.4 
•i-,.-. .Ttwir'von nMnei-i-aUc' wt'i i!if uorMi llii , 
•.fi«iiil h'oc!: l>nfi>l. •hcii- •lort.'iwnrilly on t'lPlln. 
'iM-v.^cn L'Mn •; 111 1 In 1 . <! '«'o;'- H'i f-^t. th^llc 

•c,-stv.ir.!lv.i. t'lP.-.nt'i " M'lP V'l-y I'tr -Tl.rli .1 il 

n ".•; l-tt oet to "olni'H-t ■• ■ t.iml t'.onro ^ 'iit'iw.ir.n 
• .r" I'l" e.i»t line of II 1 • <"■ •'^f '„•. '•l.'''J'''*' '" '. . 

i.i *••.!. (.-.1 til the i-.'l ootitv-: . 
, •■ .ii'if "ip-iln • m «il-1 r'Tn'lo-i.wltliost*. 
Dit ■ I 'iTi.-'- is;'», t«<. . „.,„.,,,-,,.. 

Hm».«-IT.M, .T^f.lU TIinM*^. 

Mfrs for'" •••tin's, ?her\.Tof rScott OouBtf. .'l!«i 
iiViTi 






--^;*|^? 

Ccr. First and Lc"wis Streets, 

Shakopec, Minn. 

DE.^LER INj 

ir;\rt]\Viii'C, 
Stoves, 

Cutloiv,' 

Tin Ware, ■& 
Sheet-Iron. 



1^^ Repairing neatly and prompt' 
iy eiccutcd. 



CLIMAXI CLIHAXtl 

Page's Climftx Salre, a Funllj 
blessing for 25 eents. r ' 

It heals withont « sear.^ No 
fiimily should be without it. 

We warrant it to euro Scrofula 
Sores, Salt Bhennij ChilbUins, 
Tetter, Pimples, and all Emptiona 
of the Skin. For Sore Breast or 
Nipples, Cuts, Sprains, Bmises, 
Burns, Scalds, Chapped Hands, 
&c., it makes a perfect cure. 

It has been used over fifteen 
years, without one failure. 

It has no parallel— haring per- 
fectly eradicated disease and 
healed after all other remedies had 
failed. It is a compound of Arnica 
with many other Extracts and 
Balsams, and put up in larger 
boxes for the same price than any 
other Ointment. 

Sold by Drnfgista eTcrywhere. Whii« k HawUsC 
Proprietors, 121 Liherty Street, New Tork. 

NOTICE Or MORTGAGE RALE. 

Xas!i:.s of Mortcagobc — Fredrick Labr- 
rr.an and Soplna Labrman, biti*iff, ftf 
Scott Comity, Minnesotn. 

NAMr (;F Mcr.TGArr.r. — Mathi.is Marty, tLfln 
of M'Mirr.p, AVi.-consin. 

Date cf ^lor.TOACE— NoTcmbcr 34'h, A. 
D. 1S(13. 

Sajj) JMdKTn.'.rE wr.s re corded in the cRc» 
of tl;p Kc;ri;^tcr f>f Deeds of .Scott 
Cornty, nt one o'clorK- in the afternoon 
of the 2flth day of November, in th* 
yr.ir 18(53, iu Book "E" cf ilorlga^M, 
prco 108, 

The DKiicnirTiON* of the Morlpajred pr^mia- 
cs is the We.'.t Half of the North Wert 
Qnartf-r of S'rclion Twcnty-ono in Town. 
<;l'ip One Hundred Thirteen of Rnnf* 
Twcmy-two, eontaiiiingr eijjhty acre<i, 
Biiuatc lyirp r.nd being in tie County 
of h'cott iifoic?aid. 

Said Moutgage \vr.s innde to Fcenr* the 
payn;ci:t of the Fum of One Hon- 
tired Dollars, with rntrrest at tk» 
rate of twelve per cent, pcrannnm.paj- 
uhic in ouc year from date, m -' 
ror.'.iiirj to tho promissory rote of th« 
.si;id jiedick Lahrintin, pfyr-ble to th« 
f.:iid Mathii.s Mcrty, and bearing efea 
date uitlif-aid inorlirapre. 

No Action or proceeding's have been inati> 
luted at low or otherwise, to recorar 
the sum secured l-y (aid mortgage or 
My pnrt thereof. 

TiiE A.VM NT clain ( d to be due on said not* 
r.t the rhntr of this notice is the sum of 
Oi-e llnrdrcd and Fifteen DoUai-. lo- 
pclhcr ^illi the sum ot 'Icn dollar* 
holicitor'.s iV.- t<LUied lu be paid by ci.id 
mortgage. 

Now TiiEKKFonK notice is hereby jiivci ,tbat 
by viitiic of a power of side rcntiurid 
in f-nid niorlgogeand recorded lhfre>«itK 
and of tie | rovi.-ions of the Statute in 
tnch ea.-c Hiudc and provided, the bAid 
ii:er1};t!j;e will be foreclosed by a ml* 
of fi itl nionrnpcd prcn ises to be n ade 
by tl SI triif f f Faid County of Siott, 
lit J nlilic Midncflt tie front door of 
the Court House in Shakopee in said 
Ccr.nly c f Scott, State of Minnesota, at 
ten o'clocK in the fc-renoon of the 2bTM 
rAT OF MARiH, in the ye»r lfc68, and 
the j.rocicd.s cf Mich ^alc will be applied 
to the payment of the sum then doe on 
said nolo and iriOrtgiifje, and the coe»a 
iuid ch»ipcs of foreclosure and paid ium 
of ten dollar.'; solicitor's fees proiidcd 
by said mort^-affc lo be paid out of tb« 
|Toceeds of "^uch sale. 
PATtD Ftbrujiry 1.1th, 16C3, 

MATH I AS MARTT. 
llEKtiY Hi.NPS Mortgage*. 

Attorney for Mortgagee. 
Jacou Thomas, 

SLciiU" of Scctl CouLty, Minn, 



.ly- 
X. II. Im- 






uTTc SlKT.lf of Scott C.ninty. Mi.n. 



J>ele.r;at3s to Haticnal Dcaiccratic 
Convcntica.. 

A. G. Chntfield, of Scott county. 
James J. Green, of Winona county. 
W. A. Gorman, of Ramsey county. 
Wiuthrop Young, of Uennepin county. 
I". A. McMaLon, of Oluiitcd county. 
Oco. D. Saow, of LfSitcur county. 
Isaac Stnples, of Wa.^hinglon county. 
'ILoc'.as AV. Shechy, of Raiusoy county. 

Al.TEttNATKS. 

r. C Cralam, let District. 

Taul Fabtr, 2d DiV.rict. 

J. F. OTarrtI, Sd District. 

J, I. Lewis, 4th District. 

E. S. Everett, 5th District. 

Judge Jh3. A. Brown, Gth, District. 

Judge Evans, Tth District, 

U. W. Pratt, at large. 

rKEflfcE.VriAL SLECT0K3. 

A. G. CLsilCciil, of Stott county. 
I.uthcr DearlcVP, of Rice cou .ty. 
C. H.Liennu, 01' r.r:.'«5cy county. 
y;. Vr. PhcIps, of Ooodhut' county 



r;i.j ...e-J \. ce, mrc i-cj li.- "r. J. II. 9 ••s^.tux, 

t'li Ail' V'l >. 'J i>: c id to i! >*3'.rf iho.noisij 

.i;e'.lin jH t;.;. tlio 'rst pr ..vi; 8. d .f»-o:i. \\\ 

■'".^i-nj, Itie flOT.se'a iviili E-h.-a''«*» Vi ■ irr.v.c 

. ilU, iti; T>a c lian re.'tcr** the »rj>itiitf, »;> i cc.: 

iiu c.i 'U n-» i.0 t:.4:sj .cor: u;;i:j .; v.-.i. K- t •. 

Co3iair,p Tea rsnn'rt ba enr*! j,-3 '■.•v'.'.* I 
inu:i:r b r.:p naleis t'.ie elitr.b;!! ft-lJ tiver '• i:.:. :. 
l.e.i'lhy a.-.i t'jo i?j;i;;o rci'.aro-J, hracs l!»<j T. j t 
kiid Piiii aro re ,u ■:f\ iu or.'j-.r e-cr.- t».'t o. t-i- 
iu:ii? '(J^. A UrL' Cc^a i;ji: Mo: .to S '.VvVic ''> 
TONiCanJ;!ii-t.'i:or;b-irUjxiJo- I?i3 fIA:;rSA>: ■ 
MLLS u'lll Cia-B Ruvci-i'r.t.-/ ca:5 o.' /-i T- »• 

L>r. Scri::No.-: ma'tsj pra'i.^'-'a' «' r ».';. j) 'C ■■ 
York. !;>■»«;«, iinu a Ii!* prtu.-'p^: 0:)ice .t JVi 'i.lo.- 
ji'.ila e/cry woci. Bee Au.\\y pap.r.-.t oi e v;'j ? ^r^«, oi 
lii> {;aai;a.e; oa coajwui?.^03 ter U.* va. > •>>- »u..a- 
lUa. 

fi.-a^e i"-*e.rre. wlr.-.i p-ircTir.ras, ll.a' .\y t.'ro i;ire- 
KMiita n' \\3 D^'.or, o-e wijjii ui 4'ie ;.^4 *:a:a ot 
Coiur.;;;.j.:s3, t!:J tlio 3;'.;ir fti It.'! utn\r i«, In lM..fCt 
hoi 111, lu'coa t!i3 l5o/i;rou C-.l rtai: j. 

B)1U b>' »li l'ni;..t*st! e.iil l>ca cr?, i»r'ca £1.Vi p^r 
Lo.tlc. or .-ji"..',:) t'.;o hnli-tloxon. All let! Td ot sniir c" 
tboald bo ad 'rci.-'ei 19 Dr. 8:"uR>-fr,;'3 I'rn'-v. 
O-i'ice. Xo. !."> Nor:a ftli Slreo!, P.ii:«de p'l %, Pa. 

Cie.'icnLi V<'h«:cMie A.;c-jtj: |)ei:i!u Uir:i(>.i U Co., 
N. v.; 8. e. Xiicco. Utltiiojie. AiJ.; J, .a H. 
l:*arkn. Ctncin-itiii, Oiio; U"i.k.T iC Ta,-.Or, Ckk- 
eao*, iii. ; Co.Uiw Uro.., Si j.>uii:a. JIo. 

11*1 m. .. 



X.).'2o Mi'h-u I'lt.f. I 
Xt^c Y-rk, D.r. 14. ISUi.i" 
In my Card of No v. 1, 1807. 1 Pt.^tcd t at. 
•♦fortlic iMiii»oi»o of luoro liilly siipvly- 
Xu-ji tlie MaiiiK of itio |>ul»ll<', and in j 
ortlcr to i>roveiit »ih»«tiii>h!oi!s <:<.n!rr;« I 
Trom pMliiilii;; oQ' tuleriur uii<l wortit- 
ICMM coudMan the >Iurlou (•old I>mi».. I ! 




dischur^'C of the bond debt. 

Mr. Dunie'.s, in reply to Mr. Ba.vter, said 
that to leave tiiia settlement with the State 
olhct-r.s was just pivcisely where it siiould 
be kit. He pri-aicted that lo turn over 
this inattur to iiidivilu;ils thu Slate woald 
never reallzo anything worth naiiaag, whilt* 
in the end the people would be coin p^?i led 
to pay by taxation uvery dollar of the boads, 
principal and iuterest. 

The aub.siituie ollcred by Mr. Smith was 
lost. 

The sub.slltute ofTerud by Mr. Dauielj 
was also lust. 

The coniiaittoe then recoJBmended that 
the original hill [the Dristul billj lay ou the 
ti.ble. 

The Delano bill waa then take a up by 
th« coniniitlee. 

Mr. rcllit moved to amend the bill by 
providing for the p.iymeni uf the claims of 
Graham «IL McDonald, and FItz. Grindcl! & 
Keepers iu the general scuhjiueni. Wit'.:- 
uraw.i. 

A a amendment was adopted, ofTered by 
Mr. Smith, prescribing that in aelecting 
landi lor caiicflhiig bonds from time to 
time, one half selected i»hall be from tho jo 
of the least value. 

Mr. Eolsom thought the bill provided for 
jiartial repudiation. He was ihcretore op- j 
posed to it. i 

Tho committee rccommcuded that the i 
bill b« cngros.sevl for a third reading, which [ 
with the other recommendation* was adopt- j 

by the Senate. I 

_____ I 

HOUSE or represe;;tatives. I 

BlI-LS 2NSU0DUCED. 1 

Bv Mr. Henry An act to incor'>orattt '■•*«" ''*='^*^'*'**''' **^''' ""^ **'***^* "' "''"''"" . l"»*"i i i»y aU .vuoi ML-ai..! re iii .leiier- i».iru-i 

the borOU J-h of Dclle Plaiue * i ■'•''^ e.vtopt only to duly api>oliito<1 atul ; am mtlkl.i.-s tl.r) ;:!ir.Mt tlio \u\:* I .-litPK, an.l t,y 
° " ' ......I •.».! ».,....-« ..1... Tnthi,r,i^„ TUaTiSf^ & C5., SQfC Proixnctors, 

I JO THEM'JXT ."^T.. Ujstov, M ISS. 



NOTICE Oi' EXECCTIOX SALE. 

Notice is horoiiy ijiv.-'ii. that oii the 8iii 
day of Ee'iruary, A, 1'. 1868, I levied njxm 

lue f diowiiig descniicd roul tslaie, lying ami 

j oein^r ill iliL- C 'Uiity of .Scoit, Suite of .Miii- 
A. SA-TB, 1 iiesoia, as tlit,' jjroji.-tly ol James AriiuitiouL', 

CERTAIN, 
a:.d 

Speedy Cura 

loa 

NEURALGIA, 

AS'U ALL 

NERVOUS 

DISEASC3. 



Merchant TailoB; 

FiasT Stkee^. SuAKorEE, MisN, 

A now and sploiulid Rtock of Clo- 
thing, Cloths, and Geuls' Furnishing 
Goods, 

FALL L WINTER STYLES, 

£55=- Clotirnr madcto order. 
Shakopec, March 14th, 18C7. 



iJSltNiti.L 




Jiagicalm 

It I* the CNKAJUjio ifWEDT In all c.is.'.s or xMir.iIjl! 
Kitlilli, 'ifti-ii cllecil'is a H-*'!''."! -• iri- i:i :"»* Hit' 
iwc ill i'>»i' iiour», fru'.u lUe ui^ <-f no iiur.? t'.uin Tw / 

OR TIIRKK l'.U.fc. 

>■., Ill I ?r lyr.ii of Xou'ji^U ur .iO'mju* Dl»--ai ■ ua.- 
ralicU t<i ylri<i lu l^la 



wor-DSTircL :ism 'Dal AaesT. 



T.vrn ll tV" ^I'Tf'refst e-««ei oi C'lrmlc V "in •_!{'» "' ' 
ri.in'r<l n"-v HI* I •' . i •<? n i* ., — if mi ••'• y» i- " «r I'l • 
I i..,--»'le.'tlii;; I'l :'tf iiir^-V'iti.ii. i>» 'is* r.- i "^ 1av« 
■ ir :• r"* w •,?"ii it "i.- itil ••*, I'w.tx-n .iTjrla t'i>* iii.>..i' 
ivt >")<Uli;/ r-''<>f. ■•T I *'>r.' 'iff ':.!:» t-i pr'>iiict. n 
cu iri'.K" m i ■! T I ■•>"it :■•■•-». 

It ..• >i:il I. no 'ri:* . r •fi r nut^-NUI-* •'ie-Ii.-!it 
rtt I".— -•" ' il'irvjaj". -Tfn •-■» ih« -iu->l leKcilB i>.'>lp:.'i. 
all. I C4U iWAfi lia in i with 



It h*» long been !ii confant tjie ' r tn-i-y of oar 
MOST EMIXE.VT PUYSICIaN.^. 



I trho give It thfir uanilm-vnn ail iiriTaillOiJJ appro 

I T»l 

."^eiit liv mull on recclrit of price, in't postnen. 



f>nc p:irkn(t<*. $1 f'', Vo»ti?rCi <: 

P'x p.ic~at.-'». ».'••, " n 

Trtt-lveimk.KeB, S.u"), " ii 



■nti. 



ea>t 
to nin 



a track to the bank op;;osiie St. 



autiiorlzed .lseiit»," etc. To thia plan 

VALl.tY r.OAD fcKltEF. 1 j j^avo since strictly adhered. 

The special committee to arrange amend- : In accepting: Agci;ts. jrreat care haa boen 

ments to the above bill, reported amend- exercised to appoint those who, by lous- .jp»»pi rni\ t\ I \ t H^ '?'^<l*^r 

mcitS whcrebv ibc road is to pass ou the ' continued fAir dealing, have aoqmroa a , «|j| Ll LjU \ I j. [Uj J 'pj'* 

.siacofth3 Minnesota river, but aro , '^•^y't*^-^^^ "^^^o^^f^y-^'^P^^'i^^'^^y- ^f ^ llu'LL lUliOALL U'l li;4.--L. 

.!- »-. ,1... 1.«mL- „nw..«;,.. .S, probity -rae.i in whose word tho pubhc 

have learned to place ccnfic.eiice. These i 

uvve acreed to keep a full assort- i rp-^^ MLnnGSOta KcH- , 

my pens, ar.d to EcU them »f my . ^. , , t ■ •in 

^ prices. Thus the public are sup- At .Shakop-c, wiil l>e i>iJL<ti..i.^.,l, 

1 ia cour.tv wa?., with othtsr eminent per- | i"'"5'»'"^'^'J'» '^f '* bridge across the rivtr, ' p^iod by them with just such p.?n3 na they nr I'lAiJ^.J Fv.Mt A K\;t':. h is a 
'"' §2,.''jU of which is to he paid each year, ; want, cither as to writing or price, aiid (,c: birpjo hottd, ne'>iy ti.ii.sli-- i, in a c»io.i io- 

until the entire amount is cancelled. t a full equivalent for the money paid. 

On niotiou of Mr, Miner the rules were j No agent is Bopointed to trav.-! fron 
euspended, and the bill lelieviug the V;il!ev I plac=J to pl'vce, or canvass the counlrv, 
Kaiiroad Ccmpuiy from crossiii„' the river i "o tb.it all who want a Korton OoH Pen 

ut SU retor, wai read the third time and '■ m^"* f^- ^^ ^"'^'^ ^'* ^^"^^ '*^^-* °' '"'*"" 
,1 ' lieirtgLU->rt<:Ta, 



- ,, ,1/1 . I •! I ■ iiave ifi»ru 

■•■•■•■ : ~^,. ,, i eter, and the Company are to b;iild a .-._.,,„ ^v 

A CoKREciiox.— W c notice in tho / t*'^*-^ depot uikI keep the track in repair thereto, ^cnt of m 
4"j;/ a Bltitecc.Dt that M. Hess Dunand o.*"* and also pay St. i'eter !:!iJ,000 towards tho p^-biished 



sons deflated before the State Couvention, 
Thja ia a mistake, as Mr. Dunand's uama 
wa.i not bfcfora the couvcuttju as a candi- 
date for aay position. 



H^ The Speciotor has four editor.! now. 
Two Tfpubiican., cue seiui-dem:»i.riulc and 
liufj fvina'..*,— a'l hatched in th.- UazzAri'i 



cation, has a ;rood Sioue iJ.ir.i. lar^f y;ira 
A good well of water, ami a ll.ie ru:i ofi 
custon. inquire at thi.s oflice or r»f ihe! 
owner, 



indvr and hy viriue ot an c.\eou ion is-iiei 
out of and undoi the <cal oi llic rfupiv in 
t!ourt, of tho Slate of .iliiiiiesota, hearin-j 
::ite Oil liie 'lri\''\ d ly oI .laiiii iiy, .\. D. itSi'ic^. 
to liie .Sh'-r.tf of tiie Couuly ul .*icott aC.re- 
.■i:iid, d reeled and tIeiiVi'ivil on tins ^>t!i da} 
>r Febraa-y, A. i>. 18GS ; wiiich said ese- 
cutioij w.isijiued upon a j idj,nnent leiideivii 
in^.iiil S ipieme Court of tiie .Stale of .Min-j 
nciol'., u;t the Element. i day ol Octo!icr, in' 
the year lbf>."), in au ucti.tii therein ijendinf: 
oelween Jiimes Arn-tioiijj, lespund-nl and 
• lenry lliiid-, uj»])el.uiit, m luwj:- of >jiLl 
.ip,iellant aa I a:;aiiist .s.iid rocj>.nid •.•!, toi 
:i.e su u of Tnii iy: 111.; d.iJiri ami e;j^lily-li''e 
:viilft; wiiica h>i.d jud^.ne it Was docketeti 
•.v.'ii the Cl--: k or lue iijsiiict iJo'iit ot the 
Fil'lu Jiii ijial D.slric!, i.i and fir tuj Couu 
v of .Sco I .iloicsai J, on t ic 2Tia d»y o. 
J.iiimtr , ia tiie year. IbuG, by which ^aid 
"(••cuiiou ill-' Siicntf >ji s.iid t'oUiily of 
-■C'.tlt IS coiina.i.eu lo saii-fy tlie sidJ 
;a liroiciil with ialvre.>t and costs^ oul of the 
>er.M)nal properly of the rtiiid judgment 
leiilor n./l '■xempt from e.\e<:ution within j 
;'je 3a;d Conn'v of .S-olf, oi if suiiicieiit 
^KfTxtiial piopeiiy co'jld not be fiMiml, then 
iiul ot Ihe real properly iiul e.veuipL from I 

•..•Jtecution in said Contity ot bcoti, bebjujr- 1 __ 

:n- lo the >aid judgment dehtor ou tlie day ' i^^lia/COpCe^ Minn. 

whenlhcsaid judgment »as so docketed as j ■* ' 

aforcs.iid in tiie said County ot ."tieott, or at 
any time thcit-after; 

Now, liicrcforo, furilier notice is hereby 
ulven, thit Ui.der and hy virtue of said e.vo- 
ciitioti. I, Ju'.'ob Thomas, fciieiiif uf said 
County of Scott, at 10oclo.;k in the fore- 
iioou of ibo 23rn day or Makcii, in the year 
ISG8, at the fiont door of the Court House, 
at Siiakopcc, in .said County of Scott, \Viil 

sell lo tho hi^ilicsl bidder, liie real estate eoJia-.r»*e Sft fX "Xt r\ e>. ti 
Lvied oil uiMl -r a.d by vinuu of of said ^^O OM^ OtCJllOCS, 
execuiion, whieli is d.'scrili.d as f.i| .W;. to i-i t^ a -r r>i itt- i t ^ t-i 

wit : Lot Four in \\\ -ek Tw.-n:y-a.e io : ( ) I 1^ Ji \i VJ \V/ A ]■? \i 
the plai .if Snak-.tce C-iv, o.. iile i . the : SL ^ J-J-LJlA kJ \\ i-AAlJ^, 

Hats & Caps, 

— AND— 

Millinery Goods. 



FIRST ST., SHAKOFEE, MINN. 

— DEAIBIt IK — 

Drv Goods 

Grcccries, 
Boots & Shoes, 

Hats and Caps, 
Crockery, <£x*. 



jigj- The ki^httt price paid/or 
Cov.itry Produce, -^sa 



C. Raivelage, 



'Dealer in 



DEI GOODS, 

Groceries^ 



NO'lUK or AOivTJAOE fALIL 

XAyrs or Moptcagokp — Charles Ilartmfinn 
nr.d Ann liartnnrn, Lie wife, of tScclt 
County, Miui.esotu. 
Na>:f. cf Muiigacki; — Cathuriua fcbrantf, 

of Scoli County, MitiiiOf Ota. 
Datk fiF ?LCi::cAOE~CttoLcr ICth, A.D. 

18C.% 
SAin MiKTCACi: v.ns recorded in the oRIco 
01 the llcgijler of Deeds of ^cott Coua- 
tv. id lonr o'clock in the iiftcrnoon of 
the 19th day cf October, A.V. IhBi, 
in Look "E" of Mortgaj{Cs, on T'tifit. 3C3. 
TiiK Dt.s» KirTic.N ol the noilgtigcd picmiset 
is Lot Three in I"lo< k 'Jhrte, ia the 
plat of fchakopcQ City, on liie m tb» 
iCiceof the Kegistcr uf Deeds of th« 
County of Seott, State of Miiii;cpot», 
Mtucite lyinp aiid being ia the taia 
I'cnnty ot Scolt. 
Said MohicACK was made to ECCttra Ihf 
pKu:;ciit of tie fum of One Hundred 
l>oii;u-s, with iutcvcit at the rntn rf 
tv.the per cent, per annum, payable in 
(lic yctir ficin dale, f.ccordirg to the 
jnn is^bf ty note of tL« said ChnrlcB 
J'aitn.sin, jijbble lo the taid Catbn- 
liia Scl i:intz,'«nd beuiirg even dste 
wi.h faid umrlgagc. 
No AcTiox or piocctdinsrs have bccu irRt:- 
tuivd at lav,' or olhctwihi; to recover 
t e 6uin t(tuicd by ttid cxrlgoge or 
any purl thcreoh 
TiiK Ami INT claimed to le Cue on fei.1 
nu,it).jij;c id the dale cf this notice is 
the triii of Five llnrdrcd and 'J'wenty. 
tv.o Doi'ars and Fifty Cent?, together 
with the !-uni of ten dollar.s i>o]:citor'i» 
ke fccurcd to be paid by said n;Ortgnj;c. 
Now '1 iiF.KEFor.F, notice Is hereby given, that. 
Ity Tirlue of a power of taie roniuincd 
iu >aid inortiiage fciid lecordci therewith 
iiKd of the provisi(in.s cf the Statute ia 
huch Ciifcc njiide and provided, the naid 
nicrtgagc will be foreclosed by a tale of 
fcaid iiari«ro'gcd premises lo be trade by 
the hherifl" of said County of Scott, at 
public veiidue at the front door of the 
Court II on-* in Shokopee in said Conn. 
lY ftf Scott. State of Alincciota, at len 
o'clock in the lorenoon of the lerii cat 
or Ariiu., in the year I8C8, utid the 
j:roceeds of buch sale will be applied to 
the payment of the sum then due on 
wdd noie and mortgage, aiid the cos'.« 
Qud charges of foreclosure and said Kom 
of tCu dollars solicifor'a fees provided 
by said inftigape to be paid out of th(> 
luocoedn of >uch pale. 
Dated March 5th. 1SS8. 

CATHAJUNA SCnRAKTZ. 

Attoiu* y for Mortgagee, iil-7t 

JACOB TIlOiiAS, 
Sheriff of Scott Couuty, Minrieiota. 



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EAFNIi-SS, CATARRH, CONSUMP- 

TIo;<. AND CANCEK CCUKD. 

A TreatitP on 0ca!ni'»s. Citatrh, Consntiir't'on •«fl^ 
Cii'Ker: liic-ir c«uses^ijiev» •>! Bpatir rt,|ifi, aim ult - 
inatt cure. By • I'Mpil of tlie AdaiJeniy oiMeUitiLe. 
A^ariK. itv< l«i;a»" a<l.lr«'^■^ Ji.r lOornU, 

I.Ht.r from l.i.I.ert MfMjrdy, t>. D L. 1.1 T).. Gr»i<4 
PnlHiecLtirsBd KucaiiipiiiCni of U.S., •xia tAlmt 9t 
ill)' ".'' ."lionai Frrcnia^ou." 

Xjv TohK, Sif!- 17. 1867— Da. Brai*^*". ••• «■ 
f'i;.:^e ol Urace t'liurrli lIofpl»ii Alcxaoorla. Vji.^ 
<Ui-'!iK il;e wnr. I frsqiifni' ftliiio*l dally; .t»»f 
uioiit|i», ▼l^U«.<J tlif iloksittal. ,x,(l h«<I»v»-j- i<ii>«ntor 
l.-»o»li.p bH re-iiulstloij for r.mrlirVfT •nJ aBiu.. !• 
wmi<»r the Mioal credlta' ,f ch^ract*"^, »n'l hi* kvcM* 
1 . tlip (rcaiDieuiof i^iienw ws* r«B«irkaS»lt.-:-vO»t 

XCSlCKDI. 

OR'^.ANIC VI8f»AtO«l. 

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notffM tv f/,j /,f,i„\ »|j,i tiial>ttl U<*f r<T»onii to »ifar 
rtt»l;i:<^,Iv „t chiiroh nn.» fublitf »»f»nili:'.<'<'. ThU iv 
Mr.,«neiit «ltl olii-n iil'uUurerenrUj Si" "*t inlracn'^^tr 

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SUMMARY OF^THE WEEK. 

General Ifeira. 

The President has approved the bill for 
the payment of a bounty to the heirs of 
soldiers. 

It ^as understood in Washington on the 
27th that the rejected Senator Thomas had 
recommended to the Maryland Legislature 
to appoiat .Montgomery Blair as his suc- 
cessor. 

On iHe afternoon of the 2-lth the Presi- 
dent sent to the Senate a lengthy commu- 
nication arguing in favor of his right to 
remove Mr. Stanton, and nominating 
Thomas Ewing as Secretary of War ad in- 
terim. 

Fractional currency printed for the 
week, ending February 22d, |54,463; 
Bhipped, 1-180,272 ; National Bank notes 
issued, fl21,S50; amount in circulation, 
|299,G70,176. Currency redesmed and de- 
stroyed, 1303,400. 

The President gave a slate dinner on the 
night of the 28ih ult. Moat of the J astices 
of the Supreme Court, who were invited 
two weeks ago, attended. Chief Justice, 
Chase did not deem it proper, in view 
of the impeachment trial, for him to be 
present. 

A Democratic Congressional Committee 
was organized in Washington on the 26th, 
consisting of Senators Doolittle and Buck- 
alew, and Representatives Randall, Hum- 
phrey, L. S. Trimble, Lewis, Ross and W. 
H. Barnum. The committee was author- 
ized to appoint an Executive Committee, 
and a resident committee in that city, to 
take charge of the distribution of cam- 
paign documents. 

It was reported in Washinf>ton on the 
21st that the Maryland Legislature was in 
a state of considerable excitement over 
the action of the Senate in refusing to ad- 
mit Philip R. Thomas. The leading mem- 
bers of the Legislature met in secret caucus, 
and, it was understood, resolved to re-elect 
Mr. Thomas, and send him a second time 
to the door of the Senate, to present his 
credentials and demand admission. 

The United States Marshall on the 
28th ult., called at the War Department 
and formally handed Mr. Stanton the writ 
notifying him of the suit entered against 
him. Gcnral Thomas was |at the War 
Department during the forenoon, but had 
no interview with Mr. Stanton. Under 
the law relative to the summons served 
upon Secretary Stanton, he is allowed 
twenty days to respond before the next 
term of the District Court. 

The committees on the impeachment 
<luestion appointed by the Speaker of the 
House, on the 2Tllh, were : Committee of 
two to announce to the Senate the action 
of the House— Messrs. Stevens, of Penn- 
sylvania, and Binghj»m, of Ohio. Com- 
mittee of seven to prepare articles of im- 
peachment— Jlcssrs. Boutwell of Massa- 
chusetts, Stevens of Pennsylvania, Bing- 
ham of Ohio, Wilson of Iowa, Logan of 
Illinois, Julian of Indiana, and Ward of 
New York. 

On the morning of the 22d, General Lo- 
renzo Thomas was put under arrest on the 
charge of violating the Civil Tenure law, 
and was held in )f5,000 bonds to appear be- 
fore the court on the 24:th. After his re- 
lease, he made a formal demand fcr the pos- 
session of the War OfHce, but Mr. Stan- 
ton refused to comply, ordering General 
Thomas to his duties as Adjutant General, 
and refusing to recognize him in any other 
capacity. A Washington dispatch of the 
23d says : " The President is in receipt" of 
letters and telegrams giving him assur- 
ance of approbation and support, and the 
Republicans arc constantly bemg encour- 
aged in a similar manner to unfalteringly 
execute the work they have undertaken." 

The excitement in Congress on the 24th 
is described as similar to that of the war 
times. The galleries and lobbies of the 
House were crowded with spectators, 
eagerly listening to the debate on the im- 
peachment rcsolution,which was continued 
during the entire day's session. Messrs. 
Ashley of Ohio, Wilson of Iowa, Wash- 
burne of Illinois, Woodbridge of Vermont, 
and Stevens of Pennsylvania, were the 
principal speakers in support ol the reso- 
lution, and Messrs. Boyer of Pennsylvania, 
Woodward of Pennsylvania, Wood of 
New York, Pruyn of New York, Nichol- 
son of Delaware, and Eldridge of Wiscon- 
sin, in opposition. 

It was given out In Washington on the 
27th, that there would be six articles of 
impeachment, as follows: First, declar- 
ing that the President had violated the 
Consiitution in making a removal while 
the Senate is in session ; second, that he 
made this removal contrary to the Tenure- 
of-Offlcc act ; third, that he had appointed 
General Thomas as Secretary of War while 
there was another legal Secretary ; fourth, 
that he had conspired w ilh Lorenzo Thom- 
as to obtain posession of the War Oflice by 
military force ; tifth, that he had conspired 
with or endeavored to get oflicers of the 
army to destroy the laws of his country 
and enter into a conspiracy to get the legal 
Secretary of "N^ar out of oflice. The sixth 
articled had not been completed. The 
committee do not take up any act of the 
President prior to the removal of Stanton. 

The suit of Gen. Thomas against Secre- 
tary Stanton for arrest and false imprison- 
ment, laying damages at $150,000, was 
duly docketed on the 27th, in the Circuit 
Court at Washington. 



Forei^B Intellisence. 

There was another severe shock of an 
earthquake at Montreal on the night of 
February 25th. 

The House of Lords has passed the bill 
renewing the suspension of the writ of 
habeas corpus in Ireland. 

The Royal assent has been given to the 
bill for the suspension of the writ of 
Tuii^>eas corpus in Ireland. 

All the prisoners charged by the Cor- 
oner's jury with complicity in the Clerk- 
enwell explosion have been committed to 
stand trial for murder. 

A Washington dispatch to the New 
York Herald of the 28th says that it is not 
believed a two-thirds vote against the 
President can be obtained in the Senate. 

A plot for the assassination of President 
Juarez was recently discovered in Mexico. 
The plan was to murder him while at a 
tlieatre in the evening, and then, in the 
midst of the consequent excitement, to 
rob the Treasury. 

Mr. Sullivan, of the Dublin Ifaiion, re 
eently convicted of publishing- seditious 
libels, has been sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment. Mr. Pigot, of the Dublin 
IrisJimant has been sentenced to twelve 
months' imprisonment. 

Earl Derby has resigned the Premier* 



ship, and his resignation is accepted by 
the Queen. It was also reported on the 
25th that Disraeli would replace Lord 
Derby as Prime Minister, at the same time 
retaining his present post as Chancellor of 
the Exchequer. 

The London Times says the American 
Minister who will succeed Mr. Adams 
could not have an easier or more gracious 
task than the settlement of the questions 
which have risen concerning the rights of 
naturalized citizens. 

At a mass meeting held in London on 
the 25th ult., the following resolution was 
unanimously adopted : 

ResolteJ, That thii meeting expresses the most 
hearty good will toward America, and pledges It- 
self to support our Government at home in its ef- 
forts to efl'ect a prompt, ri^fhteons and pacific set- 
tlement of all international diiVerences, and es- 
pecially of those connected with the Alabama 
claim qacstiou. 

Admiral Farragut has arrived at Genoa, 
and was received as the guest of the city. 
On the 27th the corporation of Genoa gave 
a grind banquet in honor of the Admiral. 
Over the prmcipal table was the motto, 
" America at the cradle of Columbus." Be- 
sides the officers and members of the city 
government, many of the nobility, the 
naval officers jn a body, and all the prin- 
cipal citizens of Genoa were present. 

A Berlin dispatch says : " The negotia- 
tions by Hon. George Bancroft, on the 
subject of the naturalization of Germans 
in America, have been brought to a suc- 
cessful issue. The North German Bund 
agrees to fully recognize and accord all 
the rights of exemption from military 
duty, etc., of native-born Americans to 
Germans naturalized according to law as 
citizens of the United States, after th«y 
have spent five years in the United States. 
A treaty to this eflcct was signed by Mr. 
Bancroft on February 22." 

The West. 

The nail mill recently erected at Bel- 
laire, Ohio, and in operatien but a few 
weeks, was totally destroyed by firo 
on the night of the 22J, supposed to be 
the work of an incendiary. The loss is 
$70,000. 

The Committee of Arrangements for the 
Republican National Convention to be 
held in Ciucago in May, Lave voted to 
hire the Opera House for the Convention, 
if it can be had on reasonable terms. 

A letter received in St. Louis from Fort 
Berthold, dated January 16, says that for 
two weeks previous the severest snow 
storm had prevailed in that region that 
has been known for ten years. At Fort 
Stevenson, the troops had been obliged to 
burn their warehouse and all their lumber 
to prevent them from freezing. Cattle 
and mules were actually buried in the 
snow, and large numbers had been frozen 
to death. Indians in the neighborhood of 
Fort Berthold were in a starving condi- 
tion, being obliged to eat the carcasses to 
sustain lif(?. 

The Chicago TribuM of February 28th 
notices the mysterious disappearance, with- 
in a couple of weeks, of three individuals 
in that city, foul play being suspected in 
each case. One was a stranger, register- 
ing himself as " J. W. Wood, New York 
city ;" he UTt considerable baggage at the 
hotel where he stopped. Another *was an 
employe of a packing house— Hugh Rob- 
inson — who, when last seen, had started 
for his home with fOOO in his pocket. The 
third was a wealthy citizen of Chicago— 
J. V. Kingley— who had several himdred 
dollars on his person at the time of his 
disappearance. The Tribune says : " In- 
quiries are daily made at the various police 
stations by persons who have lately sud- 
denly missed friends and relative?, many 
of whom, when last heard of, had heavy 
sums of money about them." 

Xlie l^a«t. 

The First National Bank of Bethel, 
Conn., was closed on the 2 1st, and the 
cashier arrested. 

It has been decided to hold the Demo- 
cratic National Convention in New York 
city, on the 4th of July. 

The validity of Gov. Bullock's veto of 
the bill repealing the State constabulary 
law, has been affirmed by the Massachu- 
setts Supreme Court. 

Tlie schooner Lizzie F. Choate, of 
Gloucester, was lost at sea February 9. 
Captain Gailney and two others were lost. 
Two of the crew were saved. 

The New York Constitutional Conven- 
tion have decided to submit the question 
of negro sufi rage separately, at the election 
on the new Constitution. 

The Rhode Island Republican State 
Convention, on the 22d, nominated Gen. 
A. E. Burnside lor Governor, Pardon W. 
Stevens for Lieutenant Governor, John R. 
Bartlett for Secretary of State, Wiliard 
Sayles for Attorney- General, and George 
P. Tew for General Treasurer- allpresent 
incumbents except the Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor. Delegates to the National Conven- 
tion were chosen. 



TCie Sontli. 

The steamer Kate Putnam was sunk 
three miles below St. Louis on the 21st. 

General Meade has issued an order pro 
hibiting imprisonment for debt in Georgia. 

The West Virginia Republican Conven- 
tion assembled on the 22d, and appomtcd 
delegates to the National Convention. 

The Georgia Reconstruction Convention 
has resolved that the State capital be re- 
moved from MilleJgeville to Atlanta, by a 
vote of 91 to 30. 

The Florida Convention on the 25th, 
adopted the Constitution which they had 
prepared (forty members signing the same, 
and five refusing), and adjourned subject to 
the call of the President. 

The Kentucky Democratic State Con- 
vention, on the 22d, nominated Hon. J. 
W. Stevenson for Governor, and appointed 
delegates to the National Convention. A 
resolution in favor of Pendleton for Presi- 
dent was adopted. 

In the Senate, on the 22d, communica- 

ons were received from the President In reply to 
a rcsolntion of Inquiry in regard to lands in San 

Juan and Pngeni'e Sound Without transacting 

any farther business, the Senate adjoorned. 

In the House, on the 22d, the Pension 
bUl, appropriating $30,350,C00, was reported and 
passed A bill to prevent and pnnisb the unlaw- 
ful use of public monevs w.ia passed The Sen- 
ate bill for the protectiun in certain cases of per- 
sona making disclosuroa as panles or testifying as 
witnegsee, was passed.. . The Committee on Ke- 
construciion made a report, concluding with the 
submission of a resulntion that " Andrew John- 
eon, President of the United States, be Impeached 
of high crimes and misdemeanors." The resolu- 
tion was discussed, jTo and co/i, until a late hour 
at night, when the Bouse took a recess until the 
Mth. 

The House re-assembled at ten o'clock 
a. m. on the 34th, and resumed the consideration 
of the impeachment resolation. The debate was 
continued until five p. m., when the vote was 
taken, resulting in 12G In favor of, and 47 against, 
impeachment. Messrs. Stevens and Bingham 
wer« appoiBted to proceed to tLe bar of the 



Senate and notify tliat body of the action of the 
IXouse. 

In the Senate, on the 25th, after some 

unimportant proceedings, the doorkeeper an- 
nounced a committee from the House, and Messrs. 
Stevens and Uingham entered and the former 
made formal anuoanccmcnt ol the impeachment 
by the lIou.?c of the President of the United Suites, 
and the presidiu£; officer of the Senate replied that 
the Senate would take action in the premi.^es, and, 
on motion, the message relating to the impeach- 
ment was referred to a select Committee of seven. 
The chair appointed as snch committee. Messrs. 
Howard, Truraball, Conkliiig, Edwards, Morton, 

Pomeroy and Johnson The Supplementary Ue- 

construction bill was taken up, considered, 
amended and made the order for the S7th.... Ad- 
journed. 

In the House, on the 25th, under the 
call of States, a large number of joint resolutions 

were introduced and referred The Impeach 

ment Committee made report in the afternoon 
that they had proceeded to the bar of the Senate 
and, as directed, in behalf of the House, formally 
impeached the I'rcnideni of high crimes and mis 
dumeaners in oflice, and demanded lliat the Sen- 
ate should take order to make him appear before 
that body and answer for the same; and that the 

response was '•the order shall be taken" Kes- 

olutions in reference to the ri^'hts of American cit- 
izens abroad, came up and were referred The 

Naval Appropi lation bill was considered and 
passed — A resolution was adoptefl tobuspendall 
other business when the Committee to prepare 
articles of impeachment shall make report ol the 
same, and that the House thall go into Committee 
of the Whole on the <[ue?tion, and report be mside 
to the House on the second day thereafter at four 
p. m., when the House shall immediately vote 

thereon, etc The House took a recess until 7 

o'clock, when it met and indulged la general de- 
bate lor several hours, and adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 2Gth, a memorial 
of the citizens of Utah praying for the erection of 
the Territory of Wyoming, and the annexation of 

Utah and Idaho thereto, was referred A petition 

of 4,000 citizens of Louisiana, setting forth their 
grievances and hardships, was presented and re- 
ferred — A bill was reported from the Judiciary 
Committee and recommitted, to prevent the en- 
trance into the United Slates of persona adjuiljjcd 

guilty of certain crimes in foreign countries a 

resolution was adopted that the Senate would take 
order on the impeachment of the President by 
the House, and give duo notice thereof to the 

Hotise Several messages and communications 

were presented from the President, and appropri- 
ately referred The H<msc amendments to the 

hill approoriating fl.'i.UiO for the temporary relief 
of the destitute population of the District of Co- 
lumbia, were concurred in The bill providing 

lor the sale, by the Secretary of War, of lands, 
tenements and water privileges belonging to the 
United States at or near Harper's Ferry, was con- 
sidered, amended and passed A bill was re- 
ported from the Juriiciary Committee defining the 
jurisdiction of the United States Cooits in certain 
cases Adjourned. 

In the House, on the 26th, a petition of 

the citizens of Allegheny county. Pa , complain- 
ing of the burden of taxation, and praying for a 
reduction of the government expenses, and for 
the proper adjustment of the duties, was re- 
ferred — The ^^enate amendment to the House 
bill extending the time lor the completion of the 
Dubnqne and .Sioux City Kailroad, was concurred 
In — Several resolutions wtre introduced and 

disposed of A message was received from the 

Senate giving notice that the Senate will take 
proper order on the proceedings of impeach- 
ment, and that duo notice shall be given to tlic 

House The Senate substitute for the Suple- 

mentary Keconstruciion bill was concurred in— 
yeas, %; nays. 'Ji — The bill to provide for the 
payment of pensions out of the naval pension 

tuiid was referred In Committee of the Whole 

the sundry civil expense bills were considered, 
but without disposing of the sulijcct the Commit- 
tee rose A petition ol citizens of Koss county, 

Ohio, in favor of a general reduction of the army 
and navy and civil expenses of the Government, 
and a reaiJjuimiii:nt of the revenue law, was re- 
ferred ..^uiuui'ucd. 

In the Senate, on the 27lh, a favoraWe 

report was made on a joint resolution relative to 

the survey of the isorthorn and Northwestern 

lakes, which was passed — A bill was Introduced 
and referred for the relief of persons in the railll- 
tary and naval service of the United St.ites who 
may have instituted claims to i)ublic land under 
the homestead laws. . . .IJills were introduced, to 
dissolve the Indian Peace Commission, and lor 
Inndmg the national debt. ...The bill providing 
for the disposition of moneys received from the 
sale of abandoned property at the 8ou',h was 
taken up and diecussed at some length, when, 
without dnal action, the Senate adjourned. 

In the House, on the 2Ttb, a rcs.ilutkn 
was adopted, permitting the committee to prepare 
arlicles of impeachment to report In print Sev- 
eral bills were oti'ercd to permit the building of 
railroad bridges over the Ohio river The Speak- 
er presented several communications, including 
resolutions of the South Carolina Cunvention. ask- 
ing an appropriation of a million dollars for the 
purchase of land lor freedmen, «kc ; and the Na- 
tional Commercial Convention recently held in 
Boston on ilnance, taxation, etc ; which were re- 
ferred The Speaker read a communication, re- 
ceived from the New Superiutendeut of Police, to 
the ed'ect that 1(J5 pounds of nttro-glyccrine had 
been sold by the United Slates Illasting Oil Com- 
pany, of New York, to some p'Tsons who pre- 
sented an order, which afterward proved to be a 
forgery, and fears were expres.-ed mat the nitro- 
glycerine hud been taken to WashiiiL;lou forsomc 

mischievous purpose The resolution of the 

Wisconsin Logislatuie, in reference to the project 
of connecting by navigable channels the waters 
of the Mississippi and Lake Michi:;a!i, was pre- 
sented and referred In Committee of the.Wnole 

the Civil Appropriation biU waa taken np and dis- 
cussed Aojoumud. 

In the Senate, on the 28th, the Chair 
submitted a resolution of tho Lugislaturc of Wis- 
consin relative to the improvement of navigation 

of the Fox and Wit'Onsiu rivers A report was 

received that the Select Committee of Seven have 
adopted a series of rules lor the proceedings of 
ihclligh Court of Impeachcient, with a lequest 
to print a notice that they would be called up on 

the S'Jth A joint resolution was introduced to 

establish the right of way of the Portage Lake and 
Lake ^^uperior Canal in Michi^'an, and granting 
-iUO.OCO acres of land in the Nortnern reninsula of 
Michigan to aid in the construction The bill re- 
quiring persons applying for the extersion or re- 
newal of patents to irive put)lic notice thereof was 
passed. ...Senator ilcCreery, ot Kentucky, took 

the oath and his seat The Military Academy 

Appropriation bill came up, was amended, de- 
bated and passed Alter considering the bid de- 
claratory of the law in regard to officers ciirhiered 
or dismissed from the army by sentence of a (.Jen- 
eral Court Mariial, the Senate went into iixecutive 
Session, and soon afier adjourned. 

In the House, on the 28th, the Postofllce 
Appropriation bill was made the special order for 

the id Several private bills were passed, and 

adverse reports on private claims adopted The 

Senate joint ^e^olution for the survey of the North- 
ern and Northwestern lakes passed.... A bill was 
reported and passed tor regulating the custody and 

expenditure of jjublic moneys The rejohniono 

adopted by the Ornnd Army of the Kepiibllc at 
Philadfclphii, January 7, relative to ignoring sol- 
diers and sailors in the appointment to Govern- 
ment offices, a-king action by Coiii;ri;ss, were pre- 
sented and relerrea....A resolutumon IheCuustl- 
tuiloual Convention of Mississippi, adopted yes- 
terday, approving the action of Congrcs-t In the 

Impeachment of the President, was reUrred 

Tue Civil Appropriation bill was considered in 
Committee ot the Wtiole, reported to the House, 
and postponed nntil the 4ih A bill was intro- 
duced and referred to protect the rights of insur- 
ance compauii'S, and to give them a iien on assets 
in certain cases A bill was introduced and re- 
ferred to llx and equalize tne pay of officers, and 
to establish tho pay of enlisted men in ttw army. 

A bill was leported for the relief of certain 

exporters of distilltd spirits, and the Hoii:ie ad- 
journed. 

poi^ri'itJAi.. irK.iis. 

Forney says that a certain thing 

surpasses his comprehension. On which 
Prentice remarks that his comprehension 
is veiy easily surpassed. 

At the municipal election in Cairo, 

111., on the 25th, Dr. A. G. Holden, Dem- 
ocrat, was elected Mayor. Majority in- 
creased by 100. 

The returns received up to the 2Clh 

ult , from the nineteen counties in New 
York State in which elections have been 
held, show a net Democratic gain of 21 
supervisors. 

Stokes encouraged enlistments in 

the Confederate army ; he is pronounced 
loyal by a R.idical Congress and admitted 
to a scat in that body because he votes 
with the Radicals. Brown advised citi- 
zens not to enlist in the Federal army, and 
is pronounced disloyal and refused his scat 
in Congress by Radicals because he will 
not vote for their ultra measures. This is 
Radical consistency. 

The members of the South Carolina 

Convention have voted themselves |11 
per diem, and 20 cents mileage ; and, as 
they eat in the market and roost promiscu- 
ously among their colored friends, their 
daily expenses can scarcely exceed 50 
cents. Their special tax bill to raise the 
funds for their own pay . will take about 
$1.25 out of every $100 worth of property 
in the State. 

The Democratic State Convention 

of Minnesota on the 27th ult. nominated 
Presidential electors : W. W. Phelps, C. 
H. Lineau, Judge Chatfield and Mr. Lu- 



ther. Delegates to the National Conven- 
tion were chosen, and resolutions similar 
to those of Ohio were adopted, with the 
exception tliat no preference was given for 
candidates. 

Speaking of the new Senator from 

Kentucky, the .Louisville Courier says: 
" Colonel Thomas C. McCreery, of Daviess 
county, the Senator elect, is a life-long 
Democrat. Though known throughout 
the State as a gentleman of commanding 
abilities, and particularly distinguisjied fcr 
his oratorical powers, he has never before 
occupied any public oflice. He will soon 
prove himself one of the giants of the 
Senate." 

It is nauseating t« notice the cant of 

the Jacobin press in denouncing the Presi- 
dent for an alleged violation of the Consti- 
tution. The policy of thatparty, says the 
Chicago Tiines, ever since Lincoln issued 
his emancipation proclamation, has been 
to educate the people into contempt of the 
organic law; and the regard now pro- 
fessed fir it by the Jacobins is as disgust- 
ing a specimen of hypocrisy as would be a 
homily on chastity by a bawd. 

In the Executive session of the 

Senate, on the 28th ult., Mr. Sumner of- 
fered a resolution that it was not proper 
for the Senate to hold any intercourse 
with the Executive after the notifica- 
tion received from the House of Repre- 
sentatives that the President had been im- 
peached. A spirited discussion ensued, 
during which it became very apparent 
that the resolution had but few supporters, 
and on a vote it was rejected, by a large 
majority. 

A New Orleans letter, speaking of 

the proceedings in the Louisiana Conven- 
tion Feb. 10, says : "About this time an 
orderly entered the convention hall, 
marched through the centre ais!e to the 
desk of the secretary, and handed him a 
document. This cavalier-like action on 
the part of the soldier caused an indignant 
colored member to exclaim: 'Mr. Presi- 
dent, I move that the next time Maj. Gen. 
Hancock comes in here, the sergeant-at- 
arms put him out.' Judge Coolcy re- 
marked, ' That isn't Gen. Hancock.' This 
incident created considerable laughter." 

When the Legislature of Ohio, a 

few weeks ego, rescinded the ratiflcation 
of tho amendment of the Federal Consti- 
tution, Reverdy Johnson was reported as 
havlrg expressed an opinion in the United 
States Senate that the State could not take 
such action. The report was incorrect. 
Charles O'Conor addressed a letter to a 
member of the Senate in New Jersey, dis- 
cussing this point, and expressing posi- 
tively the opinion that a State may revise 
its action on au amendment of the Federal 
Constitution at any time before it shall be- 
come a law. In this opinion, Revcrdj 
Johnson is said to concur. 

— — An immense mass meeting was held 
at Cooper Institute, New York city, en 
the night cf the 2Sth ult. James Gallatin 
presided. Resolutions were adopted 
alllirming the right of the President to re- 
move members of his Cabinet ; declaring 
the attempt to deprive him of the right a 
monstrous perversion of tho powers con- 
ferred on the House of Representatives ; 
deprecating impeachmentas the last resort 
for the protection of the republic from 
disgrace or grievous wrong ; exi)res3ing 
c(mQJeuce in the dignity and moderation 
of the Senate, and finally denouncing im- 
peachment as scandalous and unconstitu- 
tional, at the same counselling to trust 
to the ballot-box for redress in the event 
of the removal of the President. 

The following is a copy of General 

Sherman's letter to the President, indicat- 
ing the opinion of the writer and also of 
General Grant that, "for the good of the 
service and of the country," Stanton 
" ought to resign " : 

WAsniNOTON, Saturday, Jan. 18, 1SG3. 

I neglected this a. m. to say that I bad agreed 
to go down to Annapolis to spend Sunday with 
Admiral Porter. General Grant also has to leave 
for Kichmond on Mond.iy morning at •> a. m. 

At a conversation with the General after our in- 
terview, wherein I ollered to go with him on 
Monday morning to Mr. Stanton and to say that it 
was our joint opinion that he should resign, it 
was found impossible by reason of his going to 
Kichmond and my going to Annapolis. 

The General proposed this course: Ho will 
call on you to-morrow and offer to go to Mr. Stan- 
ton to say, for the good of the service and of the 
country, hn ought to resign. This on Sunday or 
Monday, and will again call on yon, and, if you 
think it necessary, I will do the same— call on Mr. 
Stanton and tell him he should resign. If he will 
not, then it will be time enough to contrive ulte- 
rior measures. In the meantime, it so happens 
that no necessity exists lor precipitating matters. 
Yours truly, 

W. T. SHERMAN, Lt. Gen. 

Dispatches from Woshington dated 

Fcbniary 20th say : 

General Gary, member from the second 
district of Ohio, to-day received a letter 
from one of the most influential leaders of 
tlie workingraen's organization of Penn- 
sylvania, Republican, in which is this 
Sentence : 

"Tun thousand thanks for your vote 
against thia fearful wrong, impeachment." 

A telegram to the President from Cairo, 
to-night, announces : 

" At the charter election, yesterday, the 
Democratic gain was 100. Slick to the 
War Department." 

This was signed by the Democratic Cen- 
tral Comiiiittee. 

Another, from Holyoke, Mass., says : 

*' Hang to the Cnustitution, and you will 
be sustained by 30,000 men of Massachu- 
setts." 

This is signed by a number of citizens. 

Another, from Terre Hauie, Ind., says : 

" Stand firm to your position, and in de 
fense of the Constitution and the Execu- 
tive Department. Indiana will sustain 
you with 100,000 brave, stalwart and tried 
men." 

Speaking of the impeachment ques- 
tion in the Senate, says an exchange: 
" The latest report states that every Jaco- 
bin Senator is for conviction, excepting 
Ross, ot Kansas. Assuming these reports 
to be true, the farcical character of the 
impeachment business is fully apparent. 
The judges who are to sit upon the trial 
of the President ; who are sworn to render 
judgment impartially, according to law, 
and not according to their partisan im- 
pulses, — these conservators of justice have 
already made up their minds to convict, 
even before the charges they are to try 
have been made ! This looks as if the 
forms of jlaw, the judicial decorum, and 
the respect due to the Presidential office, 
if not to its incumbent, w«re to be pre- 
served with a vengeance ! But it is the 
only course left to the Jacobins in which 
they have any chance to win. If the trial 
be not rushed through while partnan rage 
is hot, there will not be fuel enough to 
carry it through at all." 

I » III 

— A San Franciscan has invented a 
means of propelling vessels without steam 
or sails. He connects three boats together 
in a line, and expects the two on the ends, 
by the rise and fall of the waves, to move 
machinery in the central veesel, which 
Shall propel aU three. 



The Presidents 9Ie»>sag:e. 

The President, on the 24th, sent to the 
Senate the following message, which was 
read in secret session, laid on the table, and 
ordered printed. The Senate removed 
from it the injunction of secrecy : 
To the Senate of the United States : 

I have received a copy of the resolution 
adopted by the Senate on the 21st inst., as 
follows : 

Whereas, The Senate have received and con- 
sidered the communication of the President 
piaticg that he had removed Ldwln M. Sianlon, 
Secretary of War, and has designated the Ad) uUut 
General of the army to act as Secretary of War ad 
interim ; therefore, 

liesolcecL, By the Senate of tho United States, 
that, under the Constitution and laws of the 
United States, the President has not the power to 
remove the Secretary of War. and designate any 
other officer to perform the dniiea of that offico ad 
interim.'* 

This resolution is confined to the power 
of the President to remove the Secretary 
et War and to designate another officer to 
perform the duties of that officer ad 
interim, and, by its preamble, is ma.'ie ex- 
pressly applicable to the removal of Mr. 
Stanton, and the designation to act ad 
intertill of the Adjutant General of the 
army. Without, therefore, attempting to 
discuss the general power of removal as to 
all officers, upon which subject no expres- 
sion of opinion is contained in tho resolu- 
tion, I shall confine myself to the qucstiou 
as thus limited to the power to remove the 
Secretary of War. 

It is declared in the resolution, "That, 
under the Constitution and laws of the 
United States, the President has no power 
to remove the Secretary of 'War, and 
designate any other officer to pei form the 
duties of that ollii^e ad interim." As to 
the question of power under the Constitu- 
tion, 1 do not propose, at present, to enter 
upon its discubsion. 'The unilbrm practice 
from the beginning of the Government; as 
established by every President who has 
exercised the office, and the decisions of 
the Supreme Court of the United States, 
has settled the question in favor of the 
power of the President to remove all 
officers excepting a class holding appoint- 
ments of a judicial character. No pru;- 
ticc or any decision has ever excepted a 
Secretary of War from this general power 
of tho President to make removals from 
office. It is only necessary, then, that I 
should refer to the powers of the Execu- 
tive, under the laws of the United States, 
to remove from ( fficc a Secretary of War. 

The resolution denies that, under these 
laws, this power has any existence; in 
other words, it affirms that no such author- 
ity is recognized or given by the statutes 
of the country. What then are the laws 
of -the United States which deny to the 
President the power to remove thr.t offi- 
cer? I know of but two laws that bear 
upon this question. The first in the or- 
der of time is the act of August 7, 1780, 
creating tho Departmeni. of War, whicb, 
after providing lor a Secretary as its prin- 
cipal officer, proceeds as follows : 

Sec. 2. And be if further enacted. That there 
shall be in the said Department an inferior officer, 
to bu appointed by the said principal officer, to be 
emitloyed therein as he shall deem proper, and to 
be called Chief Clerk in the Deparmcnt of War; 
and who. whenever the said principal officer shall 
be removed from office by the President of the 
United States, or in any other case of vacancy, 
shall, during such vacancy, have the charge and 
custody of all records, books, and papers, apptr- 
lainiug to the tald department. 

It is clear that this act, passed by a 
Congress many of whose members partici- 
pated in the formation of the Constitution, 
so far from denying the power of the Pres- 
dent to remove the Secretary of War, re- 
cogm'zes it as cxistitg in the Executive 
alone, without the concurrence of tho 
Senate or any other department of the 
Government. Furihermore, this act does 
not purport to confer the power by legis- 
lative authority; nor, in fact, was there 
any other existing legislation through 
which it was bestowed upon the Exeeu- 
tivc. The recognition of the power by 
this act is, therelore, as complete as a re- 
cognition under the Consiitution itself; 
for there was no other source of authority 
from which it could be derived. 

The other act which refers to this tiucs- 
tion is that regulating the tenure of certain 
civil officers, pa3sed by Congress on the 
2d day of March, 1807. The first section 
of that act is in the following words : 

"That every person holding any civil office, to 
which be has been appointed by and with the ad- 
vice and consent of the Senate, and any person 
who shall hereafter be appointed to any such of- 
fice, an'l shall become duly qualiiied to act therein, 
is and shall be entitled to hold the office until a 
successor shall have been in like manner appoint- 
ed or duly qualiiied. except as herein otherwise 
provided. Provul'd, That the Secretaries of 
state, of tho Treasury, of War, of the Navy, of 
the Interior, the Postmaster General, and the At- 
torney (ieneral shall hold their offices respectively 
for and during tne term ol the Pret-ident by whom 
they may have been appointed, and lor one mouth 
thereafter, subject to removal by and with the 
consent of the Senate. 

The fourth section of the same act re- 
stricts the tenure of office to the limit pre- 
scribed by the law creating them. That 
part of the first section which precedes 
the proviso declares that every person 
holding a civil office to which he has been, 
or may be, appointed by and v;ith the ad- 
vice and consent of the Senate, shall hold 
such office till a successor shall have been 
in like manner appointed. It purposes to 
take from the Executive during the fixed 
time e6t.ibli.shed for the tenure of cilice, 
the independent power of removal, and to 
require for such removal the concurrciit 
action of the President and Senate. The 
proviso that follows proceeds to fix the 
tenure of office of the several heads of the 
departments, whose tenure had never been 
detiued before, by prescribiug that they 
shall hold their t flicc respectively for and 
duiing the term of the Presideutby whom 
they mav have been appointed, and for 
one month thereafter, subject to removal 
by and with the advic* and con?cnt of llie 
Senate. Thus, as to these enumerated 
officers, the proviso takes from the Presi- 
dent the power of remov'd, except with 
the advice and consent of the Senate. By 
its terms, however, before he can be de- 
prived of the power to displace them, it 
must appear that he himselfhas appointed 
them. It is only in that case that they 
have any tenure of tffice, or any indepen- 
dent right to hold during the term ol the 
President and one month after the cessa- 
tion of his official functions. The provis- 
ion, therefore, gives no tenure-of-office to 
any one of these officers who has been ap- 
pointed by the President beyond one 
month after the accession of his successor. 
In the case of Mr. Stanton, the only ap- 
pointment under which he held the office 
of Secretary of War was that conferred 
upon him by my immediate pre-decessor, 
with the advice and consent of the Senate. 
He has never held from me any appoint- 
ment as the head of the War Department. 
Whatever right he had to hold the office 
was derived from that original appoint- 
ment and my own sufi'erance. The law 
was not intended to protect such an in- 
cumbent of the War Department by taking 
from the President the power to remove 
him. This, in my judgment, is perfectly 
clear. The law itself admits of no other 
construction. We find in all that portion 
of the first section which precedes the pro- 
viso, that, as to civil officers generally, the 
President is deprived of the pow er of re- 
moval, and it is plain that, if there had 
been no proviso, that power would just as 
clearly have been taken from him so far 
as it applies to the seven heads of depart- 
ments; but for reasons which were no 
doubt satisfactory to Congress, these prin- 
cipal officers were speciaUy provided lor 
and, as to them, the express and only re- 
quirement is, that the President who 
appointed them shall not, without the 
advice and consent of the Senate, remove 
them from office. The consequence is, 
that, as to my Cabinet, embracing the 
officers designated la the first section, the 
act takes from me the power, without the 
concurrence of the Senate, to remove any 
one of them whom I have appointed ; but 
it does not protect such of them as I did 
not appoint, nor give them any tenure of 
office beyond my pleasure. An examina- 
tion of thii act, then, shows that while in 



one part of the section, provision is made 
for officers generally, in another chuse 
there is a class of officers designated by 
their oiicial titles who are exempted from 
the general terms of the law, in reference 
to whom a clear distinction is made. 

As to the general power of removal 
lunited in the first clause of the section, 
this distintion is, that, as to such cf these 
enumerated officers as hold under the ap- 
pointment of the President, the power of 
removal can only be exercised by him with 
the consent of the Senate; while as to 
those who have not been appointed by 
him, there is no like denial of his power 
to displace them. It would be a violation 
of the plain meaning of this enactment to 
place Mr. Stanton upon the same footing 
as these heads of departments who have 
been appointed by himself. As to him, 
this law gives him no tenure of office. The 
members of my Cabinet who have been 
appointed by me are, by this act, entitled 
to hold for one month after the term of 
my office shall cease; but Mr. Stanton 
could not, against the wish of my succes- 
sor, hold a moment thereafter. If he were 
permitted by that successor to hold for the 
first two weeks, would that successor have 
no power to remove him '? But the power 
of my successor over him would be no 
greater than my own. If my successor 
would have the power to remove Mr. Stan- 
ton alter permitting him to remain a 
period of two weelcs, because he was not 
appointed by him, but by his predecessor, 
I, who have tolerated Mr. Stantcm more 
than two years, certainly have the same 
right to remove him, and upon the same 
ground, namely : that he was not appointed 
by me, but by my predecessor. 

Under this construction of the tcnuie- 
of-offlce act, I have never doubted m\- 
power to remove him. Whether the act 
was constitutional or not, it was alw^yo 
my opinion that it did not secure him from 
removal. I was aware, however, that 
there were doubts as to the construction 
of the law, and, from the lirst, deemed it 
desirable that, at the earliest possible mo- 
ment, these doubts should be settled, and 
the true construction of the act fixed, by 
a decision of the Supreme Court of the 
United States. My order of suspension 
in August last was intended to place the 
case in such a position as would make a 
resort to a judicial decision both neceisary 
and proper. My understanding and 
wishes, however, under that order of sus- 
pension, were frustrated, and the late or- 
der for Mr. Stanton's removal was a fur- 
ther step toward the accomplishment of 
that purpose. I repeat that my own con- 
viction as to the true construction of the 
law, and as to its constitutionality, were 
settled and were sustained by every mem- 
ber of my Cabinet, including Mr. Stanton 
himself. Upon the question of conslitu- 
tionality each one in turn deliberately ad- 
vised me that the tenure-of-office act was 
unconstitutional. Upon the question 
whether as lo those members who were 
appointed by my predecessor that act took 
from me the power to remove thcai, those 
members emphatically stated, in the pres- 
ence of the others sitting in the Cabinet, 
that they did not come within tlic provis- 
ions of the act, and that it was no protec- 
tion to them. No one dissented from this 
construction, and 1 understood them all to 
acquiesce in its correctness. In a matter 
of such grave conseciuences I was not dis- 
posed to rest upon my own opinions, 
though fortified by my constitutional ad- 
visers, and have, therefore, sought to bring 
the (luestlon, at as early a day as possible, 
before the Supreme Court of the United 
States, for final and authoritative decis- 
ion. 

In respect to so much of the resolution 
as relates to the designation of an officer 
to act as Secretary of War ad iidcrim, I 
have only to say that I have exercised this 
power under the provisions of the first 
section of the act of Feb. lo, 1705, which, 
so far as they are applicable to vacancy 
caused by removals, I understand lo be 
still m force. The legislation upon the 
subject of ad interim appointments in the 
Executive Department stand as lo the war 
office as follows : The section of the act 
of the 17ih of August, 178t», made pro- 
vision for a vacancy in the very case of a 
removal of the head of the War Depart- 
ment, and, upon such a vacancy occurring, 
gives the charge and custody of the 
records, books, and papers to the chief 
clerk. Next, by the act of the 8th of May 
1703, section 8, it is provided, that, in case 
of vacancy occasioned by the death, ab- 
sence from the seat of Government, or 
sickness of the head of the War Depart- 
ment, the President may authorize a per- 
son to perform the duties of the oliice un- 
til a successor is appointed or the disabil- 
ity removed. For tho case of a vacancy 
caused by removal, the act, it will be ob- 
served, does not provide. Then, by the 
first section of the act of Feb. i:j, 1705, it 
is provided that, in case of any vacancy, 
the President may appoint a person to 
perfoim the duties while the vacancy ex- 
ists. 

1 hcse acts are followed by that of the 
20lh of February, 18CII, by the first sec- 
tion of which provision is again made for 
vacancy caused by the death, resignation, 
absence from the seat of Government, or 
sickness of the head of any Executive De- 
partment; and, upon the occurrence of 
such a vacancy, power is given to the 
President to authorize the head of any Ex- 
ecutive Department, or other officers in 
either of said departments whose tppoint- 
ment is vested in the President, at his dis- 
cretion, to perform the duties of the said 
respective offices until a successor be ap- 
pointed, or such absence or inabiUty by 
sickness shall cease ; provided that no one 
vacancy shall be supplied in the man- 
ner aforesaid, for a longer period 
than six months. This law, with Fome 
modifications, re-enacts the act of 1707, 
and provides one for the sort cf vacancies 
to be filled ; but, like the act of 1702, it 
makes no provision for a vacancy occa- 
sioned by removal. It has reference alto- 
gether to vacancies arising from other 
causes. According to my construction of 
the act of 1863, while it implies the repeal 
of the act of 1702, regulating the vacan- 
cies therein described, it has no bearing 
whatever on so much of the act of 1705 as 
applies to a vacancy caused by removal. 
The act of 1795, therefore, furnishes the 
rules for vacancies occasioned by removal 
— one of the vacancies expressly referred 
to in the act of the 7th of August, 1789, 
creating the Department of War. Cer- 
tainly there is no expres^s repeal by the act 
of 18G3 of the act of 1705. The repeal, if 
there is any, is by implication, and can 
only be admitted so far as there is a clear 
inconsistency between the two acts. The 
act of 1705 is inconsistent witn that of 
1803, as to a vacancy caused by death, 
resignation, absence or sickness, bul 
not at all inconsistent as to a vacancy 
caused by removal. It is assuredly proper 
that the Jf resident should have the same 
power to fill temporarily a vacancy occa- 
sioned by removal as he has lo supply a 
place made vacant by death or the expira- 
tion of a term. If, for instance, the in- 
cumbent of an office should be found 
wholly unfit to execute the functions, and 
the public service should require his im- 
mediate expulsion, a remedy should exist 
and be at once applied, and time be allowed 
the President to select and appoint a suc- 
cessor, as is permitted him in case of a 
vacancy caused by death or the termina- 
tion of an official term. The necessity, 
therefore, forjan ad interim appointment is 
just as great, and, indeed, may be greater, 
in cases of removal, than m others. Be- 
fore it can be held, therefore, that the pow- 
er given by the act of 1795 in cases of re- 
moval is abrogated by the succeeding leg- 
islation, an express repeal ougfit toappcar. 
So wholesome a power should certainly 
not be taken away by a loose implication. 

It may be, however, that, in this as in 
other cases of implied repeals, doubts may 
arise. It is oonfessidly one of the subtle 
and debatable itatutefti Ifupontacha 



question 1 have fallen into an erroneous 
construction, I submit whether it should 
be characterized as a violation of official 
duty and of law. 

I have deemed it proper, in vindication 
of the course which I have consedered it 
my duty to take, to pliice before the Sen- 
ate the reasons upon which I have based 
my action. Although 1 have been ad vised 
by every member of my Cabinet that the en- 
tire Tcuurc-of Office act is unconstituvion- 
al, and therefore void, and although 1 have 
expressly concurred in that opinion in the 
veto message which I had the honor to 
submit to Congress when I returned the 
bill for consideration, I have refrained from 
making a removal ol any officer contrary to 
the provisiots of the law, and have only 
exercised that power in the case of Mr. Stan- 
ton, which, in my judgment, did not come 
within its provisions. 1 have endeavored to 
proceed with the greatest circumspection, 
and have acted only in an extreme and ex- 
ceptional case, carefully following the 
course which 1 have marked cut for my- 
self as a general rule, faithfully to execute 
all the laws, though passed over my ob- 
jections on the fccore of constitutionality. 
In the present instance I hrve appealed, 
or sought to appeal, to that final arbiter 
fixed by the Constitution for the determi- 
nation of such questions. To this course 
I have been impelled by the solemn obli- 
gations which rest upon me to sustain in- 
violate the powers of the high cffioc com- 
mitted to my hands. Whatever be the 
consequences, merely personal to myself, 
I could not allow them to prevail against 
a public duty so clear to my own mind, 
and so imperative. If what was prpbibie 
had been certain— if 1 had been iuUy nd- 
vised, when I removed Mr. Stanton, that, 
in thus dtlending the trust couiuiitltd to 
my hands, my own removal was lurc to 
follow — I could not have hesitated. Act- 
uaic'l by public considerations of the 
highest Ca« racier, I earnest Iv protest 
against the i^c.olution of the Senate, 
which charges me in ^bat 1 have done, 
with a violation of tUe Couititution and 
laws of tho United States. 

AKDKEW deTTNSoK 
Washington, Feb. 22, ISOS. 



Wby I>o(Ikc the IssneV 

The action cf Judge Cartter, in dispos- 
ing of the case of Stanton against Tiionias 
by liberating the latter without bail, was 
a pirtisan trick, executed by a parti^n 
judge, to delcat the course of the lc»w, and 
prevent the President from gelling a 
speedy decision upon the validity of 
the Tenure- of- Office law by the Supreme 
Court. 

If the Tenurc-of-Offijc luw I e valid, why 
seek to prevent a decision lo that efitct by 
the only tribunal which cau render fueh u 
decision':' Or it; ns Jacobins a:sume, the 
right to impeach the Pres-idcut would be 
the same if the law were inviilid, why seek 
to thwait the course of juttioc, even if an 
adverse decision should Jte the result? 

The coui te which the impeachers chooFC 
to pursue furnishes the answer. By seek- 
ing to prevent a judici:il decision upon the 
law, they virtually concede that tUc law 
is invalid, and that a lUcisiou lo that tfi'cct 
would overthrow their scheme of deposing 
the President, law or no law, on pa/tisau 
grounds. Every step in their pi^^re^s 
thus far shows that the impeacimeut busi- 
ness is not to vindicate law, bul to get rid 
of a public officer because he la obnoxious 
to the party. — Chicatjo Taius. 

The New York Tribune is exceed- 
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by the New York City Council iy>i the 
observaccc of Wash:n;^tou's birthday. 
The name and memory of Washington arc 
a stinging rebuke to the party which the 
jf'rtiio/e engineers ; and it Is no wonder 
that such a paper should denouuce every 
efibrt to keep Ihem alive. — Mm^juii Re- 
publican. 



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I 



t 







•mi— 



BH—aMMW—igM 



^iisaUauM. 



fImILT MUSIC. 



Bc?idi! the window I sit alone,' 

And 1 watch the fetars come ont^ 
I catch the sweetnfss of Lucy's tone 
And the mirth of the chorus' chout ; 
I listen and look on the solemn nljrht, 
Whilst they etand tinjln^ hencalh the light. 

Lucy looks just like an early rose, 
(Somtl)ody el^e is thinking bo,) 
And every day more fair stie rtovvs 
(Homebody will not say me no) ; 
And she Miiffji like a bird whooc heart is blcBsed 
(And somebody tbinkis of building a nest I ) 

And now eUc chooses another tune, 

Uue that was oficn simg by me— 

I do not ttiiiik that thoso niithta in Jnuo 

Are half as fioe as they used to be ; 

Or '[i* colder watching the solemn niaht 

Than standing singing b«neaththe light. 

L'lcy, yon sing like a silver bell, 

Vonr face is I'nsh an a mornins; flower ; 
Wh) should yon ihiuk ol the sobs which swell 
When leaves fall fast in the antnmn bower? 
Ruber ::iirheryonr hiids and »lng your son" ; 
Their p«lumc and echo wUl linger long. " 

I'm r-ray and grave— and 'tis quite time, too— 
I go at leisore along my ways ; 

Bni I know how life appears to yon 

1 kuo.v ihe words that somebody says ; 
As old songs are sweet and old words true. 
So tUero'd oue old story that's alwajs new. 

There is a grave that you do not know ; 

A drawer in my desk that you've never seen ; 
A page in inyjife I never show ; 
A Kive ia iiy Heart that is always green. 
Blng out the old e<oug ! I fear not the pain ; 
I rai.g it once, Lucy, bing it again I 

— Good Words. 



TISK I.ITTl.K lIKROI^iE. 

" Moraine^ again !" and the weary, wast- 
ed invalid lilted his head from the pillow 
and looked pitifully over the dim room. 
" Oh, that the night had been longer ! " 
To the wretched, sleep is dear. "My 
poor, poor wife— my darling babies— mutt 
they Ireczj and stiirve?" And, with tears 
gu:ihin^? from his eyes, the pale man buried 
his hcail in the scanty covering anti 
groaned aloud. 

Ji \>a3 i>o wonder that he was out of 
heart oa that cold, dark December day. At 
best he tad a hard struggle to get food, 
and for the past six months the struggle 
had been desperate, for his wife had been 
unable to assist him in the least, being 
coniined to her bed with a slow, wasting 
disease. His little daughter Marie, a pret- 
ty child of twelve, kept the room tidy, and 
herself, and two little brothers, like wax. 
By the aid of Tier mother's whispered di- 
rect! -ns, she also managed to do up the 
weekly washing and ironing. 

" My htile sunbeam," the father fondly 
called her, while the mother would say, in 
her low, sweet tones, " our angel." 

One nieht the young housekeeper waited 
until it was pilch dark for her father to 
come home to a frugal supper, and then, 
with fear.'ul forebodings at her heart, un- 
dressed the little boysand put them to bed, 
and tied on.her hood and cloak to go for 
him. A crowd was at the very threshold. 
"With a wild cry, she rushe'd toward the in- 
animate form they carried upon a board. 
It was bcr father, brought home with a 
brrken leg. 

A week has parsed since this misfortune. 
By lae sale of the few pieces of furniture, 
the wolf had been kept from the door. 
But now, nothing remained save the coarse 
bed on which the distressed ones slept. No 
coal for the little grate ; no tea for the 
feverish lips; no crust for the famished 
children ! W'h it should be done. 

It wa3 a question little Marie asked her- 
self aor.iin, as they lay there watching the 
few pale sunbeams that struggled through 
the window. And f !ie asked it ofteacr 
after she had risen and dressed herself and 
brothers, and smoothed the two beds. 
Bread ti.ey must have that day. Tliey 
were all laint even now, and the boys 
clacaoring for their breaklast. 

buddciily a bright thought came to the 
little daui:hter. She remembered having 
s^jcn, in the co^Fce-houEes, young girls no 
taller tht^n she-. Waiting upon the custom- 
ers. Perhaps they would try her. "11 
they only would," she murmured softly. 
"I am hardy, quick and patient, and I 
would try so Lard to oblige " I am pretty, 
too, she might truly have added, had there 
been a spark of vanity in her heart ; for 
she was a sweet child, with a brow like a 
sunny snowdritt, and eyes like the spring 
viole s that nestle in the wo<)dlai:d3. "1 
will try, at least, and see what I can do;" 
and, alter watching a moment the weary 
sleep of her parents, she whispered to the 
little boys that she was going out to get 
some bread for them, and hurried away. 

Shi: did go to the btiker's but her pitiful 
story failed to touch his hard heart, and 
there were tears on her cold cheek as she 
turned away. Even if she secured a place, 
she could hope fur no wages until Satur- 
day, and there wero four' weary days be- 
tween tiiis and that. Broad would be too 
late if Fho waited till tLen. What should 
she do — beg ? She asked herself the (lues- 
tir»n with a quivering lip. Never before 
had their povt-rty driven them to that 
fetre.lt, and it was hard, even now, with the 
picture ot that wretched home fresh in her 
visi' )n, to plead for charity. But she did it. 
Again and again she said to the passer-by, 
"Please, yi r, please, ma'am, give me a penny 
to bay bread lor my sick parents." 

But the gentlemen had their overcoats 
buttoiicd up to their chins, and the ladies 
were enveloped in furs, and it was too 
much like trouble to lind their pocket- 
books or purses, just to supply a beggar's 
wants. 

"Go to the soup-house," said one, at 
last, more churlish than the rest. " The 
city provides fur such as you." 

It was a new idea to her, and, as fast as 
feet could carry her, she went, and, enter- 
iug iii^tfeathiess haste, told her story to 
the attendant matron. 

" i win report the case to the commit- 
tee," said the woman quietly, making a 
mimoraiulnm of the name and number of 
street. "Ceme in tomorrow morning, 
and I will do what I can for you." 

To n^orrow ! she would become too weak 
to vialk so far by that time, and what 
woxild become of the rett ? 

With a heavy heart, she went home, 
having no courage to present herself as a 
waiter to any of the coffee-houses she 
passetl on her way. 

"Did you get some''" cried the boys, 
gathering about her, and pulling otf her 
cloak to bee if it were hidden in her cloak 
or under her arms. 

"Did you get some?" said two faint 
voice- from thi; bed in the corner, and the 
coverlet was thrown off, and two pairs ot 
thin, white hands put forth. ' > 

"No, no," she answered, plaintively; 
"but 1 will try again. Keep up £ood 
hope." 

" There will be plenty out of the oven 
now. Yes, plenty,** she said to herself, as 
she buttoned Iter cloak on the threshold ; 
" plenty, and I'll have some, too. They 
shall rot siarve. Men and. women forsake 
me ; God doesn't hear me any longer ! 
There is nothing left for me to do but 

Her face paled as she spoke it, and for a 
few moments there was a wild wrestle in 
her heart. Then she went on quietly, 
pausing an iastant before each baker's 
door,tiad looking anxiously within. By 
and t-y she found one that seeme d empty. 

A ^h'.lo pile of steaming loaves lay 
upo« t'lc counter. 

She rushed in and seized one. and, hiding 
it under her cloak, lied madly up the street. 
Bat th<i baker had seen her from the little 
sitting-rooua, and wi« after her, crying 
lustily, " Stop thief, stop thief!" A crowd 
follow* d her and the poor child was soon 
run down. 

" .1. ce^r case," said the police officer, 
who took her. " She muut go to t'ae court- 
ro<jm." 

In vain she pleaded with them, and told 
her story. 

They must'do their duty; she might 



have begged, she might have gone to the 
soap house ; there was no cxcvwefor steal- 
ing, at any rate. 

No excuse, and her mother was dying 
for food ! 

An important trial was just closing, and 
all the avenues to the court house were 
thronged. 

"They'll be through soon," said the 
oflicer to the b.aker; "we'll wait here a 
few minutes. No danger of her getting 
away while my grip is on her," and he 
tightened his grip on the shrinking arm, 
till the flesh quivered with pain. 

"Take me home lirst," said she, 
sadly ; " they will worry about me so. 
My poor mother will die if she thinks 1 
am lost." 

" They'll soon find out where you are," 
said he, grullly. " Bad news is like light- 
ning, it travels so fast." 

" Oh dear, oh dear ! What will become 
of them ? " and she sobbed aloud. 

A little Ctrl about her age was passing 
by— a rich'man's child— you would know 
it by the embroidered dress and cloak, the 
rich velvet hood, and the costly fur tippet 
and muff. But there was no false pride 
hidden under the expensive^ raiment; 
a warm heart was beating there, and 
its sympathies went out far toward 
the poor little prisoner. For a moment 
she paused, as if irresolute upon her 
plan of action ; then laying her mittened 
hand gently on the officer's she said, 
politely : 

" May I speak with her ? " 

" Oh, yes ; slie is not committed yet." 

Putting her soft, rosy cheek close to the 
purple, cold one, she whispered very ear- 
nestly. Marie told her the touching story, 
and begged she would, by the love she 
bore her mother, find out her humble 
home, and comP:)rt the distressed ones. 

"I will, 1 will," the stranger replied 
earnestly ; " and don't you cry any more ; 
my father knows the judge, and he'll get 
you away to-morrow. Gooel-bye— keep 
up a good heart ;" and off she ran. 

She knew her mother to be one of the 
most charitable of women, and hastened 
home to tell her story of Marie ; but un- 
fortunately she had just gone to ride, and 
would not be back till near dinner time. 

" What can I do?" she cried, and wrung 
her hands. " They want coal, and bread, 
and tea, and so many things, and I have 
only ten cents in my pocket." 

She sat down on the marble steps and 
pondered. All at once her eyes bright- 
ened, and a beautiful color flashed in her 
face. 

" I will do It," she said, resolutely ; " ma- 
ma will forgive when she knows all. 
Without fire, without food, nearly naked, 
quite starved. Oh, she will be glad I 
thought so far," and she bounded down 
the street and rushed around the corner. 

Pushing open the plate glass door of the 
most fashionable hairdresser in the city, 
she went quietly up to the attendant and 
asked to see Monsieur B. He ushered her 
into the inner room, sajing he would call 
him. 

Her heart fluttered while she waited, but 
her resolution did not fail. 

" Ah ! it is my little Theresa ; and Mon- 
sieur B. took her hand kindly. " Good 
morning, dear. Come to have your ring- 
lets dressed for the ball to-night I— no?" 
as she shook her hctd, " why not ? — you 
go certainly ; you are one of Monsieur's 
best pupils. What is it then, my dear'?" 

For a moment her lips quivered ; then 
she spoke up quickly : 

" You said once, sir, you would give me 
an eagle for my curls. Will you elo it now 
—today — this minute?" 

The hair-dre.'-ser was astonished. What 
could the child mean ? To cut off those 
curls, long, silken and'golden colored, the 
pale gold of a stray sunbeam ; to sell them 
was surely a crime. 

" Does she, y(.ur mother, does she know 
you came here?" 

"No, sir; bat she will not blame me 
when I tell her how it was. Oh, no! she 
is too good !' 

" And how is it, my dear ? Make a friend 
of me, and tell me how it comes you ask 
me to buy your hair," and he stroked the 
glossy curl.^ r.s tenderly as a father might. 

She he.sitated, and then opened her 
heart to him. "There was a mist m his 
eyes when she linislied her plaintive story. 
lie walked the floor a moment, as if irres- 
olute, then stopping betorc her, he took 
out his pocketljook, and handed her two 
half eagles. She put them in her purse, 
and took off her hood. 

"Not now, my little angel!" he said 
huskily, "not now, I am too busy ; to-mor- 
row will do as well ; or, stay, 1 will come 
in this evening. Till then, do not men- 
tion it to any one. Go now on your mis- 
sion, my sister of eharity," and he led her 
to the door. 

How quiciily her little feet flew 
over the pavement. She could hardly 
speak when she had reached the baker s 
shop. 

"Two loaves, sir— large ones too," she 
gasped, and threw down one of the gold 
pieces. 

The man stared at her curiously. Tlie 
color rose to her brow but she said nothing, 
and hurried away with her warm, fragrant 
bundle. 

" Is that you, M\T:e ? What kept you 
so long, dau:- liter? (^uick, break me a 
crumb, I am l^int." 

Like an angel the little stranger 
looked to them as sue (glided in, her cheeks 
like apple-blossoms, and her hair falling 
over her shoulders like ripples of sun- 
shine. 

" Marie cannot come home, yet," she 
said, in a voice that was as a robin's in 
May lime. " But she will return to mor- 
row ; perhaps this evening. She has sent 
me with the bread. See the two nice 
loaves I've brought," and she broke it in 
fragments. 

Tears coursed tlown her face as she saw 
how eagerly they clutched them. She 
had never dreamed of poverty like this ; 
never known how hungry folks may be 
and live. 

" I must go now," she said, opening the 
door ; " but I will come again soon and 
make you comfortable, and she hurried to 
the nearest grocer and bought a basket of 
provisions, and engaged him to send in 
some kindlings and coal. 

The little boys helped her build a fire 
in the coal stove, and when it blazed mer- 
rily, she put on the kettle, and soon had a 
refreshing cup of tea fur each invalid, 
and a piatter of smoking potatoes for the 
children. 

" Where is M^irie, do you know, my lit- 
tle angel ? " asked the sick mother, as she 
gave back the cup. 

" O yes, I know," she answered cheer- 

ully. " Didn't I say she would be home 

early, tomorrow ? Don't worry. Better 

days are coming. I'll bring her in the 

morning. Good-by." 

It was as though a fairy had come and 
vanished; =a kind-hearted fairy, for, beside 
the supply of coal and wood, a half eagle 
lay in the sick father's hand. 

Munuuring to himself all the tender ad- 
jectives in the French language, the good 
hairdresser inllficdiaiely hastened to the 
court room. The judge was a friend of 
his, too, and he hoped to save the child 
from prison. She had not been brought 
in, the court having adjourned for half an 
hour. He asked for a private Interview 
with the judge. As fcoon as it was 
granted, he told him all Marie'* distress, 
and the generous kindness of Uttle 
Theresa. 

"Poor child! good child!" said -his 
listener, wiping his glasses. " She must-.go 
to prison, I suppose, but it shrill be tp^a 
chamber in my own house. Go intocoiirt, 
and tell the &ume story over, it will he "bet- 
ter than a lawyer's plea." ' 

He did so, and there w'as not a di^eye' 
in the audience when he ce'ased. Evfen 
the baker hung his head, and seemed tb 
mu=e. Before the breathless silence had 
iMea broken, he looked up and said to the 



judge, " I withdraw my complaint ; let her 
go with me and take all sh^MMAi." '"" 

The spacious room rang with applause, 
and, while the enthusiasm was at its height, 
a thoughtful old man went about the 
crowd with his hat. People's fingers found 
their pocket-lKXiks as if bv intuition, and, 
when he poured the collection into Marie's 
apron, she screamed with joy. No more 
huBger, no more cold, no more nakedness 
that winter. They were rich. 

The baker took her home himself, and 
told her as the door not to worry about the 
bread till spring, for his wagon would 
leave them all they wanted every morning. 
How lightly she bounded up the staircase. 
It was hke a bird's footfall, a singing bird's 
in the lime of flowers. 

" Have you come, Marie ?" Two voices 
spoke at once. 

" Yes, mother, yes, father, and we are 
rich, see !" and she emptied her apron on 
the bed. How merrily the silver and gold 
coin jingled. It was like the echo of a 
harvest song, the distant echo brought 
back by summer breezes. 

" Bless you, my little sunbeam, bless you, 
my angel." And two hands were laid 
upon her head, and tears and smiles were 

strangely mixed together. 

******* 

" What docs it mean, Theresa ?" and the 
mother looked wonderingly at her beauti- 
ful little daughter as she came into the 
parlor, in obedience to a message brought 
by a servant. "Monsieur B. says you 
promised to see him to-night." 

" I did, mnmma. Did you bring your 
scissors, sir ?" And she carried a footstool 
to the sofa, upon which she sat, and quick- 
ly nestled at his feet. 

" Yes, my dear, see !" and he took from 
his pocket a shining pair. 

" Theresa, what means this ?" the moth- 
er spoke sternly. 

" I have sold my hair to him, mamma, 
and he has come to cut it ofl"." 

" Sold your hair — cut it off! Were you 
crazy? Are you in earnest?" And she 
gathered her to her side, and laid her hand 
protectingly over the precious curls. 

"Tell her how it was, sir. She won't be 
angry, then. Please sir, tell her." 

He did so. And when it was finished, 
she covered her face with kisses, and said, 
in a broken voice, " Of such is the king" 
dom of heaven !" 

A single ringlet was severed from the 
beautiful head that night — one long, soft, 
golden curl, which the hair-dreeser car- 
ried home as reverently as though it had 
come from an angel's wing. On the mor- 
row he had it woven into a heart's-ease, 
and the sunny, shining human flower was 
ever afterwards worn next his heart, a tal- 
isman against besetting sins. 

The Preftidcnt — Ntanton — Ibh- 
peacliiuent. 



" Anger and fury," says Swift, " though 
they add strength to the sinews of the 
body, yet are found to relax those of the 
mind, and to render all its ettorts feeble 
and impotent ; " — a remark which is veri- 
fied in the preposterous proceedings into 
which Congress is hurried in this flood-tide 
of its rage. Out ot the lurid atmosphere 
of Washington, intelligent men can form 
but one estimate of the attempt to depose 
the President of the United States for so 
frivolous a reason as his imwillingness to 
be on a confidential footing with a subor- 
dinate who openly insults and defies him. 

Impeachment is the extreme medicine of 
the Constitution to be used on great and 
weighty occasions lor the cure of desper- 
ate aistempers. The President is no more 
exempt than any other civil officer of the 
Government ; but justice and the public 
tranquility require that he should not be 
arraigned except for some serious abuse of 
power which endangers the general safety. 
When this grave process, adapted to a 
great exigency, is degraded into an instru- 
ment of party malice on a petty occasion, 
the honest public sentiment of the country 
will aeljudge the prosecutors to l>e greater 
criminals than their intended victim. 

Who will pretend that the safety of the 
Government or the stability of our insti- 
tutions is Slaked on the retention of Ed- 
win Stanton as Secretary of War? By 
what title does this man rank as the indis- 
peusible savior of his country ? Never 
before was so great a i[uarrcl raifcod on so 
pitiful a question. We will concede, (fc)r 
the sake of the argument.) that the lle- 
construcLion acts have all the imijortance 
the Republican party attaches lo ihem ; 
we will concede that to thwart and fius- 
trate the de.-^ign ot those acts would be a 
"high crime and misdemeanor" for which 
the President ought to be impeached. But 
even oti this hypothesis Congress cannot 
justify its reckless proceedings. Stanton, 
in tjic position he has cccupted since his 
restoration, is an olhcer without authori- 
ty, transacting only such routine business 
as moves in the rut of established prece- 
cedents. The General of the army had 
been ordered to obey cone of his orders. 
The President held no t)liicial intercourse 
with him. After matters had passed into 
this condition, and a Committee of Con- 
gress had, alter an investigation, 
found this to be the state of the 
tacts, they decided, a week ago 
that there was no ground for impeach- 
ment. The present proceedings, therefore, 
hinge upon the ciuestion whether it con- 
cerns the public safety that Slanton shf.ll 
continue to discharge the routine duties 
of an '.Executive clerk. What a pitch of 
partisan fury and infatuation Congress 
muct have reached, when this is reckoned 
a question of tremendous interest ! In- 
trinsically, it is a mere personal question 
relating to the salary and minor duties of 
an office. Congress is about to impeach 
the P/esident m the personal interest of 
Edwin M. Stanton. If Stanton had the 
ordinary sell- respect of a gentleman he 
would have resigned immediately on his 
reinstatement. General Grant and Gen- 
eral Sherman expressed the opinion that 
it was his duty to resign, and General 
Grant offered to advise him to that efl'ect. 
General Grant siates, in one of his letters 
lo the President, that he visited Stanton 
to tender this promised advice, but became 
satisfied by conversation with him, that it 
would not be taken. This proves that, in 
the opinion of the highest officers of the 
army, the public interests would not suf- 
fer by the displacement of Stanton, It is 
therefore merely a question whether a 
contumacious subordinate of the President 
shall be kept in an office where he is pow- 
erless, for his private advantage. And on 
a question so trivial, this recklefs Congress 
is ready to disorganize the Government 
and convulse the counliy ! 

That the public interests do not require 
this revtdutionary violence is perfectly ob- 
vious. Even assuming the Reconstruc- 
tion acts to be valid, and founded in good 
policy, it is clear that the retention or dis- 
placement of Stanton can have no efl'ect 
on their execution. Stanton can neither 
aid nor obstruct them while he is a mere 
routine clerk denied all intercourse with 
his superior. But even before he was re- 
pelled from the pr> .^^^w u-J confidence of 
the President, he c •'J '.♦ V" no important 
step without the P.uaiutuww direction, nor 
decline to obey his orders. Even General 
Grant was powerless in that position. He 
tried to save Sheridan, but had to succumb 
to the decision of the President. The only 
function of the President under the Re- 
construction acts is the selection of the 
district commanders ; and, while the law 
'stands unaltered, no Secretary ot War can 
impede him in the exercise of that duty. 

Stantim may pretend that he keeps the 
•office to prevent the appointment of a 
Wor^ man. This is a false pretext The 
Senate is in scsi-ion, and likely to remain 
JQ .«e&sii}n until the whole process of re- 
construction has been gone through with. 
The fifst thing'the President will do when 
Stanton is oul,' will be to send to the 
Senate the uomlnaliou of a new Secretary 
of War. 'He cannot put Into the office 
whoever he pleases, hut only some man 



who has the confidence of the Senate. The 
pretence ot danger from Stanton's possl-" 
Die successor is absurd. But even if the 
President could appoint whom he pleased, 
the new Secretary would exercise no dan- 
gerous power. Before the Republicans 
felt quite sure of Stanton (hey guarded 
against this danger in advance by passing 
the law fixing General Grant's head- 
quarter's in Washington, and requiring 
all the military orders of the President to 
be issued through him. With this law in 
force, the Republicans have a double guar- 
antee ; first, in the power of the Senate to 
reject an unfit nomination, and secondly, 
in the necessity lor all orders to pass 
through the hands of General Grant, whe 
is fully committed to the Reconstruction 
scheme. Congress is therefore about to 
impeach the President, not to subserve any 
public interest (even as they understand 
the public interest) but to espouse a per- 
sonal quarrel. It proposes to put the 
President out of office, rather than that 
Edwin M. Stanton should not enjoy a 
vain-glorious and malignant triumph over 
the highest officer ot the Government. 
The crime for which the President is to 
be ii.L peached consists simply in the exer- 
cise ot a right which has been enjoyed by 
all his predecessors, and belongs to the Ex- 
ecutive head of every Government in the 
world. This right is called in question 
by a pretended law, which is in such fla- 
grant violation of the Constitution, as well 
as all precedents, that this same Stanton, 
who Is a lawyer and has been Attorney 
General, advised the President to veto it. 
And now the President is to be impeached 
in Stanton's interest because he believes 
the law to be unconstitutional, and insti- 
tutes proceedings to bring it to a judicial 
test I If the precedent now set is to be 
followed, it will be in the power of any 
future Congress to summarily eject any fu- 
ture President. Congress has merely to 
pass some unconstitutional law which re- 
verses the whole past practice of the Gov- 
ernment, and when the President takes 
the first steps for bringing it to a judici.il 
test, forthwith put him out of office by ar- 
ticles of impeachment. We might as 
well abolish the farce of Presidential elec- 
tions if Congress can thus unmake elected 
Presidents at their caprice.- iV. Y. 'SVorU. 

^•'» 

An Important DiHcorcry. 

This is indeed an age of progress. 
Science, with crucible and retort in hand, 
has developed another invaluable truth. 
Progression seems to be written upon all 
things and is ever pointing us to the great 
future and inciting us to action and labori- 
ous research, and the philosopher and 
chemist is unceasing in his eflorts to trace 
cause to ettect, and to develop and bring 
to light great truths which for ages have 
been mysteriously wrapped in obscurity. 

Before us is a treatise on Eggs by Dr. 
W. C Bruson, a practical cheinist of Chi- 
cago, 111. He claims that eggs, for one-half 
cent a dozen, may be kept perfectly fresh 
and sweet for years. His mode is founded 
upon a new theory, the electroizing of the 
organic constituents of the egg,^ with a 
peculiar combination of chemical agents, 
thereby suspending the embryotic princi- 
ple and relieving the germinating heat, 
thus preventing organic dissolution with- 
out imparting any unpleasant flavor, or in 
the least changing the natural taste of the 
egg. He says that when the egg first 
commences to decay, the albumen is the 
base of the putrefactive fermentations, and 
subsequently the yolk is involved in the 
chemical change known as putrefaction. 
The elements of a fresh egg are : 

Carbon 55 parts. 

N Itrogen 10 " 

Oxygen 15 " 

Dydrogen 7 •' 

Sulphur 4 »• 

Phosphorus 3 " 

Which, in the progress of organic disso- 
lution, separate from each other and com- 
bine again as follows : The carbon absorbs 
oxygen and forms carbonic acid ; one por- 
tion of the hydrogen forms water with the 
oxygen; another part, uniting with the nt- 
trogen composes ammonia; another poition 
combines with the carbon, producing car- 
buiated hydrogen eas, and the remainder 
unites with the phosphorus and sulphur, 
producing phosphureted and sulphureted 
hydrogen gases, which are in a great 
measure the cause of the fetor (so offensive 
to the sense of smell) evolved by tlie 
breaking of a perfectly rotten egc, which 
18 justly entitled to the anpellation of igg 
ultimatum. 

Those who wish to investigate the merits 
of this scientific discovery we would reler 
to the Elect! o Egg Company's advertise- 
ment in another column. 

The ]tlarylan<l Ca!«e. 

We do not wonder that the refusal of the 
United States Senate to give Philip 
Francis Thomas the seat in that boJy to 
which he was elected by the Maryland 
Legislature creates considerable iurtit'na- 
tion in the last named body, as indeed it 
mast all over the country. Mr. Thomas 
was never a rebel, and he was wiUing to 
take the Congressional iron clad test-oath. 
Yet, upon the miserable pretence that he 
sympathized with the rebellion, the 
Senate undertakes to deprive the 
Slate of Maryland of her chosen 
Represesentative. Ti-c reason of this 
is simply that Maryland is a 
Democratic State. The Representatives of 
Kentucky are kept out of their seats in the 
House for the same reason, just as Stock- 
ton, of New Jersey, was ousted frtm the 
Seuate, and just as many othe-r real and 
true representatives of the people have 
been turned or kept out of Congress since 
the Radical parly got into power. 

It is just such acts as that wc have 
named— acts which meet the disapproval 
of men like Trumbull, Fessenden, Preling- 
huysen. Grimes and Anthony, who, wiih 
four other Republicans, voted to admit 
Mr. Thomas— which disgust the people 
with Radicalism. They have had enough 
of it. — Missouri Republican. 

"Tiiehe's Many a Slit 'Twixt the 
Cup axd the Lip." — Not long since a 
young M. D., who does not live more than 
a thousand miles from Liberty, De Knlb 
county, was engaged to be married lo an 
excellent young lady of that vicinity. 
" The course of true love " is seems ran 
smooth enough until the evening set for 
the wedding. All the relatives and fi lends 
of both parties were at the house of the 
bride's father — everybody on the qui vive, 
awaiting anxiously the appearance of the 
bridegroom. In the meantime, the groom, 
in order to keep from being nervous and 
raise "Dutch courage," it seems, had been 
"taking something," and when the hour 
for the ceremony arrrived he steamed up 
with about three " sheets In the wind," and 
in attempting to "tie up" to a chair, 
"heaved anchor" in the middle of the 
floor. This, very properly, disgusted the 
lady, and she then and there told him that 
she had no other use for him, and the mar- 
riage ceremony should not take place. 
The young doctor was put to bed, and she 
invited her friends in to supper, when the 
remainder of the evening passed off, to all 
appearances, as if nothing had happened. 
The now penitent M. D. has made several 
eflorts to " fix the matter up," we under- 
stand, but the fair and noble young lady 
positively refuses to have anything more 
to do with him.— Sclnui (Ma.) Herald, 



►•♦" 



Old Uncle Ned, fro down dat hoe I 
And Dinah, drop dat kitchen dough ! 
We now are free, wid noflln to do 
But to dance all night and all day too. 

De poor white trash have nof&n to say. 
But to work I work ! and d»> taxts pay. 
While de bressed darkeys dance dar fill. 
Let d« white trash lout de Sadler's bill. 



A taklnjf title Itor a farce for our AmeruiMi 

conslna— Ala-Bama, or th e Forty ThleTe».-rJ^»«. 
Forty !— there were about a huhdrcd of 
them ; but they have adijoumed.— i^'o^ite 
BegisUr. 



CLIPBiNfiS AND_ DBIPPlHfiS. 

IfUacellaneous Items. 

—In Lawrence (Kansas;) there is not a 
pauper. 

— A Methodist insurance company has 
been stared. 

— The largest paper-mill in the States is 
at Greenwich, Conn. 

— A firm in Western New York is en- 
gaged in raising minks for their fur. 

—Forty thousand Spaniards by birth 
and descent are living in New Orleans. 

— It is proposed to take down the 
famous Broadway bridge of New York. 

—New York appropriated |15,000 to 
celebrate the birth-day of George Wash- 
ington. 

— A lawyer of St. Louis, while endeav- 
oring to collect his fee, ^as robbed of |50 
by his client. 

— New York is receiving tomatoes from 
Bermuda, which are selling at four dollars 
per peck. 

— Detroit has contracted with a Roches- 
ter firm for building a new city hall to cost 
1339,000. 

—Nearly twenty thousand loaves of 
bread were given to the poor of Newark, 
N. J., in January. 

— Charles Davis, in Cincinnati, tried 
five times to kill himself, the last eflort 
being a success. 

— The united ages of thirty persons in 
Somers, Conn., is two thousand three hun- 
dred and forty years. 

— Recently five ladies had their pockets 
picked while attending a funeral in a pri- 
vate house in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

— Fifteen thousand three hundred and 
fifty-one new buildings were erected in 
Ohio last year, worth nearly $10,000,000. 

— A widow millionaire in Boston has 
been spending twenty thousand dollars on 
a party in honor of her son's becommg of 
age. 

— The hearing in the case of the Sharp- 
ley-Kelley homicide case in New York 
city has been postponed to the April 
term. 

— It has just been decided in a Brooklyn 
Court that boys may play " tag " in the 
streets without being liable to arrest by 
the police. 

—A bar of bullion has been on exhibi- 
tion at Denver, weighing 279 ounces, 
valued at $0,400, the largest ever cast by 
the Denver mint. 

— At Molinc, 111., the new works of 
Dimock & Gould have a capacity for turn- 
ing out daily 1,500 buckets, 500 wash-tubs, 
and 600 wash-boards. 

— Klopstock engraved on the grave of 
his wife two sheaves of wheat, thrown, as 
it were, careiessly together, with the words, 
" We shall ripen in heaven." 

— Baltimore, the newspapers of that city 
say, expects to become the first tobacco 
market in the world, when her new Eu- 
ropean steamship line is in operation. 

— A well known fish dealer in New York 
city has been fined $00 for selling trout 
out of season, although he pleaded that the 
trout came from Canada. 

— An EugUsh jury has awarded £1,000 
elamages to a gentleman whose nerves were 
shocked, but who received no bodily 
wound, by a railway accident. 

— Ridiculous as it may appear. New 
York jewelers keep m-.n whose sole duty 
it is to travel over the city and wind up 
clocks for the lazy New Yorker?. 

— A livery stable-keeper in New Yor'ii, 
named Malloy, allowed two of his horses 
to starve to death, and is under arrest. A 
number more of the animals were in a 
starving condition. 

—The Philadelphia Board of Health 
have examined pieces from some of the 
lin< St looking specimens of pork oflered 
for sale in that ciiy, and have found them, 
without exception, to be filled with 
trichina. 

— A young lady near Columbus, Miss., 
met her death very suddenly, a few nights 
since, from eating snow. She complained 
of a headache when she retired, and was 
found slifl" and cold in her bed about 
midnight. 

— New York city is afloat again, and 
many are the joked on Whiting, tlie street 
contractor. Gang planks are suggested for 
ihe street corners, and the Tribune reports 
several cases of seasickness in the Broad- 
way omnibuses. 

— California pays her Judges a larger 
salary than is paid by any other State in 
the Union — fG.ODO. Next comes Louisiana, 
^55.000; Massachusetts, *4,000 ; New York 
and Georgia each 1 3,500 ; and so down to 
Illinois, |1,200, and Delaware, the lowest, 
11,000. 

— The New York Daily BuUttin esti- 
mates the amount of tea used in this coun- 
try in 1867 at 33,0'27,001 pounds. The an- 
nual shipments are expected soon. It takes 
about six months for a China tea ship to 
make the trip. The inward bound fleet is 
expected about Aprif 1. 

— Two young ladies, in Springfield, 
Mass., who wanted to do the leap year 
business up brown, escorted two young 
men to the skating park, the other day, 
hired skates, put them on the young men's 
feet, were attentive in every possible way, 
and finall}' — stole the skates ! 

—If fruit and vegetables could be trans- 
ported North quick enough, market gard- 
ening in Florida would be a good busi- 
ness. Green peas, radishes, lettuce, etc., 
can be had in a bundance, even in mid-win- 
ter. Strawberries ripen in February, and 
continue to produce fruit until June, at 
which time peaches are ready for market. 

— A recent historical paper, which has 
just come to light, states that William 
Penn, in order to raise funds enough to 
send his prodigal son back to England, 
sold his manor, calletl William Stadt, for 
£850. It consisted of 7,000 acres, and is the 
place whereon is located Norristown and 
Norriston township, in Montgomery coun- 
ty, Penn. 

— A Gentile paper, published at Salt 
Lake City, predicts that if the Mormon 
question is left alone, the progress of civi- 
lizaiion will settle it in a few years. When 
the Pacific Railroad gets out that way, 
when men are plenty and women scarce, 
how the ruthless invaders will "gobble 
up " the superfluous wives, and leave the 
disconsolate Saints to mourn beside de- 
serted hearthstones ! 

—John Jacob Astor left Halleck, who 
was for years his confidential clerk, only 
two hundred dollars a year. HaUeck oft- 
en used to joke Mr. Astor about his ac- 
cumulating income, and perhaps rather 
rashly said : " Mr. Astor, of what use is 
all your money to you? I would be con- 
tent to live on a couple of hundred a year 
for the rest of my life if I was only sure of 
it." The old man remembered that, and 
with a bitter satire reminded Halleck of 
it in his wilL 

— Hiram Smith, an eccentric old bachelor 
at Chester, Mass., is having his sepulcher 
hewn in a large rock in that town. He 
pays a man $700 to do the work, and by 
the stipulation the cave is to be seven feet 
long, four wide, and four deep, and alter 
his coffin is put in, the aperture will be 
sealed up with a marble slab and cement. 
Smith says he doesn't want mud to get 
around his bones ; he means to have a good 
dry place for them. The scheme is an old 
fancy of his, but nobody has supposed till 
lately that he would attempt to carry it 
out 

— The Louiflville Journal, speaking of the 
defalcation of Joseph Bloomgart, first As- 
sistant Teller in the United Stotes Survey- 
or's Office in that city, says : " It is no less 
strange than true that every dollar of the 
mgney embezzled ($12,200)", and all that 
previousiy lost by Bloomgart, was spent 
. tot lottery tickets. He nerer used a Jarth- 



in^ of it in providing for his wife and 
children. To 4his purpose he always de- 
voted his salary while in the custom-house, 
and a prescribed sum while merchandising. 
Nor did he squander any of the money up- 
on wine, women or fast horses, as a cotem- 
porary has stated. He is a man of steady 
and moral habits, and no one is more at- 
tached to his family. Altogether, the case 
is unparalleled." 

Torelfsn GoHslp, 

—Jerusalem has only 2-2,000 inhabitants. 

—Cuba will have only half Its uiual to- 
bacco crop this season. 

—The future allowance of the British 
soldier is to include " a pound of meat 
without bone." 

— In the Society Islands are two infant 
girls who are connected at the hips, Siam- 
ese twin fashion, and the king and queen 
have adopted them. 

— The bellows of the organ in St. Paul's, 
London, burst during divine service, re- 
cently, and the congregation was at once 
strucii with a Fenian panic. 

— At a recent book sale in Lontlon, Au- 
dubon's " Birds of America," four volumes, 
brought £160, and his "Viviparous (Juad- 
rupcds," three volumes, 00 guineas. 

— In London and its suburbs there arc 
72 Catholic churches and chapels, served 
by 180 priests. There are in Liverpool 18 
Catholic churches and chapels, served by 
71 priests. 

— A couple of magistrates in Derby- 
shire, England, have sent a man to prison 
for a month for picking up a dead pheas- 
ant overlooked by a shooting party, and 
the property of the Earl of Derby. 

-*The Lord's prayer has lately been is- 
sued in Moscow in all thirteen Sclavic 
dialects, but in Russian characters and 
spelling. The author is Professor Jezber, 
who has the professorship of those lan- 
guages. 

— As a precaution against the Greek fire, 
the English authorities are having quanti- 
ties of sand conveyed to all the govern- 
ment offices, and placed in heaps inside 
the windows of every llrwr that is at all 
accessible from the outside. 

— In India you are compelled to have a 
light all night to prevent serpents and 
scorpions from getting into your bed. If 
the light go oul, it is dangerous to get up 
lest you find a cobra under your feet or a 
poisonous reptile in your wash-bowl. 

— A French scientific paper states that 
the pulse of the first Napoleon, when he 
was calm, beat only forty times a minute, 
or almost half less than ordinary persons, 
and that this was the secret of his coolness 
in the weightiest moments of his stormy 
lUe. 

— The Toronto TdcjrapJi says small-pox 
is committing fearlul ravages in some 
quarters of that city, though very lew peo- 
ple are aware of the fact. " The scourge is 
of the most violent form, and has spread 
to an extent never before cxperieECtd in 
Toronto. 

— Not long ago a boy was seen putting 
up Fenian posters in London. The police 
arrested him. All the papers copied the 
poster, but the tditois were not arrested, 
althouijjh they gave the incendiary docu- 
ment far greater publicity than the boy 
could have done. 

• — The great deluge in China, in Decem- 
ber, flooded a space of over 4,0(H>tmies, and 
swept off' entire villages. Thousands of 
people perished, and sixty towns were en- 
tirely destroyed. Suffering and starpation 
will exist for years in the district over 
which the deluge swept. 

— The British Postoffice has given notice 
that on and after the 1st of March it will 
charge twenty-eight cents per half ounce 
for letters between the United States and 
the Enst Indies, by way of Southamptom, 
and thirty-six cents when sent by way of 
Marseilles. Pre-payment compulsory. 

— The Archbishop of Algiers has pub- 
lished a heart-rending description of the 
sufleiings of the native population. Tens 
of thousands of Ar-bs have already died 
of starvation, according to his staiements, 
and the number will reach hundreds of 
thousands before the return of the warm 
season, unless relief be provided on the 
largest scale. 

— A newspaper on a novel principle has 
been started in London. It proposes to 
insert, free of charge, advertisements of re- 
putable shopkeepers, being paid by the 
1 -tter a commission on the amount of pur- 
chases by readers of the paper, who will 
receive from sellers checks, on the co-op- 
erative system, entitling them to share in 
the distribution of a reserve fund. 

— Bayard Taylor finds living cheap in 
Venice. A cup of coflee at a first-class 
restaurant costs but four cents, and a good 
dinner with wine costs 40 cents. But this 
involves extravagant luxury. Bread, fish, 
and fowls, cooked, may be bought for a 
trifle, and roasted pumpkin seeds, more 
palatable to|somc people than almonds, are 
sold in the streets at marvelously low rates, 
and eaten in large quantities. 

— The salaries of the difl'erent monarchs 
of Europe are stated as follows by a Ger- 
man statistician: Alexander II, $8,250,000; 
Abdul Aziz, $6,000 000; Napoleon III, 
$5,200,000; Francis Joseph, $4,000,000; 
Frederick William I, $3,000,000; Victor 
Emanuel, $2,400,000 ; Victoria, $2,200,000; 
Isabella II, $1,000,000 ; Leopold II, $000,- 
000. In addition to this salary each of 
these individuals Is furnished a dozen or 
more first-class houses to live in, without 
any charge for rent. 

— In Freiburg, in Switzerland, they ex- 
ecuted, the other day, a handsome young 
fellow who had assassinated his wife in or- 
der to marry his mistrcs. His hcad.was 
cut ofl" with a sword in the old-fashioned 
manner, the executioner standing behind 
the culprit and his aid holding up the lat- 
ter's head by the hair. Previous to the 
scaflold scene, the executioner exhibited 
his sword in every tavern of the pkcc, 
and the relatives of the culprit consoled 
themselves by selling photographs of the 
murderer. 

— A Cork paper says the scene at George 
Francis Train's second lecture in that city 
was lively. Ribs bent and all but cracked ; 
hats were smashed ; loose properties were 
torn away An elderly gentleman, wear- 
ing a part of his coat, having the handle 
of his umbrella embedded in the pit of his 
stomach, and his hat firmly jamed over 
his eyes and nose, implored mercy in vain. 
EnterancG into the galleries was no deliver- 
ance. There the crush was something 
tremendous. Motion was impossible. 
The ma?s was forced into every interstice 
and down to the edge of the railing by the 
constantly increasing pressure from with- 
out, and many oi those in the front clam- 
bered over to escape and slid into the body 
of the hall, previously crowded to incon- 
venience. 

Relierious and Kdncational. 

— Jeflerson Medical College, Philadel- 
phia, has 353 students this winter, 187 of 
whom are from Pennsylvania. 

— An effort is about to be made in Penn- 
sylvania to secure education and shelter for 
the orphans of colored soldiers. 

— There are over sixteen thousand school 
children in Utah, and the schools are in a 
moderately prosperous condition. 

— Zion's Herald estimates that 155,000 of 
the inhabitants of Boston attend no 
church. At least two^thirds of the entire 
population. 

—The Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion of Brooklyn have introduced the cus- 
tom of giving, every Sunday morning, a 
breakfast for the poor. 

— A wag threw four packets of horse 
railroad tickets into the contribution-box 
at a Portland church, recently, with the 
Scriptural words—" Silver and gold I have 
none ; but such as I have give I thee " — 
catefhlly referred to on the package. 



— A petition to the Legislature is beinj; 
signed in Toronto, Canada, praving that 
laws may be enacted which shall in a 
measure fender the education of all child- 
ren compulsory. The petition is signed by 
many of the first and best flien in the city. 

— In Massachusetts the School Commit- 
tee of Cambridge have abolished corporal 
punishment of girla. In the same State a 
movement has begun in the Legislature to 
have the school laws changed so that 
women can be eligible to membership on 
school committees. 

— The Boston Transcript says that at a 
Sunday school exhibition iii that city a 
D. D., wishing to indicate an itching to 
applaud the performances, m addressing 
the children said he had had trouble with 
his feet all the evening, inquiring if any 
of the scholars tmew what it was. "Chil- 
blains," was the prompt response from 
some of the bright ones. 

Benjamin Nott, son of the late Presi- 
dent Nott, of Union College, is writing a 
biography of his father. 



THE MARKETS. 

Nkw Toax, March 2. 1968. 

COITON-Middling $ .« &$ 

KLOUK— Extra Western 9.40 & 11.30 

WHEAT— Spring 1(0. 2 4.40 ^ 2.43 

KYB— Western I.b9 @ 1.91 

COUN— New Western Mixed.... l.-il & 1.23 

OATS -New Western :. .b2Ha 

BARLEY— Western 2.15 & 2.20 

PORK-Mess 23.374a 24.75 

LARD— Good to Prime 16»,a .lC«i 

GOLD— 1.41)4. 

CHiOA.eo, March 2, 1868. 

BBBVES— Fan Grades »575 ©$875 

HOGS-Llve 6.75 & 8 50 

Dressed 9.50 © 10.60 

BUTTER— Choice ... . 35 © .as 

EGGS-Fresh 28 & .27 

FLO UK- White Winter 1350 Q, 

Spring Extra „ 8.50 © 10.50 

GRAIN— Com— New 77>4a 

Barley-No. 3 2 05 © 2.08 

Oats— No. 1 554® 

Rye— No. 1 1.58 © 1.60 

Wheat—Spring, No. 1. 2.00 © 

" No. 9. 1.934® 1.94 

LARD 15 © .164 

P0&&-Mes8 2300 €t 

CiSCiHHATT, March 2, 1868. 

FLOUR— Famllv f li.OO O $ll.2S 

WHBAT—Red Winter 2.40 & 2.60 

CORN— New Kar 81 & .82 

OATS— No.l 66 & .67 

RYK-No 1 1.70 © 1.75 

BARLEY- Fall 2.30 © 

PORK-Mess 23.75 © 24.75 

LARD 154® .16 

St. Louis, March -2, 1868. 

FLOUR-XX f 9.25 © f 10.75 

WHEAT-Wintcr 9.J5 © 2.68 

CORN— Shelled .80 © .85 

OATS 08 © .73 

RYE 1.70 © 1.79 

BARLEY'— Fall 2.B5 © 2.60 

PORK-Mess 8450 © 25.00 

LAUD 10 © .164 

MiLWATTxn, March 2. 1868. 

FLOUK- Sprinj? ExUa $8.50 © t9 75 

WUEAT— Spring 1.93 © I.9SI4 

CORN-New .78 © 

OATS-N0.2 t5 © .56 

RYE-No. 1 1.50 © 

BARLEY 205 © S.20 

UOGS-Dressed 9.00 © 10.00 

CLBVXLAND, March 2, 1868. 

FLOUR-XX Spring flO.'.S © $11.60 

WHEAT— No 1, Spring 2.30 © 

CORN— No 1, SheUed 94 © 

OAT.S— Nol 67 © .68 

BARLEY— No 1 9.20 © 2.22 

KYE-No. 1 1.55 © 1.58 



Ttte miserable^ 

Of this bright and cheerful world are the 
Dyspeptics. 

W iihout a good digestion there can neither be 
bodily comfort nor mental enjoyment. 

lictwecn the stomach and the brain there Is a 
close and wonderful alliance. If the one Is dis- 
ordered the other is gloomy, dejected, incapable 
of elfort, and indifferent to all that makes life 
agreeable to tho healthy. 

Is this a condition that any rational human be- 
ing is willing to endure, when the means of certain, 
immediate and permanent relief can be obtained 
everywhere ? 

The Dyspeptic has his fate Id hie own hands. 
If he chooses to banish forever the disorder that 
racks his body and disturbs the mind with name- 
less horrors, he has only to step to the nearest 
drug store and procure a supply of HOSTETTEB'S 
STOMACH BI rrERS. 

No phase of Dyspepsia has ever yet resisted the 
alterative, tonic and anti-bilious operation of this 
potent vegetable specific. It literally regenerates 
the lethargic stomach ; rouses into healthy action 
the dormant liver; puts to flight the dipmal fan- 
cies that be'jet the mind: gently relieves and 
regulati'S the bowels ; stengthena the enfeebled 
nerves; restores the appetite, and makes as It 
were a new crbatukk of the desponding and do- 
bliitatud invalid. 

Ladies who suffer from indigestion have only to 
take a small dose of this pure vegetable corrective, 
once or twice a day to secure entire exemption 
from the pains and penalties of a weak stomach 
aiid tliat perfect functional regularity, which but 
few of the sex uninterruptedly enjoy. 



TO CONSLinPTlVKS. 

The Rev. KD WARD A. WILSON will send (free o f 
chargr) to all who desire It, the prescription wlih the 
direollous tor niaklng and uelnc the simple remedy by 
vnitch he was cure<l of a Iuuk aUectlon and that dr^d 
dlsenie, Cousumiitlon. His only object Is to l>eiieflt the 
Bflllctod, and he hopes every sufferer will try hU pre- 
fcripOou, as It will cost them nothing, and may prove a 
bles.s!ng. Please address Kbv. KDWAKD A. WILSON. 
No. 165 Soutb Second street Wllllamsbareb, New York 
♦ » ♦ 
INFOKITIATION. 

Information iraarautecd to prodnce a luxurlan 
growth of hair upon a bald head or ))ear(lIe8S face, also 
a recipe for the removal of Pimples, Blotches, tcrup- 
tioiw, etc., on the akin, leavinj; the same soft, clear and 
beautiful, can he otilalned without charce tiy address- 
IneTHos. F.CHAP.\IAN.CnBJ4i«T. l«3 Broadway. N.Y 



EGGS ELECTROIZEDI 

A n«w mode by which Eeprs mav be kept PfiliKECT- 
LY FKESII AND SWEET YOK VEAIiS, for V cent a 
doz^n. Aiients wanted In every county. Our Treatise 
on Eigs, conta'nin'/ pHrtirulars. fent free to tiiose or- 
dering It. ELECTHO EGG COMPANY, P.oom 4, Ko. 
79 West MaaiKon St., Chicago, HI. P. O. Box, 1114. 

HOPS! HOPS! HOPS! 

Good, Bonnd Hop Roots from best Sink County 
Yards, furoished in desired quantities by the under- 
8i(.'nL'd. 

Having a practical experience of seven years as hop 
growers i'l Sank county, we furnish our patroiis the 
result of ourexptrience. In pamphlet form, setting forth 
the best method 01 Betting. Pullmr, Cultivating ; Best 
.Mod" of t'ulture for Diff'-rtnt Soils; Constincli'in of 
Dry Houses ; Drying, Baling, ibc ; In fact, complete 
Instnicllono to Insure giiccfss In Hop Growing. 

tlf~ AM Roots packed In Moss, and the requisite 
Qu<iiitliy ol Male liouts per acre in separate package. 

2>. Jt. & E. O. JRVDJ>, 

Jieedsburg, Saolc Co., Wis. 



BKrCBKNCSS 

M^ctcpy. Rudd&Co.'sBank 

S»uk County liaok Baraboo^ 

Carlls Bat<»8, Banker Sauk City, Wis 

f^eoond National Bank Chicago. Ill 

Marshall & Illsly, Bankers Milwaukee, Wis 



Rcedsburg, Wis. 



FOR SALE. 

Send for Price List of Pl'RE ENGLISH CLU 6TER 
free from New York diseases, and lull In.struetions for 
tultlvallon and cnriug, to HOWARD H. POTTER 
Baraboo, Sauk Co., Wis. 



Water Proof Eooflnff, 

BBLT»« * DASH CM PATKS, 

•ittd SUmr for Olrcniar aad B*apl« of 
tt« Pmpcr. 

C. J. FAY 4& CO., 

3M* TlM Sto.| CuDdaa, K. imwtjt 




Important AnBommcenieBt ! 

A Beautiful, Illustrated Book, worth a Thousand 
dollars, sent free to any address on receipt of 25 centa, 
by addressing Professor JOHN VANDEliPOOL. No. 
266 Wh^ihrop Place, New York City. 



BARREL KAOH INERT— Greenwood'B 
Piitcnt Stave and Heading Machinery, for Tight 
anf! Slack Work. (i. L. Benton's Patent Convex Kmeir 
Wheels, lor Gnuimlne and Sharpening Saws. JOHN 
GltEKNWUUD, Rochester Barrel Machine Works, 
Uocheateir, N-Y' . ^ . . . .— , 



^^ (\(\(\ A. YEAR GUARANTEED! 

^Oi^yJyJyJ Employment for Ladles and GenUemea 
everywhere, by which th« above amount can l)e 
realized. No rUk, and $10 a day of*«ANTJ»D to 
Agents. For parUcaiars. send post-paid addressed 
envelope lo J. W. ZOOK, 0«k Grove. UL 



HORSE - OWNER'S FRIEND; OR 
Help In Time of Need : a complete work of 25* 
pages, on the Horse. Diseases and Cure, mailed to any 
address, post-paid, on receipt of price. Bonna in 
ClotU, T5 cents uP«P«. 'i'^SS.'"; i^f*?.'".,^'''****- 
UPJOmi * TYLKR, PabUahera, 

Ann Arbor. Michigan. 



t 

K 

i 



MEDICAL BOOK ON DIS- 

Bend 



1^ eases of Imprudence, and their wow* tmrnmi^Mi, 
worth a journey to New York on foot to obtain. B«i(_ 
tree under seal bv indoslnK a postage Mamp to DB. 
LA W RKNC:K. «i Kiuit Tmth ntnvt. TJpw VorV 



IrOR SALE, CHEAP— One Lamb Knit- 
ting Machine, entirely new. price $70-fi>r sale for 

r^JeSS^^TursorMS-^j^^ 



n 4 ^>% 






I imtmrngi^a^^''-'-^ 



* ■ m ^ 



I mf<m ■■»■ y 



ritORT^IETOR. 



-0:. 



STAPLE f»f« FAKGV 









o^r>s^ 






cibc, C530., C'1?C3 
On liand uud far sale ii3 cheap as ihe 

a H E A. J:^ jr. s T . 

Jan. l-l, IsGJ. \i.''~ 

TROYim^ SiOFiE 



Yowa *^K!) counvi. 



S TAKOPIiE, ^!A^lCII 5, IS(5?. 



Shilior"* 3Iaikef. 



Ilnr — p"rtnri, 
Pork — per Ir.inorc', 
V.'l r;::— p. r bi.-I:i-!, 
(';„•:;_ •• " 

^Vfi,,' — Jrv, ppr e rJ, 
Lime— per barr;.-!, 



SO.OO to $8.00 

G.OO to 8 00 

1.50 to '.4.-. 

9j u. 1.00 

- :-i 00 -.11 .1 od 

1. 00 



Til" cc'curntti ror;'l:i'> Plow i.s ho:\fofl in 
ri ruriiacf, nrnl j)!?in;.^cl int^ watci', whic-Ii :3 
prop.irod f.-.r ll.e purpose, .itu! tliertjUy it is 
liarjcizcd ll.rnrjrli .and tl;rriiif;!i. Tins ;r!ves 
it ;;r. r.xfrcniu dunbi'ity luver but'oro iil- 
tuicd, if over altcinpti'il by any otl-.er maii- 
u'aciirtr in the country, siiid causes it to 
mov- l!u- :r.^'Ii t!.y soil with lidj IVieiioii 
t a ! luiy ot'icr plow uo.v in usf. Fur sale 
b John .McM!!!;<>-... 



Th« nnJ'»r»','ao''^-''' "pcKe-I 4 new P.-cTlsljn Stere on 

s-Jw>.N:>arKEi:T. (ori-cv-iTUTii;: nr.i of.) bi: .*.;:- 

Ol'Ki:. all.N.VKtOTA. 
W^.er;1^9 !nt«nil3kccpli»;,' a 5i*ner«! assortment of 

f^rocerirs and Provits!o£i!^v 

At ]<-lccB ds low as any tn ShaU^pe.— a'l i as good 

o»;'>. If. sPKvrt:r, 

p. s._T wfll vnAf^rnr tokocy on Xtm.c i.con^ml 
n30t' '"'• »'• =• 










Will roJnrn from N'pw York, nnd rom- 

I»5^. Kuy In n.e.l r>f 

riRST-CL.ISS WORK, 

#«•» ti* »T1>P''"1 witnout soliisto ft. P'n;. nn.; at Eior? 



Wi; -vi:k glud to ii -.um tliat our cstcsnied 
le'ilon" citlui'ii, Jiiij. M.ap'iy, is out ot" im- 
mediate dan^'cr, and it i:i hoped Lo will 
soou L-: ou il".c iuinruvoiiicut. 

* I 

Ti.'Eiii: was i.o wheat sown in tliis county 
this year on tidier the !uoL or Jiecoiul day 
of M;irch, aIlhon;;h tliere ii at tliis liuie 
ou'y nbtut throe feet ofsolid, compact snow 
CO.XTii:^ tl.L- xrroauJ. 



A iinr lursa^fo ll;0 evccing train ou the 
Viill^y ro..d ruii inui a;: ox team which was 
trav( !ii-.^' t^pon thu tr.ie'; !:eir boHc Plaine. 
The ;•. r.!ii ^ppcars to iiavo Lton iollowinpj 
the Irat':, fi:d A3 the traiu camt around a 
cui-o iht; " cow cfitchc r" rulher rou^'hly 
ur.y oLcd the oseu and set one olf o:i one 
.side uud tl'.i^ other ou the other .si lo of the 
Irac'-. Xc:th»r oxen were iiilied, but thcre 

The driver £or 



Wire .sc2',vrnl Iroku.i 'e;ji 
o .: 0.' t.'.e Hrty. 

Ilu.-wiy ITr.n^iiAMrffH, rlsf;., has been 
rppoi:i!..d rcst'nastcr ut Jordan, vice At- 
Wjod, r(.5:i,iied. 



Grar.dShoolirij Hatch at Shakopec, 
0.: Saturday, Marcli 7th, 1868,~com- 

m'!:iciMj :.i IJ. o'clock. Given t-y John 
A.>ielt) iur 

1 Good Sound Hors«">, 



-....„. -- * vwv/u >juui.u i.iiii:»*, 

If e are Conuna! ■■> ^■h.r v..w!,«. 



A.ni will pr?sc!it to aay firaon sc-uuiio' i: 
i. club io our Oreat 

O'^CT* n Tk r T A ir> CAT "I 
.'.V ti Ji » ' » .1 1 1 t .^ V » • » ^ 1\ J 1 1 

cf DRY AND FANCY COODS, a Wut.h. 

Piece oifShceiiufj.Sillv i)r;.vss Pattern, &e., J.c. 

ITl^IDE OK COS'] . 

Cat!tlo;,*ae of Good.; uud y.iDir,U' iO;U Ic 
e%7 udure-ss free. 

'ALL1:^]M, H^lWES & CO . 
15 Federal Street, Eoslc:;, 
F. 0. Bex «A liass. 



"Wfcolesa!" Peaicr.i in French, Gcrmf*!-. 
And kuijUsh Pry and Fancv OooiiF. C'-.t 
Ury.Piatttd V.'arc-, Albuu-.s, Lriih.r Go, -V 
ic. -••^- •'• 



O o X2. "tr o :5^ r^-. 2:1 o c • i." . 

A X 1) 

CLES:i OF TEE DiST. COURT. 
O^i'C at iho Court Jlovse, ^hilcop, c. 



V'ill make Dce-'s and MnrtjTr.?*-.", V' 
all Legal papers. \\ ill j>:;y t;i.\fs aiid 5-< .• 
Ra&l Kslate on coinmisi:ion, <S:e. 51::'; 



2 Colt's Il..r.lvtrs, 
1 L;.o 'I>!n.' Pe r. 
Tjial 



\.iit;J 



■UjU. 



by ai)piica'i')!i to 



Chances can be h;id 



■. . ■ « ♦ « — w 

. iOiiih ichocl. — Th.' 

bt'i;ii;s on Monday, JIareh 
Vtai.s old. 



S. I.. 

a r. .r T.r 

2 . i-. r punii.s j.ot ov< r 12 
-I'.O:. ; ever VI, $1.00; boys over ]•!. 
ij.OO. Pi.'iicr Eiijjlish Pranches, §1.00 
e.viia. Paynietit required in advance. 



f^ Tho Lidj";. i'eslival of the JI. K. 
Church, netted alioi;'. .sr.ventyfivc dollnrs. 

JZ^ The !,'i:i,tirlr^', windy daya of .March 
made their Rppenranco iu February tliis 
yon-, aid are tliil on » bender and prove 
loriliy .'if j!iv '.t r'-piitatlttn. 

t-Cj^ r:olfrl Anns'rong h:'s b.-^Mi improv- 
w^ 'u\--> liiiv w. 11 i.iio wiiiUr by erecting a 
i«;t Uweili:;g house ncu" tlii Depot, ou 
.'^econ t '."t. It* ot:.tr carp ntora would act 



Farm for Sale, 

In tlio Town cf Ecilo Plain: 

The Subscrihrr Vtil! sell one ol hi.i f.in.i- 
oT 120 HcreS of lir^t rate land, all leneeu 
30 acros of timber. 20 acres of •rnoii nn :. 
dow, 14 acres under culljvaiio;:, b.g Lou * . 
• table, and good wutrr. Situated •! Uiilc 
J^ijutii of Peile i'laii.-,;. lor aa!e thiap 
Y>i%:', cajh, part ou time. ;"j-:I,ii 

JOHi: IiAHLY. 



ZSCtoiiL, Xtoii, 3:tC5l3. ! 
bCiAica. cciiAiOUi! bcuATCii:: 

Ss frttu- !C to ISaouij. 
VrSfaton'i G!:itinent cure* The Itch. 
VY'lioutoa'a Oiatmtnt carej Salt llhcutn. 
WlieatOii'.-i Ointment euros Tetter. 
Whs^toa'a Oi^tiueat cur..s Parber^i' Itch. 
Vi'tieaton'* O'.utmeut cures Old Sor 8. 
V.'heato:i*3 Oiitmc::t euros Every kind 
of iluniurli':e Magic. 

P'1c». 50 cents a ^"Xj br '^ail, SO r«Tts. AHrei 
Wi<:-..ii..< i PuYTKIt, -No. 170 •'•■i,>-,;iiit'.n Street 
B ••tin .Mrn». 4J* t"or %i'.» hv .ill u. a^gitt*. 

Uvitoa ^j;'t. ;S67 ,— ap . uultcc > TT. 




G THE SUREST REMEDY 

I'ttf Con-hs, Cildf, S«Tofa!iU tousaaiptloa 
fiheamatisn, C«acral IkWity if. ' 

tV-'IL'vfr OH, whcii perfectly r"rp, Ig of tocS Wco 
li^ a cur»tue ngvnt m ihe irc*tn;(nt of jJcbofvla, 

tll-vCIiTlOX. IJUONCUlTlf, GEMfSUI, UEOILnT aud 

ITLMO.VAKT .^FFKCTlo^>. .1* t'l ncdiT a!I coniir.*tu 
noiK-tPssaiy. The trtat t-nrvrtol-'ty of onr bn.ud of 
r... co£s1«t3 In Its be).'-.' p-c.>»reJ with ccnwicn'.'on* 
t^rr, fW>m Tkur Cod L:vr>A lu a manner thnt (I* 
rrlvrsthvoil frr.tn ii!I Ini: ur;tlc«. anil the l;^^Il'r.^ar.J 
li»vorn;;nn!!y(rx!,s;'njrl3.-.!lothor brands. It iiiih-«V8 




iu.1 MKiiiciSAlJ.Y'piire. - -- - 

trr-s-jH Jn ciucAOii, by all Dnvooiti* e- 1 br 
aviucrv la Sltsiicicc cvcryw!ji.r«, " ' 

® JOHN C. BAKER & GO'S 

CITRATE MAGNESIA 

.«ia« nJi.J 1 xailvclao.stsoi C:... i. . ., ., c - 

♦ .!.| cure urti k li.uu-.cUv.-, a,... th:.t i..:u:J. IM . i i'...- 
l..ir«r. wbicli is !;k- ^u^t• fi- .u-r u: u.ju.e Vuea-.-, 
iioiwiiij-u o'.u.i t) uiir t'LJ>l.U.{.Mt.D fcl-HtttX 1 "si- 
i;.U cnUAlfc OK .\JA-!.Nl..>..V. tor fc-vi.u lrc»lurc.» 
v. « . 'teni jjitfi l,y l:ii()rii<lfiicc or by toil, .t i.f.vt-s 
Iifi-.f a I'anacj. U l»s;jarit.!.i,' .ii.d oo i>ilv».,_|,,u,,ije. 
»> I f'- vi;tt;u:r tiiau t" >|IJ.•:,•^- VV.iH^r f.r .nur i.u.u.sci 
ui««.«-viT, wti'ie (», irrsfc !.«•;.■. .sgiuirj:iu-tMi i,»'ii.> periiij- 
I -. I. : i.c UaOe iu,'j<ticd ;rj2» ciilcato t y aU fV tu.caalc 

JOHN C. BA^^ER i:^z CO., 

P It o p i: I n T n 6 , 
718 M tuK?,T STr.KF.r, Piiit.Ai»KU'in.v. 



lihe unto hlro, 



Sh 



ai;opec w>)i 



■ Id contain 



more Ltju3> .5 ;«.-! 'o-s abo to uccouiuiodatc 
ru i:*o people 

Kg Cltti;;! Pttooi' IlKqvir.ED. — It Iuh 
jjot yet been publicly denied that th<; ".7* 
Chittiical ii'ij.tnnuj made by D. B. Pe 
L.tnd & Go , is till that i:s tiieiidi hare 
cla:med — th.it is a pure and wiioh-soine 
article, 'ibis taiinot be denied in face of 
the t;\stinionj of cLejciota and those best 
qualiii .d to ji.'!;;e. It is much better than 
Soilix- For s.ile by P. M. J^torer. 

" ill-: Pi.i'fc; CoATrf." — Thtre is :i certain 
, orl'o 1 i)f the War lliat wili i:c\-er ^'o into 
ihe rcjul.ir bistoih;s, nor be ctnbo lied in 
romance or ifetry, which i. a real 
p:;rt of it, and much of it icj wcH pri.'.5ented 
,':;d will be 1 reserved in •' TJjc iJiite Coat.s,"' 
.1 worh juil issued \y Jone^ Inollicr? iV Co., 
C'jicajfo. 

£?3°'At the C'utile Fair held ou Mai.day 
la«r, Kdward Jordan, of Clendalo, told a 
hciur, two yrr.r.s r.i.d two roo:iths old, for 
the sum of $il.O0. IIo haj four more lor 
8 do at the same price. 



A Choice library of Mnsic- 

Tiii; UxiTCD St.vtes Mi-sical Peticw, 
published by J. L. Peler.<!, 'JOO Broadway, 
>-ew York, is before us, and merits the at» 
teutiou of all loveis of rau.^ic. It is a 
niauimoth monthly magazine, shec'.-aiusic 
size, containing over seycnteeu pa;je3 of 
mucical i:ews, reviews, and choice art 
items, every line v'' which is roadnblc, aid 
we should bay, iniuilvablc lo all musidans. 
'i ilia alone is well worth a year's subscrip- 
tiou, which is only $2, The publishers, 
however, do not sto • here, for, in addition 
to t'ic above, each nunib.r contains fuvr 
pitas of c/iuicf nrw inu^ic by tlio bfst uit- 
Ins ni Jlinmai, thus ;:ivin;,' a select libra- 
ry of new niusie at such a low r.ife that 
even the poorest may indulge in what Iul-^ 
biihcrto been eonsidcrcd a lii.vury- 

The inusie in the Kkviiiu ts "J tin- brs'. 
a3 tiic fo'lowin^- select lijt will le.-tify, ail 
of which liis jqpcnrtd witiiin its ])^^^^^ 
during the last si.\ mouth : '• Xoia O'Ne^d," 
"Katy MeFetran." " Yoii've been a friend 
to me," and " Kiss mc <iood-bye, d:;rli::p,' 
all by Will. S. Hays ; "Good-bye, but come 
a^ain,'' at.d '• Po you tliia'i ilie moon could 
have seen us?' by J. P^. Th.tsna.s ; "All} 
Pay," and *' Lialc Bro.va Church." bj 
William .S. ri;!s; ".Maribcdl,*' by Dankb ; 
"Let the dead uud the beuuti.'ul rest," 
" Ijieax, hreiih. sea,' etc. 

Also Kinl-el's " Heavenly Thoughts"' acid 
•' Maiden's Blush h'chotti;che," .'NJaci-'.- 
"pRIua.^k Pe--e" and " White P.o.,c March, 
aud several other choice piece.-*, amjuuiicp 
in all to C3 at rtt .i! prij.-s. 

The C. 3. rdi.iCAt. :-:viEW it publiah«»«' 
at t'2 rt-r yri.r; *i:;^:!c copies, iO c»i,t.s.— 
N'j tiiusi.al faiuiif shoald bo without it. 




GranU Jury, /.pnl Teio, 1<jS8. 



Andrew Schneider, 
iicoT^e Hinlih, 
N. .M. P. Uc.MuKeii, 
Samuel .McC'.'V, 
J. B. Iteiter, 
Peter J. Ual^es, 
K.irl Schtds, 
Juhn lu is, 
Peter Pader, 
lp.i;,'h Johticon, 
J.'.nics McCariViv, 



J. ii. IIuntsuLin. 



John .Sohw.irtz, 
Peter (teyern.ann, 
h. \. Tiiclie?, 
John P.ily, 
AiuL^i. Klein, 
Marii;i Thornton, 
Aut.ju I'a.-te'l, 
M ichutl .Maloney, 
Iho mas P. KiiiJ, 
Michael fceifert, 
Georje Parker, 



Potit Jury, April Tsrm, 1068. 



Geor.,'<.' M.:rphy, 
Fred. I'eters, 
IMer Yi'st, 
-Michael Harvey, 
II .bert K!oeel%ii;r, 



Gir^ui\ ! iil!.iibi;r;rtr, t^. II 



Thomas Kennelich, 
John lliekev, 
F. X. liiisi'hcr, 
Va:>,\\ vi\ Jor h.ll, 
Peter 'di r-eu.-,, 



Jo.sepii Viiruer. 
^'icl.olai \\ ;>;.M.er, 
Wii.'; 'i.i Mo-nv, 
Juhii i-i^ei,er, 
11. 11. Hir.."'h, 
Jjha ilolle.-l!!. 



• r 



^ialaul I Lord, 

Mitthew j;o:i)K;!y, 

If. IX. .ilorreil, 
Ti.o.i; .-. v.»al!i;i i^di, 
,.'.)ua i-d;ik;Mmaier, 
Michael Me-Muhju. 



-•— ♦- 



— A chr.rity fair held ia Minuf^apori.^ rc- 
cuVy realised the respectable su;a of 
$!,72:.U'. 



ES^Tie nijjahly Cattle Fi'ir at :-l:i»ko 
peo on iPjuday i.sl was pr.tty wcdl attend- 
ed coi;3iJcrin,.j the st.ite of the roavta. The 
uniLet i;0',vv'.er wa.-. i.ol very well provi.ltd 
■>i:h fcithcr f.U cattle or woil.iu^ teaai?. 
* ■ i* ■ '■ 

— A Uian ctiu ^o nh.u;,' without adver 
tiaing i.i,d to tan a v.iv.ui v.itLuul giea^iu.? 
but it goes hard. 



— Pillon O'Pii.n, P.^q., ft,r several 
mo.ilhs past editor of tho Nonhwesteru 
Chronicle, has s.vercd his coiiiieeiicii with 
chat p:.per, aad is goii:^' cast to l-.- gone 
s tuc tiir.e. 



«v>.*^ A ue 



oth-r cvcniii^ not f;ir f.-oni 
" :.kopte, a lover who was hli^htcd by his 
ladylove, \cry niod(;.uljr aAitil another 
young lady if she would let him sp^'nd the 
ovcuiu^' v.iih her. " Xo," she an;jr;!v- ri.- 
p'd.Jj "that's what I won';." "Whyl'- 
replied he, "you i.eed't bo so fussy 1 1 
didn't mean thio evcia.-ii.', but some -tormv 
one when I can't go arywh- re elae." 



Xd" Vi'e copy l!ie .'oliovvinjr bit of advlcf 
to our farniera fro:u the Dod^o County 
Rfpubtiuin \uih rd'civnce to puttln^^ out 
fruit trees : 

** Have you a fi^r.-n and no nrohard ? I 
not, you can d.) n;» letter job t!i>' eoinin,.' 
se.i.-o!i :h lu to j)ut o 'C ntit. It will be th. 
hcfti iii'.tsiment that v,-e iiiiow of. A youii, 
ihrifty orehari, of a well .stl.-ele.l ami 
hardy vjritty. wii!, ;jood lariuors, ii;creasi 
ihe vubie of yo.'r !.)i;d-i to a ;;ce it extern 
Fr.r.t rai.-ing in .\;iniiesola i.-^ no I:.::;;«r : 
l)robler.i. Ji h;is bc.M ihoioaijhiv tcsltjj 
Tco ri^ht vari-.tie.'?, ri-htly hamfied, a'ui 
c.ircd lor will do well. Yj.ir t.\es, !iiv> 
tatc, or trine, u ill cjiistaniiy pruL're--.--, am. 
a.s ihey extend iliiir r>)t.s downvvard aii' 
Ihtir lops up.vard and i»ile layer tilur hivei 
upon their eircuiuibreuce, th^y will jiista.- 

■■'l^'rC £..i'» _,Vi-. vv'-'W-i .i.j j.i niwj wire ....^ 
L . 8. bonds. I'ht; m.ir.'tet for j;ood fruit is 
unUmited aud we would have no;.e others 
cjltivatcd."' 

For the benefit of our readers we will add 
that Jud;,'e Ilawliins, of this eountv, has a 
youui; orchard in beaiin;,', and by manv 
ycaro*expenenco has acquired a knowled-e 
of the hard) varieties of apple tix-e.H tiiai 
win certainly wiihsland our climate and 
thrive. Atiy one iaten.iing to plant fruit 
trees would do well to cousalt Judj:e Hawk- 
lus us to the varieties. 



^Hir- The Anoka Prcs.s learns that the 
lumberin- interest in the Viilley of liu. 
Suuhe and Pum rivers i.i prospering this 
season. One compiiny have banked t'OO, 
000 feet of logs nu' y to cjme down vvhei. 
the livcr opens. 



i'lED. 

At lloline. lll'.nolit. on luc ;.i:i. of re'.raaiy. Mrs- 
LLCV -M. tTUUU..!;, loriiicrlv a nsiafulof St. Law 
riucc, :iul wi.j* . t Mm. II. SloJ ttr. 



:22rThe Anoka C<»uKty Press oomoa to 
U3 this week enlarged aud greatly impiovcd 
The reasuu of this is tit.', a ijood luanv 
men up at Anoka jay the printer. 



f 



Great Dis-ccvsiy ! 

r. T 2 i; Y M A .\ II 1 .^ v.- N A i; T 1 S T 
A feCIK.MlFIC AVOvpKU. 

Ao tiistrument by whi^h auy p.-rson can 
t..^** Correct Lilutipsses or Phofo;;raphs 
'i r.ii irx«'ritni»*nt » irh lull instructioui sent 
l>v j.Tuil tor ou»" dtJt.ir. Address, 

C. H. A. MPS t CO., 
18i lirc^^t;-, New York. 



Sewinp. Mvcai::E3. — Notice i» herebv 
given I hat I am t -rout i\ r tho salo vi' 
Sing-er's Sfcwiug Machine. I will eel! 
ihe.M! -Miichiiiefi »>i .\I,«iin;"ictorv prices — 
S:de rooms at Schwiitti" Cloihi-.ij Store, ia 
6liako|)Pt». 

Pated Pod?, I'GT. 

JOUN' SCTITARTZ. 



— .\ nfvf pn;rrir;!l Las be?!! put in cp<?r 
I Bliou at !liaceap0os. 



AGB.Ni>. WANIi.P FUR 

TrJJ:. BLUE-COATS, 

Aai iiow iliey Lived, roa^jlii cavi 
» icu for the IJni:*:i. 

WITH 

C'iiilAT ilii:Si2LLi:.M. 

Comprioing Xarraiivcs of P.i-so al Adven- 
ture, Thrilliiig P.cideut-., Uari.v Ivv- 
l)lcitd, lieioie l.!»eu», Wo.iderful 
liicapes, Li.'e iu ih,' Ci.mj., 
i'lcld and iloSjiiiuI j Ad- 
VtMituiesot •"•piei iiiid 
Stouts, To;{ether • 
with tuc bongs, lia!..ids. 
Anecdotes and iii:ii.oro'<.j 
1 n e i d e u I s of the War. 
lPn!<nJidi')/ ll'us!rat>J, tciL'i onr lUii n.ie 
I'urUaiis aiiJ liaivtij'ui Ei»i::ruv'.)tgc. 

iUc.e isa icrtaiii jjortioii 111 lim wartliat tviu ii vi-; 
go liiiu il.o r.:.;ui-r i.l. loi.ir, i.u.- Levui^o icii lii . .• 
ii.aUt.l-ur l)iHli.>, w1;.lIi i.-> u wry iruljjaitof It.ai..: 
w.il.U ;.n-fi-rv»u.C"liV-.v to nucci-oriii'i. ».cui-jMi..n»a 
bi tier ItiiiM u: I'li-hpifll o I I lie coiitlicl t^iaii l,i;.<.v ,jiy 
r,'|iurt-i 4,r cardial i.i-.rrativ.:, <■■ ek ei.ts, uiii i!i:.s |> ..i 
lii..y l>j lal.U', li.c- ;;uA-.li>, 4;.o lun. tlu ('■>ll>"> "> ^■''^■ 
War. 'iiiU il'K. li'uU;, i!u' ctialKi. t'l' ul tl.« I. J' i ^^, ti.' 
uuiuor •;■ ihr »u;.iicr><. t!ic i.fVotiun ot \»<'i..tii. ine 
!<r.i\ I'ly i.i Dit a, till- t>lai. tu t,u,- Lert»». tut rauiaUtc 
aiiU ha!''l9:iie'> '>! ciio s4rv:cu. 

"il.c \a;i'iit iiiii! i'.iavo li,-arte.l, the IMc urcsqi,* an 1 
Oi'anii.iK, i!»e \',it;y ant .'>lui ve.uu„, lU- I'oii nr tiiii 
Ha : li< lie, .iiid flic » uule i'rtUx.uiiia i>t Hi ^ War aic iiuiH. 
tinil.i.it:l V luiiru.Mil in u i.ia.'-lcrly iiiaenrr, i>c ojicc 
bijiuiica! 1.IKI iuniatiti<: ivuuciii'i; it t^ic Un.-ttt aiiiL.It:, 
unl<)ar, liniiidiii iiuu rcauablt t«.«>l: .liat lUei^urUaa 

Callv.l fuftll 

A l^,i^•.UllIlt r« rrii og irst'>u;!oii may !><• f.ti'il In 
ev.iy t.i<c, u> tJl.'tli'ii'; U''l..i'»lMUli.-.fcl » .i.aiiu aui ini- 
tio li.>tury. are akil.la'ly l.itef Wuvuit lu tut* «urfc»i 
aural> at. 

*eiii. fr iTrf :larsaiiJ »ee oej t.n.'.F, auil a ft:iUe- 
•(.■rltlivuel tf.iwuiK. .^c-tii a.», 

ij> t.^. i.l.ViilLR;< L C>.. ilhUizc. \\\. 





H0:FLAND'S GERMAN BITTERS, 

AND 

mmmi mm\ toiic. 

Prepared by Dr. C. iM. JACKSON, 

1'1iiladi:lpuia, ia. 

TisGralRenietosfirallDMSs 



Of TU3 



LIVER, STOMACH, or 
DIGESTIVE OSGMTS. 

Eoo3and^s German Bitters 

u-u f'Hinxi-i'.l i>f tb<' jvure Jniotwi (or. aa ttjoiy arc ratill- 
cliiiUly t«-i iiiv.l, /'.r jii w I ^VMW* (ruft') cf Il'Otd, 
IliTliti and l>.i«!<.i(, '^_^.S| maliUiif II prr{nra- 



, i.-:it«d, .in.l «uitrcl y 
atiinixUirt <J a»y 



Tlio irtoin^icli, f ruiu a rariftiy of <-j«j»««, iucn M Itw 
t."«:Hlloii. l)y:^^.*pHl;^ ,4^^^^ N«r»-.-tw> Ufl.lhl 
( Jc, !•< very Hjit to iSl ]■ tuv* Itu futicihj 
J^r.-n.Cfc'l. TU<i re- \^^^^ iult cf v blcSi Ij, U. 
tho piitivut •ulTiri ftviu i«vur»l cr Ui. 



ti -ii, liiglily r'/!ipeii 
/"•e' from Alcufujdc 
hitvi. 

HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIO 

1h i comlrlutill « of nil t.'iti IIcr«^li<;^Jtl^ (.•! tlit« flltt,>r.>, 
wllL flie rii'fst iro-il'ty of .SiinAi fyi*a Htun, Ora»jf»s 
I'M., niHkhtK oil*' iif ttio nvi't jiliMuvUit auJ ajrovaOto 
rwi.ioli.w ev.r alfercJ «<■ ll.u piiUic. 

Ttm'w priferrtoK a ilwliciuo fro* from AlcoUulli; 
•dii.lxi .rt, will ti,-j 

Hoofland's German Bitters. 

Ii: c-(*o» ...f iiervoiiH J*i>r«»B»wu, \»beu •omc okvliv^llo 
sti:i.ulu4 i3 uectiinaiy, 

HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIC 

eb->nkl liM Uied. 

Tbr Bi»»«r« i>r fU»Tonk arst.oth ^lu^ly gooJ, ti»J 
Ct'bt.ilu fUo wuiie niC'li.laal Tlrtui^ 
Tlio irtoin^icli, f ruiu a rariftiy of <-j«j»««, iuch •« Ttwli. 

>i«r»-.-twi Ufl'lhty, 

iuits 

IjK 

lacr* 

of tiiij f j'luwlnj: di«e»»«ri : 

Consttpation, Flatulence, T award Pfles, 

Fulnt-si* of Blood to x^o Head, Acidi- 

ty of the Stomach, ritasoa. lt«*rt« 

burn, Disgubt for iho Pool, 

Fulness or Weigh* in tUo 

iStomach. Sour Eructa- 
tions, SiakiuK or I'iutt^r- 
Ing at the ir'it of tno ntumaoh. 
Swimming of tha Ueaii, Eurrioct 
or DifUcuR UreathiaK, FiUtt^riiiE at 
tho Ueart, CHoltins or 3ufl'ooftnns Sea- 
sations when ia a lijyins Pcsture, 
Dimness of Vision, Dcta oi* Weba 
before the Sight, Dull i'uin ia 
tho IleaJ, Ceilci«ncy of 

Perspiration, yellow- 
ness of ,^e7'*^*\ thj t.Lin 
and Eyes, fc^ JM Puin la tho 
Side, liucic. V- V>cy O h o 8 t, 
Limis. etc., , " ." *l ^^, °u 

FiusUe.T of Heat. Burnicg in tho riesb, 
Coustaiiu ImHi;iniiis:3 ot Evil, aua 
Ureat Depression of Spii-its, 

TliP^o ri'!ne<t'n «ill errfctiii'.ly cnr» Liver 
Comi.l lint. Jaiei.ll-P, I>y!^I>(■^)^i:^ C'hr.niio or Nervfifls 
DoW.litv. fliioiik biarrbasi, Dist-n-v .f lliB Ki'liieyiS 
niitl III! I)i^'ea>'•M mining from u Di«ordcrcd Uvor, 
StKiiiath, or liitcstiiitb. 

jIJ3E333ITjXT-'?r, 

I!o<inI<i:i£; from .•>!»>' <":Jn»*o v. JiafovfT t 

viios i i; vnoN oi' ru s: hv.«» rr.M, ^ 

iiK^iicotl l»y Ki'voro I-:»I)or, iiinrU- 
tthlpM. IJxptisuns I'cvprs, etc. 

Th.'ro ij noiuiliiiiiecitiin- i-ini*! totju">r>Mneil!«i 
111 iij'h cast.;. A ton- lU. 1 vi^...- i.-i i!iip,-ii toil lo tlio 
wli,.le l?v«U'i!i, tbc 'Jm"^l| AppetitoUS:rrr.-th. 
enwl. {•M'\ ii en fiWid j"ye(l, tlio •toiiiaeh 
ili'oiti pioijiiit'.v, r^BL^ tliu I'looU is ponntj.!, 
til- cc.mi"li-.\i'>u io '^^ com t9 no iml o;iJ 
li'>.-illby. tlio yellow tinpo :a eraaicitcl fr,m tbo 
rye*, « l.l>«.iii i« civon ti th»cUeo6s, aiiJ ll.u wciilt 
aii'.l nervous iavAiii bccjC^^Ji nattvai ikttJ Uiwiu^ 
buiiiji. 

Persona A'lvnncM tn Ll/i', 
An.l fc-elliig tue liana of time wr-is,-arn3 hrnTity Bf«a 
thoiii. Willi all its atle'i'Unt IIU. will flnJ In thu \.v 
«.f lh<*,sHrrrKK8,ortlie TONIC, an «llxir tl.at wit' 
tnstill new life into tUelr Toii.''. restore in n uienjur* 
tliO cnt-rpy Mi.l ardor of nioie youthful Jut*. UuiU 
up llifir slinmkfn f-rin^ and givu b«alU» ftaJ b»;>pl 
fitu to llivir reui-iiuiu;; yMf i. 

NOTICE. 

It is • wcll-ostslliblid f:t;t Ci^t fury «M»-ri»Uo( 
thr fi'iii.tla p.iiii,,ii of jny ir.r )ii>iii.lji'>it'a ara 

wMi'ia ill tUo uiij.,y H ui.-ut ufistXAihiiilili; 

jr, to »!«• th,lr ov<u JH^^J'xi.r'—fii'n, '•n<rv»r 
feci well." 'ih.'Ti'.ro ^^^^ i.HsciJ.-letoMof all 
tu'T^-y. extieiiiely nervoni. ttf.u ha\o li.' a(4vtit :. 

To lliij i;la<<j cf pcrsoiM Uiti UlTIiU;^ w tXA 



I JUST PUBLISHED, 

ii ■ Oi «i. 

BASSINI'S 

Twenty Melodic Exercises, 

1\ For.M OF 

Solfeggios for Soprano or Uezzo 
Soprano Voices, 

I.NTi:Xt)ED A3 

Studies to acquire the Art of 
Sinjm^. 

" Those exercises were composed to be 
u.'^ed simultaiieou.'ily with hid fvstetP, 
" Tm; AuT ok &iNiii.Mi," or with auv otkn- 
iiiflhoil for the cultivation of the voice, 
and will take the place of COXCONK'.S 
.SOLFPliCilOf^; beinii more melodious 
and bettor adapted for teaching. 

"Some of tbe?e exercise^ aie Fnecially 
beautiful as well aa usefu', a minfilinrf of 
the dulcc et utile, which sccur-ii the i.t- 
tert^st as well a.s tho itr.proveniitit of the 
student. The various stylcb developed 
ill these exercisva render thuin invalm.ble 
in an educational point of view, a.- they 
tend to eclarge the inteiiitjonce and the 
uppreciation, and at the btm.e time form 
tho taste of the pupil. Tliey uiuM bo 
studied c«i-cfully with rcfereuce to the 
iBOumerablo luatks cf c.\pn'it>ion and 
forms of orDaaietitation. Upou the nd- 
nule accuracy with which the--c are uc- 
coinprr<lied depends the r-ctual stcr.irg 
advuncerncnt of the pupil; tmy eva-on 
or sluni.!^-- in tlie.se rvspectsit« time aud 
eff-irl utterly wa.sled. wbik*. ou the other 
hand, a clos-e and patient iiivcuiijiuliot^* 
and a iiiin.iteiy faithful execuMon of then., 
will c^ive tiije.vpecled power and rac.:i*y, 
ufKl open (o the .student tho mentis and 
resource.- by nlijcl irrent artif-! ;ri.duci 
thii'- mo.-t brillJH.iit n\;<\ jiruf-.t.ud cliecl.'-. 
— ff atacn's ,1rt Jovrnul. 

In Tv^o Vfinrnps. 

Price, e.teh. in JKiards, l.ttnil, $2 OC 
i\o do in Ch.th, Rcttiil. li 50 

.\ rf.iMrLi: C'lJiY sent by Mail. ]>osl t>a;d 
on receipt of Wlnilesale Price, ^"1 1.50. 

Publi-shed bv \VM. HALL .N: "i^CN, 
Xo. 543 llroadw ly, New York, 

Pabli^her8 and dei;lti.-i in Mu.-ie, nnd 

Mdnnfaciurers cf FLUTlhS. FIFF.S. 

r LAciLoLPTi.'-, &(:.. A:c., ic. b'cud 

Tor catali'truc of rricc5. n-lS 



NEW DRUG STORE 



.^^ 



-•-«-«^-*- 



EDWARD G. IIALiiE, 

A^UXT DOOR TO GEYERMANN'S STORE. 

Iiespectfullv announces lo the citizens of Shakopec, and Vicinii/ 
that ht Ims just oi;ened a complete stock of 

Drugs and MccliciiieSj Perfumery, Patent Medi- 
cines, Toilet ArJclcs, Combs, Brushes, 
Stationery, Lamps, Pure "Wines and Licfuors, 
and all other articles usually found in a 
Drug Store. 



Petrolcne Fluid constantly on hand and 
for sale. ^S^ 



Pk. L. E. ?i!or.rxOv.- keeps his ofilce at tho Not;* Dru 



Stcrc. 






B 



MJ1E3 



ny 




! 






riNPCLK & laYOX 

I-OCK STICK 

3 c ID i n 9 ill a £ !] t u c , 



The o.viy Machine .-<» perfoeted tlu.t 
entire .satisfaciiuii i.s irn.truatecd or the 
piircii.nse money refui. dod. 

Where we have no Ai-'cnl a sample 
.Machine will behold al very low prii •■. 
.nd a Loea! Au'ont ajtpointed on tl.c 
•nost fav. r.'ble terms, 

X. P.— 'eiiil for {'iic'iliir. Travelu j; 
.\;ze!Hs wanie 1. ifalary, l.ber..!. 

1)^1 ijr.o.viiwvv ^scw Vi.rk 



^t «»**«-« 



1:1 PEO-JATL. COUrvT. 

•SCO if C'-l '^iV; Fvbia.iiy 'i ei 1.1. 
Fcbruirv jiu, Ittih.!. 

Ia Ihe nrttter of t.ie 1, slate of Joh:: J. 
.M'ltrict', f)i'eea.-,et!. 

On readini; aud lilinj the peiitinn oi 
Peter C. Mattice, of Peile Plaine, in 
tiic Coun'y of ricott f.r,!i >';itt' of .Min- 
nesota, pr.tyini.- for ro;sohs theicin staled 
l!:i.t L.tler.-. if Adu:ii.i-ii::ti n on tin 
i'islato of the siiiij del e:. .11* 1. t:y Ic h- 
S'Jad to Jontttlian (Jit.,.;.a rd-ii. 

It i.»- ordered liiut fcJalUMinv.'he fci vei t: 
uuy of Mareii, i.'.i."'tf, al l;) •j'i1< t'; in the 
f-rcrioon at tii- eiiiceofili. Ji,dj:e id' Pio- 
bate, i.t the town of Siuikop.-- in -aid 
coun y bo t'.s.-i.;iitd for tl.f' Ifar'nf.' ul 
said pelitioij. aud iha» the leir« <.f ia* 
of ti:e .said tJecca-.' d. if a"y there b , i.!ii' 
ad ot tier |)er-ol,^ i^iterestc ! iu the j^jmi 
estate, arc leipiircd lu be- present ul Ui;.. 
time and place to .show c.niFt', if ».n> 
thcTt* be, wliy the prryi r of i-uid pctJiio > 



af 










>/J| 






TIjY 



AUn C^TLMBY 



T^ 



'-(r 
'♦*'. 



•?^ 



CUPNEP OF I!0LMi:3 AND FIPST STPvEET?, SIPVKOPL'.^ MIXXKSOTA. 



a:t.^ia^ae»— ■■■■ ■■ mil ulii'W' fyig^ryCT^-o^T .'orM 

J. L. IlUNTb.MAN. 



-; i?. p. now 



SIIAKOPEE MINNESOTA 



ULALRRS IN 








i 



J'J CJ 






L^- c I. mwM 












Bon't iorgct the place — Cor- liolines & First Sts, 



•Jimijv*i»p 






H. S. JIOLTON.J 



i%./ 



"3'.^' 






~. <» 



ii.'i.rkf:ns 




k 




C/cmer c* .tiO::ncs c^ 






Cf 7. ^? 



^opcc, r.Ii:i--i9»<:la. 



i...A^.ari' e«^,'cia:iv tv.OMiUVU !;■!« 

WEAK AND DELICATE CHILDREN 

Are in.i le (.truii;: I'y Il.c U"C n" oltli-r • f i'i»we romo 
diea. Tliey will euro evvrjr Ciuie cf U.Vlt.VbML'3, 
williniit I III. 

Tliouuiidi of cert Ideate* Jirto awnmnlatoJ In tl>« 
hnnd:) of lli« iirnpiiilcr, but Rj'tce vill ftllnw of ll>« 
|>iililiv'ali<^n <<t l.ut u fow. Tbowc, it will t>t- iLri<rv*d, 
aie tiiMi of uote x..\ bf liucli fctkialm^ U_'i. \um-j iaust 
lie btlivVi^i. 



\ siiOUiii llijl 



• 1.(1 



TESTIMONIALS. 
iiox. CEO. \\. Avoaow.iR:', 

n>if/ Juitii-e </ Lh( .'^vfrrvv C'urt of JH., wrlUx: 
J'hiU'U!jJ,i3, >tarch 10, IW:. 
'• I And 'Tl.xilland'n /f^ 0..nn.«n PItteiVU 
a Itouil touir, u^M'fiil /a»ij|k ia di:io«.?e* uf tho 
di);e>itiTe .'lpii!«, and .^J^ I^Btf of great livuelll io 
cajtoji iif licLiiity, aiiJ m;»Ji; kf Itrrvijnf 

action iU ibe ^ybtcDJ. Tttura traly, 

GK\ W. WO'">r)WAK^." 

nox. j.iMi:** Tiio.tiri.ox, 

J'hilaJf'i'Kia, Aj til -■^ 1>AA, 
'■ T enr»«ider 'Ilnofland"* Gernivi Bittsrs' a ra/u'il'd 
m.-ilniM iu CiUo <'t rttttu k^ of IiiUiiv<ii.>Ti cr 1 v»;h;» 
tla. I COA cei't-v thi.'> from my exi>ri icuvo vf It. 
Ifuurc, »flb reej.ptf, 

JAM."^* T;io;.tl^«^!^.- 
rrom Her. JCS. 11. liON.inD, I>. P., 

J^i'lnr of lie T--nlU ltaf<ist C'lurcA, I'Mt.i>;,Jp\ui. 
Th. Jjcj.tnn — I'ear ^lr : 1 have \mn fr«>»ju»mlv r*- 
qtit-'tod t.i c<iiiiiact my irk.)i.> with roeuninioiii'ati'>ni 
of diil.'reiit l.i:. li i.f'i.iL'lM ino^ tut re^afdiii,; lUo 
rra/'ticc i-jcut o.'i.iy *f^^ -"V* '»I'I'r'~pr;.>tcK|vera, 
I li^iTo ill all cttMS I ^Pk I ilccl;ii>-,l : l.ut vilii 
arlervr v'o^'f *i ^••ri (^, aftj ""• inst.iniX'* ntid 
jiArti-iiliuly ia :iiy o*n tkiuiiy, of iho 

UdOfulnosK of Dr. ilo .K.^n-rsOemian l;ilter«, I d-i^rt 

..i .. .„<...... ,..11 • 



Tcalcrs la 

vj €^ood^5>5 Bresr^i Goods^ Clothlng^j 

Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Cap?, 



A;id 1: I, r«iithvr vrd^rcJ, that notic. j 
of the lore.:;oin{; order, be •.;Iveii in Ih'' 
Shakopee Ar;-!!-!, a weekly uew.'^pape: 
pr nteil and p-ibl.siied atShakopeeiU the 
^aid Count V «>f."^coti.for tim e aueceriiv< 



:m o .rr;. oi'^r- i"*-^ «^ 



B»5:r,.cio c:ic:^tl3.lzi.iic. oto, oto, 



M'e<'t\>, 



nreviiMss to .~rti,l hcari:);?. 



Paled Fe!)niav .jth, 1^08. 

L li. HAW KIN.-', 

.Tndu'C of Proliu'p. 



ALJUITI C; WOCDEUaY'3 
O ^. ITL Z^ X .A. cr.- JTI 












r.v. 



p;'^^ Tho highest mi.rhct price p.'.iU lor V;hcat, Furs, and II 
hinds of country produce. 

^SrCall and ice. V.'e ate DOUXD XOT TO BE U-NDEPSOLD by any flra ii: tl« 
Miuticsola Val.cy. 



l U M ■ ' - ' ^ j y*;3jrr^^ 



U P J i . W IP* U l ■ 



JACOB UOl'FEirr, 



— DEATi:?. IN — 



fur oure fimii my UiU.%1 cccrs.-. to n;jirii*« my full 
ConTiOti'.n fhiti/or /jrnrral lUinlitf n/tie tyttirm. a' -l 

Trrrfkiraiu'V.. Jii « mif c«m it iiiiiy fill ; I i;t u--imliy, 
I d'>nl:t not. it will b« vory IwiieliciiU Ut ihjuo v.'lM> 
■oHir fiuia lUe uI-ct« cau^s. 

You:*, very re*p«tfiilly, 

J. 11 KUNNAT.a, 
Eishth, tvww Coatoa tt, 

rr*ra Rev. F.. I*. ITXn.i:,!., 

Afi't'trU J-ilUt^ Ciri.'fU.H C-'ir'niclf, rhila-UpTiia. 

I l.avi. d, liri'-l dt.;:Jo.l Kiufii fr\<n tl.« uiw c4 
nc'llimt's OeiTiiau lt.ttc:i, and feel i: my pHtU&K* 
to it-ooiniueiid ilicm aa a mc*t v^Iiiablo tor.lc. to hJI 
wi.j a.-i Biif'eiir..; fn-i/i finernl •k'l.Llity or fr>.m «H»' 
lUUiUii ftoiu Jt.rulico<ii<Mil ol tl;e Ilrcr. 
Vv-um trule, 

tl'. tliXI'AT.L 



Carriaroe i 
tiotis!, Ptd>,*, ;. 
t Licture<l to or 
! Painii: ? 'iti 
I ?ntisfuctori:\ 0- 
."aii'ed til i-e .. 
."ri'.'cs re:iv<Mt!ib' 

Is. n.— acj- 

?':/->nCi t!<.u >\iih < 
t;h"t' on th" f c 

.SF.Cn?<D c 

Petwceti the <r. 

Jid tVo Pi iic'vl. 

Tir llf nieiiibcr 





t^. 


'i dtsf 


rip. 


CC, f.l 


ii*«j • 


:-e. 




•.p;ly 


at.i 


• o-.k 


IV ar 


.litv. 


nat 



r-L." •.:•«'« 



l^iv 1 



CVUTION. 

tI(v^f^^IK^•s CfroJJr. r..nic':.;< ar^ «vnpt"rri~'tci. 
goo that Ow •i?n kt mf\^ 7iii_^ r.re of ('. M. JACK- 
i'ON Mou the«n|i Ed '^ I"'' << •■«t» ;-..tliu. 
All (.tt»'i«ine O'un jEjL_^|)^ Orfiit. 

I'liiMijiul oi«ca vn.l >TaTf>;tory 

at tl>e Oi-r:i>an McJWlut L ; ro, Ni. (31 A1;CU SLiw«(, 

lt*iivi^^l ll"V 

CHAUcr/i .n. ir*'*s.«i. 

CieJ lu.tii rii;',.;Ui, To^'riclvr, 
fonr^tlr C. M. 3kC-iL.>a A (Xx 

Uoi'iCaDTiCeru.ui iii-'i-ri*, p"-'.-<ttl« fl CO 

l.v.'.;\i 1 6 00 

IIoo!laiid'«<1-rinanT.v. !-.;■.«; rr'ini-.uii-tK^tWa.l M i 

I>er U.ttie. or a liulf it :> i, f v 7 M I 

Ai' I>o o.-'t f .tiv ; to 
iMti', is otiJor to t«t ti.« 




Minr-csota Vii!h 



U'-.'.i! further nolict, ". : . 
ns fcliow* t 



;oae ic 

."DufTy 

'ro us 

•"5 



jad. 



•.^;i; ran 




^0 v^-^J^hv. 




Li: 



«x^ '. ii.a weU th« artloie j'tMt j .■• t^ i 

gcaclHo. I Lenv,-; rt Paul, 

Arrive at ^^t. P;.u1. 



For SMo I>y oil Drojslstd »nd I>o.-il« 



1. M 

7 45 

11.50- 



r. M. 

2. .in 



! iT. PAUl t •.JN\'K.\r0L!3 TRAINS 



II o o f I a El 4 ^ u 



A. M. 

I.cure Pnlr.t V'nM. t*.0.\ 
.•\rr;vcr»f«:.P.»:I. II,*') 



r. M. 


r. -J. 


l.lo 


i\?> 


:i..^i> 


?.45 



Saddlery KdiuW^re, 

florso Collars, 

LEWIS .^TRFiT, . 



ru..ciiAS. LOUD, 

SUA KOPEC, MINN. 

0- 

Atl profe»ViniiiCi".i pri-!i?t^y a('en4»1 K>. 
<^ .!•>;• at It JW.; l>ri^ Sli.c. aiJSai 




Ri\*IA!^ 




S 1 5« 



'M:'c month 1 - T.A MP/S 
F.iMILY KMTTINr: 

MAriiiNK rrnr^Mpn.ANT .\t tpk. 

PA Ills KXPO.SITfONI r>rr!drd •'•' 

PF3T fy th^ v<r,KT,n. Gr-ttlv itr.'n"v<'c'— 

r*rico rcduei d. Widen'S^r^ ynrrowp. T<'.;'tR 



, F.ln-«tt rri I'vpr^o^ h'riVesSt. Pau'.'l 1,5 a m 
j Trtirn 01 ihi' rft^d ni'iko close con- 
nection rt Mon lo'rv witS !i»»nj on Min- 
I n*'*otft C^^rnl Railroad for MinneHpoli.-*. 
I (>wntp:.r!\, V,'iriOn»» an' all piilnt.l S-.uth 
and Fi^t, and at L« .'^...Mir with Mintte- arid Plain. Kni's pair.-; with.'Ut coMifn;. — 
*ot;i .<i,^pe Comparj'j* Li.'.e cf btaSi 8 j Knits 2 l-Aiii h'ot k-< an Iforr— r'i ol.<. x^v'v. 
•r Lrf> Siftr. V'. P. ter. Mankato and j ."Su cts., Ti hours per d.-!v. fr. TO. "-, dov" 

per month. ?0 r>cr djv. ;?l:>r).fiO. Or-a' in- 



ll'-cl and Ti*". Shiy!.? .and Dou'de. P!'t' ed t 



»mpar-j » 
Hiftr. Vr. p. ter, 
nil I'xiiita wiHt t»n 1 s,Tit''iwe.-<t 
• ''•-•l«ef 



out of cn(i'^>b>rin»*n'. — 



F.ir PaV it ho 



n r-\r\ b.» procircd a< LMon ; iluoenMnt fa tho^o 
Ticl.' t OlSer. J.i'k.aon i'f^-ei, threft ^i^- A.-.r.-.Ti Wa.'ctki* I ---^-^j A.b'-'^r, e-. 
doora be'ovir tho Mer'^VatifV Hotel, and c!« sing gtnfin. Lams Kmtti.v.; M.-'ivv 
at tho D. n"' nt ".7.-«t >^i. Paul. i C iirAi^v, Davtnptri Iowa. 11 (J ^.ry 

•Ton: r. LIXCOL.^, Snp'V 'Gcttral A-ii.*.^ \,i'j ' 



isplatile Siciiian Hair Renera 

lilts f*(ood the test of seven years 
trial Of/ the public ; and no prcpa- 
rtifion for t/ic hair yet tliticoverect 
iri.'f. prodirre tho .fame Ocne/lciai 
results. It is a new scientific dis^ 
covery, couihininq the most power- 
ful and restorative agents in tho 
VEGETABLE KINGDOM. It restores 
GRAY HAIR TO ITS ORIGINAL YOUTH- 
FUL C0L03. li makes tlte gealn 
white and clean; cures dandruff' 
find humors, and falling out of thf 
ha'r* ""'^^ "'*'' make it yroivvpon 
bald Iteau.".; except in very ttficd 
persons, as it j ,:rniKhesthe nutr^ 
five principle by n.J'^/* the hati' 
is nourished and 8Upiyoi't?n. •*£ 
makes the hair moist, soft, (inH 
fjlosiif. and is unsurpassed as n 
HAia" DRESSING. 2« f* </<« cheapett 
preparatlo7t ever offered to the 
public, as one bottle will accom- 
plish more and last longer than 
three bottles of any otfier prepara^ 
Hon. 'i 

It is leeom mended and used bj 
tfu; First Medical Authority. 

The it'ondrrful results produced 
by our Siciliau Hair Heneiver 
h-ave inHueed tnany to inaniifac" 
%iir<f prepttrations for the IlfH^A 
under various names ; and in 
order to induce the trails an*i th« 
public to purchase their com- 
pounds, they have resorted tcfalse- 
hrmds, by cl4ti-ming they wtrre 
former jHtrtners, or had some con- 
nection with our 3Ir. Hall, anrt 
tlieir pre/Htration was similar to 
ours. Ih) not be deceived by tfiem: 
ruvchftse tti4i original: it ha* 
tU'ver been cqwtUed. Our Treatise 
on the Hair with certificates, serii 
freti by nuiil. See that each botiUt 
has our private lievenue Stamp 
over tlLc top of the bottle. All oth- 
m-sare imitalions. 

rWP.Hall & Co., ^»rcp'$» Nashua, N. H, 

ttMl t/t/ all l>ruoyjUU ami iiealerd in ilexHeO**.. 

, C.A.C00K,CKieAG0.ILL4^ 



i 



■ I ■ ■ - 




i 

M 
1 



■ I ■■ 



I 



f 



I 



u 



^ytiintuni i."i^.aj* 








;^t 



y 






D, 31. STOREM 

TRORKIETOR. 



STAPLE AND FAKGY 











lOBli WMl. 

Yankee Rotioiis^ 

Cfi?C., €fi30., CS^OS 

On liaiid aut] for siile ;i3 chunp as the 

Jan. U, 1668. (i.52 

phoa^ision' sroKE 

Ih» ntiiler»Isne<lhjs oponcl a new Prc«l9l'>n Store on 

SaJOM^STREKT. (Ori'OSITU Till: DKIOT.) SUJlIt- 
Ol'KE. llI.\.\KiOTA, 
Wh«reh« lnl«JnUii-.opIi(„' a !;i<ner»! assortm.^nt of 

Groceries aad Provissonxi^ 

At prices M l»w »» sny In 8hii'.cj|>e-— an 1 as so«J 
ftrileic*. A^ Ulve me ucirtl. 

OKO. n. SPKVTKT?, 
■p. s.— T wMl en»l(»aTor tokccp on lini.a uconalaJt 
• up/'./ vf Ore*>o Grv>eer»e*aua i'ouUr>. 

nSOtf o.u.g. 



70¥m km coyNTY. 



s:rAKOPi!:E, march 5, i6<j?. 



Sh-Akorc' ^laifcet. 



Ilnr — ■por Inn, 
Pork — per liani're'', 
Vv'I'cat — per btishfl, 
Cnvv. — '• " 

^Voo!— Jrv. per cor J, 
Lime— per barri-!, 



SG.OO to $8.00 

COO to 8 00 

1.40 to 1.45 

95 to 1.00 

- 3 00 10 n 50 

1.00 



-9— 



Tnn ccleoratcil Pcrrina Plow U hoatod in 
a furiiaci', and pliinge.l into water, whicli is 
pr?pnrod for l!ie purpo.so, nuA there'.);* it is 
hi'-rdcuc'-l llirni'jjli and ihrongli. This </\\es 
it ;;n pxtrcnm durability never before ut- 
t lined, if over attempted by any other man- 
u'aci'.rcr in the country, .'ind causes it to 
mov- ihrjiigli the soil with IiSJ friciiou 
t' a ! any otlicr plow now iu use. For sale 
b ■ John McMtilieii. 



m. p. <j. 'i^.mi 

"WI!! ro4urn from N'pw York, nnd ram- 
m'.-%ct t.osln's^ <!■ 81) JC' pea thu n.'.^V.t of Jiuuar>, 
I»J3. Any In ncc.l of 

FIRST-CL.1SS WORK, 

»»?! t>« iipp^l^l witaout solus to Et. P^nT, an<! at laor? 
f»l"«i«t';< rat«^. XjWJn-o 

ff^e (ire Coming! 

And will present to any person senuiu^' u. 
& club ia our tcrcat 

of DrlT" AND FANCY GOODS, a Watch. 
Piece of SLceling.SiHi Drjos Fallen!, &c., t. c. 

C'atalo^'ae of Goudj «ind Sample sont tc 
eny addre«s froe. 

ALLIEN, HA. WES & CO . 
15 Federal Streei:, Eos ten, 



F. 0. Bex 



«/. 



luas^. 



"Wholesa!" Dealers in FrencT., nernfv 
Jind K-Ji?lish I>ry ami Fancv Gomi.«. T-.t 
lerr. Plated Ware, Albums, Le-ithcrOo. •- 
&c. 



liv). 



O O 23. "V O 3^ rt 23. C O 2." . 

A X V 

CLEEH OF THE DIST. COLT/; 
^uTii'C at the Court JIonsc,Shu/iorMC. 



Cfic 



Will make Deceit and MortrmsPi", p: 
all Legal papers. Will pay tiixts aud si !• 
Raal Kslate on coinmis.:iuii, ic. 5-:'; 

Fiirm for Suie. 

In tli3 Town of Epiio Plains 

The Subscribrr uill soli one of hio farui • 
of 120 Hcus of lira rati- land, all linci*. 
30 acres of liuiber, 20 acres of good me:;- 
d«rfW, 14 acres lUKler cultivalio::, h.g hon i . 
Biable, and goo'l water. Situated 4 uuli- 
S^uulb of I>elle l'laii;e. For sale cluap: 
liai'. cajh, part oa lime. 5_:;,ii 

JOHZI KAKLY. 

2Ctoix, Itoli, Xtola. 2 

ii c .i AT c a , c c li AT c a 1 ! b c ii AT c li : : 

is froiii }0to43hocTS. 
VTS-aton'i Ointment cure* Tbo Itch. 
Vv' iieatoa'a Oiatintiit care3 Salt lihcum. 
Wbeatoa's Oiaimeiil euros Tetter. 
Vhe*ton*3 Oiwtiuent cures Barbers' Itch. 
Wlieatoa's Oiutmeiit cures Old Sor's. 
"Wheatou's Ointment euros Kvery kind 
of Humor Ii':e Magic. 

P'tc*. 50 cents a ^•s ; by nail, 60 r«nt». i.lilrti 
WK«t.< 4 POTTKa. No. iro V.iiih'.iiiton Street 
]| tatia Mf.t*. A^ /of '*'■• l>'y ^'1 IV ii.;c!*ta, 

Hjitoa svS't. ;i>07,— »|>. uoitcc 1 rr. 



m^^M. 



Wu .\r.E ylftd to kara that cur esteemed 
fellow citizen, Maj. M.upliy, is out of iiu- 
mediato dan^'er, and it is hoped ho will 
soon b'J on the improvement. 

Theui; was no wheat sown in this connty 
this year on eit'ier the lliji. ar tecoad day 
of March, aUhon;,'h thire is at this time 
on'y nb:ut three feet of solid, compact snow 

coveriiia' tl-^" ?rouiid. 



A h:at cats ago ll.c tvcniiig train ou the 
Vulitiy roi.d run iniu an ox team which was 
traveling t:pon the tr.iek neir belle I'laine. 
The it am appears to have Ltcn following 
the track, uud as the train came around a 
curve the "cowcatcher" rather rou;;bIy 
unyoked lac oxeu and sot one oiT oa one 
side aud the oilier ou the other aide of the 
trac'-. Ncith-r oxen mcfo killed, but there 
wir;.' .sivf-ral brokeii Ie;js. The driver gor 
o..*. 0." l.'.e war. 



ric:.TiY liMNEliA-ViMFB, T.ic[., has been 
rppoiit^d Postmaster at Jordan, vice At- 
wood, rtsif;ned. 



Grand Shootiuj Katch at Shakopee, 
oa Saturday, Marcli 7tli, 1868,— com- 
nnncing at 12 o'clock. Given by John 
A.^felt, for 

1 Good Sound Hors.^, 

1 New liu^gy Iliirnesp, 

2 Sihtr Watches, 
2 Colt's IlcT^dvers, 
1 L:.e T.nne De r. 

Tital vaino $250. Chances can be had 
by application to 

J(in-; ArrF.i,DT. 



S. It._ . iCixih ibdOCl. — lhi' 
St- ;: '!'• n.i be^ii;8 on Monday, ^arch 
2 • F. r pupils not ov< r 12 yiar.s old, 
Si'.Oa; over 12, $4.00; boys ovi-r 14, 
$5.00. F.iViier En^^lish Tranches, $1.00 
e.vUa. Paynieut reqi.ired in advunte. 



I^" Tbo Lrdy's Festival of the M. F. 
Church, netted aliont seventy-five dollars. 

y:^ The b'pstcrir;.', wi.-.dy days of March 
made their appearance in February this 
yea.-, ar.d are elill on a bender aud prove 

ivurthy of tlulr rf-piitation. 

£iO* Tcolert Anns'rong has been improv- 
ing his litny w.-U tiiis wiiittr by erecting a 
i;e;l dv.-i-;ii:}!T houso near tlio Depot, on 
.Secont Vt. If otJtr carpenters would act 




• TH£ SUREST REMEDY 

IVr Consrhs, CoWf, Swofula, toiisamptloa, 
fihesmatisa, Gtacnl Ddunty &t. 

C<x5-tlver OH. whon perfcctlr ^nn. It of rach ^iTco 
ux a curative ngfnt in tbe trc4tm(-nt cf Scbofvla. 
bHACiATiox, KuoxcuiTiF, GE>£B.tL Ukdilht aa<l 

I'VLMO.NAKY AFfECTlONS, »* to riCdiT all COKKetti 
nBni-cfs»a»-y. The jjriat f.up*rU>rf!y of onr 6r:u;.1 of 
r... consl«ta In its bclr.^ p-c;^areJ with ccTific!<-nt)otn 
corf, tram Vkvk Cod Livik*. lu a manner tli»t d*- 




a pers „ 

lo'l great virtue In lis u.«.e. Puvsici.rio'Jrd'thci'r 
r»ticnt» can re!y upon lUls oU as tcUiK CU£iiiCai.lt 
it.ii Mri.i<:ixaU.y pure. -*...» 

IxrsoM in Ciitr-Aoo, by all Dsvoauxa Mi4 by 
nsnicri la MeUlcicc cvcrj-wtjcrt. 



® JOHN C. B AKEB & GO'S 

CITRATE MAGNESIA 

-.Jan;!. J l xailvi- Uiciistj oi v.>:..^l , , ..s .iC- 

1...1 ture orbl k liruU .cUo, aua ihutiauc:Mlj M l.iv 
l.iir«r. wbu-li Is !lK- >urc pr-iu^..r w .icu.e .ilsea-f, 
iiO.,..lt,g u e.,u.l Vi our i:Li.tUK.ATlJ) ttHtUVtsC- 
i:.li tnilAlliOK iJA!M..-..\. For K.vi.u ut^I.^.e^» 
*c « ■;>teni J.i,lc.i liy liiipriidciitc or by loll, a i.r.iVfs 
liri-tf a l-nn«c«>a. Ji l8s;*arkiiii.; ai.d oo OikM— ii,ii,,jte. 
•J » r.- va:u .ulr tiiau t" >llU!l'^^ VVi;i»?r fd- uiiy uu.uscs 
vl.«:rvrr, viti'iK lr> fr»sfci.ei> .»gUi:ra:itfr<l i.> ii.» periuu- 
» -. '.. '1 Ue iwUe tu.>j,Ueil ::jsi tUIcaj;"' l^y all Wtoitaalc 

JOHN C. BAKER & CO., 

P It O P k I K T a 6 , 

718 M -.UK?.? fc'Tr.KKr, Piiii.Ai.Ki-nii.v. 

Great Discovery! 

r. V S U Y .M A .N IJ 1 J! r N A U T 1 S T 

A SCIE.NTIFIC WONDKR. 

At iHstrniufnt bv irhich aay parson can 
i.ikti correct Likeneesrs c>r Phcto^rraphs 
'i^.ti ir>'riinient vifh full instructioni gcut 
bv inuil iur OU* dollar. .\Hdrcs."», 

C. li. A.MFS & CO., 
ISi lirc^'^-i.-:, Now Yurk. I 



like unto him. 



moro Louses ;«»-» b-j ah 
mire jcoplc 



jakopeo woidd contain 
to accommodate 



A Choice Library of IfTisle- 

TiiK Uxiti:d St.vte? Musical F.eview, 
published by J. L. Peler.i, 200 Broadway, 
New York, is before us, and merits ihc at- 
tention of all loveis of mu-sic. It is a 
mammoth monthly magazine, shect'Uiasic 
s:ze, containing over heycnteeu pa;;ea of 
muiical news, reviews, and choice art 
items, every line of which is readable, aid 
we should say, iniutltmble lo tilt mnsiciana. 
'J lii.i alone is well worth a year's subscrip- 
tion, which is ouly $2. The publishers, 
however, do not sto • hire, for, in addition 
to the above, each number contains four 
pitcia of cfiuicf ntw viuttc by the beat ui t- 
If 1 8 tn Jlinrnr.a, tliiis jiivin^ a seU-ct libra- 
ry of new mu.sic at sutii a low r.ite that 
even the poorest may indulge in what has 
bilherlo been conaidcrtd a lu.vury- 

The music in the litviEw is f>J the btsf, 
as the followiiig select li:jt will testify, ail 
of whieii las jijpennd within its pii;,'<,s 
during the last six month : " Nora 0'>i'eal," 
"Katy MeFerran." " You've been a friend 
tome," and " Kiss mc good-bye, d;;rli:-,' 
all by Will. S. Hays ; " Good-!/yo, but come 
a-ain,'' uiid •• Do you think the moon could 
have seen us V by J. II. Thuma.s; "Ally 
Hay," and *' Liitle Bvo.vix Uhnreh." b) 
Wiiliaui S. Pitts; ".Muribel!,"' by Dank« ; 
"Let the dead aud the beaulilul rest," 
" Break, break, sea,' etc. 

Also Kinkel's " Heavenly Thoughts'' and 
•'Maiden's Blush t-Jthottiich*;," .Maci-'.-' 
" Damask Rose" and '• White Ro.^o March," 
aud several other choice iiiccc.<, amouuii^g 
in all to C-3 at nt.iil price*. 

The C. 3. Mui^iCAi. M:view ia publisher' 
at $2 per ycjr; hii^^dc copioR, iO ciits.— 
No musical family uboald be without lU 

m ' -♦-- o — - 

Grand Jury, .April Teiia, 18S8. 

Andrew Schneider, John Schw.irtz, 
tteorge Bmilii, Peter Geyennann, 

N. M. D. McMnllen, F. A. Tuckey, 



Jiamunl .VleCojr, 
J. B. Heiter, 
Peter J. Baltes, 
Karl Schiilz, 
John lit is, 
Peter llader, 
Hugh Johnson, 
J.tmvo MtCart'ny, 



J. li. Iluntsnum 



John Daly, 
-Math. Klein, 
Martin Thornton, 
Anton Ca.-tiil, 
W ithael .Maloney, 
Ihoiuas li. Kllib, 
Michael fef^ifert, 
George Parker, 



Pont Jury, April Tsrni, IC68. 

Geor^'e Murphy, Tliomas Kenncfi ck, 

Fred. Peters, Jolin llickev, 

IVter Yost, F. X. liir.seher, 

-Michael Harvey, Filftird Jordan, 

11 .bt-rt K!oeekiii:r, Peter Mi rg^us, 

Gn-^ory lall.-nbergcr, «>. H. Jay, r^r., 
Jo.^cph V'arni.T. Samuel Lord, 

Nicholas \\ agner, 
\Vii".':.'ai Mi..jre, 
Juki. ii;=ei.fr, 
ii. 11. ^^lr,.;'k, 

J'jhii Hollerl:;, 



Miiihew j;oi„K.:iv, 

ii. 11. .dorrei!, 

T''"-n •> uaiiia jg!i, 
J.)liii Llitikaamjier. 
Michael McMahjii. 



■^ I ■ ♦ • ^»- 



N<j Bltteu Puoof KKqvir.ED. — It has 



X^ Vi'e copy l!ie fwlio.ving bit of advice 
to our farmers from the Dodge County 
Ri'publizun with reference to putting out 
fruit trees : 

" Have yon a farm and nn orehard ? I 
not, yon can do no better jol) t!io coming 
sea.^on than to put o'lc nut. It will bo thi 
best iintslnietit liiat we know of. A youn,- 
ihrifly orclsarj, of a v.ell selfcte.l anii 
hardy variety, will, good farmers, increase 
ih« value of your l.iiid-< to a greil extern 
L'V.r.t rai.^ing in .Aiinuesota !.< no I;,::;^er i' 
piubloi.i. ii h;i3 been ihoroughiv tested 
Teo right varietio.'?, rightly hand'ied, ani 
oared tor will do well. Your trees, lik* 
fate, or time, v. ill cjiiotaniiy proirre.ss, an., 
a.s ihey extend ihtir r»)ls downward au' 
llicir lops upkvard and pile layer alter lave 



'^ ^ j upon men- eircumioroucc, th^y will just a.> 
liot yet been pii'ollcly denied that th<? J.7' .,are ''•'!., -""''-" ^e-^— «.•.-. 



Ckcmical Su,'eraiits made bv D. B. De 
L.ind it Go , is all that its fiieiids have 
claimed — that is a pure and wholesome 
iirtiele. 'ibis tannot be denied in face of 
the t;\stl!noiiy of cLemiits and those best 
qualifljJ to jt.<ige. It is much better than 
rfoda* For sale by D. M. Storer. 

"Tu-: Di.i'fc: Coats."— Tht re is a cert.iin 
,;orl'o 1 lif the War that wiil never go into 
il.e regular bistori^js, nor be embodied in 
lomaiiee or poetry, w'uich is a real 
part of it, and lunch of it is well presented 
and will beircserved in " TJie Blue Coats,"' 
a work just issued by Jones brothers & Co., 
C.)ica:,'o. 

fi©°-At the Ojitih; Fair held on M.^nday 
lasr, FJward Juvdan, of Cleinlalo, bold a 
hciivr, two years aud two months old, for 
the sum of $14.00. Ho has four mora for 
8.i.lu at tie same price, 

^' * » 

^A charity fair held in Minneapolis re- 
CJitiy realized the rejpectablu suji of 
$!,722.U'. 



£S^TLe m)!Uhiy C.iUle Fi>ir at i-hako 
pee on M..)n.!ay lust was pretty well atten..!- 
ed considering the state of the roae.a. Tbe 
market howi ver was not very well provided 
"i:h feithcr fat cattle or w(.il.iag teams. 



— A man can go aloug without advor 
tising M.d to tan a vngui witLout greasing 
but it goes bard. 



—Dillon U'Prhn, Fsq., ft,r several 
mo. libs past editor of iho NorlLwestern 
Chroriiele, haa scvercil Ids coniicclicn with 
chat paper, aud is going cast to be gone 
i.iae time. 



iSgr- Tbe other evening uot far from 
T ;.k()pec, a lovir who w^i^i blighted by his 
ladylove, \ery niodiirLly a^keii anolhcr 
young lady if she would let him spend the 
cvcuiag v.iih Lor. " >kO," she augrlly rc- 
pliitJ; "that's what I won'i." "Whyl" 
replied he, -'you nerd't bo so fussy t 1 
didn't mean thio evening, but £Oiue Jtormy 
one when 1 can't go anywhere else." 
^•^♦-•.^ 

;S^TLc Anoka Cot!:ty Prcsj comes to 
us this week enlarged and greatly improved 
The reason of this is tL a*, a good manv 
men up at Anoka pay the printer. 



, v« vy»»«rs «k4 ,1 lu^ 



were 



a 



U. S. bonds. The market for good fruit i_ 
unlimited aud we would have no:.e others 
cultivated."' 

For the benefit of our readers we will add 
that Judge Hawkins, of this eountv, has a 
young orchard iu bearing, and by many 
years' experience has acquired a knowledge 
ol" the hardy varictie.-j of apple trees that 
win certainly wiihsiand our climate and 
thrive. Any one intcn.iing to plant fruii 
trees would do well to consult Judge Hawk- 
ius as to the varieties. 



The Anoka Press learns that the 
lumbering interest in the Valley of the 
Suake and Rum rivers is prospering this 
season. One company have banked bOO,- 
000 feel of logs rtai.y to come down when 
the river opens. 



i'lED. 

At Mollne. ininoU, ou lUo 2S;ii of FeLruary. Mrs 
LL'cy Jl. fciOOU.'.K, lormcrlv a naldf ai ot SI. Law 
riuc«, au<J wi Iw* . f « ui. II. SioUJtr. 



Scwtvr, Machixes.— Noiic« !•- fcerebr 
given I hat I am i cf'nt fer tho salo of 

Singer's Sewing Machine. I will eell 

these Machines ni Mi«nnrictiiry prices- — 
S.ib: rooms at bchwiiit^' Cloihing Ston*, ia 
JSIiak»)pf«. 

Dated Doc. 19, l^fJT. 

JOHN' SCnTARTZ. 



— .\ new pn;rriT!in Ian be«n put to cp«r ' 
ntiou a: MianeapoTis. 



ageni.-. wamkd fur 

THE BLUE-COATS, 

And hovr liiey Lived, Toajlit cai 
iici fcr the Uniart. 

VITII 

SCENES AUD INCIDENTS 1^ THE 
GitEAI EiiBiilLLIJN. 

Comprising Xarratlves oi" Perso al Adven- 
ture, Tiirilling incidents, Daring K.^- 
plcits, Heroic Deeds, VVoaderfuI 
liseapes. Li.'e iu thj Caiup, 
Ficlil and Hospital ; Ad- 
venUires of '"jjies and 
fcvouts, Toyelher • 
with the 6ongs, li.iiiads, 
Aueedotes and HuDiorot.i 
I n e i d e u t s of the War. 
i>vl<!iJid!y Wuitrutid \n Ik over !OtJ ri:ie 
I'iiitrutts auJ. Hedviij'ui EtifrnifiHgj. 

Tlice isa ccrtuin i>uctioii Ol tin warthat wUI n.-vor 
goiiilo tl.« rv;;u!-r l.!..;i;il(.:f, 1,0.- becuiuo icii tli s 1- 
I!, ante or poUiy, v»ljah i>«\tty uul patt of lt.ui..I 
w.il.li iiii-MTVvu.ti.iiVf.v lOKUccewtlin; i^cUfiblloBaii 
bi tie: l.iea o: I'lChpifli ol'tSa; iia-tJiLt that: Lii...y uiy 
(> purt-i ur oircjia uarrutivib i.j e» ei.ta, uii'i l!li^ |i.i,-i 
liii.y bo ittliei li.L- i.we-.Jp, i.io luii. tin. i..»lU.f» ot i.,«; 
war. "iiiii I!Ii:.,iruI<.i. ilii- olwiHt.ir 01 tLe Iv Jl,lr^, tl..- 
Uuajor «;■ ihe liwi.acra. tlie ticvution of wi>i.:i'n. Uic 
;>r.i\ eiy lii njia, tlie iiijc» oi oa.- l.ero»». tut ;"ouiaati 
uiij har'i9:ii{>> of ilio i>4rvicu. 



Pa 

tlnil;i:i(,'lv |.oilru\i<l in u uus4erly niai:n<T, i>t oiicc 

bl.>nilii':<l i>Ii<l lulUilliti>: lOUiietlni; tl tucltiunt ani^tt!. 

uiiiti.ie, li.'UIiuiit iiUvl rcau..blt: l^cok i.b..t tli* v^aruita 

cjh«.! forth 

A i:.u.-ciiunt f.a r-ru o» Ir.-iliiirtloii Duy t><« foun'l In 
ev.-iy p.i^e, lui tirmitiK iift„i),liriili.t4il » 11.411U jut^icu- 
^tc h;!>tury, are akil.iailf l.iiurwovuu iu luu •urk..<t 
aitraty »,i. 

OKUii fT t'Tmlariaiid xce ■lei trine, auJ a roliUc- 
arrl^UuU cf ti.s woi K. A(i<lii 94, 

JJ.Ni.c lil;oilltR;< t C).. Cl.:oa»f«. in. 

Dil..QiiAS. LoiiV, 

P!;*j3irian an5 Surgeon, 

6HAKOPEE, MINN. 

lltprofcMtanalcVli pr'J-nptTy «('.en4*'1 »». 
I 



Il.e \a:ma uim I'.iavo li.-arte>), the I^c urcs<jn»ana 
:'a iiit.it>.', i!ie \'. it;y uii t .M^rve.uun, ih't foii kt »uU 
a'!u tU', aiicl t'lic uiiole I'aUo.uiHa of (liw ^Kur aic Imm 



HOOFLAND'8 




BITTERS 

HOCFLAND'S GERMAN BITTERS, 

HOOFLiUB'S mH MC. 

Prepared by Dr. C. iM. JACKSON, 

PlIILADELPUIA, PA. 

Ti3 Great Reiaflies for all Diseases 

or Tus 

LIVER, STOMACH, or 
DIGESTIVE OSGANS. 

Hoo3and's German Bitters 

u-uc<Miii><r<i'.l "f th"' jviirr Joi<-<«< ^ir. iw tbey iw^ naJl- 

llirlxi and UkKh, 'M^m^B nMl;lii« a prvpsra- 
li.Mi, tiii:)ilT C4»iipeti lifit^^fc tr:it«d, »n(i •oltrely 
fff frout AlcohUic ^^ ^^^ tuinislturt tj any 

HOOFUND'S GEfiMAN TONIO 

U \ comlrluiitton of nil tha lrurevll«ot« of Uie Blttor*, 
wltU fl»e ru.-*8t ipjiility of ."iin^ Onut Hum, 0^a»^^^ 
i-t«., Byiklii« ott« of tliti mont plMaaaat and a(r««aUa 
r«u:i.;Ji«ii aver uffereJ to U.<s puUlc. 

TliRw yr«fkrrlBK a MadMitiO frua ft-om AlcoboU*; 
adiiiixt .ire, will «s» 

Hoofland's German Bitters. 

In C.-OM of iiervoiii) J*i>r««kioD, whau aomu aiouUuUc 
itiii.ulu* is BKonary, 

HOOFLAND'S QESMAH TONIC 

atiookl ba uwL 

Tti«> BMtaro or t\,» T>)nk a^a both atjuJly good, u<l 
cubtitlii Tba aivnie muJI;:l&^ Ttrtucc 

Ttie atoiuivcli, from a Tariatj of cMita«, inch a« TiMtW 
Ifealton, l)y»l*pHl.'^ M^^^ Narrvoa Dot.Ultjf, 
I tc, i* very apt to l^B ]■ hav ltn ftiJiclloua 
Oarai^rwl. TUn ra- ^^^^ iult cf wblciiln, tLn* 
tbo p»ti«ut aufTtrs ^^^^ from aaroral or taura 
of iha fjttowtnc d>«w«i : 

Constipation, Platnlenoe, Inward Pllei, 

Paln«8(i of Blood to tho Head, Aoidi- 

ty of the Stomach, Nfeosoa, Itewt' 

burn. Disgust for tho Poo'l. 

Fulness or Weight in tUo 

Stomach, Sour Eructa- 
tioni«, SiakinK or Tlutt^r- 
Ingat the Pit of the Stomv^h, 
Swimming of the Uend. HurrtCKl 
or Difficult Breathinif, riuttering at 
the Heart, Chuking or BuffooRTms Sen- 
sations when ia a LyinR Feature, 
Dimness of Vision, Dcta or Weba 
before the Sight, Dull i'ain ia 
tbo KeaJ, Deflciency of 

Perspiration, yellow- 
ness of ^^ar*^ tho btln 
and Eyes, Mf }@ l^'^in l" 1^0 
Side, liaclc, '^^^SF Cheat, 

Limt^H. etc.. „ . ^ ." fl '^r^, \ 

Fiusuea of Heat. Burning ia tho rle»h, 

Coastant Imagininfirs ot Evil, aau 

(ireat Depression of Spiralis. 

Tlipso remeilin will efTect\!:itly euro Mver 
ComiJiiiiit. J;inii.tl'-». Pyni«>imiii, Chronic or Nervood 
l>«li:iity, riiioiitc I^iarrli.r.i, llijw-n-c "f tli» Ki'lM^ys, 
niKl all lilHeaxioi luining from a Diiioiilci ed Livor, 
Stuuiocli, or Iiituhtiiicii. 

Re^nltinc from nny «'ini«o \vli»tov<>r \ 

riKk.s 1 i: vnov or xii i: .sv.s rr.n, j 

iiittucril I»y St«vcre Labor. itlnrU* 
nlilpM. K.vi>t>suro, I'cvors, oto, 

Tli.^ro io no iiiiliciae extunt (xiurI to tiio-i r<«:neJ!«a 
In lucli casfo. A tou«^ii.l yiKnr is iiiip.-\rte<l to tho 
wh..le SvstfiTi, the JMHT"''^ Arix-titPls StrrnKth- 
ta<ri. i'M-l i< «•!> «Ni j^>ye<l, tho •toni»ch 
(liiieiti p.-jiuptly, ^jHu »''" ^^'JO<l ia pllriC(^^, 

the complexion l.« "^^ comes souid aiij 
ho.-kllhv. thv) yellow titipo in eniJiaite<l fiom thg 
f yen. a l>l>K.m li (siven V> ths cheofes. aaJ tliu wmiIc 
aii.l iierTOua iuvaiid Uecoaifti a atiwui iutvl U(wut-y 
buiiij;. 

An.l feelliii5 tbe baud of lime wciKUtn^ hf atjIv tlp<»o 
thorn, with .til its atten.lmit IIU. will flnj In tho US' 
of thfato BITTKKS, orthe T<")N1C, an elixir that wlf 
liwtill new life into their Teii.% rtstoro in » ineasur* 
the energy nnd ardor of luoi youthful day*, ImiU 
up their shruiilifu fvrms, and givu iMtlttt Mil bappi 
pfia to ibbir rauf uaiu^ 7«vt. 

NOTICE. 

It ia a wcI1-e4tftti1ibh'.'d li»ct that tnVSy nn»-naU e4 
l):r fi'iiinlH )v>rlii>ii of •'tfgp <'i:r popcUUcti ar« 

*eldi>iii in tLo onj'.y H iiuiitiifj{iKMhi.iiliJi; 

>r, to ii«« th.'ir own (JH^^^ » x j .r<-*«ii'n, ••n<r»»r 
feel well." Xhcy are ^^^^^liinKuiJ.'leToJdof all 
eu'TiTy. extrimicly neiTon.'S and ha^o ii..> appetili.-. 

Tu this tlH.<>4 uf pcXSuM llid ll>'rX.La:i. Mt tl* 



JUST PUBLISHED, 

m MM M mmi 

BASSINI'S 

Twenty Melodic Exercises, 

IN FOnsi Of 

Solfeggios for Soprano or Xezzo 
Soprano voices, 

INTENDED AS 

Studies to acquire the Art of 
Singing. 

" These exercises were composed to be 
u.'^cd siniulta!ieou.sly with bis eysteir, 
"Tun AiiT OK biNci.NO," or with any othtr 
method for the eullivutiou of the voice, 
aud will take tho place of C0XC'OiNK"ri 
SULPKGtJlOS; being more melodious 
aud better adapted for teaching. 

"Some of these exercises ai« snc?cially 
beautiful as well as useful, a ml»j;ling of 
the dulcc et utile, which Eec«r*s the ir- 
tcrrst as well as tho improTCinerit of the 
student. The Tarious stjicb developed 
in these excrciees rcndtr thvin invaluable 
in an educational poiut of view, a.> they 
tend to eclargc the intelligence and the 
appreciation, and at the suir.e time form 
tho taste of the pupil. They must be 
studied carefully with rcfereuce to the 
iaaumcrablo marks of c.\)ire;6ion and 
forms of oruameiitation. Upou the uii- 
nute accuracy with which these are ac- 
compfrshed dc-pcnds the cctunl ster.ing 
advancement of the pupil; nny eva.-ou 
or .'-lurriiig iu these respectsis time aud 
effort utterly wasted. wbih>, on the other 
hand, a close and patient iuv«»i;ij:nl'«^"» 
an'l a miiiiitely faithful execuHon o;' then;, 

will give Que.vjHJcled power acd facwity, 
ufitl op<-n to the student the means and 
:c.<ourcC'* by uhich jjrent artife's product 
their rno.^t 'litiuii'.iit and jirofotiud cifecl.-. 
— ff atton'i .Irt Jourmil. 

In Tw^o Vf lumes. 
Price, each, iu Boards, iietiiil, t- 00 

do do in Cloth, Retail. li 50 

.\ tJ.i.MrLii Cory sent by Mail, post paid 

on receipt of Wholesale Price, 61 •^^■ 
Publishe.l bv \V.\1. HALL .N: "SUN, 

No. 5-13 llroadway, New Vork, 
Pabli.-herg and desiUrs in Mu.-ie. and 
Manufacturers (.f FLUTK.S, PIPES. 
FLAG 1:0 LET9, Ac. ic, &c. b'cud 
for catidogue of prices. n-lS 

finkle'& i.yox 

1.0 CK STICK 

Scmiug iHaci)tne. 



NEW DRUG STORE 



XSNF !S 



•» o e » 



EDWARD G. HALLE, 

^'FXT DOOM TO GEYERMANN'S STORE, 

Kespectfiilly announces to the citizens of Shakopee, and Vicinit/ 
that he has just opened a complete stock of 

Drugs and Medicines, Perfumery, Patent Medi- 
cines, Toilet Anicles, Combs, Brushes, 
Stationery, Lamps, Pure Wines and Liquors, 
and all other articles usually found in a 
Drug Store. 



E^^ Petrolene Fluid constantly on hand and 
for sale. 



Dr. L. B. ?l!orrow keeps his ofuce at the Nov,' Drug Stcrc. 



TT^"^ 



S.J. 




The o.MT Machine n> perfected that 
entire .salis,raeii<>ii is cnniautetd or the 
pnrciir.se money refuiidod. 

\\'here we have no At'ont a Eample 
.Machine will be sold at very low pri*-'. 
,.nd a Loeiil Airotit ajipointed on tlie 
most favi r.tliK' terins. 

N. P.— -eiid foi Circular. Tntveliij; 
.■\)ji-iils wanted. Jfitlary, l.berul. 

.')^7 li.ii)AH\V4V \ew Vuriv. 




W^.fs.'VtiJ. 







TIjV 



CUKNPCK OF nOL>n:3 AXD FIRST STPvEET?, SlIAKOPi:?., MINXF.SOTA 



1 IJL. 



J. L. HUNTSMAN. :- 



-{ 8. i). now. 



S II A K P E E MINNESOTA 



iw..*.., arc iw^'ccwiiv rwowjuvadt'i, 

WEAK AND DELICATE CHILDREN 

Are IM.1 !e tirurij; hy the u.«o cI oithi r ■ f th«te roin<y 
dies. They will cura every oua of 3i.llt.U>UC3, 
without f.iil. 

ThuuKuidt of certificate* haro actnmnlativl In the 
haiidt of the propii.ti.r, but njHwe will allow of ll>« 
linlillaitif>n el hut 11 few. Xhonc, it will It ulj.«rTed, 
tuc nif'ii iif iwte a:.d of iiuch btkhdmg l;>i; li.*y laiist 
l>c LicUuYut. 

TESTIMONIALS. 
iiox. GEO. w. woodw-vr:'. 

a.if/ Jiuticc of lh( SJifmnf Court nf J'U., virltea: 
JViiU'UljJixa, March 10, 1807. 

'• T And 'lI.Hifland'n /l«8k German H'ttersMa 
a (toud tonir, uacfiil i^Mi*^^ '" difuaacn of th« 
di^vKlive .iiRiiiiF. and ^^ tdBS of great tH:u<>lll ta 
caMW of liuLiiity, and vu.i i.t hervoni 

action in the wyktciu. Tovra truly, 

GF.O. W. WOOBWAKi)." 

nOTi. JA3IK.S Tiio.uri»ox, 

Judgt of Out Suj<rrm' Omrl of I>>w syh'^tnia. 
Philaddphia., K\u\ 2S, \fXA, 

"T onnsider 'Ilnofland'n German Bitters' a r«liMhU 
mtdieint in iaeu "1 attai ks of ln.!!<e«lio!> or l'J»IH-;» 
bla. 1 caa certify thi.s from my cxpeiictK'e of it. 
Tour*, wt'.li r<«peft, 

JAMSS TJIOMI^OX.- 
From Rer. JOS. II. KEXN.inD, X>. !>., 

pn^or of Vit Tt-nth Jiaplui C'lttreh, /'^t•^^i7/\^ia. 
/v. Jjck-vm — I 'ear Sir: I have l>een freTOonily r* 
qufted tiT oiiiiuect my nii.)i<> with rooumDi«i«>iati<«Tia 
of different Ul:ili of iivi-dicinoK, hut re<ardiii,; lh« 
practice w cut of my W^ -mm apjiropriatonpiiera, 
I hare iu all ca*o* 'I ^1^1 dcclintxl ; hut wlUi 
a clear \Tnj( in varl (JjUjJ ou. Inatanot* and 
jrtni.-ularly in my o*n fuuily. of the 

ueefuinesK of Dr. Iloi.fland'a 0«mian Hitters, I <J»iirtrt 
fur I'lK-e friiui my usual ccnrs"-. to expnwa my full 
ConTicti'-n »hit,/"r grnrrai •iebiWf nf fie lyitm. «r <i 
e-ffci jDh f'.r Litrr 'nmfiiiiint.itiia$>if<tii><i\'<iluat>i4 
jnrp.iralum. 7n »>ir.e oatfi it may fall ; Uit unually, 
I d'>nkt not. it will he very t>«iic&cial to tUa«o ubo 
■aC'it fioiu tbe ubcre cauiica. 

Yoiuii, very re«p«ctfiilly, 

J. 71 kennahu. 

Eighth, l>olow f)03t«a EC 

Fr«ra nrv. E. ». FE3rnAI,I». 

AtriHarU tJiUm- ChTiftit.n Cfirnnicie, miaiUlphia. 
I have d.>rire-l dooldul twnrfit frum tl.e dm a( 
no*..tVind'ii Ornnaii B.tttr*. and feci it my privlloaa 
to rxooinmend them aa a most raliiahlo t<.>n1c. to hJI 
who arc sutTerin:; frmii fcnoral ilehilily or frwtn rfW»- 
•aA« aiUiu^ U\jUk Ucraugameni ol the llr«r. 
Vvurt trulr. 

E. 1». fKXDAIi, 

CAUTION. 

Hooflawrs Cennan Kamciitea are eointorf-tttd. 
Soo that the lil^n it "^iAfx^jiik c.-e of O. M. JACK- 
ttV.i w on the n ra|i il ]M I"-< "f aactt t.ott:a. 
AU (>th«r»ai<;c<'i:n ^^^^^ t.-rfiit. 

I'Tiucijia! omre and Marnf«tj»y 

at the Cfrman Modictuc E(<^re, No. (SI AtlCli SU«m(, 
lliil'vl-'l 1,1ft 

l>»rm.>>i ; r«;;<ia, 1'rt/i'rictc.r, 
Pormerly C. M. 3kCi)tf>s A Oi^ 



1:1 PEOBATi. COUnT. 

SCOiT Oi.»U.SiV; Fvbiaa.y Teihi, 
I'cbiu try jtii, ItdS. 

l^i iLu inntter of t.ie listatc of Joha J. 
.MtUtici.', Dei-e.-i.v.^!. 

On readiii!.^ and blin^ir the peiilinn ol 
Peter C. Mattice, of 'iJelle P!i;int\ iu 
the County of Set. tt r.ni yt.itc of .M 11- 
iicsota, praying for re ..--(Mis il.eie^n stated 
lliat L.itcrs t;f Adiiiii.isin.ii n on Uie 
Kslale of the Mild d'.ien.MO i..ay Le i.- 
sucd to Jonatiiau l/ii.id.Ie:tt.>i!. 

It i.s ordered that fc?atun;ii\,i!.e Si vei tl. 
duy of M-iriii, lb.-::*, at ly o'eh C; in the 
forenoon at the t'llieeofttu J<.d;;c of i"io- 
batc. in the town of Slniki. ;»*■•- in iaid 
county h(\ iis.-i;4iiid for (1.0 ! {•.irlnj,' <d 
said |)etiliou, and that tho leir« i.f laiv 
of tl:t« said dect a>f tl. if u'-y thei-e b , a!;i': 
all oiiier p'TMii.s iulere.sted in t'.e 5a:i! 
tvlate, arc re«piiriil to be present at li'... 
lime and place to show c.iufe, if liiiv 
thv,'."e b'.", why ihe prayer of ^aid pttiiio.i 
I shouiti n./i !!;,• gf;.!'.'"''. 

Audi: i, r>tithvr V''J'i.'"cJ. tlnit nniic 
of the loro.;:<)iiij,' order, be ;;Iven in Ih'' 
Shakopec Ai;:n-^, a weekly iiewtpajio; 
pr iiti'cl and pnblished at Shakopee in the 
^aid County wf Scott. for thrre aucccisiv. 
week", previous to .«aiil litiiriDg. 

Dated Pebrnav .'>!li, li-Ca. 

L. 11. HAWKINS, 

Jiid'-'C of Pruba'e. 



Di:.A.I.KIl& IM 



DRY GOOD 



9 



ClOTHIM. 



SL-adics Sress G-ocdc, etc 
Don't iorgct the place — Cor- Holmes & First S^s-, 



mwrrHMorvMnaminBHa^aiMi^mn^v 



r\5- 253 -C^ir W jZ 2f I :^H 



t* 



II. S. IIOLTON.J 

n 






[CilAS. IIARKF.NS 






) 



AL'JSITT 


Ci WOCDEUEY'3 


I 






O ./^- DFL 


^.ni: js. 


c;- JT. 


Wo.::^ 


- , .- 


13. 


mCtcU':^' . 




^r.rJiifT; 


Hop 




and 



Ccrner cf Ho!:ncs & Firfct Ct.% e^ilickopce, T^Iin:- 9»cta. 

Tcalcrs iri 

Dry Goods, Dress €!oodS; Clothhigy 

Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Cnp?, 

^^^^ The highest mi.rl.ot price p.'iiU for ^Vhcat. Furs, and W 
kinds of country produce. 

^f^-Call and aee. We are DOUND NOT TO BE UNDERSOLD by any lira it: tl» 
Miuiiesoltt Valley. 



Liu i . ■ ■ip» li I . ... M l aa ^^iwmrm ' i .^ "' .» ' 



JACOB nOFFERT, 



— DEATc:: i:» — 



..^^WSLV. 



CAnni;, .TinG- 

CJapriajroc t. .1! di.scr-;p- 

tion.s, Ptd!,*, ^J <ic., I'.tiiij'. 

factured to or-. jc. 

Painiir ? siti'. T.:'r ai.tl 

.'ntisfactfritt d- ' J- ' i\ war- 

.'aiited to be t f tr:e • litv, aatl 
."rices rensot>»b%,\ •f--; 

N. 15.— Cr.->. ' done in 

CG'nCi li'.'U with i . ^ t. 

Shop on the ft ■ 

SKCOND i :. ■ ^.. 
lietwcen the »e. . . t- ; . , . . . Duffy 
:.nd f'.e Uiiiio*!. 

Sf^f U«:ne(iibcr X:;^. ••lacf. i.- .'. .-(TO as 
n call. S.J. c 

f47 
















\^ 



Minnesota Valh 



I'2:^zc: 



I U'lti! further nolict, 



run 



tl M 



not^flaod'eCerraio liii'cr*. p^r untie . 

» hvfd>x.-u « 9* 1 LE SUEUK A MA!f::ATO TF.AI!.'.^. 

nooflatid'»'^*rmanTof.i?. ?m; npin<;uartI>ottl««,l V) 

I>er Ixittif, or a bait ii.i^u ft' T M I 

lOr Do tiot f .ri;. t to exi.i.ii.e wcil the arlioie yca« j ^ 

iMiy, is Older to get tl.« gciulno. ' ■ 



! I.env.^ Ft- Paul. 



*. M 
?45 



P. M. 



Saddlery Hardware, 

Horse Collars, 

4c., Ac.. 4e.. 1 

LF.WI.S STRKi:T, . i 

Shake rce^. Wm.\ 



For StUe by all Drosslsta and X>oni> | 



Arrive at St. P;»ul, 



11.50. 



5.0 :• 



ST. PAUI t >aNNKAP0L!3 TRAINS 



f 



i. M, 



/ft ^ F I o t% ifl 9 f 1 ^^''''•' '^''^'■^ ^^ ^'^^ 

O O I I <rl El ^1 ^ » .■\rr:vf.MSr.P;».;r. 11 



r. M. 


r. a. 


!.1.-^ 


4 IS 


3..S* 


r.45 



GERMAN 

TON 



, ♦« 

F^n-itt rn Kypr^«^lor»vfsSt. Pau'.4 15 i m 
Trains on ihi< rftr\'l niako close con- 




For PaV -.f he 
NEW rr.UG i:-TOUK, SHAEOrEH. 



ncetion r.t Men lofa with !f»in3 on Min- 
ne-?o!» CrrfrnlRriilroad for Minneapoli.-*, 
j Otmronr.'*, V.'inonn and all point.'? Sr>uth 
; nnd Fift, and at L.:; Sucnr with Minne- 
H!>ta Stapo Company'* Line of btaftf s 
J">»r Lf Saorsr, fjt. P.'tPr, >lADka<o and 
aU foiiita w»-.<(t itnd a.-):ith«ej<t. ' 

TicVets r'\r\ b.» proc'ircd at U'^i^^n 
Ticlrt Office. Jaf^k.aon s^n^t, thre« 
doora below the M^r-^hantV Hold, and 
at tho Den^f At Woat Si. PatiL 

.TOn\- F. LINCOL.^, Sb1'*1. 



a 1 56 



PF.^i MONTHI-T.AMP/S 
FAMILY KMTTIKr^ 
.S'.ArillNK TKirMPH.ANT AT TIlK 
PAULS KXP^^SlTfONt r>rn!f»d 'bf 
PS3T TV TH^ vtoKt.n. Cfr'^ntlv itr.->rovi'(' — ' 
Price redupt d. Widens; -in 1 Xarrowp. 'Ki.'tR , 
llfcl aad T'»r Siuirle and flouiile. Prt>be<l 
and riaiii. Knifs pairs w'llu'Uf fofiid'n;.-^ 
Kni'8 2 l*Aiu H«HK^ .\K Iforr—"''. cl.x. p?'ii-. 
."VU Cl.l.. 12 hours prr dav. ?f» TO. Of, ds'v? 
per month. ?6 rwr day. 8L'>/,.r;0. Or««« in" 
iJnceiPtnt to th'^sc ou! of cnin1rkrii»»'nt.— 
Bj^f ArtKNM Wa.-^tki* l-sJEg A'dr^r"^* «>-. 
chslng iUmn. I.jiJis K!«iTTi.vf> Ma^'mvp 
CuapAirv. Dttr«nporr Iowa. IL (J. T-rw, 
(icLcral Ajyu:^ niS 




nALls 

tfsptable Sicilian Hair Renewei 

lias Mood the test of seven years 
trial Of/ the public ; and no prepa" 
ration for the hair yet discovered 
null prodiwe the same heneflciat 
results. It is a nettf scientific dis- 
covery, eoinhining the most power- 
ful and restorative agents in the 
VEGETABLE KINGDOM. It restores 
GRAY HAIR TO ITS ORIGINAL YOUTH- 
FUL COLOR. It makes t/t€ scalp 
white and d^an; cures dandruff 
and humors, and falling out of th« 
ha'i* • ""'^ **'*" make it grow upon 
laid lieail":; except in very agcf 
persons, as it j;:rnifihe8the nutria 
five jirlnrijyle by tt.j/<?« '«^ «'»"; 
is nourished and support ^f<^' *t 
makes the hair mofst, soft, anm 
glossy, and is uttsitrpassed as n 
HAIR DRESSING. It is the cheapeat 
preparati^m ever offered to the 
jtubfic, as one bottle vxill accent 
plish more and last longer than 
three bottles of any other prepara^ 
tion. *^ 

It is recommended and used by 
Ifie First Medical Authority. 

The ivondcrful results produced 
by our Siciiiau Hair Henewer 
have in*luce*l many to tnanufa4>- 
tare prepuratlotis for the Haitf,, 
umler variotis names / and in 
order to induce the trade an*i the 
public to purchase their> ^ofn- 
pounds, they have resorted to false- 
hfwdM, by ckUmina they were 
former partners^ or had some con- 
tiection with our Mr. Hall, ant$ 
Uielr preparation was similar to 
oa rs. no not be decei ved by f A«m.' 
Purchase the original : it has 
tiever beet*, eqiuil/ed. Our Treatise 
on the Hair, with certificates, sent 
free by nuiil. See that each bottle 
has our private Kevenue Stamp 
over tlie top of the bottle. Ml oth- 
ri'H are imitations, 

iC-P.Hatt & Co.,Prop*«. Nathita. N. K. 

Hold bj/ all l>rus»}uU and i>ealert in ifc<iieO*a» 

, C. A. COOK, CHieAClO. JiL ^ 



JAfi0.aL> 



. 



> 



l{ 



I- 




y 



-M , ■■ <■ 




Ai^a^k-iaM.* 



di 



Y. 




\ 



/ 



Cr^ ' eXoi 




The Shakopee Argus. 



I3y IIKNR Y H I N 1 > S . 

^fFiCIAL paper of SCOT T ^OUNTY. 
SH\K(»PES, MAttClI 12, l^OH. 



A Public Wrong for Private Gain. 

By the terms of their charter the Minne- 
sota Valley Railroad were required to 
construct tiieir road so as to cross therivtr 
at St. Peter. The public convenience of 
alt of Nrcolct county, IJrown county, and 
llenviilc county, imperatively rcfiuircd that 
the road should cross the river at St. Peter. 
The whole business of this vast region for 
all time to come, must be at the inconveni- 
ence of crossing the river to get to the 
railroad, or the railroad ntust cross the 
river to jjct to the business. But it would 
cost money to build a bridge, and therefore 
our ignoniimous Lcgiftliture Ir.ivo rcicttsed 
the Company from their ob!ii,Mtion to cross 
the river. In this regard the St. Peter 
Tribune says, and how true the saying is: 
*• All le^L'islalion seems to be for tliu wealthy 
and bigging lew, not for the moss of the 

people." 

^ »^^ » ~~~ 

A Judicial Murder. 





Vol. 7. 



SHAKOPEE, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY. MARCH 12, 1868. 



No. 8^ 



— lied Wintr !>> to have a steam ferry 
this season. Their uew levee is the best 
above dubmiue. 

AcciOEXTAL SnocTiK«. — Another of the j 
too frequent accidents rcsuUing from a j 
careless use uf iiro-artns oceiirred last i 
Tuesday ut .St. Croi.x I'aiis. 



"Tbo Pen Is Mlrilitlor t:saa tlio Swort!. 





Willie enter- 
ing a low door wav with liis gun ro.sting i 
cal-clcssly on his shoulder with the muzzle < 
forward, Mr. JJevd'j shot his companion, 
lli-urv Cole, wlio had jii,t p.vcedod him.— 
The Uiggor caught on the upper casin-, 
discharging the piece, the contents taking 
effect in the thigli of (^ole, iullicting a dan- 
gerous wound. Tliis is iho second per on 
Uial Mr. Ueede has shot uccidciilally, witli- 
in about a year.— 'i'<ij/.'or t'<iil^ JirjxjrUi 



iw s m m 

vo xoT iriJAi: out. 



A SiiJGLi] 0::i] will L.\st a LiriTiME. 

THE LABGE OF Y/IllTINO 13 EE DUCED, 
Greater Uniformity is Obtained. 



I IN IMIOIJATK COURT. 

I PTATi: OF >nVKF'-^"TA,1 | 

I I'outity of K-itt. J I 

' In llif M.tl',r nf the ICsldtc if S^rah A. F.tri'jault and 
llirrirt hUrilmnll : 
Ilir.fet r.irl'i.iiin. liiiar-Uan of garah K. FarlbitnU 
1,111 irri-t t\iril>:lillt.l"'*l"« pr'-<'Mit.-.|tnnir- I>i<,lM!0 



Cross Plows! 




THE PKRIUXE CROSS-PLOWS 

Aro for Sale l)y 

Johsi lioMullen, 



f Wult: nw\ !.'«t l.iiiS--li;.:i:U.tt'il U.t S liii».-. tl"ii •!", ! 
• •• •' Snirli K.ist 'I'lirfcr <>f the 



:u, In T<.wii.«lil|> lIl.Rsnac 15. sitn.a.-l In tli;- Conn v 



At Ills 

arc SlorCj^ii 



Andreas Rocsch was executed at St- 

Peter ou Friday last for the alleged murder 

of a boy about sixteen years old. The 

<jvidence npon which be was cauvicted was 

not suiEcieut to establish a di-iputed mer- 

<Aaul's account of ton dollars, much lesj to 

take the life of a human being. After a 

4.aroful perusal of the evidence upon which 

he was convicted, we do not entertain the 

slightest doubt of Lis innocenci-, or of the 

guilt of another. Had the trial been had 

at some place free fiom the excitement 

necessarily produced by the commission of 

u murder, there could never Iiavo been a 

^.-onviciion upon evidence so weak and un- 

reliaWe as that of a half idiotic young man 

who testified there were eight days in a 

week, G78 days in a year, and that the sun 

rose in the South. 

A Jdiunesotian for Congress in Ar- 
kansas. 

We clip the following from the New 
York correspoTidence to the St. Paul Press : 

.James Hinds, formerly of St. Peter, nuw 
^ Lhllii liuck, Arkansas, has been nuni.- 
■iiatcd on the extreme radical Republican 
ticket to represen t in Cojigrcss tlie ^ecuitd 
Congressional D istrict of the latter .State. 
His election, I nni informed, is assured by 
ji majority of KJ.OOO— a result ^^llich will 
be extremely gratifying t*j -all liis old 
Iricnds. Jim was, uj) to the lime of leav- 
ing Minnesota, a bitter " C4mstitutionar' 
J)ftuoeraI, but it is .ss.j'j'osed that lie was 
converted into the true laith by reading a 
New York Tribune, whidi Judge Caatlieli, 
•through Ceorgo llealep, Es.j., mislakeniy 
^urved upon him once, sui»pj.ii:ig t!ie sain-;' 
lo bo a •• notice of trial." He is sai i to be 
as SO A at euchre as at houso-moviiig, 
having on one occasion euchred Heztup 
MkiJ*1he latter held both bowers and ihe 




o: February. This will happ'jn .igain in 
Id'Ju. 

AVERACK Cttovs IX MiN-N-t:soTA. — The 
following table' from Hewitt's pamphlet 
shows the staple productions of tlie State 
and about the average yield of btiohels per 
acre : 

Av. No. bu.->hols per ncrc. 
1'2.0:) 



Iti f:|i.i';o|...o. »ii snl'l (Vpiinty. ti. slii.w rjiii>y why a 
( LUts" .<!i()Uil n.)t l)u xraiilf I for tUa gale of uai.l Uc- 



Ci-ops. 

Wheat, 

live, 

l',\rloy, 

Oats, 

IJackwhcat, 

Corn, 

Pot;<t;>es, 

i>(:ins. 

Hemp lint, (po;mls,) 

Flax lint, 

Si;rg!iuui, (gallons sviiip) 

Hay, (tonsj 




£0 !jAn>i:.v r.AXt!. 

NEW V01iK» 



NOTICE OF .MOUTtiAlJE i^ALE. 

Xames ok Moi;7(:a«;-.k.' — Janios Egan, ami 
Mary Ei;a!i, hii will, of Sibley County, 
M iniie-(i<a. 



of »ll':li-|ll.r. 

l).ito I ^\•;lrua^y 23tli. 1»0S. 
ii6 U 



L. R. II \WKTN'?, 
.l!Mj.-.il" Frol.ite, 



Tlipy arcmn.lfi of ir;ir.!cnel CAHT 8TKKI, nivl 
UEltMAX S-rKKfi, byC. K. I'KIIUI.VK. at f.ie .Miiiuc 
apulU I'low Factory. 

TUlS IMow lb tlio 

BEST PLOW IX THE WORLD, 

Aivl will lASTfroiu iwo tu tiircc times longer Uion 
any otlicr i'ijw. 



PROBATE NOTICE. 

ETATn <".!■• MIWKB )rA,1 

I'uuiity ">!' r^cott. J 8*. 



.^.. m" .«liniieMi<a. ^ Cuuuty ..l .>^cott. j s*. 

...i.LJ ^ J,;^^j(^; ^fy M<)KT<;A'iEi: — Mal!.!;L« Nhuty, thca in IVobatL- Ciiurl-Spi.cl.il Te.-ui, Feliruary 21»t, 

••-••■''J I of .Monro.-, Wisconsin. »• '^'■•^- ,. ^ . ,„..„. „• . , 

^.•^".^. ' Datk ..!' MoitTOA.;K-.\!ay :'.;):h, A. l\ Uiy.i J',//7 ^^■'«''- "/'"' ■^•'•'«'« '^ »•«'<"» ^^-'^'"'- ' 



'*'''* iSaij) MoKTc.At!*: Win n-ct rdcd in llio oUh-e 
208.00 „r ii„. j{o-irer of Hecd^ of .S.-olt 

County, at i.'ovcn o'clock in the foie- 
jioon of tho I'h tlay «d" June, in the 
Vc'ar lMii;i, in Houk "E" of Mortgages, 
page 1 If) 



Ij.OO 

1,110.00 

TiO.OO 

100.00 

2.V1 



A. 

De- 



On rfffJIii? nri'l flMni: the petition of ITonrr P.VItha'-l 
of tlio V>wu of lleiciir.. In tlif Con-ity i>f Scili ami 
i-itiito "f .Miii:i" •"■ti. s<-tliii-' t.irtli mil iiriyin.; tor ri-a- 
>.w,s !!ierfill St it'-'l. I'll' l.i'lt'Tsof A'lMiinislrulloii <iti 
ill.' J\t;itL-nl tlK-sill WlilU'ii Mir!ia.-!.l..ti-<.l tiiocily 
iif Uitinov, In tli« Sl.il.i »r lllliioii. tlficasiNl. may 1>' 
-r mil ■! i'l'l Issue 1 to llciiry l>. JlKUuel, brolhur ol 
sa il ill c>'aH«^l. 

if i; Orleroi tint S ifur lay. t'lo 2!it Uayot Man-h. 

fiivi'ii'i'i, at fbi" r.ltl '0 



"Vvhj Kerosene Laiaps Explo.lc 

The nnmorous c.vplu.iiutis of Koroicnc 
lamps n^ported by telegraph and Ihrough 
t!ie newspap'.Ts iuiliices ns to r'publish llic 
lu'Jowitig jiaragrapii con*ai!it;d in a recent 
article from the Boston Journal of Chemis- 
tiv. It cmanalcs from reliable autiiotity 
and familiarity v.ith its sug;:eslions may 
prove of practical impurtance to our readers: 

Kerosene is not explosive. A lighted ta- 
per may be thrust into it, or flames applied 
in any way, and it dues not explode. On 
the contrary, it extinguisl'.es Hame if exper- 
imented wilh at llie usual tuniperatures of 



. .I.'. l'..S..in.'TION 0. t. 1-- m trigiTt i p., m,.s ^ ^. ,|„.ju,^.y „, |.|.„i.ai,.ii, im.- Court. ll.iH.r 111 »l.*ko 

cs is till' riimth Half of the Si)nt!iw.:.-<t ' i,..o. i:i tin- siii romtyof s.-<,tt, in- asi','!!.! f-r ti! 

,, . I o 4- '!• ., „. I ti.,. o ..fl. i iioarliiu' of s:i'<J )>i'lllli'n. uti't Unit. lUo liclr-" at law ■)! 

<».i;irter el Scctum Icii, and the ^"'«"i j ",,.,.•,> i ,i,-c.-is.- 1. aM.i ail .aii'-r p.rsms inti-r. >i ■ii.i 
\. est (hiaricr uf (he Soutli Eiist <>iiar- I H'" *"i'i .-sut- aiv i..-roi,y i...t!«e.i "'''1 '•;;;i"'':" •';•'''• 

^ ,»■ . ,,, ,, . ,,. , • ,v i.rc .i-lit. at >ai'l mil'' .I'l.l ii!:k>" to ^ll'■^^■ railM', it mil 

4^'r Ol tv.vlli>Il leu, li!l m lowiisliip t>no |:„;- hiv, why tlic iiray.r oi s.il I petition kUouII iioi 



h. It. ITAWKtV^, 
.lu.U'i: of !*r ibaf' 



our rooms. Kero.seno accident.^ occur from Xo AcTiox or proc.:'C(iiiig.> have been insti- 



tuted at li'.w 
t.ie S'lni .s'vurt'i 



unv purt tI:ciV',i! 



STATE NEWS. 



two causes : hrst, imperfect irannfacturc of 
the article ; second, adiilterutions. An im- 
peru'clly nianul'acturcd oil is that which 
results when i!:e distillation has been car- 
ried on at too lovv tomperature, and a j-oi-- 
tion of the n.-V'tha remains in it. AtUiUer- 
ali'jus are largely made by unpriaeijdtd 
I'ltahTs, w];o add 20 or '.\'J per cent, of 
nap'-lia alter it leaves the nianafacturcri 

hands. The light nap*, has whicli have ^ j^^^^' '|'.,f.;:,..,:f,,.,.._ ,,,,;'i;.u j^ itcn by 
been spoken of, as known in comiuoicc un 



Huildrcd aial Fourteen, of JLingC j '''X"T'l"u"u f.irth.-r Or.:.Te.l.ttimt m.tlrcof t1..«hr.nrln.- 

'i'wentv-oix', c.tiitaining on..* I.u:idivd of 3 .11 i)ctii!oii !><• ^iv,- i.M iniiiMiiM^s co,iv..i ihu 

, .• ' • 7 I • I ■ orlr hi \\i" .V'l '/".<•.' I'V'K. a u-i-.kly in'iv-u iji'T. 

H'.n tWrl.lv SU'liS, .situ lie ly.tlg an 1 l»e- „;i„t,. i aul i.nl.llshi.l ut SliaUoii-'-, I'Kil.l Ooniilyvf 

ing ill the Co.mlv of Scott a!\.ivs.ud. •'"-'■;• ^r "";;""?';''";*i!.n h«';'^;;J'"^''""''''^ '"'"''^' 
, p, • , . ,. Ill" iiic till.' iln"l for s«l>l iicariiis. 

.^Aii» .\l.)Krt:.\<:i: was nride to s;*eur.? Hie | uatd F. i.nuiry ::i3t. iw'^ 
payment of the .sum of Eighty Dollars, 1 ^^^j^ 

wiin interest at the rate of tw.lve j) r i 

cert. p.jrr.Luum, paya!)!c in one year j^ PR0!3.\.TE COCRl'. 

from date, r'.ccordinj' to the proiinssoiy I 

not., of the 3;iid Ja7nos l-:gnn, pavatile i S'r.OTT rMU.VTV.-.So, cl 1 T-rm F« rn, y -^t". '^ 

to the .aid >.!atldas Marly,°.n.! b.ariai^ ^« %:^;!:::,;^ "" ^- ''' '^ -"^'''^ oahiw.a^. 

On rc-alnsatinUt.istlif petition of Prt'r Carrl?a'i, 
of fprlni' /.aki'.l'i th- Cuiiitv nfS'-'itt, ami Slat.- o; 
Mliiiii'sota, i'n«yiirr tir piuk'His t'l'T'-in ^^lt••■I Un 



even dale with .'iaiiJ .Moriira 



Tlic reasons f.r Us fillK.VT DCitARlLITV are:- 

l.t. TheEXTRE.ME ILVRDNESS of the 

Steel from which il is made. 

2,1. The THICKNESS & STRENGTH 
of Iho exposed parts. 

3d Thp wood w.Tk i.s of the B EST WHITE 
OAK 'iniliER. 

These qaallt «> ii.akL- It tlio 

CllEAl'EST VLOIV 

In llie MurM.as wtil as tliP JtKST.iWil as Miro n-. 
tiieie is L'fomuiiy In iiaylnx .sl.x tloHars oiuc, rat..cr 
than live . lobars t .vo or tliiof f.liics uver. 
Its i're.it harJii'J^* ctuscs it lo 

S C O U R 

Iq 111'! niostilim a'.t sol!, when all other j.lowj fail. 
'i'liciao I'jovvs uru 

WARRANI'Ef) TO CLEAN 

In any Klmtof Boil, or tlio money will bu roiunlo.l. 
it i/ljws at \x-:y 

1) E P 'V H 

Fraai f.im to twclvt; huh.'*, ami will turn iimlcr 
gTa>i, wt-'ols ali'i islabble. coJiiiilctcly . 

FUR i^ALi: BY 



P. GeyermasB, 

DEAL E R I N 

DRY GOOD 

GROCERIES, 

aj^oLccigoots & Shoes, 

HalJ3 el Gap is. 

Bi'PF-S I 
A V» (^ bJ ' 

YANKEE NOTIONS 

Queeasware, 






O "O" ^"l^ 31i 33 HES. IT 
)Bis :aL» 33 ec^ 5=^-3 e^ 9 

O-fcc- OtO- C^tGn 



SEa.lMG'FC^K 



:TEE?^3f. 



OP 



V 



wmm, 



nt" t r 



, or olherwi.<o, to lecuver" i,..M,'rs oVA.iiiiinistrjiioii on ih-- k.-mi.- ..s tv .sii 1 

Uj vii.l 111. !■• ' i.f> 11 • J.-f<;i.s'a liny l.-r Kiii.-l I., liiiii.t'i.' s.il 1 I'otir <:.irri.: in 
Dy baid UIi-l.o.lJJ 0. '^j^.,^ ,„-.i,.rol t'MitSiturUy.tl..' Twcity-llr^t .1 :v -l 



1 .■.l.Arch, I.~;s, at On • 
• -.1 th.' Ju.t-u-of Tn 



iliKk ill t'l. 
Ii.it • 111 t'.ii' 



inir:iooil «t til'! tilUvi' 
l.iA :i of S'l il-oji,i>. 111 



—The Mankato Union s.iys : The case 
of Mary Glouke against Godtray Glouke 
for a divorce wliich was tried by the Court 
.»i the last term was decided in favor of the 
plaintiir, .Mary Glouke, ou the ground of 
cruelty and inhuman treatment. 

Hor Cui.TVRK. — The Minneapolis Trib- 

ttne says : " A hop yard is better than a 

.^old man.'' It may not be:gcner.T.r.y known 

that the attention of eastern capitalists is 

being drawn towards Minnesota, as the 

■tooai promising field for the investment uf 

•capital in the business of hop growing. 

Our State is believed to possess advantages 

over Michigan and Wisconsin, and farmers 

und ethers from the aforesaid Suies are 

already making arrangements to commence 

<he cullivation of hops in this Stivte, Our 

farmers should not be behind others, but be 

prepared to reap the bcnelit.; of this kind 

of busii'.css. 

— W. F. Walbridgo, f.«rmcr1y Sheriff of 
nine Earth county, was fatally injured 
while chopping wood, by a tree falling on 
liiin. It is an often repeated story, lie 
cut a tree and it lodged on another tree ai.d 
lie cut this and the first fell on him and 
trusbed him. He was taken home insensi- 
ble and will probably not recover. 

F:io7.KX TO l.KATii. — On or about tlic 
24ib ult., a party ot live or six soldiers 
vifcre eaugiit iu a heavy storm between 
Forts Abercaoiabic and Wadsworth and 
Irozen to death. They had leM tiie mule 
team and driver and started to walk into 
Fitrt \Vadsworih in advance. The driver 
reached the Fort in the midst of the storm, 
but nothing has .since been heard uf the 
■oldiers, ai.d it is believed that they lost 
their way on the prairies, and perished in 
the deep snow.— »5>'/. Cloud Juunial. 

IiEMAUKAr.i.K Stokji. — Tbc storiQ of Sun- 
«3av, Feb. 23d is noted by our state ex- 
changes as having deposited a thin crust of 
hail and earth over the larger part, of Ihe 
tttate. Where the earth came from 13 the 
uiyKtery, though it was probably gathered 
by a wind storm a thousand miles away to 
the southeast, where the ground is bare. 

Max KiU.ED. — ^I'hrce men were at work 
on llic track between Anoka and Manotnin, 
when the locomotive and snow plow came 
up. Two of (he men stepped from the track 
uafely, but the third, named Lyon, was 
caMi'at by the snow plow, and had both 
Ieg.-r and one arm cut oil", kihing LIm in 



der the name ot beir/.cno, benzidine, g.i.-oHie 
etc., are very violate, inflaiuable and duu- 
ceruus. They, however, in themselves, aro 
not explosive j neither are ihey capable uf 
ruiniahing any gas, wlien placed iu lamps, 
which is explosive. Accidents of tiiis iia- 
tirc are due entirely to tin; facility with 
which vapor is ju'otluced from them at !ov/ 
tempera'.uies. liut the vapor by it.seif is 
inexplusive; to render it so, it must be 
mixed wiih air. A l.inip may be filled v,iih 
Ue-tosene, or with ihe viijureven, and in no 
[Kissible way can it dclunale, or explode, 
unless almo.sjjhurie air has got s-^nivwhal 
mixed with vapor. A lamp, therefore, lull, 
or nearly full, of the liijuid is safe; and 
also oi.c full of pure warm vapor is safe. — 
Exjilosions g<n( rally occur v.licn the lamp 



Titi: .V.M >i"XT claimed to be due on ?aid note 1 ViiTc-.n it"li."'i5si.'ii' 1 f.r t'l.- h- irSi;; of s.ii 1 o-tiuou 

:i 111 mat 111- li-lrs of law of th- sii I .li-i'-n •■!. If any 
thiTe be. anlail otiiiT pc am:! intorrsti'.l In th- -iiil 1 
.MtHli! afH r.'i|Hiri-l In Iw pn-^i'iit at that t.hn.'nul 
i.l.«.e 'lo «le.w I an<s if .my thiTr in-, way tlio i»raycr 
01 s.il.l iirll'ioii .^loiil.l nil h> i:r*Mti' I. 

■\itit. I* fiirtiiiT or-liTi- 1, ili»t not r" of l!i! ticirln:,' 
.il't'i' sail! ovlllio:i '',• .•iv.ii !>'• |.iil.lls!ilii,- a copy ol 
t'lH o'-l-r III III" S'iii.'.'i]>-f. 11' ''..'7 Ariin'.n w<'<'>ily 
M 'vv-ii'ii) -r i.rl-iii-l aii'l i>iiMI<h'l at .•^hiko.i.-.'. In ■<.i\'\ 
f>hii'y, for thri'i! su'i-im^Ivc wooKs U'lmcaiately l""i-" 
ci- ilm till' I li'l lifiiH'iir. 



iit the dale of this notiiv is t!ie .>-il:n (d 
Ciij Hun.lr.^d and Sx Doilars -.uid Fttriy 
Cent.-, togollicr v.ith the sum of 'JVn 
Doiliirs .sulicitor's feo secured lo bo 
])aid by said morlgiirc 

vcn, 






EXECUTION SALE. 

vnTtCK iBlKTPVv clvonth-ntl Inn c- l.-vl.'! npnn lli" 
r.n.iwln::aii.rnu-.Mii.l.»^.t.sas;hM.ro,,.,ty.M_lvi.-, 



Ccr. rirst and Lewie Strcctc, 




i-x.'iuilon w.is U<i;.!l "1 
Olslrlit Curt In in.- sni I V 



rth .lii.lUlnl Ulstiirt li> 



I^iiiin. 



tiial iiy virtue ol a power ol .sale con 

tained in .-aid lao-tKaoe ad recorded I ^\\'j^'/''^'''''tVK''iiAWklN?. .ini -o -.f l'ri.b»to 

tlierovviih and of the provi.^ious vi' 



Sta'u'.e ill siicli ca>c made and provi- j ^-- \VT'-I> 
tied, the said mort.'u-e will be for -' \y -^-^ a^-^'» 



clo.Sv<i by a .s::lj of .said luorlg.isrtHl 
premi.scs tv^ bo v.unl- liy t'le Siiiritr ot 
jiuid <'ounty of Scot?, at jmlilic vndu' 



Acr^nt^ to?<>!I Iir. U'M. SMtT'fd 
it Dlcti^tanry nt tUo IJllilc." 



uL Iherr.mldoor of \hs (^onrt Hon.so Tt p«nt. !...<. v--r ion. r!n..-ivi.rii.foi.i..n;.i«c^^^^^^^^ 





Shakopee, 

DEALKLl IN 

llardvTJire, 
Stoves, 
Cutlcrv, 

Tin Wjivo, k 
8hcct-lroii. 



MOFFAT'S Life Pills 

ASD PH(EMX BITTERS. 

The Most Successful Mcdiciucs 
in the World, n 

Established in 1835 by one of 
our Most Eminent Physicians, and 
now used throughout North and 
South America, with more plcasin?^ 
results than any other Medicine in 
cases of diseased Lirer, Blood or 
Skin, ^.' Indigestion, Costivencss, 
Bilious Complaints, Rheumatitsm 
and Fever and Ague.' i 

Thousands of certiflcates are in 
our possession, giving detailed 
accounts of perfect Cures effected 
by these invaluable Medicines. 
•They regulate the System and put 
all < the functions of the body 
in a healthy condition. " O 

Boli by all Druggists. "WTiitc & nowland, rropri- 
ctors, Successors to Dr. John Moffat and Dr. 'W. li. 
Moflat, New York. 

NOTICE OF MORTGAGE SALE. 

N.vMKs OF Mor.TOAoorv.'^ — Fredrick Lnhr- 
uTan ami Sophia Lalirn.an, his wife, of 
Pcott Count \-, :Minnesola. 
Xamk of MokTcuiKi:— Mathias Marty, 1l.cn 

of Monroe, Wiscon.'.^in. 
Datk of Moutgagk— November 14lh, A. 

1). 18C.3. 
.^Ain JM0KTr..\0E wns rrcordod in Iho f.n;Pt! 
of the Rogi.^lcr of lUfd;? of Scott 
County, at one o'clock in the aflorm on 
of the* 20th day of Xnvcnibor, in tie 
year 1.SG3, iu IJook "E"' cf Moili,'ai;<.s, 
I'iitrc IG8. 
TiiK l)KsrriJ-7iox of the Mortgncrd jirondp- 
c* is the We.-^t Half of tlie NorUi \\ r»t 
(I'lartrr of flection Twrnty-oiie iti'ltiwii- 
j c^iiip One Hundied Thirteen of Ejinee 

I TwcniY-two, ccntainiiig eighty aties, 

bitu:itc' lyirg and being In the County 
of Hcoll afercsaid. 
Satd Mtii;T(i..f:i-: wn.<; made to ffcnro t! e 
pnymcr.t of the sum of One lluii- 
di-fd Holbir.'s. with jntcrct;t at tie 
rale of twelve per cent. perannnn\p:>y- 
allp in one year fioni dale, nc 
cording to thc'i ron.i.ssoiy i!"te « t the 
siiid Ficdrtk Lalini.sni, )•: yablc to tl.<^ 
i-iiid Mail.ia.<; Marty, and Lu^aruig even 
du;« \\ilh;-aid inortgago. 
No .Ao-H>x or procccdiniLis hr.vc been insli- 
(nieii v.l law or otiicrwitc, to recover 
the .-r.:n secured by paid ruortrraj^c or 
any part t! crmf. 
Tiir. AMoi ,\T cliiimi d lo be uv.c on paid nolo 
at the date of thi.s notice is tho sum of 
Oie. Hundicd and Fifteen ]>ollar.«, li — 
gethcr with tlie sum of 'IVn dollars 
holicitoi'b fee secured lo be paid by said 
irorlgago. 
New T!ii.!;;";roKR notice is liorcV-y givon.lhat 
by \ir!iie of a power of sale ci^i.tsiimd 
in f-aiil inor!g:'gc ar.d rctordid th( levith 
j'lid of the provi.sions of the Hlatnle in 
nicli case made r.nd providtil, the tnid 
incrlgagc Viill be foivc!o5-cd by a tnlo 
of said mortgtigcd incn.isCf; to Ik' n ado 
by the t^heriir if said County of .'-"ci.tf. 
at public \ci.dncal tie front door of 
the Court Hou;-:c In Ir^l.akopce in t;nid 
C( nnty ( f Ktoli, State of Miiii.cfola, it 
ten o'clcck iu the forenoon of the '2^iii 
1 AY OK Matmi, ill tie year I!- O, and 
thc])roccc<!sor.«nch .--aie will be applied 
to the pf.ymcnt of the (-nin then cue < n 
Said loto and inori^'afrc, and tie cci-is 
and charges of forei Iti.siiie and ?aid !fun\ 
ol ten detUarb .solicitor's lees pi(;\id<d 
by ."-aid mortgage to bo J'aid out of the 
pnicc( ds of -nch sole. 
Datkd Fcl ru:.ry i:".ih l^CS. 

AlATHLVS MAliTT, 
Hkxrv HiNO?, .Moit-agcc. 

Attorney for Mortgsgcc. 

J A con TlICMAP, 

SLcrill" of Scott Couuly, Jliun, 



opairlng neatly and promp- 



is lii-it ligl.twl williuut being filled, a. id lalt, - _. , 

i.i the evcni.ig, wiien the liidd is nearly c; - , ' '' ,*' , ., , ,,>-q 

hauseted. 'Iho reason of this v. ill readilv , "•^■^'■'•' -^''"'^'''f" ';';:'• ,, .p..-^ 

b.^ seen. In usiag iini>erf..ct and ailullerat d ^ ,_ M .V I H i .Vr, .M .V .w l\ 



nci. sale will be applied lo t'l. payment , I^^HrSf'^S^^i'luy ^i";';:;' 't^"'^^^^^^ 
of tliO i^um tlu'ii due on ■Jail nolo and ; „„.^i,t lo !..• in .-viry fiiiiiiv 

< . 1 ii». . . .« . ...I ..'...... J ..r li ii 111 "ilv coiiini.oilt^il 'iv nil lo.trni.'l nn I «>mlni'nt 

mortgage, and tin? osts and ca.ng.'.sol j ,„J.'„';;f,',V ;;,\no rr-s. 8i.,.rri,n.v i„ aii i.nfs ..f the 
f.»ie<dii.-.iiro liii'i said nun of ten d.illui'sj .-..n-'iry. m lac ti-st iwoiuf the kunl la tuu Kiulba 
solicitor's lee.-< pruviiied l>y said m..r;- j l''»»'"'-'-" 
{•.i:ie I J be p lid out of ihe pro vel.i of! 

a viii i/f A'i/-'(V/ t'lri'li.ii'i'. 'ii f i '• I.Hiiiio f iriM, of lOioit 
tiiiil i.ai;i5.H, li:u b.-iMi r«iMliili-l lo llii-< coiM'ry In lar.:iT 



i.'.lock n i!i<* lor^uooii "''■;■ ," ,• , ii,,." i.i «ii.i 
I.^iv,. ,t til.- front 'l''''r .\'f/''^: •'^"'V 'S'Vst.iVr -Vi 
con itv or.^cott. «vlli i^ell •" *•"• '"t^^J"-'"' ',' '"^l, •! 
r.lMwluC ,lr..r;i..M real i«tate. bovu..t!-aaii.iaescrli,ed 



Co not be Deceived i 

0«i:i.'» 1 f'j" fni,- ■■:liil-l p iii'iLirily oT tlil.i W-irl:, 



Iveru.seiiC, the .sp.ice al..uvo the line of oil is 
alwav.i lilled wiLh v.ipor: and .so long as X 
is warm, and it is sale. i\l bed time, \\hc i 
the family retire, the light is e.xtingaisheti ; 
the lamp cooIj, ."i poriioa of the vapor is 
ciaideuaed ; this crealis a iiaviial vaeuum 
i I the space, viiich is iusianliy filled >viih 
air. The mi:itiiro is no*v more or loj.3 ciii- 
plosivc ; and when upon the next evening, 
the lamp is ligiited v.ithout replenishing 
with oil, as is ol'ieii done, and e.xplosiu.i is i 
liable to take plau\ l.a:e in the evening, 
when the oil is neariy con.sumed, and lue 
space above lilled with v.ij.or, iho lump 
cannot c-vpiodo .so !o;:g as it rc;nains at 
rest upon the table. l>ut take il in Qaad, 
agitate it, carry it into a cuul room, the 
vapnr is coulod, air p.i-ses in and the va- 
por becomes e-\l lv.'.si\e. 



Attorney t«ir .M(>it.:ag"'i\ 
.JACOB 'IHOd.V.S 
n7-7t rfheritf uf ^i^coll ('ounty, 



\ri'.!i. 



How to tell Brd Kcroaeno Oil- 

The fiuc.-;.tion will ojfi.'iehow to di'iinguisu 
the good jio«i the bad, the sale from the 
dangerous? A very snni-lu and sure way 
is to half-till a saucer with hot .water, say 
110 lo II j degrees by the lhermui.ict«r ; 
pour into the ^vater one or Iwo siioon.jfall ni 
the oil to be tested, hold a lighted match a 
few inches above and gradually lower it tu 
the oil. It' l!ic vapor or gas from the oil 
Hashes, and the oil iir.ally ignites and burns, 
it must be rejected ad bad ; and if il is 
poured into the lamp when burning, or 
such Ktulf is used to start the .stove fire 
u'lt'i, and a "kerosene accident'' is the 
re.salt, don't blame any one but your.self. — 
If, however, the match can finally be Itd't in 
the oil to barn out without igniting the oil, 
it inny be considered " non-e::plosivo." 
Tuo remed}* against imposition is in the 
hands of the people; let every consumer 
demand of his merchant the ntsT oil.— not 



•1" ^' V V --•'.';.).'*, linf. ^c-.tiuM* l4 

~ .■i.i 1...1". Tk ar A.; r'"-'' 

1-. .. ! • . .; r > 1 5 J ■ w . Ol t ■".;.' Ik- n;. -. i<"t-.J 4lJ 
»o t.^n^ to rr. c ti *.of tO'fl •v!:.-e-.'i.;foo'l, wLi:-!, 
t;. !i.c >« ir.fi- ••iJi V.i. to C • i«-1 'rriri T^y- *■■* 
r^oi UcV-Uj' h'V>) »ni'.i! tK.1- lja'H.iu ; trp Hi-} 
C.n^r 'u-ici. £ : i:".N>.i>*3 M.VNol:.".^': fIf.Ll 
c wsr «tU».<t'i. -.-jkUo' »'l b<r'n3i or mi:c.i;u a.-ci.mtt- 
ii.t (.ud; t.:rf, l.> u.-.'u7 ill..! S-J* Vi'e-_-4 Tju.c .;i ou- 

E ■.'Ir.SCr'3 i'i.'L«.0":C CVr.rP is nalrVIojs 
t»"v.ioa.Miif'l.f iul,»:: l.l'/w^'i'- !'"'0'''"<?3'i-' "' 1 '■■■*• 
e"l inipi.'-l'O- *rv f\fv"itl Iro- 1 Ihc «.r'i-sH, ii:il 
rryi-f, vrhTivurt'O blc;^ r>!i;*e, t.1i!::i rriU r-n.-l n.I 
dii^ase. I; lint enU wUt tl';'^ i'r--o i:indiclnf?:ft;o(irfl- 
iui! to direct"!-.!?, CV.iiov^p.ion rory trC'imtlv In 
I'..; la-tt s:a :3 yit.ia nwi'ly to ili.^r • ■iion. T ik« :l:e 
p;i:a lro;u;.'.ii:.v, t3 c^iuriso tU'.iiver.aui EUrir.jli. Il 
<lo-« not .o'.ow I'll! I.-.-c-uro i.!ie l>ov>2T.? are nat poic 
live they arc sol rfljuirrl, for »rac*.'ii;C.i in (r.irr- 
li.rn friiy iv;-o r.ccc.arr/. Tlie rt.T.-.aoh r.-.iwt l* k. pi 
biaHiiv, oiJ a:i a!r;»^i.iuj cnaii. 1 lo elltTr l!:o I'jl- 
moaic 3yrnri io art ou tha ra-p. .Tilory r■r^■■xn^ i ri. jsrl/ 
B.> 1 alluy suy irriiation. Tli 'd til tiiat ia r: lu'i d'J ro 
por or:n a pcrma lo.te cure i«, lo prevent taWinj 
col J. ticrciiC &loi'.l llic Tjo:n} an nsii: 1; a^ pitt-lliln, 
fc&t »'l the r!clii-«t !<xid— 'at uu^al, pinie, anJ. in tunt, 
B'lj-thinj l!;<; txirtlilc cravos • Lut lif pirtirumr snil 
iuu8ij:ai.c r.'eX ; ^ (HuJ vr. ca. mo. 1 yr. 



tvif. un r tftrt III over ■"«! o t.ivo iia^'f-". cvi |i-!iMy— .... 
iii.iUin-' a l;ir,'.'r liDk nni Hi'- .irl.-ln;il-n ulvv- tin- Ini- 
i„v«loii ..l^^•r Out It N .oreiltio.i. It .; i.i ,<'"«''" 
),./'/■ II. r.-.-U^/ "» I'l-'rnf i» •r.<. hii.I 1h «ol.l ■•o'lsl.ler.^'iiy 
lil.-hcr thi'i lii>! K,i,-'l>li .•ntio.iors.eiu- li.^oktiitlip 
.■^■lu'-v. S-i ii.' I t-im iirj i!ii'le.ivoil:i„' to p:i!iii oil tnl--' 

IVrt.-li.T.s .1.1 U- lis. llrt'.i-.Ml Cl'TO-'non, hiinn<T« nn.I 
pii.r/.n- Wi'iiH till the ij; •ncv f.)r lies w<irk t-nt'i 
|.!-;iisi.it .111 ! lii-r.iUve ciniiloy ni-iit. H.-Jul lor ulrtii- 

' s d 5..iAVr'>N" * 0... l'...k i'Mlih.s'ier*. 
urt-ol 1-i A.-yliioi !^t., ll.irtior I, Conn. 




11 ,.oi-if hiMi Mil • .tiHil.I»xeculloii,wltliio.^ls. 

^"'rU'p." *'■» O !"• ' ^'''' -^ \f''>" TIIOM AS. 

Atfy."f!rVlVt!:r!i! SheilfTof .*cott Oon-Hy. Mlao. 
Hill 7t 






? 
b 




CERTAIN, 

AND 



KOriCE OF F.XECUTIOX HALE. 

Xotiec is hereby given, that on the Sth 
d:'.y of February, A. D. ISOS, I levied upon 
the f.jllov.diig dJ.scri'oed real e.-late, lying nnd 
being ill tlie County of .Sooit, Stale of Min 
uesota, as tIr? property of James Armstrontr, 
inder and by viriue of an execution issued 
out of a;id undet the .seal of the Supreme', 



Merchant Tailok, 

First Street, Siiakopki:. Minx. 

A new and sjdcndid .stock of Clc- 
tliing, Cloths, and Cents'. Furnishing 

Goods, 
FALL k vriXTEll STYLES, 

f.c^'^ Clothing mailcto order. 
Shaliopeo, March Mlh, lb(J7. 




Vilnona Democrat says 



AKD ALL uf February, A. IL lbG8 ; which said exe- ^jIq 

NERVOUS cation wasi^iiu-^d npon a judgment rendered ^^^^ i,, the tcwn td High Fore<t, 'in 

Diseases. in .••aid Supremo Court of tlio Slate of Miu- y;";„,t^.J countv, there .are nincle;;ii 

no.>i.ta, on tlio Eleventh *1'0' "'" ^'^'''-''>'-'". '" fjirmcrs who have now in store 

the year Itiii.J, iu an action therein pending I i),ij..y.si.x: hundied aud lifty bushels 

bet' 

— Tha last Mankato Union is 
filicid with a cco^raphic.tl ami sta- 



NOTKE OF A10LT«JACE SALE. 

Namks of MoRTO.\oons — Charles llarlm.'-.nn 
and Ann llnilnuuin, his wife, of Scoll 
Couiily, Minnci-ota. 

Na>;k (k Moi>'i(iA( Ki-;— Cathmina t'clninlr, 
of irAoil County, Miimc.'-ota. 

Datk of MoBTCAcii— CctcLcr lOlh, A. 1'. 

let;.^ 

Saiu >L r.TcAci: ViT.s rcorrdcd in the « (Tec — 
(d"tl:c llogi.-tcrol Dtcdx of Siotl Coun- 
tv, ill four o'clenk in the nflcjnoon of 
the r..Mh liny r.f OcloUr, A.J.!. itCt, 
in IJook -li' of iM< rtgage?, on \ : gc .'"-03. 

Ti!K l)t>( i:mt!o\ of li.e n orlgngid pn iiii.-cs 
is Lot 'J line iu J'do«k 'i bixc, in the 
]il;.l of Sl.ak«t)iee City, on liic m tbo 
« fi-.ee of the Kegi.Mif id' Deed.-; of tlio 
(.\tuiity of ^xoU. State of MinncK.ta, 
.^itniite l}ii!g ut.d Lcin^ iu ihe Siaid 
County cl Scott. 

Said Moi.TOAfi-: w;.s made fo s^cnro llio 
piiTir.ciit of the sum of Five Hundred 
Dt^llars, with iidcrcst ui the ra'.e ol 
Iwelvc per cent. j,er annnin, pnyalde in 
one year fioni date, according to tbo 
1 r(.iiii>.~oiy nolc of the. snid (Jhaih.-* 
ii ait mm I!, j -..yible to the .'■a'd Calbn- 
lir.a Scl.iai.i7,, aiid Lcuiiiiii even dale 
villi y:.id nicftjiigo. 
No A< TK N cr prOtcti'.irgs have 1 cf n ir.Fti- 
tilted at law or olheiwi.'^c lo recover 
t e pi:;in secured bv taid Uioitg^'ge or 



Ittt i:,Tcris aro 
Jilaalcul. 



It is tlin t^Tin.iso r.'jirnr in.iil casoKof Nounii;:!:! lj,^.,,.y Hiuds, apKclIaiit, in favor of san 
;^::i^^;^f;:,^V•.;'.nr::V;.?Jiu.^«lrtf'n^^ ami against s.ud respondent, fo 




Great Discovery! 

E V E i: V M A .\ HIS O v.- \ A 11 T I S I 

A SCIENTIFIC ^V0NDE1L 



II.;^.:";^.i;;'l;^';Mi;:^'i;nooi;;:;;fw:;»;;%.i;HVti;.M;:.T scott is comtname. 

; Mst iiiisiii'ia r-li.f. nnl v TV rar.ily f.iU. to |»r..,l«ri-u 
1 c''iiyl"l<' 1:1.1 n •riii-in'iit 1 'IT'- 



olijectiiig to the few ccuLs on a gallon more 
iu pri^-c — and accept notliin.tf else. Lot 



An in.'!trumcr.t by whicii any person can 
1^ , take correct Likene««sf jj or IMiotngraphs. | 
This instrument with fall in.<;!rnciions scut 
by mail lor one didlar. Addres.*!. 

C. Ii. AMES .'> Ct\, 
is] IJroai'.v.iv. Xf-v,- York. 



;s ana one arm cut on, k..w, -; u . ^^ -,,,j establish for themselves ia their 

intly. li« leave* a wue ^ud live chil- 1 -' '•-. . *i,« r n ititivi of ^eliin^ o-dv 
■' tm-ji vieniny .''O repataiio.i 01 atuiug o.u\ 



tireJi 

*— Mr. Bryant, from "^'abashaw connty, 
stated at the recent meeting of the Stale 
^2ricvil(Lur;^l ttock-ty, that he had been 
cytreicly successful with the cuUivailon of 
flax, lie raised the past year twenty 
buslisU lo the acre. lie grinds the seed 
Vlhil 'feed's it to his stock. He said one acre 
6f flax was worth as much as any tour 
'fiercs of prodiice he rai.ied npon his farm 
the pa.st year. This is indeed encouraging. 
IJolh the seed and the fiber pay. 

The Superior Chronicle say.s a man 

from HikUoii brought to Superior about a 
pionth iinec a load of flour and pork, and 
Carried back a load of fish, claims to have 
cleared irloO by the trip; it was all done 
wilhin one luonth. 

— Th-j Methodist Ep's?opal Church at 
M.irio.'i7 Olinsteil county, was recently do- 
blrdyed by tire. 

— .MiiiiteK'ita had four pi.-lol!ices in \^'>Z. 
Il bus WtJW tivy Uti-idlc'l iiqd tbiil^-ei^hi. 



a gon'.:ine urticiv, aL'^'itclj harmless, 
ibis oil can bo ordered from a.iy part ul ^ 
l!ie country either by dealers or lanul;.?. ' 
Ili.sto be hojied tliat whoever keeps the 
oil for Kale wi'.i. hcreaf.er, perform a duty 
they owe to themselves, their neighbors, 
customers, aud the country .at large. , 

" KSW^AM.P3HI2.ii:, ' 



TH : 



«AY-30aAL?-J0TEL! 



-MuAOUE Ekti nxs— i'i:»^3'.:<i.E SiCfi:ss ok 
lliirrnnfAXS. 



A i. 

Q I3L i?w IX. O I'D 00, 

Ijnowovr. ortli"accor.t io:p.' oa f:Y trav'- ; 
ir.ir i.iibll.-. Cu li'^ li"iii« l> ii.-'A-ly f.roi..|,ivl , 
tl r- 1 iKU', a:i.i is t' « luii;i»ti»n 1 t.c.>t liiyi lioa»o 

D. A-Z^I.C^I'T, Iroprietor, 



Tt r onli'ii- no .lrii,'» or nil r msti.rl.Tlp- !<i »hi- «ll'.-!it 
eft ilr.:'-'* l'i''irloi».<, Hvi'M lo lliii myol tUl.c.ilc syslcni, 
iiml tan .aw.vl-3 1j- 11*0 1 \\U!i 



ri:r.Fi:c: safkiv. 

It Iwi long been in conslanl use by ni.iny of our 

i M-jST emini:nt niYsiciAXS. 

i 

' w'n eIvu It th;!r unialinmn aiil nn jn:imi..>l .tppro 

• vjI 

' fcMt iiy mallortrpcclpt of i>rlca.:inl postajo. 

' Ouo i.ackafeP. £1 ''\ rott.e.:o il ci-nli. 

?:.\ p.icSajsis. .V'». - i^ " 

Twolvrlnik J,-"!". !>•"«. " *^ 

It iHv.l 1 l.y all .vhol sn! ■ u:..l rftiH .I.-il-rs Is .!ri!-< 
anatueiltinisthri ?li""ttli.-riil.9l .«t.itc.s an.l by 



to sali-fy the s:<id i ''■^"^ W' ., 

iudrmcnt with inteic.4 and cosl.< out of the j m^^g <iow" the east side of the 
Sil property of the said judgment nver, on the plea o saving the e.x- 
debtor not exempt from execution within ! I'ense ot bridging it. 
th.- said Co-iiify of S'-ott, ot if fcutlicienl . —A youcg woman m Faribauit 
n-rsonal propertv could not be found, then county vecenlly screan-.o 1 so loud 
Imtof the real properly not exempt from I that il took two phy.^ieians to s.iut 
exceation in said County of Scott, belong- 1 her mout! . Moral — V\ ..en you 
in"- lo the .^:iid judgment debtor on the day ! scream hold your jaw! 



I 



T'-i^i^X^f^ & CO., Sodc Pr(Jjr:et!irs, 

ijn TKEajST S<T., B-teTos. Mass. 



FiK Ti;ai)E.— St. Paul i.s the 
largest fur market in the Uniled 
StiUes. The furs dealt in here in- 
clude tho.se varieties found in the 
remotest parts of this continent, 
which now rival in the markuls of 
the world the best Siberian. 

Il is ditlicult to compute by fig- 
ures the amount of this branch of 



Coxt;oKi>, Mareh 10.— The New lla 
shire election retupus up to t> o'clock h: 
bcon receivttd from twcnty-sieven t<>\vns, 
giving Harrison G,(;.*iJ, Sinclair ti.,l57. 
Democratic gaia 24. 






!»FrnX!> nurATfii. 



Will return fr im New York, and rom- 
m"nc« l.ii.<liii-':< In SlLkov^i: ti"-- miaaic ol JaiiUdTi. 
Coxroui., March 10.— Tito returns re- ' »-*^- *•"'""•;•' "''^ , . „ . , u t, n w i 

e'!%e..l .■ilioligly indicate the Ci'.ctlii:i i)l (<oV j * I /I •'» ^ '-' •"• _ ] 

llairiinan, Il-publieaii, I y un iacicascd ,^»\.r^^^:>l^n<^^y>iilu^>l.\iv^^yil^^'i^i};:::^^•:''>'i'^^^■'■'i' 



TIiG Hliinosota Jtioiico, 

-T \t Shakop-e, will b.j SU.'AJ CUtl.lP, 
i,u- TU.\DE1> Foil A FAltM. H la a 
' lar'-'o hotel, newly finished, in a good lo- 
IcaUon, has a good Stone IJarn, large yard, 
,a "Dod well of wat.-r. and a line run of 
custom. luiiuire at this i^!?i.--,> or of the 
owner, JA.MICS IvEAIiNEY 



wl:.in the said jndgmonl was so docketed as 
afores.iid in th'e said County ol Scott, or at 
any time tiiereaftcr; 

*Now, therefore, further notice ir hereby 
given, that ur.der and by virtue of said exc'- 
cutioii. I, Jacob Tho nas, Sherill of said 
County of Scolt, at li) o clock in the fore- 
noon of the 2-;rii oav of .M audh, in the year 

liiGS, at the fiont door of the Court Hou.-'e, , ,, r . r 

at Shakopee, in said County of Scolt, will 1 trade ; the bulk of tuo furs are 
sell to the hi-h-st bidder, tlie real estate i>o i shii.pcd via St. I sail to Loudon, ana 
tevied on under and by viriue of of said it is whispered that the fur uealcrs 
rveculion, which is described as foUows, to I and manufacturers are makiui: s.cu 
wit : Lot Four in Hlock 'i'wciUy-fivc in a "snug thing that U 13 l.eSc to 

iiet. 

Jar.c S''.ls.-.heln has just 

tv of Scolt, lo .satisfy the sum then due ou \ ij.ij a deeisicur-udercd in her favor 

said jiidgtnent and e'xecuiion, with costs. • by the Suprci.ie Court of I'cnnsyb 

Dated, Feljruary 11 111, IStiS. vuuia, which gives hor some ^.ilJ,- 

JACOB THOMA?5. (lOO worth of i.tupcrly, located near 

Slicrifl" of Scott County, M in. Piitsbnrg, to v.nich h-r uivnrced 

IIexrv HiviH, 

Atlorn"V for Anpc'.lant in person. 



Ill y part thereof. 

"I'uv. Amu.-t claimed lo be ('i:o en said 
ii.crtgage at the date of ihi.--- notice i.s 
ll.e yuiii cf Five Hundred .nr.d 'J'wenty- 
tvo DoI!ai.s and Fifiy Cents, together 
viih the .'-uni of ten ('(.llais ^olicitor's 
fe<> f-ccnrcd to be paid by .-aid iiiortgagc. 

Now TiiiinKioRK, uo'.ice is l.ticby given, that 
by vnde of a jxwcr of Mile coiiUiined 
in .-.aiil n oilgcp- ai d recorded ibertwith 
and cf the ]:iovi.s)ons (f the Statute in 
such ca.'e made end provided, the .said 
inorlgnge wid be fortcloscil by a .'^aleof 
i-ai«I iiiortgagcd picmihcs to be n.ado by 
Ihe Sl.criif of t^aJd CortiifJ' of Scott, n' 
j.ul'iic vendue ot lie front door «d" ti.o 
Court Hoii.-<! in ShakojK?c iu said Coun- 
ty of Scolt. Stjite of Alinriogola, at ten 
o'elock in the kirenoon of the 2.'>Tii day 
tK Ariiir,, in the year \it\,>^, and 11 e 
j.rocecdsof such f-ale will be. npjdied to 
llie paymeiit of the sum then due on 

fcai I note and niortgnge, and the c««.-t« 

1*1 
aud charges (d' forcdo.'-ure .".nil said ;nir( 

of ten dollars soliciloi's fees provided 

by said nicitgage to be paid out of iLo 

jirocccds of i^uch sale. 

Dati;i> .March .^th. lsCt<. 

OATH AKIN A ECIIRANT'/. 

IlE.vttY Jli.vi),*, AloMgogce. 

Attor;"".^ for Mnilgagee, lH-VI 

JACUl! IlitJilAS, 

ShcrilV of Scott County, .Mrimcsota. 



loxecuinm, wiiicn is uescnoeu us i"-i«'"'^» ...,»..«.. - 

\\?\^X\ rO^ cur fi') TnSn[ ^vif. Lot Four in Hlock Twenty-five in a "snug 
H iil? f Mil .\<^U' 1 hl-lllL tl'C plat of Sbakop^ C.ty, on hie in the keep .luiei 
till' LI I Uli ^^^^ '^ ^J » .IAJ\.* I ^j^. J^,. ^^^ i>3.istorof Deeds of said Coun- 1 _Mrs. 
I tv of Scolt, lo satisfy the sum then due ou , ij.ij a dee 



l.« 



w 



,;i 0-1 !■ i' 'J\ ; 



la. I vcui- 



ii^Siuo 



ANTED. — Ti-:Ar!ii:R<?, FrrnKXT.-i, 

.ni.i«iU»«r mi IlL'-nt M.oi an.! W-inidi.lna 

l.nslii. -i^ :'.i> III.! *."''i > S.'iTt o r iiioiitli. Ill- 

, lo-iliii!; to' .iM !•>. fo iiirli. ii!.ir>, a |.ir.>s 

rKI'lLtll HvCl-l."^ * '-■^'- '"iujuj I II" '..Cliicajo, 

v:*. ■ u;s lui 




FAIRBANKS' 

S O -A. T^ "E S . 

rv M.I. V|Mi«. 
K \ 1 RMA \ K !*. «RKKKUf. Ar Jb C©. 

•y. .V 111 i.i;;-' ■■'t . iMii.:i;;o. 
.,1)1 2i,i M.ir'hct .-I., M 1^1. I.-U 



claimed exclusive 



husbai;d had 
titlo. 

Lncliy Jonnh". A short time ago 
she was engaged in the newspaj»er 



D' 



EAFNESS. CATALKH, CONSUili'- 

TION'i AND CANrKIt Cl'Kli;!). 

A TrciifNp on l"i-)»n!i !•«. Citarrh, Oonmiiuiillon ai.'I 
Camer: iln:ir caunr.*, in' ans ol spcfly rtiii-f. nml ull.- 
liiato cnrf. liy a I'lipil «l tlif Acai'tniy ol .M.-illtine. 
I'ariH. S«nl t" any ai'iifss lor ItKciiis, 

l,.lfr ir.o:. Ki'lH-rl .VcMiinly. I>. I)., L. I,. T>.. «:r:ilul 
Frilalf ol «iran<l Kii<;.Tiii|Miieiil ut t'.>i,an'l K>!ltoi ol 
till- ••.N'jtioiiai Kr«-rnia~oii." 

Jitw York. ^v\'t- 17. IW-I — Hit. STll.l.« 1 1 1 w»s in 
cliaruc of tirace- Cloiich l|oK|>ital, Al«-M'ii'lritt. >» . 
•Iiirinc; tlic war. I fn-^ n i-ii • I v , almost ilaily, U.r 
iiioiitls, viKiii-d the Mijwiillal, uii'I Iiadiviy ni'-uiin <.| 
Vnowlns Wk rrpnlatioii li.r t;>ririi;N< i an.l ariu.. It 
was.)! tlicraoiit cr»(lliai>i<; Mi«'i'i'<r. an'l UUnuei r-s 
in till- treatiuculof paliti.tb vihb numrWabK-.— Uobt 
McJlUKl-v. 

ORGANIC VIBRATOR. 

It nis InMtliO f-iir, lit n«f /«/wr'>W*. rtvmrrt tinQiva 
, . - , - ,„ , «|. 4- «.*»<» f»i tlf, Iki'.'I. an.l i-iml>li» .l.'»f pervuiiis to |,ei.r 

bu.Slue.S.s at .^t. Llctll, Minnestia. — l Ulslimtly »t thnnU an<l I'UlilIc Bssmmliin's, llil* II- 
1' ,../,.,_„, slriiniciit wllloiieii pr 'iiici- rf-xiili. alino>l nilrai iiluu". 

o^cHun^c. i uTnl niil«'<'il In nioHlrt>»s«1 1on|! MtnuiIinK •I<Mliir»».l r 

Shetloed not w.int aid would not l *,V^a.'^nf^'o*wi.'-' "*"'" *' '"i»v i.« a.iju.ie.i wuu 
illow aiiv m 111 to shnrr^ h< r j .)od ' l»K..<\iL'L\»t.i.i. will i.« -.lof.-.'-ionaily ai :il F.abt w»»Ie 
allow aiiv m.iii to .mi. . . '^ '"'' » ,niionn,i.c,tii!v.rH:i> in.iwinjs.N V , .iail>. nto 

f.ptHUO with iltlV l«> JaiiS-.n.'.i 




^ 




II 



I 'I 



i 



I 



SOMMABY OF^THE WEEK. 

GENERAL NEWS. 

The report that Gen. Hancock has asked 
to be relieved is contradicted. 

Senator McCreery, of Kentucky, accom- 
panied by members of the Kentucky dele- 
gation, paid his respects to the President 
on the 29th ult. 

Fractional currency issued for the week 
ending February 29th, $462,000 ; amount 
forwarded |520,540, including $100,060 to 
the Assistant Treasurer at St, Louis. Na- 
tional Bank notes issued $82,480; Frac- 
tional currency redeemed and destroyed 
$527,100. Received from internal revenue 
lor the week $o,534,666. 

The McCardle case came up in the Su- 
preme Court on the 2d. All the Justices 
were present except Mr. Grier. Judge 
Black opened the case, and concluded his 
argument on the morning of the 3d. He 
was followed by Hon. Matt. H. Carpenter, 
of Wisconsin. On the 6lh, the case was 
postponed to the 9th. 

The following is a copy of the vote ad- 
ministered to Chief Justice Chase, and by 
him to the Senators, in opening the Im- 
peachment Court : 

" I do solemnly swear that in all things 
appertaining t) the trial of Impeachment 
of Andrew Johnson, President of the 
United States, now pending, I will do im- 

Earlial justice to the Constitution and the 
iws. So help me, God." 
The articles of impeachment reported 
to the House on the 29th ult. are in sub- 
stance as follows: Article first declares 
that the President had violated the Con- 
stitution by making a removal from office 
while the Senate is in session. Article 2 
— That he made this removal contrary to 
the Tenure-of-Offlce act. Article 3— That 
he had appointed General Thomas as Sec- 
retary of War while there was another le- 
gal Secretary. Article 4— That he had 
conspired with Lorenzo Thomas to obtain 
postssion of the War Office by military 
force. Article 5— That he had conspired 
with or endeavored to get officers of the 
army to destroy the laws of his country 
and enter into a conspiracy to get the legal 
Secretary of War out of office. Article 
6— That he had unlawfully conspired with 
Lorenzo Thomas by force to seize, take, 
and possess the property of the United 
States in the War Department. Article 7 
—That he had unlawfully conspired with 
Lorenzo Thomas to prevent and hinder 
the execution of the Tcnure-of- Office law. 
Article 8— That he had unlawfully con- 
spired with one Lorenzo Thomas, to seize, 
tako, and possess the property of the 
United States in the War Department, 
with the intent to violate and disregard 
the Tenure-of Office law. Article 9— That 
he had unlawfully appointed Lorenzo 
Thomas Secretary of War ad interim, with 
intent vmlawfully to control the disburse- 
ments of moneys appropriated for the 
military service and for the Department of 
War. Article 10— That he had, as Com- 
mander in Chief of the United States 
Army, declared to and instructed Major 
General Emory that a part of an act 
passed by Congress was unconstitutional 
and not binding on him as an officer in 
said army, with intent thereby to induce 
said Emory in his official capacity as com- 
mander of the Department of Washingtcn 
to violate the provisions of said act and 
to take and receive, act upon and obey, 
such orders as he, the said Andrew John- 
son, might make and give, and which 
should not be issued through the General 
of the Army of the United Slates, accord- 
ing to the provisions of said act. 

The rules to govern the Senate during 
the impeachment trial provide, among 
other things, that the hour of day at which 
the Senate shall sit as a High Court of 
Impeachment shall be, unless otherwise or- 
dered, 12 o'clock noon ; witnesses shall be 
examined by one person on behalf of the 
party producing them, and then cross-ex- 
amined by one person on the other side ; 
at all times while the Senate is siltint; up- 
on the trial of impeachment, the doors of 
the Senate shall be kept open, unless the 
Court shall direct the doors to be closed, 
while deliberating upon the decisions ; all 
preliminary or interlocutory question?, and 
all questions, shall be argued by one per- 
son only on each side, and f )r not exceeding 
one hour on each side, unless the Court by 
order extend the time ; the final argument 
of merits may be made by two persons 
on each side, unless otherwise ordered by 
the Court, on application for that purpose, 
and the argument shall be opened and 
closed on the part of the House of Rep- 
resentatives ; on the final question, wheth- 
er impeachment is sustained, the ayes and 
nays shall be taken on each article of im- 
peachment separately. If the impeach- 
ment shall not be sustained by a vote of 
two-thirds of said Senators present, a judg- 
ment of acquittal shall be rendered ; but 
if the person accused in such articles of 
impeachment shall be convicted by a vote 
of two-thirds of the members of the court 
present, the Court shall proceed to ascer 
tain what judgment shall be rendered in 
the case, which, having been ascertained, 
shall be pronounced. 



FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. 

Louis II., King of Bavaria, died on the 
28th, aged only 23 years. 

Admiral Tegethoff has been appointed 
Commander-in-Chief of the Austrian fleets. 

The motion to transfer the trial of 
Nagle to ths Court of Queen's Bench has 
been granted. 

The English schooner Mary Ann, with 
a cargo of naphtha and petroleum, burned 
at Antwerp on the 8d. The captain and 
crew perished. 

The Grand Jury in County Down have 
adopted a resolution denouncing in strong 
terms all party processions, as dangerous 
to the public peace and against the law. 

George Francis Train was arrested in 
Dublin on the 3J, on an action for debt, 
this time, it is reported. Be was about 
proceeding to a hall in that city to lecture, 
when he was taken into custody. 

W. Johnson, a Grand Secretary of the 
Orangemen's organization, has been tried 
on the charge of heading an illegal profes- 
gionin the Coimty Down, found guilty 
and sentenced to imprisonment and fine. 

The London Tinus oHhe2d is confident 
that the Ministry is complete, and that 
Disraeli becomes First Lord of the Treas- 
ury, in place of Derby ; Sir Huj^h Cairns, 
Lord Chancellor, in place of Chelmsford, 
and G. Hunt, Chancellor of the Exchequer, 
in place of Walpole. 

Letters from the British captors in 
Abyssinia, dated Magodla, February 4, 
show that the prisoners are still confined 
in the Fort of King Theodoras at Magodla, 



carefully guarded, though in great fear of ^'i'J^'^e^'l'cfopied-one that the iTe«ideut had 



the vengeance of the King. They were as 
well treated as their condition as prisoners 
would permit. All were alive and in good 
health. 



m 
29th 



THE WEST. 

Ex-Govemor Ford, of Ohio, died 
Washington, on the evening of 
ult., of pneumonia. 

The Metropolitan Hotel and an adjoin- 
ing building in Peoria, 111., were burned 
on the Ist. Loss about $100,000. 

Two steamers were burned at St. Louia 
on the morning of the 3d — the M. 8. 
3Iepham and the Fanny Scott Loss, 
$100,000. 

At Lcmont, Cook county. 111., on the 4tb, 
while five men were engaged in "tamp- 
ing " a blast, on the Norton canal-deepen- 
ing contract, it suddenly exploded, and 
four of them were killed. 

The Republican State Convention of 
Ohio has made the following nominations, 
to-wit : Judge of the Supreme Court, 
William White ; Secretary of State, Isaac 
R. Sherwood; Board of Public Works, 
James Moore ; School Commissioner, Cap- 
tain J. A Norris ; Clerk of Supreme 
Court,* Radney Faas ; Delegates to the 
National Convention were chosen, and the 
Convention declared for Grant and Wade 
for President and Vice President. 



Additional articlce of impeach 

sideut hac 

attempted, lu pabllc haranffuee, etc.. wiih a de 



THE E.VST. 

April 2d has been appointed Fast day in 
Massachusetts. 

Augusta, Me., was visited by an earth- 
quike on the 29 ult., which lasted several 
seconds. 

Julia Dean, actress, died suddenly in 
New York city on the 9th, in her thirty- 
seventh year. 

The New Jersey Democratic State Con- 
vention, to nominate delegates to the Na- 
tional Convention, will be held at Trenton 
on the IGth of June. 

George L. Crummet, convicted of set- 
ting fire .to the High School house in 
Brighton, Mass., has been sentenced to 
State Prison for life. 

The Pensylvania Democrats have nom- 
inated the following State ticket : Charles 
E. Boyle, of Fayette, for Auditor; Gen- 
eral Wellington, of Columbia, Surveyor 
General. 

An accident occurred on the Canan- 
daigua and Elmira Railroad, on the 4th, 
by which two women and a child were 
fatally, and nine others seriously injured. 
The car was thrown from the track, the 
stove broken, and its contents scattered 
through the car, severely burning the 
already injured passengers. 

That portion of Barnum's Museum in 
which was located Van Amburgh's 
Menagerie was burned on the morning of 
the 3J. The flames spread so rapidly that 
it was found impossible to save any of the 
larger animals. The loss to the Museum 
and contents reaches $500,000. Several 
othtr minor losses resulted from the fire. 



Orleans on 



THE SOITH. 

Jefl;. Davis was in New 
the 4th. 

News from Austin, Texas, on the 3d, 
indicfite that the Convention has been 
carried ia that State. 

On the Glh, General Geo. R. Vickers, of 
Kent county, was elected United States 
Senator from Maryland— the final vote 
standing 09 against 41 for Thomas and 2.") 
for Earl. 

Flayed alive is a horrible torture to 
wbich a poor German was put by Texas 
Indians. The position in which the body 
was found showed that the miserable man 
ran a hundred yards afcer being flayed 
alive. 

A Washirgton special of the 5th, to the 
Chicago Tribune, says that, although full 
returns have not yet been received at 
army heacquarters, there was no doub 
the new Constitution in Alabama was lost 
in the late election. 



CONGRESSIONAL. 

In the Senate on the 29th, a memorial 
was eubmitted from the LesieUturc of Uissoari, 
asking aid to repair th«j Icvoca on the Misslwlppi 
river A bill was iutroductd and referred to 
aholigU the office of Adjutant General of the 
army The btnate proceeded with the conaidcra- 



♦iou of thtj rule* reported by the Select Committee 
of beven to govern the impeachment tr.al, and 
considerable difcafclon was had thereon, but, 
without final action, the Senate adjoamed. 

In the House, on the 29th, varioua 
petitions w«re presented. . . .The resolutions of the 
Miesouri Legi^latare on the cnbject of levees were 
pregented and referred . . . -Ten articles of impeach- 
ment aL'ainst the rrecident of the United btatee 
were presented from the Select Committee, and 
read by the Cleric, when the House went intoCom- 
mi'tec of the VS hole for the consideration of the 
same The arlick s of impeachment were debated 
pro and con, and the Committee took a recesa 
until ten a. m. on the 3d. 

In the Senate, on the 2d, memorials were 
presented from members of the Grand Army of 
the Republic settin;: forth that their serricea had 
not been enfflciently recojjnized, and prajlng for 
a portion of the Uipartmeutal offices; from the 
Buililo Board of Trade, askinjr an appropriation 
to complete the improvement of the entrance of 
ButVulo harbor.... A petition was presented and 
referred, of soldiers of t e war of 1812, asking to 
be placed on the same footing with the soldiers of 

the last war The hill was passed, authorizing 

the Secretary of the Treasury to sell an unoccupied 
niililiiry site at Watt rport, l'a....The Senate pro- 
ceeded to the cotisideration and adoption ot rnUa 
to;:overn the impeachmcLt trial, and adjourned. 

The House le-assembled on the 2d, in 
Committee of the Whole, and continued the dls- 
ca??ion on the articles of impeachment. Consid- 
erable discn^sion ensued ; leave was obtained to 
have speeches printed in the Globe ; aeveral 
amendiiieuts to the impeachment articles as re- 
ported were offered, but rejected At four o'clock 
p. m. The Committee rose, and a communication 
was offered from forty-tive members of the House 
protesting agnlnst the manner of procedure, etc. 
I'he anicles were adopted by an average vote ot 

1-26 to 41 Messrs. titevens, Butler, Bingham, 

Bouiwell, Wilson, Wiir.«ii.o and Logan were then 
selected as Managers to conduct the Impeachment 

before the Senate A resolution was adopted 

that the Senate be Informed that the Honse bad 
appointed Managers to conduci the Impeachment; 
also that the articles adopted be carried to the 
Senate by the Managers appointed to condnct the 

trial Adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 3d, the Committee 
on Finance was instructed to inquire Into the ex- 
pediency of repealing all laws imposing taxes on 
incomes and manufacturers — A bill was passed 
restoring to market »ltcrnate even sections of 
land along the lino of the Pacific Railroad and its 

branches A bill was Introduced and referrred 

to promote uniformity of coinage between the 
United States and other countries — A bill, with 
amendments, was reported from the Committee 
on Territories to provide a government for the 
Territoiy of Idaho... The bill for the nlief of set- 
tlers on the Sloiix Reservation was passed — The 
bill to f.icilitatc the payment of solaiers' bounties 
was called up »nd referred ... .It was ordered that 
the Secretary of the Senate inform the Bonse that 
the Seriate is ready to receive the Managers ap- 
pointed to carry to the Senate the articles of im- 
peachment.... The bill to fond the National debt, 
etc., was taken up and postponed — The Stand- 
ing Rul>?s reported by the Select Committee were 
laid over for further consideration, and the Senate 
Went into Executive session, several messages 
having been received from the President, and boob 
aft«r adjourned. 

In the House, on the 3d, a large number 

of bills and joint resolutions were Introdnced and 

referred A resolution was offered and adopted, 

iastrncting the Judiciary Committee to Inquire 
whether Congress has power, under the Constitu- 
tion, to regulate the rates to be charged on Ireight 
by railroads engaged in commerce between the 
different titates of the Union ...The motion to 
Bu^ptnd the rules to have read and placed on the 
joamal the protest ot the Democratic members, 
was rejected— 48 to 84.... Several Executive com- 
munications were presented and referred — A 
message was received from ttie Senate announc- 
ing that the Senate was ready to recelre the Man- 
agers appointed to deliver to that bodythe artlclea 
Ot Impeachment. . . .The Poetofflco ApproprlatUm 



sign to set aside the richtful authority and power 
of Congress, to bring into disgnice, ridicule, con- 
tempt and reproach the Congress of the United 
States, etc ; and the other that he had declared in 
substance that the Thirtv-nlnlh Congress was not 
a Congress of the United States authorized by the 
Constlluiion to exercise legislative power under 
the same, but was a Congress of only a part of the 

States, etc Two resolutions were reported, ono 

directing that the articles of impeachment be ex- 
hibited in the name of the House of Representa- 
tives and of all ihe people, and be carried to the 
Senate by the Managers ; the other authorizing 
the Managers to appoint a clerk and messenger, 
and to send for persons and papers — Adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 4th, a communica- 
tion was submitted from Chief Justice Chase rel- 
ative to the mode of proceding upon the impeach- 
ment case, in which he took exception to some of 
the proceedings already had. Ills opinion was 
that the House Managers should not be received 
by the Senate except as a Court of Impeachment, 
with the Chief Justice presiding, and that no rules 
for the guidance of the Court should he adopted 
until the Court is organized. He would, howev- 
er, defer to the decision ot the Senate. The com- 
manication was ordered printed and referred — 
The bill to further provide for giving effect to the 
laws in regard to public lands In Nevada, was 

amended and passed The House Impeachment 

Managers appeared followed by meml>ers of 
the House, the latter ranfjtng themselves outside 
the bar of the Senate, Mr. Bingham presented 
the articles of impeachment, which were read, and 
the Managers then retired The Sherman fund- 
ing bill was taken up and debated A resolution 

was adopted that the Senate would proceed to 
consider the Impeachment question at one o'clock 
on the 6th Several orders relating to impeach- 
ment proceedings were adopted, and the Senate 
adjourned. 

The House, on the 4th, resolved itself icto 
Committee of the Whole and proceeded to the 
Senate, In company with the Managers, to present 
the ariieles of impeachment. When the House 
returned thii Managers reported their action — A 
resolution was adopted instructing ths Judiciary 
Committee to inquire into the expediency of ex- 
tending the jurisdiction of the United States 

Courts of Kansas overth* Indian territory The 

case of K. K. Butler, Representative from Tennes- 
see, was then taken up and alter disi'ugsioD. laid 
over A resolution was offerfd and adopted look- 
ing to an increase of duty to Ave cents per pound 
on ingot, pig. bar and rolled copper ; lour cents 
per pound on pure copper, and three cents per 

pound on copper ores A resolution was adopted 

instructing the tJeneral commanding the army to 
report the number of votes cast for and against 

the adoption of the Alabama Constitution A 

resolution was adopted looking to arresting the 

frauds of claim agents A bill was inlrtducod 

and referred in relation to back-pay and bounty of 
oflicirs Adjourned. 

In the Senate, en the 5th, after the trans- 
action of some unimportant business and the in- 
troduction of a bill to rebuild •ho levees on the 
cast bank of the Mississippi river and reclaim the 
lands along the Vazoo river, the President pro 
Um. announced that the morning hour having ex- 
pired, all legislative and executive business would 
cease for the purpose of proceeding to the busi- 
ness of impeiithment. Chief Justice Ctase, ac- 
companied by Senator Pomeroy, Judge Nelson, 
and others, then advanced to the President's chair, 
and said that he appeared to join with the Senators 
in forming a Court of Impeachment lor the trial of 
Andrew Johnson. President ot the United States. 
The oath was then administered to him by Judge 
Nelson. The Chief Justice then requested Ihe 
Senators, as their names were called, to step for 
ward and take the oath. When Mr. Wade's name 
was called. Senator Hendricks rose and put the 
question to the prcsUlisg oflicer, whether the Sen- 
ator from Ohio, being the person who would suc- 
ceed to the Presidency, was entitled to stt as a 
Judge In the case? Mr. Sherman replied that 
the Constitution itself svttlwd the question. 
It provides that the presiding officer should 
not preside, but being silent as to 
right to be a member of the Court, it fi 
lowed, by implication, that he had the right. 
The question wa« further arjued by Messrs. Davis, 
Hendricks and Bayard, against Mr. Wade's right 
to sit as a member, and by Messrs. Morrill (Me.), 
Williams, Howard, Morton, Sumner, Sherman, 
Drake, Thayer and Howe, in favor thereof, the 
Republican Senators taking the ground that there 
was no person authorized to make objections but 
the party on trial. After some further debate the 
Court of Impcachm-nt afij.iurned till one o'clock 
on the tith, and the Senate Immediately afterwards 
adjourned. 

In tho House, on the 5th, there were but 
few members present, many having gone home, 
expecting that no legislative business will be 
done during the trial of Impeachment — A bill 
was introduced and referred providing that incise 
of the removal of the Chief Justice of the Su- 
preme Court by d-ath or resignation, the duties of 
the office shall devolve upon tiie Associate Jus- 
tice whose commission is senior in time, until the 
disability Is removed or another Chiel Justice ap- 
pointed The case of R. R. Butler, Representa- 
tive elect from the First District of Teunesse, was 
considered and postponed... A bill was intro- 
duced and passed »pi>olntiDg Erastns B. Wolcott, 
of Wisconsin ; John H. Martindale, of New York, 
and Hugh !>. Bond, of Maryland, Managers of the 
National Asylum for Disabled Soldiers... .Ad- 
journed. 

In the Senate, on the Glh, the Chair sub- 
mitted a communication from tho President, In 
reply to a resolution of Inquiry relative to the al- 
leged interference of the United States Consul at 
Rome In the recent troubles in Italy. Also, a 
communication from the same source, in reply to 
a resolution of Inquiry In regard to tho abduction 
of Allen McDonald, a citizen of the United States, 

In Canada After the transaction of some unim- 

Important business, the impeachment trial 
was taken up, Chkf Justice Chase in the chair, 
who announced the question to be on the resolu- 
tion offered by Mr. Heii'liicks, objecting to the 
swearing in of S.-nator Wade. After debat-, Mr. 
Hendricks withdrew his obj. ct^on, and Mr. Wade 

was sworn in The Chief Justice suggested that 

tho rules adopted by the Senate la its Iccislaiive 
capacity are no rules for the govtrnment of the 
Senate sitting for trial of an impeactiment, nnless 
adopted by that body. The rules wen; formally 
adopted, and notification was sent to the House, 
and Its Managers soon appeared and demanded 
that the Court should take cognizance as to the 
appearance of Andrew Johnson to answer ques- 
tions of impeachment. The order was made and 
the writ dr iwn up, being made rclurnnble on Fri- 
day, the 13ih inataut. 

In the House, on the 6th, a new oath of 
ofHce was reported from the Committee on Elec- 
tions, and adopted... Announcement was made 
that the Senate was organized for the impeach- 
ment trial ...'Ibe bill lor the admission of Mr. But- 
ler was passed— 84 th il.... A t)illwas introduced 

and referredamendatory of the Banking law 

Adjotuned. 



publican. In Tyrone, at the municipal 
election, the Democrats made a large gain 
over last fall. 

A meeting was held at Front street 

Theatre, Baltimore, on the 4th, to sustain 
President Johnson. The building was 
densely packed. Mayor Banks presided, 
assisted by over one hundred Vice Presi- 
dents. The meeting was addressed by 
Governor Swann, Hon. L. W. Roes, of 
Illinois; Hon. Mr. Kerr, of Indiana; 
James Brooks, of New York ; John 8. 
Gallatin, Kentucky, and others. Appro- 
priate resolutions were adopted. 

In reply to the statement of a friend 

recently conversing with him, Fred. Doug- 
lass said, very clearly and pointedly, that 
slavery was destroyed not from principle, 
but from policy; and that all that the 
negroes have to be grateful for is the 
emergency that created the necessity of 
freeing them. Fr«d. Douglass is a man in 
whom the blacks can repose the utmost 
confidence, if they can in any one. What 
he clearly meant in making the above 
assertion was not in reference to the past, 
to slavery, or to the emancipation, which 
is a fait accompli, but in reference to the 
future, that, when the Radical party shall 
have used the negro to their hearts' con- 
tent, it will allow them, in the elegant 
language of Horace Greeley, " to root, 
hog, or die." 

A correspondent of the New York 

W(nld asks : " What course would have 
been open for the President in order to 
test the constitutionality of the Tenure-of- 
Offlce bill but the removal of some civil 
officer appointed with the consent of the 



Senate ' 



The World answers : 



Our 



his 



correspondent touches the point sharply. 
The Teuureof-Offi^e bill was a clear viola 
tion of the Constitution, a clear usurpa- 
tion of Executive power, a clear reversal 
of the uniform practice of every adminis- 
tration since Washington's. In no other 
possible way save by the exercise of the 
power usurped — in no other way save by 
the explicit removal of a civil oflicer, and 
not merely by the removal implied in a 
new appointment, could the Pre&ident 
have preserved, protected, and defended 
the Constitution as he is sworn to do, could 
he have invited the confirmation of the 
Judiciary to the view which he was enti- 
tled alone to take and alone to maintain. 
In no other way could the Judiciary have 
been brought to a re-iaflirmation of the 
President's indivisible and unshared right 
of removal." 



CLIPPIN6S AND^ DRIPPINGS. 

Personal and I.iiaerarj. 

The Cincinnati Mercantile Library has 
nearly 30,000 volumes. 

A BOOK of Maximilian's, entitled " On 
the Wing," is soon to be brought out. 

TnK World says Horace Greeley is 
"a self made man who worships his 
Creator." 

Pbofessor Skelky, of the London 
University, is now admitted on all hands 
to be the author of " Ecce Homo." 

Gen. Phil. Sherid.vn is thirty-seven 
years old. He was born at Somerset, 
Perry county, Ohio, on the Cih of March, 
1831. 

Senator McCbeeby. of Kentucky, is 
six feet high, weighs 190 pounds, and is 
said to be good-looking, scholarly and 
eloquent. 

The Amherst college roll of honor cm- 
braces the names of 175 graduates and 83 
undergraduates. Among them were 30 
Generals and field officers. 

The Philadelphia correspondent of the 
London Times says that Mr. Dickens will 
have to pay $20,000 of his receipts for 
reading, in this country, as an internal 
revenue tax. 

There are now three female editors on 
the list of Iowa journalifem— Mrs. Money, 
of the Jeflferson Era; Mrs. Hartshorn, ot 
the Corydon Monitor; and Mrs. Mary 
Read, of the Wnght County Register. 

John Bunyan was confined twelve years 
in jail, his crime being a " Dissenting 
Preacher." All this time he had but two 
books, the Bible, and Fox's Book of Mar- 
tyrs. While thus in prison, he wrote 
his beautiful allegory of " Pilgrim's Pro- 
gress." 

A New York letter says : It is reported 
on good authority that a majority of the 
ecclesiastical court have found that Rev. 
Mr. Tyng is guilty of a violation of the 
canon law, and that Bishop Potter has 
been so notified accordingly. Public ad- 
monition is the penalty for the first 
ottcusc. 

Horace Greeley, in his reminiscences, 
speaks of first meeting Abraham Lincoln 
when he was a member of Congress, sad 
adds : " It will surprise some to hear that, 
though I was oflen in his company hence- 
forward till his death, and long on terms 
of friendly intimacy with him, I never 
heard him tell an anecdote or story." 



.R 

....Ner. 
...Mass. 
....Neb. 
....Neb. 

111. 

..W. V. 
...Ohio. 
..W. V. 
. Oregon. 



poi.iTit;Aij iie::!iis. 

McGregor, Iowa, has gone Demo- 
cratic. 

The Oswego, (N. Y.) Oazdic shows 

that there has been a Democratic gain in 
Tioga county of 402 in a little over three 
months. 

A Washington dispatch of the Glh 

says ; " The friends of the President argue 
that the trial will not be finished during 
the next four or five months." 

A Washington special of the 6ih 

says : " A double guard is still kept 
around the War Department, though for 
what reason is unknown. Mr. Stanton 
Btill continues to remain in his room night 
and day. There were no visitors calling 
upon him to-day." 

One of Senator Hendrick's objects 

in opposing the admission of Mr. Wade as 
one of the Impeachment Court was to at- 
tract the attention of the country to the 
subject. Having accomplished this, he 
withdrew his objection on the Gth, and Mr. 
Wade was allowed to become one of the 
jurors in the trial. 

The following dialogue took place in 

Richmond a few days ago between a mem- 
ber of the Virginia Convention and one of 
the sable recipients of Mr. Hambrock's 
bounty : Member—" Well, Sam, have you 
a soup ticket ?" Sam—" Yes, ear, two un 
'em." Member— "Is the soup good?" 
Sam — " Dunuo, sar ; we feed it to our 

•pig." 

A good story is told of a brave sol- 
dier in one of tbe Illinois regiments, who 
having been detailed to act as boss team- 
ster at soldier's pay ($1G per month), found 
himself at the head of about twenty con- 
trabands, all of whom received $'25 per 
month as teamsters. Whereupon he made 
application to his commanding officer to 
be appointed a nigger by brevet, and to be 
assigned to duty in accordance with his 
brevet rank. 

In Pennsylvania, the Democrats 

hare carried the Borough of Holidaysburg, 
by a majority of G5— a gain of 40. The 
Democracy of Altoona have achieved a 
decided victory, electing a Democratic 
Mayor, City Treasurer, and ten of the 
twelve members of the City Council. 
Tbe city ])a8 heretofore b«en strongly Re- 



VLow Does* tlie Senate Siand? 

Tbe United States Senate is composed at 
this time of fifty-three members. Ten 
States are not represented, and Maryland 
has but one Senator, Mr. Thomas having 
been rejected. Of the filty-three the fol- 
lowing are Radical, forty-three in all : 

Anthony R. I. Morrill, L. M Me. 

Cameron Pa i Morton Ind. 

fatten N. J. 'Norton Minn. 

Chandler M ich. | Sye N e v . 

Conkllng N. Y. Patterson, J. W....N. II. 

Connces Cal. Pomeroy Kansas. 

Cole Cal Itamsey Minn. 

Corbett Orcgon.lRoss Kansas . 

Cragin N. II , Sherman Ohio 

Urake Mo.jspraguo 

Edmunds Vt ^Stewart 

Kerry Conn Sumner 

Fessendcn Me. Thayer 

Fowler Tenn. Tipton 

Krelinghnysen N. J.;Trumhull . . 

Grimes Iowa. Van Winkle 

Harlan Iowa Wade 

Henderson Mo. Willey 

Howard Mich i Williams 

Howe Wis.. I Wilson Mass 

Morgan N. V Yates Ul. 

MorrUl, J. 8 Vt.i 

The following are Democratic or Con- 
servative : 

Biyard Del. Hendricks Ind . 

Buckalew Penn. Johnson Md. 

Davis Ky. McCreery Ky. 

Dlion Conn. Patterson, D. T...Tenn. 

Uooliitle Wis. Saulsbury Del. 

The above shows that the Radicals have 
a majority of 33. The question presents 
ilself, will all the Radicals vote lor con- 
viction of the President on charges made 
by the impeachers? A two thirds vote is 
required to convict. That would require 
thirty-six votes, or seven less than the 
full number of Radictls in the Senate, 
showing abundant ability to convict and 
remove the President if mere partisan 
Radicalism is the only element to be con- 
sidered in (Ptimaticg prcibabililies. But 
Messrs. William?, Trumbull, Sherman, 
Howe, and Fesscndeu, arc already on 
record as vigorous opponents of the pro- 
vision of the Tenure-of Office bill upon 
wnich the President is arraigned. They 
resisted it to the la.«t, {and only when it 
was apparent that the Tenure otOffice bill 
as a whole would be lost if the provision 
in question was not maintained, they voted 
for it, yet explaining that it did not and 
could not trammel the President, and all 
of them insisting that the measure was a 
departure from the established wise usage, 
and unconstitutional. There is not a 
lawyer in the Senate who does not know 
that the provision in question is null and 
void, and that no misdemeanor has been 
committed in disregarding it. >Ve are 
now inclined to believe tLat a two-thirds 
vote cannot be got to condemn the Preti- 
dent.— J/mouri Republican, 2d. 



Democratic CSaln*. 

The local elections in towns which voted 
in February have exhibited the Democra- 
cy still pushing forward and winning ad- 
ditional victories. A day or two since we 
directed attention to certain elections in 
New York State, where the Democrats, 
defeated for fifteen years, achieved sub- 
stantial triumphs. We have before us 
a table of February elections in four 
counties in New York, which shows the 
tide of success which set in so strong last 
November still running full and strong, 
carrying the Democracy still further for- 
ward within the enemy's lines. In Otsego, 
Delaware and Herkimer counties and in 
eleven towns in other counties from which 
returns have come in, fifty-two towns in 
all, the results show the Radicals most 
severely handled. In 18C0 those towns 
gave a Radical majority, of 3,111. In 
November, 1867, the Democracy wiped 
out that majority, and scored 77 to their 
own side. Last month, in the elections in 
those same towns, the Democratic majority 
was increased from 77 to C91. Similar 
gains throughout the State would add 20,- 
000 to the enormous Democratic majority 
of November ]aSI.— Missouri Republican. 

—Evening schools in New York have 
been successful the past season. The at- 
tendance has been unusually large. The 
fortnightly average has been 2.G38 females, 
and 3,923 males— being an increase over 
the corresponding period of the preceding 
year of 1,275. The adult population were 
found to avail themselves largely of the 
advantages offered, and the attendance at 
the colored schools had become doubled 
during the same period. The total cost of 
the evening schools is $88,000. 

—Rev. Mr. Stryker, of the Dutch Re- 
formed church in New York city, in a 
speech showing the advance of the tem- 
perance cause, said he could remember 
when it was as much expected in the an- 
nual synod that the members would be 
supplied with mugs of beer and pipes of 
tobacco, as it was that the clerk should 
appear with his documents. 

In planting trees, some authorities say, 
set them no lower in the ground than they 
stood in Um nurseir. 



Ullwcellaneoas ItemM. 

—Louisville had twelve snow storms.the 
past winter. 

— The Syracuse salt mines have yielded 
80,000,000 pounds of salt since their dis- 
covery in 1797. 

— Two pretty women had a duel in Kan- 
sas, the other day, and one was shot dead. 
A lover was the cause. 

— By the time Yv'estern game is sold in 
New York, it is sai.'l, 900 per cent, is added 
to the cost of purchasers. 

—The Chippewa (Wis.) Union says 
during a cold snap there, water in wells 40 
feet deep was frozen over. 

— Substract your age from eighty and 
two-thirds of the result will give you the 
probable duration of your hfe. 

—The first building in Corry, Pa., was 
erected in August, 18G1. The town now 
has a population of over 8,000. 

— An English magazine estimates the 
Wall street money business at between 
115,000,000,000 and $16,000,000,000 a year. 
— Between eighty and ninety million 
pins can be made in a day of ten hours by 
a machine lately completed. So the Con- 
necticut papers say. 

—More that $30,000, of which Hartford 
has contributed $18,000, has been raised 
in Connecticut toward the foundation 
of a State industrial school for vagrant 
girls. 

—The total acres of land granted by 
Government to Iowa to aid in the con- 
struction of railroads, is .'■),009,784. The 
total miles of road now built in that State 
are 1,325. 

— Mr. Wm. Fraser, an amateur skater 
of Chicago, recently wagered $200 tliat 
he could skate 100 miles in 24 consecutive 
hours. He won the money and had 18 
minutes to spare. 

—San Jose, California, has gone into silk 
culture, with a company having a capital 
of $100,000, tbe machinery has arrived, 
the foundation of the building is laid, and 
the worms are at work. 

—In the United States there are one 
hundred and . eighty theater?, museums, 
opera and concert hall?, which- paid lail 
year a tax of two per cent, on their gross 
receipts, amounting to $194,039. 

— New York has had nearly one hun- 
dred days of sleighing the past winter, ac- 
cording to one of its journals. Three 
months of snow before the close of Feb- 
ruary makes a pretty long winter. 

—The Hanover, York County, (Penn.) 
Spectator, says that a strange and fatal 
disease has made its appearance among 
cattle in that county, and that many farm- 
ers have lost some of their valuable cows. 
— An irrepressible Yankee is boring a 
hole in the Black Hills to furnish Chey- 
enne with a volcano to be far sup*rior to 
Vesuvius in every respect It will be illu- 
minated by natural means on every Fourth 
of July. 

— In New YorK a plan has been broached 
to receive from all the prominent points of 
the West quotations of the labor market, 
so that emigrants may be sent at once to 
the points where their services will be 
most in demand. 

—It costs seventy pounds sterling a 
week to keep the Great Eastern. The Chair- 
man of the Company, at a recent meet- 
ing, advised patience, as other cables must 
be laid, and the Great Eastern is the only 
vessel to accomplish it successfully. 

— A lady who had carried two common 
pigeons from tfieir home in Missouri, a dis- 
tance of two hundred miles, keeping them 
in a close box, lately missed them, and has 
received a letter from Missouri saying that 
they had returned to their old haunts. 

— A lady of Troy announces in the pa- 
pers a request that the " curled darlings " 
who attend her receptions will not lean 
their heads against the wall, as "the oil is 
taken off" by the paper, and the entire re- 
papcring of a room is frequently rendered 
necessary." 

— A Brooklyn man has accomplished a 
feat in the way of bigamy. He courted tor 
two years and finally married a yotmg 
woman residing within a stone's throw of 
the house where he lived with his wife and 
family, and sustained the two establish- 
ments for some time. 

—To one who asked pecuniary assist- 
ance of a crtisty capitalist the remark was 
made : " Heaven helps those who help 
themselves." Said the would-be borrower 
sourly : " That reminds me of a fall I got 
when I was a boy, which, obtained this of- 
fer of aid from a bystander : ' Come here, 
sonny, and 1 11 pick you up.' " 

—Olive Logan tells of a suffering woman 
who " had not eaten a bite for nearly four 
years," and had not slept a wink since the 
first gun was fired on " Sumter," who re- 
ceived $13 from some charitable ladies in 
New York, and immediately satisfied the 
terrible gnawings of hunger by the pur- 
chase of a point lace collar at Stewart's. 



—One night lately a fellow attempted, 
on a wager, to drink twenty-five glasses 
of lager beer in a saloon in Des Moines, 
Iowa, but after reaching the fourteenth 
one he was conveyed home on a wheel- 
barrow. 

— A grey eagle made a descent on a 
small boy near Leon, Iowa, the other day, 
and but for timely assistance the lad 
would have been food for the monster 
bird. It was dispatched and measured 
seven feet from one tip of the wing to the 
other. 

— A man named Sampson, in Pennsyl- 
vania, is said to cherish an extraordinary 
grudge against Germans. A large for- 
tune inherited four years ago has been 
cheerfully spent in paying fines for as- 
saults which he invariably makes when he 
meets a German. 

— In chastising a girl of large dimen- 
sions, a Maine school-teacher had his hair 
disturbed and his face scratched. The 
girl's father gave him the choice of leav- 
ing the village, being prosecuted, or tak- 
ing a thrashing. The teacher had not 
been able to make up his mind, at last 
advices. 

—Id the city of Mobile, a bald eagle de- 
scended into a yard and seized a young 
kid. The old gcat made fight with the 
spoiler, and the lady of the house, hearing 
the racket, went out and knocked the 
" bird of liberty " on the head with a stick, 
stunning him so that he was easily cap- 
tured and tied. 

— A boy entered a butcher shop in New 
Haven and pittously bepged lor three 
cents' worth of meal for dinner, and was 
bountifully supplied by the proprietor, 
who was considerably astonished immedi- 
ately afterward at a demand by the recipi- 
ent of his bounty to hand him over tix 
cents' worth more for his dog. 

— Of a happy old couple, Daniel and 
Susan Lake, of Bridgewater, Yt , who are 
1 said never to have (luarreled during their 
I half centuiy of wedded life, it is now told 
that he was originally engaged to another 
girl and she to another man, and they 
exchanged lover.s by mutual consent, Dan- 
iel and Susan coming together. 

— A half idiotic boy, who left Cincin- 
nati R few weeks since and went to Indi- 
diana ia search of work, was packed in a 
box at Acton by some ruffians, put upon 
the cars, and shipped to Cincinnati. TJic 
box was marked " live stock," and the ex- 
press messenger, hearing a strange noise 
coming from it, opened it in time to save 
the boy's life. 

— An Irish coachmun, in Hartford, Con- 
necticut, who was provided with a strap 
and weight whereby to fasten the horse he 
drove, has lately been in the habit of leav- 
ing the weight in the pleigb, and securing 
the strep to the bit-ring very carefully. 
When the horse ran away, a few days 
since, he was astounded, and could only 
say : " How did he get away, an' it weigh- 
in' so much ?" 

— A Mr. Garland, of Winslow, Me., a 
short time since purchased a sleigh— so 
nicely painted and varnished that the back 
of it reflected like a mirror. It was put irj 
a building in which was an aristocratic 
turkey, who in passing the back of the 
sleigh thought he had found an intruder, 
whereupon he showed fight, and did not 
give up the contest until he had ruined the 
back of the costly sleigh. 

— A good place to keep friction mfitches 
in, if you would have your house burned 
by them, is a bureau drawer, in which are 
nice muslinp, laces, ribbons, and cotton 
garments. The opening and shutting of 
the drawer is quite sure, in time, to ignite 
the combustible things and give you a good 
tire. A woman In West Foily-stcond 
street. New York, has just tried the ex- 
periment successfully, eetling her bureau 
on fire, and consumirig about $100 wortL 
of goods. 

—A skiff, containing two men, was 
w edge-d in an ice gorge on the Mississij^pi 
river, one night last month, and the occu- 
pants were obliged to pass the entire dark 
and cheerless night in a perilous situation, 
liable at any moment to be crushed by 
the miniature ice-bcrgs surrounding them. 
In the morning, although almost paralyzed 
with the cold, and with portions of their 
bodies frozen, they managed to scramble 
over the ice to the shore, and their lives 
were saved. 

— A terrible tragedy has occurred in 
Cftlilornia. A gentleman made a lady a 
present of a pair of pistols, and after sev- 
eral trials of skill they concluded to go 
through the form of a duel. They took 
their positions, fired at the word, and, to 
the terror of the lady, the gentleman fell. 
She threw herself frantically upon the 
corpse, embracing and kissing it with every 
emotion of endearment. Under such 
magical influence the gentleman revived, 
and rose unhurt from the ground, and — 
and— they are to be married. 

—A few days since a rather rough ap- 
pearir.g man from the remote interior 
walked into the Granite Bank in this city, 
and inquired : " Is this Mr. Johnson, the 
cashier?" "It is, sir; what will you 
have?" "Do you pay any of your old 



ries," and the natives cleaned cut the stock 
m two days. 

It Eeems that there are grades, even 
among the tradesmen of London. One of 
the papers advertises, among other schools, 
one "where theduughieis of old tradesmen 
may receive a good education without as- 
sociating with the,daughter8 of mushroom 
merchants and quad ' gentltmcu.' " 

—The largest penguins of the Antarctic 
ocean exhibit a curious peculiarity in the 
place of deposit of the single egg laid by 
them. This, instead of bemg placed in a 
nest, as with other bird.?, is held between 
the legs and feathers of the belly, and 
transported by the bird wherever it goes 
until hatched. 

—During the hearing of a recent case 
at the Stalibrdshire assizes, in England, 
two young girls of fourteen were examined 
who could neither write no read, who had 
never been at school, church or chapel, 
and had never heard of the Bible. They 
were employed in the kitchens of canal 
boats. 

— Theed's bronze statue of the late 
Prince Albert has lately been elevated to its 
pedestal, which is composed of large gran- 
ite blocks, and situated about a quarter of a 
mile east of Balmoral. The pnnce is rep- 
resented as a deerstalker, w! I h his rigtit 
hand resting on the head of a large shaggy 
staghound by his side. He hokls a rifle in 
his left hand, ar.dhis face is turned toward 
his island home. 



-•••< 



Pay UM You <)io. 

There is no doubt about it, the country 
is again runnin;;; into the old way of doing 
business. The credit system has been 
slowly creeping upon us ever aince the 
close of the war. Manufacturers and im- 
porters have had large stocks on hand 
that they have been obliged to force upon 
the wholecale dealer-s upon time. The 
wholesale dealers, have, in their turn, used 
every means to get their goods into the 
hands of the country merchants and city 
retail dealers. The country is flooded with 
"ruwneis," or, as they are generally 
known in the West, "guerrillas," fiom 
leading commercial houses, who vie with 
each other in oflering the easiest terms to 
dealers. Now the retail dealer buying 
upon long lime, and often more stock ih nil 
he otherwise would, is ready to urge his 
customers, the consumers, to take goods at 
thirty, sixt}', ninety days or a year, accord- 
ing to what he considers the ability cf the 
purchaser to pay. The coubutner is thus 
tempted to take more than he would if he 
saw his purse growing emiUy before his 
eyes, and before he knows it, he has con- 
tracted a bill that will astonish him when 
the day of settlement arrives. It is a fail- 
ing that most men have, to be deluded by 
a dim vision of a distant pay day. 

It is a convenient thing to h:ive credit at 
the store, the blacksmith and the shoemak- 
er shops, and it is rather flittering to a 
man's pride withal, especially to a man oi 
rather small means. Now all these things 
going on for three or four years, hivc 
again got the credit system drawn like a 
net work about almost all cla.?sos of busi- 
ness, and its ramiiicitions have at the least, 
reiched eve rj body but the farmers, and 
we fear in two mnny cases they, too, have 
been reacheil by them. 

We have but a few words to say to 
farmers on this subject of getting into 
debt. It is a habit most troublesome and 
full of vexation and ruin. Pay day, tax 
day, and death, are said to be Jibuut the 
<mly things that people are sure of in this 
world. Tbe latter is the only debt that all 
arc surely able to pay at the arpoiulcd 
time. But the calls lor store debts and 
laxes, come just as uufailiagly, mverthe- 
less. The only sure way to avoid them i.s 
to pay as you go. There is really little 
need for most faimers, at the pnsiut lime, 
to get into extravagant ludebttdness. 
Crops have beengocd and prices rcmuntr- 
alivc and where Inigahly h:is reiRntd 
there should be plenty to pay as things 
are wanted. If a man is out of debt, he 
has about as near a heavenly sunounding 
as he can expect in this worll. Farmera, 
don't get into the habit of " getting trust 
ed ! " It is worse than the usu of tobact'i 
and almost as bad as inUimpciance ilself. 
— Prairie Farmer. 



Tub Use of Paper— Thcie is a com- 
pany in Camden, N J., who nunufacturc 
a patent waterproof paper expressly used 
for building purposes, said to be cheap and 
durable ; it is used in place of thiDgle?, 
tin, slate, and also lor weather-boarding 
walls, ceilings, and even carpeting is made 
of it that looks as htiudsome as tlie oil- 
cloth, and lasts many ycare. Sje adver- 
tisement in another column. 



A Slow Tu.\j>.— A Connecticut ex- 
change says "a few day" s^iiicc tho tnjiini! of one 
of thft Naupatiick trfliii** froae fa^l to Ui« ttock 
niar Wolcotlvillc, and it lock uu Uour ana a Uail lo 
thaw It oat with hot water." 



Incidents and Accident*. 

— A little girl eight years old reached 
Whitewater, Wis., a few ^ays ago, having 
traveled from Ireland alone, and not think- 
ing it much of a trip. 

—A colored girl in Chicago, arrested for 
theft, recently made seven attempts. tx) 
commit suicide— three by hanging, two 
by drowning and two by burning— all of 
them being frustrated by those having her 
incbarge. 



bank bills now?" "Certainly." "Well, now, 
that is good. You see I bad some of your 
bills, and the other day I oflfred them at 
the Sandy River Bank, and they didn't 
want them ; but said you would take them ; 
so here they are." The cashier counted 
Ihe bills, about $100. He then inquired, 
"How long have you had these bills?" 
" It's about six years." " How happened 
you to keep them so long ? " " Weil, you 
see, I had only one child, a girl fifteen and 
a half years old, and she died ; and then 1 
didn't care about the money, and put it 
away into an old box, and there it has 
been." The lump came to his throat and 
the tears streamed down his furrowed 
and bronzed cheeks as he turned aside, 
in memory of the child, for whom the 
money had been saved. —Augusta {Me,) 

JourrMl. 

» ■ 

— The Japanese have published a his 
tofy of our late rebellion. We haven't 
read it. 

— The story of a separation between 
Victor Hugo and his wife is said to be 
totally false. 

— European astronomers are preparing 
to observe the great eclipse of the sun this 
year, in the Himalayas. 

—The daughter of a wealthy merchant 
In Edinburgh recently received presents 
at her wedding worth $100,000. 

—A lady advertised in the London Times 
for a governess, and had to put in another 
notice the next day to head off 200 appli- 
cants. 

—The London fire brigade recently 
spent several hours hunting up an aurora 
boreali", which was supposed to be a great 
fire in the suburbs. 

—A clerk in a St. Thomas (Canada) dry 
goods store has been put in Uil to prevent 
him from killing a young lady who has the 
bad taste not to love him. 

—There is some talk of starting a new 
printing club in England, which shall 
translate and publish the beet stories, old 
and new, of foreign hterature and lands. 

—The effect of the rebelhon in China 
has been to bring about a mixture of the 
several dialects in the empire, forming 
them into a jargon which may, in time, 
become the universal language of the 
Chinese. 

— Two hundred and forty-two deaths 
from liphtning-fitrokes have been registered 
in England and Wales during the fourteen 
years between 1852 and 18G6. Almost all 
of them were cases of persons following 
out-door occupations. 

— As illustrating the cannibalistic pro- 
pensitis of New Zealanders, an English 
paper reports that a firm wishing to dis- 
pose of a large stock of prepared meat, 
caused it to be labeled " Canned Missiona-, 



LIBRARY AND BCOK AGENCY. 

101 Washington Stkekt, C'iiicago, Ili. , 
commission agent 

For purtliaslrg B»i)ka ^y the hniidroil, orflnjrlc Cf^py, 
I<;r llorarlfs or I livatf ute. S nalc cni.lcs of «riy wt-rk 
pr-nt p<>Bi-{>tii<l on lUvCiptol' relbil price. Largv t>iil\.ti 
filled at a discount. 

The Great Bcok fcr 18C8. 



GEN. OKA NT'S LIFE. 
We knew that, sooner or iMtcr, the tnift writpr wotild 
appiur, and relate llie tnu; story. We huvu not. tmi 
vi ly Ions; to wait, lor lli*' woik whnsc liiir -uc 1 :i\(! set 
down above, is hunt st aWc, and uccura'.c to a ui-^ri-e.— 
LWaaUiugtou CbroiilclcJ 



D. APPLETOW <& COMPANY, 
Noa 443 & 415 Ekoaijway, New Yoke, 



HAVE JUST PlliLISUtD 



The Military History of 

ULYSSES S. GPvANT, 

From April, 1S<j1, to April, 1J05. 

B'X" -A.IDA.1S/E EA.3DEA.TT, 

Colonel, and Al'i-di-Cmup t-i ih' <t" iR-ral-in-CLlfl, 
lirevet Url;;adler-bLiitrHl L'l.Sled feint'.* Ailuy. 



Volume I. With Portrait and Nunurons Jfaps. 
liUO JiJ'jes. Piict, m-J.OO. 

Frem the Philadelphia PrcM. 

"Gen. Badeau, who wiis a maa ol Itlters before hit 
patriotism fturig him into the lulf war. vl.'-rt It » as his 
fortune to lie placid on Gen. Giant's isfalf, to whtcli ha 
U KtlU attaclied. hag * ritien the iiillitiiry history ol hl» 
ciilef, with nnu.scul ptrfonal (.Pi'0i-t<:nii!e» o( hdi.;: i.ot 
only accarately t)nt lully Inforui<-d. Hk writer in a 
very clear ana graphic uiiinn»-r, but lar b-yoDd the 
style we esUinate there-liability of h:g woik." 

fW Sent free by mall to any atldrest on receipt of 
price. 

D. Appleton & Oo,. Publishers, 

443 and 44S Broadway, Xtw York. 

A New Monetary System ; 

THE ONLY MEANS OF SFXCKINr. THS IIKSPETT. 
iVE P.lCHTS oFLAE-'lCANDi-Ititi LUT-i, ANO 
OF Pi:oTE..TiNG TiiE Pli.LlC KilDM UNaN- 



ciAL"ii£VCLSlON6. b«>pp. iTiCy.^.-a. 
Bt Eowabs Kjcixoco. 



of 



"It presents an arnte sDalys^s of t>ie funcaonn 
money, arid Hbounds m Bin(!;ali»rly fajiufsUve lih as, 
whtcii canrot fmi to ttwiiken the lutcrest oi the rea- 
der."— [N. Y. Tribune, Jan. i'i. 

"The author lays the ax at the ro"t of the evil* of onr 
ctirrrncy and financial sjstt'in. • • • • We are Just 
now in a trunsUlon nat« »lth rfRMd to ctirrency. bank- 
in;;, national unaii'e, and al! S'lcU cnlj' ct-, and »■!■ are 
in a position to strike out Into any n* w or 'Tli;iiial 
course that may t* sound In theory, or that may prom- 
ise to be of btnefit to the conntry. Our ttnu-Mneu Hud • 
public men might Crd v»lnahletU2gtBtii»n8 lu ths work 
ueiore us."— [S. Y, Herald, Jiii. .t>. 

Sent post-paid, on receipt of price, by 

A. N. KELLOGG, 

101 Washington St., Oiicaffo. 



HORTICULTURIST lALMANAC ! 

rOR 1868, 

ContatolEg llluBtraUons and deEcriptioM of all 
the new and best variotice of Ra?pberrici, 
Strawberries and BlackberrieB. 
^T" Sent post-paid for a three-cent Btamp. 
F. ^V. WOODWARD, 
Agricultural Book Publlbher, 
F, 0. Box 3890. 87 Park Kow, New York 



DEFECTmERAGE 





. — • ..•- •• %a0ai m Bl 



I 

r 
I 



> 'I 




■' < 




■ 1^ ■»•<■' 




piiSireltattg. 



BABrS LETTER. 

The following letter, purportins: to bo from a 
very promti'ing bprisr of the rislnsr generation, just 
three weeks old, has been handed us, with ihc 
a«gurance that it la uonuine as well as pood, which 
we do not prcsinme to doubt. If any one has a 
smarter baby, let it be exhibited —I^ £01/ (jV. i'.) 
Oaxtle : 

Dear old untie, 

I dot tMir letter; 
Mr old mammy 

She ditt^n better. 
She every day 

LJiiit; 1)11 Mronger, 
l)»n't mean to be sick 

Very mncb longer. 
Daddy's fo fat 

Can't hardly stagger, 
Mammy says he jintu 

Too much lager f 
Dear little baby 

Had a bad colic. 
Had to take tne drops 

Hassy paragolic ! ' 

Toot a doce of tatnip. 

Felt worse than aver, 
Shan't *ate no more 

Tatnip never I 
Wind on stomit. 

Felt pooty bad ; 
Worse fit of sitness 

Ever I had. 
Ever had belly-ate. 

Old Untie Kill r 
Taint no fun, cow. 

Say what 00 will. 
I uxed to sleep all day 

And cry all niijht; 
Don't do 90 now, 

i'Hu«e taint yinhtl 
BJt 1 m growl ii}j, 

•ieliinir pooty fat ; 
Galu most twopoaiids, 

O.ily tlnk o" yat ! ! 
Little flannin blankets. 

Was too big before. 
Nurse can't pin me 

In 'em no more. 
Skirts so small. 

Baby so stout. 
Had to let the plaits 

In em all out. 
Got a head of hair 

Jess as black as night, 

ad big boo eyes 

Yat look very bright ; 

■^ mammy says 
Jever old see 
Any ozzer baby 

Half as swctt as me. 
Grandma comes often. 

Aunt Sarah, too; 
Baby loves zem. 

Baby loves "00. 
Bab J s s-nds a pooty kiss 

To his unties all, 
Anntiee and cousins. 

Big folks and sma 1, 
Can't yite no more. 

So good-bye. 
Jolly old nntle, 

Wiz a trlass eye ! 

€]EXT13iO iW AT IVIOIIT. 



Je 
And 



The door 'was locked when I got home, 
Baid Tom, and how to get in without wak- 
irg the governor was the difficulty. I 
knew he v,ould give me particular tits if 
he knew I was out after ten, and the clock 
had just struck one. The back yard was 
an impossibility, and but one chance re- 
mained. There was a porch over the front 
door, the roof of which was a few feet be- 
low two windows. One of them I knew 
to be fastened down, and the other opened 
from a bedroom, which might or might not 
be occupied. An old maiden sister of the 
governor's wife arrived on the same day, 
and it was very probable that she was in 
that room ; but 1 knew the bed was in the 
corner furthermost from the window, 
and I hoped to be able to get in and 
through the room without awakening 
her, and then I had a comparatively easy 
time of it. So, getting a plank from the 
neighboring board pile, I rested it against 
the caves of the shed, pulled oil my .shoes, 
put them in my pf)cket, and "cooned." 
AU right so far, but I thought it ncccs«ary, 
in order not to arouse suspicion in the 
morning, to remove the plank ; so, drag- 
ging it up, I threw it oil the end, and down 
it weni with an awful clatter on a stray 
dog that had followed me two or three 
Equaree, and who immediately set up the 
most awfal whine a hound ever gave 
tongue to. That started half a dozen dcgs 
in tho n*.iglkl»o^il«J^xi barkiug; a mocking 
bird in the window above commenced as 
it he intended to split his throat at it, 
and a woman in her night clothes ap- 
peared at the window across the street. 
I knew I was safe as far as she 
was concerned, but if any one came to 
our window the candle gave light enough 
to have discovered me. Nobody came, how- 
ever, and the lady, after peering up and 
down the street for a minute or two, 
popped in her head and retired. The 
mocking bird still kept up his eternal whis- 
tle, and it was fully half an hour before he 
and the dog settled down and gave me a 
chance to move. Creeping slowly along 
the wall till I reached the window, 1 put 
my hands on tha sill, sprang m, and with 
my legs dangling out, stopped to listen. 
Yes, she was in the room, tor 1 was sure 
1 could hear breathing. After waiting lor 
a miLUte 1 cautiously drew up one leg, and 
then the other, drew them around, and put- 
ting them down on the tloor, was just con- 
scious that I had stepped on something 
soil and yielding, and was withdrawing 
them when another yell broke forth at my 
feet ; the old maid jumped from her bed 
cryiiig " murder !" And the mockingbird 
started again. A little darkey was lying 
on her hack under the window, and 1 had 
stepped oil her face and of course woke 
her up. I decided in a moment what to 
•do. The house would be aroused, and I 
would be caught to a certainty unless I 
could get to my room before the governor 
was up ; but I hadn't a moment to lose, for 
the little nigger was screaming; so I 
stiirted for the door in three steps, struck 
a chair, stumbled over it of course, mak- 
ing the awfulest racket you ever heard In 
the hours of night in a peaceful house. 
The nigger and the old maid screamed 
louder than ever; the mocking bird whis- 
tled louder than a steam whistle, and they 
fairly made a chorus as loud as Julian's. 

1 reached the door, however, and quietly 
and swiftly opened it, and just got into the 
hall iu time to see the old gentleman open 
the door, with a candle in his hand, and 
come hurrying up the stairs. There was 
a wardrobe near where 1 stood, and I 
sprang behind it. Up came the governor, 
reached the door, opened it, and went in, 
and in the meantime there were all sorts 
of contusion and inquiry down stairs as to 
what was the matter. Nobody else came 
up, though from where I stood I heard 
every word of inquiry and explanation in 
the room. Of course they could not make 
much of it. The little darkey was too 
much frightened and too sound asleep at 
the time to tell the truth, and the upshot 
of the business was that they concluded 
that she had been dreaming, and the gov- 
ernor, after giving her a sound shaking and 
explaining the matter to the aroused neigh- 
bors from the window, went back to his 
own room again. 

" So lar so good." I now had to go down 
stairs, reach the back door, unbar it, get 
into the yard, make for my room, which 
was in the second eiory of the brick build- 
ing that stood connected with, and about a 
dozen yards from, the main one. Afler 
giving everybody another half hour to 
settle down again, 1 started. 

Boys, did you ever try to go up or down 
a pair of stairs at midnight without making 
a noise? You may try it all sorts of ways, 
but every step is sure to creak, each with 
a peculiar noise of its own, and loud 
enough, you think, to awake everybody. 
I had got nearly to the bottom when a 
little dog came trotting up tho entry to- 
ward me, yelling furiously. A suppressed 
«• come here, Zip ! " silenced him, for he 
recognized me ; but the little fellow started 
the mocking bird, and all the dogs in the 
neighborhood, having learned to take the 
cue, of course, joined the chorus for a 
third time. 

I ran along the passage, reached the 
door, and unlocked it just as the governor, 
aroused the second time, opened his door, 
and seeing a man coming from the house 
by the t>ackway, of course cried " Thieves ! 
thieves!" and made a rush after me. I 
was too quick for him though, opened the 
door, sprang oat, made for the door that 



opened into a room below mine, and had 
just reached it, when crash ! within a foot 
of my head went a brick, and a voice that 
I knew belonged to the next door neigh- 
bor, Tomkins, joined the governor in the 
cry of " Tincves ! thieves ! murder ! mur- 
der ! " I was safe, though. 

Ruuuing up stairs 1 "shelled" myself 
quicker than 1 ever did before or since, 
and was in bed sound asleep in half a 
minute. 

Wasn't there a row, though ? I never 
heard so many dogs before— the mocking 
bird, of course, was outdoing all previous 
efforts— the chickens began to crow — 
Tomkins, next door, was hallooing 
" Thieves !" and calling the governor. 1 
could hear fcreams and all sorts of noises 
and talking among the neighbors, until at 
length the old gentleman's voice was heard 
in the yard calling, "Toml Tom !" 

Tom, fortunately, was sound asleep, 
snoring. 

Jumping from my bed, I raised the 
window, rubbed my eye and looked 
partially frightened (which 1 wasn't), and 
asked: 

" Why, father, what in the world is the 
matter ':'" 

" There's thieves in the house," was the 
reply ; " get your gun aud come down — be 
quick." 

" He's in the room below you," hallooed 
Tomkins ; " I'm certain of it ; I saw him 
as he ran down, and threw a fire brick at 
him. I know he didn't pass the door, Mr. 
Jones." 

I was directed to look out for myself, the 
governor stood sentinel at the door below, 
armed with a club, while Tomkins had five 
minutes to collect aid from the neighbors, 
and in loss than half that time, so thorough- 
ly was every house alarmed, there were a 
dozen or more men in the yard armed with 
guns, pistols and sticks. 

The governor led the attack ; opening 
the door he called : 

" Come out of here, you house-breaking 
scoundrel ! If you attempt to resist I'll 
blow your brains out." 

Nobody came, however. 

'• Watch the door while I go in," and I 
was told to look sharp, and shoot the ras- 
cal if he came up stairs. A momentary 
search was sufficient to satisfy everybody 
that the thief was not in the room. 

*' He's up stairs, then !" cried Tomkins, 
"^for I'll take my liiblo oath that he didn't 
pass the door." 

,So up stairs they trooped, but I had lit a 
candle by that time, and there was no 
burglar there. The strictest search, even 
looking under a boot, didn't show the 
faintest trace of him. 

The yard was examined, then the house, 
and everybody was tolerably satisfied that 
he had escaped ; but I wasnppointed senti 
nel for the rest of the night, and ordered 
not to go to sleep on my post (but I did) un- 
der the penalty of a flogging. 

The articles missing, on a thorough in- 
vestigatiiin the next day, were two pies and 
the old lady'a silver thimble. The thimble 
.turned up in a day or two, being discov- 
ered under the carpet, but the pies have 
not been accounted for even unto this day. 
On oath I could have given very material 
testimony as to the deposit of the stolen 
property, but the cise didn't come before 
any court, and I remained quiet. 

Didn't the local editors loom though? 
One of them elongated himself through a 
halt column, and headed the article, " A Di- 
abolical and Atrocious Attempt at Burg- 
lary and Murder !" describing with graph- 
ic pirliculars the fiendish attempt to throt- 
tle Miss L and her servant, compli- 
mented the coolness of K. Tomkins Esq . 



and perorating witlia wilhcriug anathema 
on the want of vigilance displayed by the 
policemen. 

It was fun fir me to see with what wide- 
awake sagacity the watchman used to stop 
at our front t'oor and lit-ttn during his 
rounds for a month after. The excitement 
died away, though, after r. -.vhilc. But I'll 
never forget the nigLt I tried to get in 
without making a noise. 



►♦-•- 



I'pitapliM. 

From Temple Bar. 
Epitaphs in England are of three orders, 
each with two classes. There is the com- 
monplace unobjectionable (such as the 
mere name and date, with a text or two 
added), and the commonplace extremely 
objectionable, such as : 

" Afllictionsore, Longtime I bore." 
Then there is the grotc-Hi'ae iuteational, 
and the grotesque unintentional. Among 
the former we should rank the epitaph on 
Mr. Foote, of Norwich : 

"Here lies one Foot, vrhose death may thousands 
save. 
For Death 'nath now one Ibot within the grave." 
And the one on Mr. Box: 

" Here lies one box within another. 
The one of wt;od was very gornl, 
Wc cannot say so much for t'other." 

Also the famous one of Sir John Strange : 

"Here lies iin lion'-sl lawyer. 
That is Strange." 

And Albert Diner's epitaph for himself— 

certainly the siiortesl, and perhaps the 

best in the world — the meet ins^criplion for 

the closed door of the House appointed for 

all living, the one word " Emigravit." 

And this one on a bellows-maker : 

"Here lies John Mellows, 
The Prince of Good Fellows, 
Clerk of All-h!illow*, 
And maker of bellows. 

He bellows did mend till the d.iyofhis death; 
But he who made bellows could never make 
breath." 

And this, at Jfanchester, on an old man : 

"Here lies John Uill, 
A man of ^kill, 
His aire was ilvo flmcs ten ; 
He ne'er did good, 
Is'or ever Wduld. 
Had he lived as long again." 

And this on a dy^r: 

"Boneaih this turf a man doth lie, 
Who dyed to live, and lived to die." 

As f »r the unintentional! v grotesque ep- 
itaphs, they may bu found in almost every 
churchyard in Englat.d. Now and then, 
when we hear of thera, we have a suspi- 
cion that they ure " too good to be true," 
but he who has h>;d any experience 
of British monumental stupidity, will 
hesitate to put limits to the absurdity 
it may display. The following are a few 
which we recall to mind, omitting such as 
we happen to 1 ave elsewhere seen iu 
print. Can anything be more simply 
touching than the second line of this coup- 
let: 

"IN MEMORY (»F JOHN' DALY, Ac. 
He died of a tjuinsy. 
And was buried at iJin«y." 

Or the third of this triplet : 

" Here licih wrapt In clay. 
The body of William Wray 
— I have no more to say." 

There is certainly no lack of faith dis- 
played iu the fvllowing, v.hich is, we be- 
lieve, to be found in Sunbury churchyaid: 

"A — B — 
Left Sunbury, 
And started for ParadlBe, 
June SGth, IS—." 

Very difterent is the sceptical, not to 
say rollicking, tone of the inscription over 
a certain Gabiiel J'^hu : 

" Here 11 s the body cf Gabriel John, 

Who died in the year eighteen hundred and one. 

Pray for bis soul, or lefTt alcue. 

For it is all one loGa'oriel John, 

Who died in the year eighteen hnndrcd and one." 

There is a fearful weight of innuendo 
conveyed in this stern, brief notice in the 
churchyard of Cotttn-Hackett, Worces- 
tershire : 

"Here lies the bodv cf John Galey hi expecta- 
tion of ihe Last Day. 
What sort of a man ht was that day will </»«- 
cover." 

Here is another cruel remark on a 
doctor: 

" Here lies the corpse of Dr. Chard, 
Who filled the half of this churchyard " ; 
and a still more unpardonable one on a 
lady, possible ct those loquacious tenden- 
cies too often harshly attributed to her 
sex : 

" H'jre rests in silent elay. 
Mil's Arabella Young, 
Who, on the aist of May. 
Began (0 hold her tongue.''^ 



This is as bad as the unkind hint conveyed 

in the following : 

'• Here lies Margaret Sexton, 
Who never did aught to vex one. 
Notlike (he Woman under the next slone.'^ 

The following is simple at all events. 
It is at Melton Mowbray, in Leicester- 
shire : 

" Here lies the wife of Bimon Btokea, 
Who lived and died like other folks." 

Grief and selfishness are finely mingled 

in the following, by a widower : 

" I've lost the comfort of my life. 
Death came and took away my wife. 
And now I don't know what to do. 
Lest death should come ahd take nie, too." 

Grammar is postponed in the next to 
high poetical and moral consideration: 
" She's gone and cannot come to we. 
But we shall shortly go to she." 

Another is grossly personal : 

" Reader! wherever thon be, oh, tread not hard. 
For Tadlow lies all over this churchyard." 

In the churchyard of St. John, Worces- 
ter, there is an epitaph which, if brevity 
be the soul of wit, has high claim to that 
character. The arrangement ot the aux- 
iliary verb is, >t all events, original. It 
reads thus : 

" Honest John 
's dead and gone t " 

A "happy conceit," it was doubtless 
thought, in 1G40, to write over a member 
of Parliament named White : 

" Here lies a John, a burning, shining light, 
Whose name, life, actions, all alike were White I " 

The following would be eet down as 

Irish, but we believe may claim a Saxon 

origin : 

" Ah, cruel Death t Why so unkind. 
To take her and leave me behind r 
Better to have taken both or neither. 
It would have been more kind to the survivor I" 

But of iLe following there tan be no 
mistake. 

" Under this stone lie two babies dear, 
One is buried in Connanght, and the other here." 

We have always felt satisfied that that 
most delicious of all epitaphs which cele- 
brates the virtues of Lady O'Liwney, 
must have been composed by her confi- 
dential maid : 

" Here lies Lady O'Looney, 
Great nieca of Burke, commonly called 'The 

Sublime,' 
She was bland, passionate, and deeply religious ; 
Also she painted in water-colors. 
And sent several pictures to the Esbibitiou. 
She was flrst con jin of Lady Jones, 
And of such is the Kingdom of Heaven I " 

Shall we class among the intentionally 
or unintentionally grotesque epitaphs the 
following, composed by three Scotch 
friends, to whom the person commemo- 
rated had left a legacy, with the hope ex- 
pressed that they would honor him by 
some record of their regrets? The first 
friend composed the line which naturally 
opened the epitaph : 

"Provost Peter Patterson was Provost of Dundee, 
The second added : 

" Provost Peter Patterson, here lies he, 
The third could suggest no other conclu- 
sion than 

"Hallelujah! Hallelujee I " 

The following must have been flattering 

to the bereaved widower : 

" Here lies the body of Mary Ford, 
Whose soul, we trust, is with the Lord ; 
But 11 for hell she's cban^'ed ttiis life, 
'Tia better than being John Ford's wife." 

There are de par le monde a number of 
epitaphs the absurdity of which consists 
in the substitution of a wrong name for 
the deceased person, to accommotiate the 
exigencies of the poet. One of them runs 
thus : 
" T'nderneath this ancient pew. 
Lie the remains of Jonaihnn Blue, 
His name was Black, but that would n't do." 

And another : 

"Underneath this stone aged threescore and ten, 
Lie the remains of William Wood hen." 
(/'or Hen, rearf Cock— Cock would n't come in 
rhyme.) 

We confess we are sceptical about the 
authenticity of these various readings. 
No doubts, however, attach to the sweet 
agricultural simplicity which breathes 
through the following : 
" Here I lies, and no wonder I'm d':ad. 

For the wheel of a wagoi. went over my head." 

A very facetious story is told in some 
quarters of a pauper, who having died in 
a workhouse, was to be buried in the most 
economical fathion. The master proposed 
to inscribe over his tombstone : 

" Thomas Thorps, 
His corps." 

The guardians at the next meeting f'f the 

board indignantly forbade such a iirofligate 

expenditure of the rates, and ordered the 

epitaph to be curtailed thus : 

"Thorps' 
Corpse." 

T ic narrators of this anecdote arc grossly 
ij^norant of Poor-law management. Any 
tombstone, or any epitaph whatever for a 
pauper, would never have been dreamed 
of by either master or guardians 

After all these ridiculous instances of 
grotesque epitaphs, we have no heart to 
speak of the remaining class »jf mortu- 
ary inscriptionp, — the few, the very few, 
in English, which are really good; good 
either as poctrj', or because their directness 
and simplicity make them affecting. 

Certainly we cannot class with either of 
these the last we shall quote, a real epitaph, 
and a whole satire too : 

" He lived and died a true Christian, 
He loved his friends, and hated Uu enemitt ! " 



Encourag;ln;>; fi»is'n»'. 

We heard much from our Radical oppo- 
nents, last fall, by way of explanation of 
the defeats which they sufft-reo. "Apathy" 
and " local causes " were assigned as rea- 
sons for disasters which followed six years 
of triumph. That any permanent changes 
had ensued in the relations of parties they 
would not believe. The next elections, 
they assured us. wtiuld show that the Uad- 
ical's had simply been caught napping, and 
had thereby lost a small portion ot their 
camp equipage ; but their forces were iu; 
tact, and at the next fight they would 
sweep the field. The Democracy were 
confident of entirely another state of thing?, 
judging from the tacts that a powerful rev- 
olution in public sentiment had gradually 
taken place, and that a strong tide was 
setting against the Radical party which 
no effort could reverse. It was no mere 
eddy, or whirlpool, but a steady, flowing 
stream. Every week, in local elections 
held here and there, we see evidence that 
the change of political sentiment, so 
signally manifested, was not evanescent or 
due to ephemeral infiuenccs, but resting 
on a sul)blantial basis ot changed convic- 
tions. In New York State, lor example, 
where Radicalism was swamped under 
50,000 Democratic majority, the local 
elections, show the vigor of the Democ- 
racy unabated. They are, in fact, 
achieving new victories. In the town of 
Waterford, in Jefferson county, last week, 
for the first time in fifteen years, th«y 
achieved a triumph at the municipal 
altction. In 1866, Fenton carried the 
town by a majority of 156. In 1867, the 
Democrats knocked that majority down to 
47 ; and, last week, still pushing on the 
column, they carried the town by 40 ma- 
jorily-:-a gain of 87 since November, a full 
vote t)eing polled. So in Herkimer county, 
in that Slate. The Radicals have con- 
trolled the count; ^(^t ' ^y years. Of 
the nineteen townfe 'bpybn" diz teen, elect- 
ing the Supervise: a lu cucu. Last week 
the Democrats carried three additional 
towns, thus doubling the number of Dem- 
ocratic Supervisors. In four other towns 
they so reduced the Radical majorities 
that a change of 50 votes more would have 
given them a majority of the Supervisors 
in the county. A significant fact is that 
the Democratic majorities in the six towns 
carried by them are larger than the aggre- 
gate Radical majorities in the remaining 
thirteen— showing that upon a general 
ticket the Democracy would have carried 
the county. Another sign of the perma- 
nence of the change of sentiment, and of 
one of the most powerful operative causes 
by which that change has been produced 
and has been perpetuated, is in the in- 
creased extent of the circulation of Demo- 
cratic newspapen. As one inattuice of 



this, take the town of Hammondsport in 
New York. In 18(57, the New York Tri- 
bune held the field there, outrunniiig the 
Winld. Now the two papers stand thus : 
New York Weekly World, «5; stmi- 
weekly, 11 ; total, 96. Tribune weekly, 7 ; 
semi- weekly, 20 ; total, 27. 

The sentiments of a community may be 
pretty fairly inferred from the sentiments 
of tho newspapers circulating amongst 
them. Where four-fifths of the religious 
newspapers taken at an oflice are Metho- 
dist, it is quite safe to conclude that the 
active denominational sentiment of that 
community is Methodist, and where three- 
quarters of the political newspapers dis- 
tributed in any district are Democratic, it 
is certain that the active thought of such 
a community is running in Democratic 
channels. The immense increase of the 
circulation of Democratic newspaperu in 
every State, from Jlaisachnsetts to Mis- 
souri, ii one of the assurmg signs that the 
change in the relations of parties is a 
thoughtful and deliberate one — not spas- 
modic, passionate or capriciouf. 

Iu the city of Reading, Pennsylvania, at 
ihe late municipal election, the Radicala 
were routed, "horse, foot and dragoons." 
The Democratic Auditor was elected by 
y36 majority, a jjain of 317 since the elec- 
tion in October. Both brunches of the 
Common Council are Democratic, and a 
majority of the Ward officers. Coming 
West ana passing on to Kansas, we loIicl 
there that the coiidition of affairs is most 
encouraging. Kansas is Radical. But the 
prodigious majority of 0,000 agaiust negro 
suffrage in a total vote of about 25,(JOO 
shows that the type of Radicalism there is 
not reliable. The vote showed, too, that 
Democracy waa far stronger thau any one 
had sujiposed. There had been no thor- 
ough organization. The Democracy lor 
years had been retiring and quiet in 
the presence of rampant JAyhawker.°, 
red legs and furious Radicals, so that, in 
fact, they were scarcely known as an or- 
ganized party. But the large vote which 
they cast satisfied ixperienccd campaign- 
ers that if a timely and thorough organiza- 
tion had been hud the Democracy would 
have carried the State. The surpri.-ingly 
large vote which they did cast has had one 
excellent effect. It has spurred them up 
to make a complete orirauization to liad 
out their real force in the State. One of 
the counties where they proposed to begin 
was Douglas countj*, where Lawrence, 
the headquarters of Kansas Radicalism, 
flourishes with all the rank luxuriance of 
the most intolerant Radical faith. They 
were laughed at and derided for any rue h 
attempt, not merely by the Radicals, but 
by friends who had only a weak faith. It 
was predicted that they could not drum up 
three hundred Democrats in Douglas in 
three months. But the movement was un- 
dertaken, and with most remarkable suc- 
cess. Last week the Secretary ot the 
Central Committee of the C(mnty an- 
nounced that in three weeks' effort seven 
hundred Democrats were enrolled in the 
county. Clubs were formed in every 
township. February 16ih a meeting as- 
sembled in Lawrence to t rgauizc a club. 
In that hot-bed of Radicalism, seventy-five 
names were signed to the constitution aud 
by-laws of a Democratic club that night, 
and the Secretary says two hundred and 
fifty names will be got in the city. Let a 
thorough, active, systematic orj^anizatiou 
of this fcort go on in Kansas during this 
spring, and the prediction of one of the 
Democratic papers made tlicre in Novem- 
ber, that in 1808 Kansus will be Demo- 
cratic, \N ill be verified. 

There is everything, in fHCt, in the signs 
of the times to encourage li'.e Democracy 
to go into the approachlug cainpaigii with 
the most exhilarating a-^surarces of victo- 
ry. In nineteen StJitts whicit voted last 
fail, the aggregate Democratic m»j >ritit8 
exceeded, by many thousi;Tid, the R.idica). 
If Indiana and lllinoia, iu which a sum- 
ming up of the Df>morr'i.lir- mij''>r?lics in 
the local elections showed the Democracy 
were in the ascendant, are added, we have 
twenty-one Stales in which the aggregate 
majorities of the Democrats show Uiai the 
" people " of the North are now Demo- 
cratic. The sigrs to which wc have al- 
luded, and many more to which we might 
refer, point unerringly to the fact that the 
" people " are more aud more ranging 
themtclves with the Democracy, and that 
the year 1808 will install that partj' in pu- 
prcmc power. — Missouri Bipubiiciin, Ftb- 
ruary 29. 

Tbe IVrous: Woman. 

Readinf: the article in Thursday's Chron- 
icle headed, •■ Shall Women Propote ? ' in 
which Mrs. Oakes Smith relates a story 
of a woman proposing to the wroiij man, 
reminds me of an oc<nui cnce t hat happened 
here some twenty years bince. A distin- 
guished professor aud divine from this 
neighborhood was on a visit to sonic 
friends cast of the mountains, and wns 
introduced to a verj' respectable family 
which had two accomplished daughters- 
one ot them very handsome and tlie «ilher 
nuher plain. After spending Pome weeks 
iu the neighbi>rhooJ, and having trequt nt 
opportunities of meeting tho ladies, he 
became quite enamored with the younger 
aud prettier of the sisters, lie, however. 



returned home without s!iowing any 
preference. He wus a man of very 
sedate and studious habit?, aud soon be- 
came absorbed in his JMioks, and for a 
time he seemed to forget his new ac- 
quaintances. But the image of one of 
them seemed to be continually before his 
mind. After havii!g maturely consiticrid 
the matter, and having, I have no doubt, 
sought guidance from on high, he con- 
cluded to commence a conc?r>ontIencewi'.h 
the object of his affection. Unfortunately, 
or fortunately, as he afterwards sUtted, he 
addressed the wrop.g lady. He Lad got 
their names transposed. The correspond- 
ence finally led to an engagement. Tne day 
was fixed for the Wedding, and the grave 
and reverend 1). D. entered his appearance 
at the proper time. But wliat was his 
consternation to find that he was going to 
marry a lady he had not courted. But, 
being a sensible and an honorable man, he 
said nothing about it, believing the hand 
of Providence was in the matter, and was 
actUkUy married to the sister of the girl he 
thought he had won. Time wore on ; she 
proved to be a most amiable, intelligent, 
and aSectionate wife. He never told the 
story till after the younger sister was hap- 
pily married. He never had reason to re- 
pent the mistake, and he to this day is 
firm in the belief that God so ordered it 
for his happiness. " All's well that ends 
WQ\V'—Piltsburf/h Chronicle. 



iMPEACTrMEXT TuiALS. — Siucc the adop- 
tion ot the Constitution there have been 
five trials of impeachment by the Senate. 
The first of these was that of a William 
Blout, a Senator from Tennessee. It com- 
menced Dec. 17, 1798, and was concluded 
Jan. 14. 1799. The next was the trial of 
John Pickering, Judge of the New Hamp- 
shire District, which lasted from March 3 
to March 13, 1803. The next was that of 
Samuel Chase, one of the Associate 
Judges of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, which was commenced Nov. 30, 
1804, and lasted until March 1, 1805. The 
fourth was the trial of James H. Peck, 
Judge of the Missouri District, which was 
prolonged through two sessions, viz. : from 
May 11 to May 25. 1830, and from Dec. 30 
of the same year to Jan., 31, 1831. The 
last trial by the Senate was on the im- 
peachment of Judge Humphreys, opf the 
Tennessee District, about the year 1863. 

m^-m- 

— A. fervent church member recently 



astonished a prayer meeting by supplicat- 
ing for the preservation of the lives of the 
young ladies of the congregation, and that 
one of them be eventually reserved for 
him. On being remonstrated with by one 
of the brethren, he said such was the hon- 
est wish of his heart, and that he did not 
see the impropriety of praylsg for it 



Tlie Protest. 

The following is a copy of the protest 
offered in the House on the 2d. The mo- 
tion made to suspend the rules that the 
protest might be read and placed on the 
journal, was rejected on the 3J— 46 to 84 : 
The underfcigned, members of the For- 
tieth Congress of the United States, repre- 
senting directly or iu principle more tJian 
one half of the whole peo2"»le of the United 
States, do hereby, in the name of the law 
and justice, and in behalf of those they 
represent, most solemly protest against the 
tyranny and liju tice practiced by the 
majority of the House in violating the sa- 
cred rights of free debate and unrestrained 
deliberation upon the greatest questions 
ever brought before an American Con- 
gress. The rules of the House made for 
the protection of the minority, and by a 
strict adherence to which the weaker party 
can only be protected from those irregu- 
larities and abuses which wantonness of 
power id but too often apt to suggest to 
large and successful majorities — have been, 
during this entire Congress, violative of 
their true spirit aud intent, wantonly and 
uupreocdently suspended and set aside, not 
upon particular and ijressing matters, but 
upon all pending subjects of legislation, 
so that by this reckless and arbitrary sus- 
pension of rules and the wanton abuse of 
tbe previous question, the rights of the 
minority have been utterly disregarded, 
the House «>f Representalives has ceased 
to ba a deliberative body, and the minor- 
ity have been compelled to vote upon the 
most important qutstions without any 
proper or reasonable time for debate or 
consideration. To such extent has this 
dangerous aiid oppressive practice obtained 
itial measures affecting vitally the whole 
country and ihedearest interests of our con- 
blitueneies. tending, as we believe, to the 
subversion of our republican form of gov- 
ernment, iu their very nature demanding 
of the people and representatives the most 
carefal examination and scrutiny, have 
been hurried throne h forms of legislation 
without being primed, without one word 
«jf debate or one moment's consideration, 
without the opportunity of the under 
signed to protest except in violation of 
the then operating order enforced by the 
majority as the order of the House. 'These 
alarming abuses of power might not seem 
to demand this formal protest, if we were 
not forced to the belief that a determined 
intention exists with the majority to revo- 
lutionize this Government by destroying 
the other co-ordinate branches and vesting 
all powers of the Government in Congress 
In the steps taken to depose the Presi- 
dent of the United States we are admon- 
ished that there is no end to this oppressive 
measure to cripple the power aud silence 
the voice of the minority. The resolution 
was rushed through the House under the 
operation of the pievi«^U8 question, refer- 
ring the matter to the Committee on Re- 
coHhtruction. The committee, in hot haste, 
setting when the House was in session, in 
violation of one of its express rules, con- 
sidered it, and by a strict party vote 
adopted it and presented it to the House 
(or lis action, and then was exhibited one 
if the most extraordinary spectacles ever 
witnessed in a deliberative parliamentary 
body. Members were allowed some thirty 
minutes, some twenty, some ten and some 
one minute only, to discuss the most mo- 
mentous question ever presented. Many 
could not even get one minute under the 
arbitraiy rule of the majority, and more 
tlian half those even of ttie party voting 
t J enforce the preyioas question, who de- 
sired to be heard, were permitted only to 
print Iheir speeches in tiie Globe afler tbe 
question upon the resolution was decided, 
and which were never delivered in the 
House. No comment can demonstrate 
more completely than the facts themselves 
the viciousness and illegality of such pro- 
ooe.din£P. But thi.a wanton and excessive 
use ot Ihe power of the majority does not 
stop here. While the committee were in 
se&aion ujion further proceedings to remove 
the President, and in anticipation of its 
action, under the operation of the previous 
quesiion, without debate, in violation of 
llie express rule, new, special and most ex- 
traordinary nilea for the conduct of this 
proceeding, changing, without previous 
notice, the rules of tiie Houte, were adopted 
to farther limit debate aud completely 
p!acethe minority in the power aud mercy 
of the majority. Thus while the majority 
of Congress are warring upon the other 
coordiuate departments — the Executive 
and Judicial — endeavoring to subjugate 
and bring them both under the will and 
control ot Congress, the minority of the 
House of Representatives are steadily and 
surely being stripped of all power, and 
their constituents deprived of all repre- 
sentative voice in the counsels of the re- 
public. 

We do, therefore, most solemnly protest 
agaiust the indecurous and undignified 
haste with which the majority of this 
House has inaugurated, presented and 
ru.-'hid through, by a strict party vote, 
in plain and palpable violation of one of 
the standing rules of the House, a resolu- 
tion demantlinjf the impenchment of the 
Chief Magistrate of the people f 'r alleged 
crimes and misdemeanors in office. When 
the gravity of the charge, the character of 
the high office against which the attack 
was directed, aud the UDfortcen and tre- 
mendous consequence which might result 
therefrom to the peace and prosperity of 
the people, called for the exercise of the 
calmest aud wisest judgment, the most un- 
prejudiced aud impartial deliberation on 
the part of those who had such proceed- 
ings in charge, we do most solemnly pro- 
test agaiust this thiicc-rtpeattd attempt to 
degrade and break down one of the great 
co-ordinate branches of the government, 
ihrouj^h the spirit of par'y hatred and 
vengeance, against a person who, by the 
Constitution, is ia the rightful and con- 
scientious discharge of its functions, thus 
consuming the precious time which ought 
to be faithfully devoted to an earnest effort 
to relieve the pressing wants of the people, 
the restoration of this distracted coui try 
to union and gr»od order, and to lightening 
the burden ot taxation which is pressing 
down all the energies of trade and com- 
merce to a point of universal bankruptcy 
and ruin. 

We do again most solemnly protest 
against aud profoundly deprecate and de- 
plore any aud all attempts to array in 
hostile antagonism to each other the de- 
partments of the Government upon the 
mere question of the constitutionality or 
construction of a law of Congress, the 
proper jurisdiction and final adjudication 
of which belong to the judicial tribunal, 
and we hereby warn the people of the 
United States that the public liberty and 
the existence of free institutions are in- 
volved in this suicidal struggle, and that 
they are in imminent peril of an utter 
overthrow. We do further most solemnly 
protest against that wild and radical spirit 
of innovation upon the early and well 
settled practice of Government, a practice 
established by men who framed the Consti- 
tution and who best understood its spirit 
and meaning, which puts the Chief Magis- 
trate of the Republic, the representative 
of the dignity and power of the people, at 
the mercy of his subordinate, assuming to 
be Secretary of War in violation of his 
own pronounced conviction of law, who 
has the unblushing effrontery to place 
himself in the unwarranted posiuon of 
communicating .directly with Congress in 
bitter contempt of the authority ol his su- 
perior, and with the deliberate purpose of 
resisting that authority. 

The undersigned, therefore, in the chs^r- 
acter of Representatives of the people, be- 
ing deprived, by the despotic power of an 
inexorable majority, of the high privilege 
of debate, that great instrument in the 
discovery of the truth, and most cherished 
heritage of a free people, do hereby sol- 
emnly and earneblly protest against these 
infractioiu ot the rights of the people, and 



ask that this their protest be spread upon 
the journal of the Hriu?e 

CtiaB. A. Kldrldge, P. VanTrump, G. "W. Wor.d- 
ward, W. Mungen, Stephen Taber, George M. Ad- 
ams, O. W. Morgan. S. S. Marshiill, 1). M. Van 
Auken, Thomas l.^vvrence Jones, W. II. Bantam, 
John A. Nicholson, E. D. HolbrooK, F. Sione, 
(■^harlcs E. Phelps. James M. Cuvuumi^h, Charles 
lUight, Lewis W. Ross, L. L. Trimble, K. D. Hub- 
bard, J. S. Galladay, J. W. Cnandler. J. Uotchkiss, 
S. Axtcll, W. K. Mbliick, W. (' Uolman, Dt mas 
Barnes, A. J. Cilossbreiiner, Lawrence t..:tz, U >T, 
Bover, Stevenson Archer, Albert J. Burr. James 
A. John»«D, James B. Bieck, Asa P. Grover, J. M. 
Humphrey, Jobn V. L. Pruyn, Simael J. Kandall, 
James Brooks, II. McCnllougo. J. P. Knott. Cha? . 
Sitgreaves, M. C. Kerr, James It. SlcCormick. 



iiOxiii:, FAum a;^i> eAKi>i:'«. 

A CORIIESPOXDENT of the Rural New 
Yorker says two and one-half, or three 
cords of wood make 100 bushels of char- 
coal. 

The Ohio State Agricultural Society, at 
their last meeting, indorsed the following 
varieties of strawberries: Filmore Wilson, 
Triomphe de Gand, Golden seeded, and 
Jucunda. The Kittatinny Blackberry was 
highly spoken of. 

A Pennsylvanlv correspondent of the 
Country Qenileman plants corn from tbe 
entire ear with good rosuVs. In one ex- 
periment, the seed from the points of 
the ears produced the largest st'cUs, finest 
ears, and was out iu ta££el and silk first. 

Sheep should be well and evenly fed ; 
no sudden changes in food from good to 
bad, nor be exposed to storms or sudden 
changes of temperature, or else the fibre 
of the fleece will be uneven ana un- 
healthy.— Cor. Plovnhman. 

The Country Gaitkman .strongly re- 
commends the plan of ]danting corn in 
drills or hills thick in the row, believing 
that the increased product of corn will 
more than compensate for any increase in 
labor in cultivating the crop. 2 

Many farmers in the northern comtics 
of Virginia are extensively engaged in 
sheep raising, and arc much encourai^ed by 
their success. The Richmond Whiij says 
it is destined to become one of the leading 
and most profitable pursuits of the S'luIc. 

Arator, in the Country Ocntlemin, says, 
" He who would receive heavy croi'S ot 
forage, must first of all put his m^uuie in 
deeply, and thus make his land deep aud 
rich. Afterwards, by fJir the most econom- 
ical mode of application will be by top- 
dressing." 

The Minnesota State Agricultural Soci- 
ety resolved that " this association is en- 
tirely opposed to any encourag«^mcnt or 
permission on the part of the executive 
committee of any gambling or jockeying 
whatever, in connection with trials of 
speed at our State Fairs." 

One who believes club-footed cabbages 
to be the result ol impure seed, directs^^to 
plant the stalks in the spring, as early as 
the ground and season will allow, with 
the heads on, and far enough from all 
plants of the same species, that the wind, 
insects, and bees cannot carry the pollen 
and spoil the seed. 

Fattenikg Calves.— a scnsibie practi- 
cal farmer says that he has open noticed 
that calves would thrive better on milk 
that was not rich in butter than what was 
commonly called very rich milk. The nu- 
tritive elements of milk reside chitfly in 
the casein. If you have a cow that gives 
particularly rich milk, and one that gives 
a quahty poorer in butter, it is better in 
every way to teed th« calf on the milk of 
the latter. The calf will thrive better, ard 
you will get more butter Cum the niilk c.f 
the first cow. 

Short Rule to MKAst'RE Grain. — 
It is conveuienl to farmers and cioppeii 
at this season to have an easy and correct 
rule by which to measure corn iu cribs. 
Hure ia one: bavin;; levekd the coin iii 
the crib, measure the length, breadth and 
depth, and multiply them together, and de- 
duct from the product one-fifth ; aud you 
have the number of bushels in the ear — 
for shelled corn take one-half of this. To 
be strictly correct, add half a bushel for 
every one hundred. — Frainc Farmer. 

Early Tomatoes. — To have tomatoes 
early, says an exchange, plaut a few feeds 
any time this month in the pots in which 
the plants are growing in the kitchen -^vin- 
dow. They will soon germinate and grow 
very rapidlj', and when the plants ar«rtwo 
inches high, set one of each in boxes three 
inches square, or very small flower pols, 
and give them the same attention the house 
plants get. As soon as all danger from 
frost is over, transfer the tomato plants, 
which will now be budded and perhaps 
covered with miniature fruit, to the souih 
side of a high fence on the sunny side of 
a building, into not over rich soil, and you 
will have lipe tomatoes on the4lh of Ju!y, 
and you can't miss it, if past experience 
and a favorable season are worth any- 
thing. 

Planting Forest Tree Seeds.- The 
seeds that have pulp should be washed at 
once on gathering, and dried in tho shtde 
gradually, also. Sun-dried seeds arc gen- 
erally worthless, especially tho.-?e of a dark 
color. The sooner seeds can'be got in the 
ground the better. They should not be 
sown any deeper th.an is necessary to keep 
them from the light, nor so near the air as 
to get dry— moisture, air, and darkness arc 
the three essentials for the successful rais- 
ing of tree seeds. Seeds that Hie usual Iv 
spring sown, and are found to "damp off," 
should be sown very early, so that the 
young wood may cet hard belorc the hot 
weather comes. Tiio soft maple will not 
keep more than a few weeks gtxid enough 
to grow. It should be sown as soon as 
ripe in June. Not sown deepen the 
surface and slightly covered wi'.h sard, is 
the best way. A long article would tell a 
longer and "perhaps a clearer story than 
this ; but this is the pith of the whole mat- 
ter. — Gardcner'a Monthly. 

IlnsinesH l» IBusinesH. 

The following anecdotes are told of the 
late W. M. Swain, formerly proprietor of 
the Philadelphia Ledger : 

As a business man he was very rigid in 
his adherence to what he conceived to be 
sound business principles. " Never fix a 
price on another man's goods," was ono of 
those principles. A paper dealer met him 
one day in the street. 

"Mr. 8," said he, "I have some excel- 
lent white paper of the size of the Ledjtr 
Do you wish to buy ?" 

" Yes, sir," was the reply. 

"What are you willing to give for it?" 
was the next inquiry. 

" Precisely the worth of it, sir ; neither 
more nor less," was the rejoinder. 

" Oh, of course. But I jnean, Mr. S., 
what can you afford to give me for it?" 

" Double price, if I choose ; but I don't." 

" But, fix the price, sir." 

" I never put a price on another man's 
goods. If you don't know the value of 
your own paper you should not attempt to 
dispose of it. If you do, you are wasting 
my time and your own in idle circumlo 
cutions to get the advantage of me. Tell 
your price. If it suits, well; if not, you 
ra&y find some other customer." 

Business is business, and nothing should 
interfere with it, was another of his busi- 
ness principles. Consequently he would 
lake nothing off the price of an advertise- 
ment on the score of friendship or benev- 
olence, or any other of the ten thousand 
petty excuses made to " nip tbe printer." 
A gentleman once called upon him v/ith 
an advertisement of a benefit for a poor 
widow with several helpless children. 
" How much for the advertisement, under 
the circnmstances?" said he. "Just what 
it comes to," said Mr. 8. ; " business is bus- 
iness, sir; charity is another question." 
"But to a poor widow, sir! every dollar 
Eared is a matter of serious moment to her 
£uiuly." " Btuiaeas is business, I repeat, 



sir. What I choose to give in charity is 
my own private affairs. My business hag 
noth:ng to do with it." " Then you will 
take no less?" "Not a cent sir." The 
gentleman paid the bill very reluctantly, 
amounting to, perhaps, two dollars, and 
was going out of the office reflecting rather 
severely in his own mind upon the parsi- 
mony of Mr. 8., when the latter stopped, 
him. "Do you know this widow? Is she 
honest and deserving?" "She is, sir." Mr. 
S. slipped a f 10 bill in the ge-ntleman's 
hand, and, turning on his, heel walked 
away, saying "business is busine.ss." 

THE MARKETS. 

Nkw Tobk, March 9. 1868. 

COTTON— Middling f .21H^f .« 

FLOUK— Extra Western 9.«55 <A 11.40 

WH SAT— Spring IJo. 2 aaO «;» 2« 

liYK— Western 1.8'i @ 1.90 

COHN— New Western Mixed.... 1.2d ^ 1.29 

OATS-New We.«tern ;. S-J at .M'/i 

15AKLEY— Western S.15 © 2.8(1 

POKK-Mess 83.ai ® 25X0 

LAKH— Good to Prune liJiii -Iti!* 

©OLD— L41;„. 

ChicasO. March 9, 186R. 

BBE vTBS— Fan Qradea | 6 00 © f 7 W 

UOCJS-Live 750 Q^ 9(fl 

Dressed lO.iO 11.00 

BITTBK-C'aoice 88 a .'42 

SUtiS-Fresh 21 © .93 

FLOUU-White Wintir 12 r.-t ® 13 50 

Spring Extra 9 75 ® 10.75 

GltAlN— Com— New tj3 ® .i-3^4 

Barley— No. a 8 10 Cfr 2 I'i 

Oais— No. 1 57V4a .5-J£ 

Kye— No. 1 1.62 © l.W 

Wheat-Spring, No. 1. 2 05 & 2 07 
" No. ». 2.01 ® 2 01^ 

LARD 15Ua 

POttK— Mess 2.323 Hb 23.50 

CuioiKHATi, March 9. 1888. 

FLOUR— Family f 11 00 O fll.25 

WIIEAT-lted ^Viuter 2.4S & 2 50 

COHK— New Kar 84 e .&5 

0.\TS— No. I (.7 @ 

KYK-No 1 1.70 O 1.75 

BAKLEY-Fall 2..'» @ 2 35 

POKli— Mess 2350 © 2125 

LARD 14 ® .154 

ST. Louts, March 9, 18«8. 

FLOUR-XX $ 950 @|1050 

WUKAT-Wintcr 2.»i5 & 2.70 

CORN— Shelled „ .8;j C» .85 

OATS .(10 O .68 

KYE 1()5 © 

BARl.SY-Fall 2.55 @ 9(50 

POKK— Mess 2400 (& 2450 

LAKD 15 © .lh\i 

Hii.WATTKEB, March 9. \9f». 

FLOUR- Spring Eitra f8.5it © fit 37 

WHKAT— Spriug 1.93 © -.i.Ot 

COKN-New XO © 82 

OATS-\o.2 t7 © .53 

KVE-No. 1 1.50 © 1.55 

BAHLEY 2.15 © 

CXBVELAUD, March 9. 1868. 

FLOUR— XX Spring JIO.'.S © f 11.50 

WllKAr— No 1, Spring 2.'28 © 2 30 

CO R N-No 1, Shelled 93 © .94 

OATS— No 1 07 © 

BARLEY- Nol 2.'i0 © 2.22 

KYB-No. 1 1.60 © 1.63 



A FcM' '^Vordsi to tUe l..adie8. 

Many ladies, particularly mothers nursing, com- 
plain of a tired, listless feeling, or complete ex- 
haustion, on arising in the morning. On tbe wife 
and mother devolves the responsibility of regulat- 
ing the duties of the household. Uer cares are 
numerous, and the mental as well as physica. 
powers are frequently called into requisition. 
She often flcds her slightest occupation a weary 
task and existence a burden, while at the same 
time she has no regular disease. IIOSTETTER'8 
STOMACU BITTEKS, if resorted to at this period, 
will prove nn unfailing remedy for this annoying 
lassitude. The efTects of this potent agent are 
soon seen in the rosy cheek and clastic step of the 
head of the family, as with restored health and 
renewed spirits she takes her accustomed place ia 
the timily circle. If this friend in need be regu- 
larly used, those depressing symptoms will never 
be complaiiicd of, and not only would lassit ude not 
be experienced, but many diseases following its 
Hdvent be avoided. As a MEDICAL AGENT it has 
no equiil, while its pleasing flavor and healthful 
cffcc's have made it a general favorite. It is free 
from all properties calculated to impair the 
system, and its operations arc at once mild, 
soothing and ifti.'ient. All who have used the 
Biiters ATl'EST ll'S \'JKTU£S and commend 

it to USi?. 




TO CONMUniPTIVKS. 

The Rev. KDWAKI) A. WILSON win send (free of 
chitre«) to ail who desire It, the prescription with the 
lirections lor maklmt acd usliig tiie simple remedy by 
wU eh he WHS cured of » lunjj aUeetlon and that drcud 
1 B'-HPC, (JoiiBumptiim. H:* only ohiect is to tieuefit tha 
•ttflicU'il. and he hopes every sufl'erer will try bis pre- 
•criptiiiii, an It will eost them nothtne, and may prove a 
b!es.»!u!:. Pleaso address U«v. EDWARD A. WILSON, 
No. I(i6 SoulU Second street. Wlillsiiisburgh, New York 
♦ «■» 
INFORiTI.VTION. 
I.iforwf.ilon (ruiranteed to produce a luxurlat t 
?rowlU of hair upon a bald head or lieardlesa lace, aiso 
a recipe for the n'tnoval of Pimplf-s, Blotcbee. Krup- 
tloni, Pte., on the siifn, loavlu]^ the same solt, cleitr and 
l>euaUfM!, cHU be oMalned wittiout chance by address- 
;.;irTHi»S. Y CHAPMAN, Cphmiht. S-JS Kroadway, N.Y 

AJLKsEKY STOCK BY EXPRESS 

1- ' and Small Trees, fchrnbbcry, Viiion. Hljints. and 
heeds sent by MaU.. Postace 
i^ f. Is only ei'/lit cculs pc:r pound, 

^'-f.' Kvergrecn Seed sent KKKE to 

all cnelotiini; pustaj^c Htauip. 
tihould b.' town now— In win- 
tor. Be< ds or valUMl)'e. ranld- 
tr-' y-l'T r,'^S**i frrowlngtrij«s,Yew, Larch, Ash, 

IV \^^Mr V> " KSSAT ON nORTIOPL- 

*-' _iW-«-Nrpr. ^ TIRK, about Tr. .s. Frails, 

Vines, and best Ornnnit'iital 

Sliriiblmry.Hnd Flowers. Tx« 

Cii.M>. Address, at once, 

HEN'RY WILBUR. 
Grant Biplds, .\ficb 

EBSTERS PLA.NS FOR LA.YING 

Out .and Bcaulfylnj Girdens and Geniral 
(';it i!07iie-' 01 Shrub", B >»'«, Oina'iieiitil Plants, and 
Sor<is, for the hpriii;; 01 18C8. Is nov ready for mxllii^ 
10 ctistomprs IVte. '1 .d to all others on rerelnt ot ten 
v\.U. Addrtss \VM. WEUSlElt, 119 blataSt., RjcU- 

iis & FRUIT UNDS: 



The Illinois Ci ntral Railroad Company have for sale 
In tract* of 40 acres and upwards, l.^li,',!)' acres of choice 
rarinliig and irult land.-". >ill I j Ing adj*cent to their 1 oad. 
Fir grsunproT* inir. ctock-ridf mc, and rvery purpose o 
pront-ible a'jricaltu'e. these lands possess every re- 
quisite ot Eoil and climate. 

TUi^ FKIJir RECiIO:V 

of Sonthem Illinois Is noted for Its wonderful rertlllty 
In the pro uctton of apples, pejire, pfae.bes, an<l all 
K'rfiH 01 irulTs. Duiinu the season of W'i. tlie S[ieolal 
Fruit Kxpre»9 Train bronzht over 610.1.00 box(« Qj 
pi'aoiies and .rOOCO bunliels ot strawlw-rrlen to Chlcaco 
alone, from thwnce fnmighipe the flrtit Iruits of the 
peason to all the northern mirke'.s. 3"fl,fi00 acres of 
these Irutt lands are now offered for sale on favor 
able tern «. 

Title in Fee from the State. 

XW^ All station scents are provided wl'h plats, show- 
Itig tiiH iands I ir 8*le In their vicinity. 

rnloniiaUon eiven upon all points at the olBce of tbe 
Lnnd D-iiartinvnt. ^8 >lichl;ian Avenue, Chicago, or a 
dw'T ptive nmiiphlct, with maps snowing the exact lo- 
cality of all the lunds, wnt to any pcrsoa writing for 
the eatne, in any language, to 

JOIIW U. CALHOrN, 

Land Commissioner, Chicago. 



FOR SALE. 

Ss'd for Prifp List of PURE ENGLISH CLUSTER 
free from New York disea-ses. anil mil tnstruet ions tor 
ciiltlv;ilion and cnrins, to HOWAIU) H. POTTEK 
Barabou, Sauk Co.. WU. 



K 


——yr^ ,- - 


'^ 




r._ _ _— 






- — -_ - 






" - — - — .-- _■ 


' 




■ _ . — - -— -"■ " ~ ■ 






T- - ----- — . 


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L_ ^^-^^i^-^i-'i 


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Water Proof EooSng, 

BUTOI* « BASK KM Pim, 

■■Bd Stmmp for Ctrrnlar u<i SanpU >f 
lk« P>|iar. 

C. J. FAT 4& CO., 



Important Anaonncement ! 

A Beautiful, Illustrated Book, worth a Thousaud 
dollars, sent Xr^i to sny address on receipt of 25 cents, 
by aodrcsslng Professor JOHN VANUERPOOL. No. 
265 Wlnihrop Place, New York City. 

ARREL MACHINERY— Greenwood's 

Patent Stave and Headinc Machinery, for Tight 
and Slack Work. G. L. Benton's Patent Convex Kmery 
Wheels, tor Giimmine and Sharpenlns Saws. JOHN 
GREENWOOD, liocliesier Barrel Macbine Works, 
Koche»t*!r, N. Y. 

HORSE - OWNER'S FRIEND; OR 
Help in Time of Need: a complete work of 3M 
pafres, ou the nor»e. Diseases and Cure, mailed to any 
address, post-paid, on receipt of price. Bound In 
Clotb, 73 cents ; paper, 5>< cents. Agents wanted. 
UPJOHS A TYLER, Publishers, 

Ann Arbor, M leklgan. 

T^EW ilEDICAL BOOK ON DI8- 

i. 1 eases of imprudence, and tbdr stms' xxnoin. 
worth a journey to New York on foot to obtain. Bend 
tree under seal by Inclosiu;; a postage stamp to DB« 
LAWRRNGK. ftl Kniit Tenth «tre»!t. Nffw YorV. 

T?OR SALE, CHEAP— One Lamb Knit- 

-T tlr g Machine, entirely new. price t70— for (ale for 
$55 ; one Grover L Baker Sewing Machine, never used, 
rrlce Hi*— will be sold for 456; one Grover * Baker 
Sewlnit Machine, never used, price 162— for|&0. Ad 



^^ 




■ . ■ ■ ■■ 1 1 '^ 






I 



■ I 






f 



m I a » 



» M l < ■ » M rn Km »ll Ml I m 



^i^"Ciipt. Scncorbox's ;,'rent raMomnia 
of tlie 3n<lian MassRcn; was ixlnbitc<l nt 
Knilrohs' Hull on Mondny evi.Mii;i;» last. — 
We wt re uiialile to be in atto'ulunce, but 
wc arc irirornied that there was a lartre turn 
out of the good people of Shaliopoe. The 
j-iit'lini.', lloi't^li uiifin:slied,is s|)oke!\ of in 
I tj;li tuni:- of praiso bv all wlio saw it, ami 
iiniNl have br.uj^'ht U) many a inlml a vivid 
reto'.lLctiuii t)f the trrrible secnc-s of I'-'J'i. 



i^.J'JSx.i 



— A Boston clerL'yninn di-nonnccd from 
his p'.ilpit tho liinbicul cxhibitloru of the 
ballet ill a l>o.ston theatre, and received 
from t'lt^ nianarjor a laniily season lieket 
and a hotter of thank.-?, "lor the chpai>est 
r.nd bc^t udvortisemtnl"' the maiia"or ever 
had. 




jC "^K" "SF 



:• l.'i -..^ L-i' 



5 ^ 






h 'I 



'T% T?v ^ f V * ^^ *'>- FT» Ji^^*^ 

%3% aT:i • V^ II. ^ ^ Lu L^j i:^! 5 
r»XlORTlIKTOR. 



iwm Af^D mmvL 



SHAKOrEl-l, MAUCn 12, l.^os. 



SUakoiice Market. 



Sift PIE Km it^m 




PRO F'ISIOJ'fS 

WOODli Will. 



CS30., C3J!0., €>t:JC3 
i)n hand and for .salu as cheaj> a.^ the 

C II j^: J^ !-» J : ^> T . 



.Ian. 1 1. ist;-;. 



faVi 



NKW 



rilOA' ISION STOl 



IE 



Tho nnderslanol bas opened a new Pruviston Htorc on 

SECOND STKEET. (ori'0?lTK TI!K DKl'OT.) SLIAK- 
Ul'KE, MiN^^;:^OTA, 

Whcro lie iTitonds keeping a general as*ortm(>nt of 

At prices ;is I.iw as uny In ShaSopee— and as ijood 
.ink" f.-<, £»»" (iivu mv ucail. 

CKO. H. SPKNTKU, 
j». s. — Twin nnleavor ti-kof-ii •>» liuiui atonstivnt 
B up,<l/f>f (Jrri-u UroccrU'sanil I'ouitry. 
n;;o-tf 



(!. II. ?. 



We are-Ce-ming! 

And will prp.'ont to any person .sending' us 
a clui) in our (ireat 

rj^EDJ^Li.ATl SALE 

of DIIY AaI) fancy (;o(M)S, a Watcli, 
I'ii-eo of sheeting.Silh Dre.sa I'altcrn, &,c., Ac 

ITRlilK 01^" COST. 

< 'ata {'>;,' lie of tiood.^ and Sanijle sunt iv 
aiiv ;>d'[ii-.'<s free- 

ALLEN, HA\7E3 C: CO.. 
15 Federal Street, Boston, 
P. 0. Bos C. Hass. 



Wht>h'>ah' Poaler.^ in Frfiudi, German, 
and ]''n;,di<.h Dry anit i''an.?v Gooils, C'iit- 
lurv, Pialed Ware, Albiiin.^*, l.t-ather Cond.-^, 
Ac". n.'>2-:!ni 

O o 2:1. -^T" o y i^ ii o o 2.' s, 

— .\ \ i> — 

CLERK or THE QIST. COTJFiT. 
'{l/icc at ihc Court lluuse^ShaJcopcc. 



Will Tn.-vkc [.V'cd,-> and Mort^rapv's, and 
:.!1 Le.ual jtapor.-!. Will pay ta.Vf.s and sell 
Ileal I'istaie on commis.-iion, &c. i2:!y 



rEtoli, Xto?o., Xto23. ! 

SOilATCIl! SCUATCII:: SCltATClI!! 

In from 10 to ASIi'TTS. 
Whoiton's Ointmont cure.s The Tt< h. 
Whe:ili»irs OintnxMjl cure.s Salt Hhcum. 
Wh'.-alon's Ointr.ic^nt cjrc3 Tetter. 
Whoato I's Oinlnvjnt cures ?.arbor.-i* Ttch. 
Wheaton*.-! Ointniont cnros Old Sort-s. 
Wheuton'.s Ointment carc;j Jv.-cry kind 
of Humor 11 ko Magic. 
Price,. "0 cits a box: l>y ;'!:i!!, Co re-ifs. Ad.Ires 
WKl<::\.-< ft l'!)'"Tr:il, Vn. !70 Wnsliiii.'li'll Stret 1 

RiiHt'tii .>l:»s<. err ? >r s:i!e hv »% l»iu:,'aiiu, 

Bost'Xi Sa.it. iau7,—«p. iiollte I JT. 




^ THE SURiST REMEiiif 

lor Ciin-rhs, <( Ids, S^ndaLu < oiiMiH.'idloa, 
filiruiiii.tisai, licuerat Debility &,r. 

Cod-I.lvc- ()H, when ptrfi-ctly p\irc. Is of sucli value 
BH !i i-iiratlve nt^eiit In llic trtatnicnt of SoK()Fi.t,.\, 
K5i.\riATios, BKoNcnnis, Gr.NKi:.\L DF.i:iLnv and 
I't L.MiiNAKY Affkctk Ns, ^.'i to n-nder iiU coninifnts 
Uiinee>;s<:iry. Tlif Kirut !<n[«riiirliy (.f cMir t.rimd of 
nil, coiisistj* In its I'cin? prepared wit li eonsiiei'.! ions 
f:iiT, from TinK Con I.ivkcs In a nianaor that d,;- 
j>iiv<H the oil from all iiiifuriliis, and llic liiipliixr.iit 
ll.ivor usually exi.stinj: in :ili other t.runds. It is ,;Uvi>y8 
T.vwi Ki.Kff, ami can Ve. taken by the youn;:e.>-t cliiM, 
eitliiT as a nutriment or medleine. Jnvai.iiis and de- 
bilitated pi isons, to *lioin this i il !.■! nnlinottn, iiill 
IJnd preat virtue In lis nsc. rHVSiri.\N8 iiud their 
pitient.s e.an rely upon this oil as 'oeii;;: Cnnuioi-LX 
und Mi-.iiic!.VAl-LY pr.rc. 

(nr".Soll la Chic.voo. liy al! DurGCiSTS and hy 
dk.iieis la Medicine everywhere. 

® JOHTTaBAKER^ GO'S 

CITRATE mkmmk 

AauUiid i .\ It ivi- ill e.ifcs of C !istlp:ili'ii, as a cer- 
'ila lU.u orSl.k Ilea in- '.le. a:il tn-it iiif<ctU;l> il tliC 
I iver,- \> hieli i> u.o .>ure i>:- ■. us r id ;u«iif i;i.-ea!'i', 
I olhiiif; !.< e.,n.il fo oiir Ctf.i'lJK.l'l l-;l> K k H: U \ h .H"- 

.\U tli'KAiJS OK M.W.\i.^..\. For givii:- lrishii>s 
to a system ^aCvi by 11:1,). uilene or by ttdl.lt pr..v^•^ 
Ilselt a I'nnje.-a. li i., .„.,i,;i.l.u .ind to orh ss— !i tiidte- 
.y nior- va u .i.i« Ji.ui U ii|£ie»- ^Vaur lor aujr i>iiM.»«i 
whatever, »li Ir ii> im»,.. ,.», ,(i i;i,.iiMiiti ed t > !>.• 1 trtua- 
l.i'i.I . Tlie IraUe .•U,>,<t>.u It^ut \.L.t:t.'£o by ull V\ iiules-ilc 

Vi'Il'-T ^ ist S. 

JOHN C. BAKSIl & CO., 

i* K O !• p. 1 K T O K S , 
TIS MaRKKT STRlTfrr, riin.ADKI.THIA. 



Mauho^d : Hot? Lo5t, How Eestcrcd- 

/•JiS^jiw'"'', P«''l'-*'»c.I. anew edition of Dr Cuiver 

— -;_^ I'.'ll's C'..ii-- <i'utej Kssiiy on t'.ie ra..ic.il i uie 

-" '-^>'",»-itiioat ii:-d:rl le) o! Sperniaturilm f: , <r 

"■"^ Seuilriul Weiliiiess, InTi!unt.ir.\ Smiiinl 

■ .•••ss, I iipotailey, Jli-ntal ttii.t i'hvs'cal lncup.it liy. 
)>m:i 'di'n Mitii to .Vlirrlase, ell-.: also, C-i.tui-ni''^- 
h^tt-l^ptj I.I i /-VJi, InditwCl l>y 8 ll-lndulb'Crce or i^xi.a! 
ex" .-ava:{ inee: 

»i»- Crice.lias-atel envelope, r,,,),. o • ents. 
Til 1 oeleir it .'d ailt'ior.l 1 tills adnilrrdiierssi-.v.c'es''- 
Ir I.J .iTistral«s,i'r ':ii a thirty Te;«r:«'*necrssm ipru • 
t J', th II ihialar:!!!'!/ co'.tse iijence-. of self ni use ni.i v 
'• -rillv-illr cure ; \vitno;it the dnejeious'se .f Inier- 

■ 1 ' III • li -111.' 'ir IhiT i;>:>lie llio-i of tiie kn fe — pol ntli :: 
■ > il 4 ■!» J le oi"i-i -e II )'iee sjniple, certain and eHiTin 1 

-'>y Tt'n< ol wnleh every siiil'^r'T, nn nLiff-r whut 
'. i c • iilitit 1 nn,r 'le.iijjy cure hl:iiieif chCBpIy. prl- 
V i» ■ '. »•• 1 /-It li-'tth/ 

t^ liU I.-i-rr. e sti cihi br» In tllV hanJsof every 
y'l i.l n ! everv lu 11 i n ' h» hm !. 

H "1 '. Mil !••! ^"il.lii II ni kin e;iv,.iopf>, to any addreas 
jir «>'■/, M r..-elpt<>r d.\ '■>-iM..,r t'JT') tins' ii'i<ni|i.-i. 
' >•. r>r. (!u .•'■r*-ir« "."JarrLiB^ (Juide." price 20tts 
.\ I li-Pi. tie >n>.M-.':e-<. 

C»l\4 i. r *i t.wr. St r ft.. 

[ISii <J;hcc U-.\ l.V-">.j 



Ilaj — per ton, 

i'ork — j;or hundred, - 

\\ heat — pti- bii.-!htl, 

Cid-n — •' 

\V(ii"d— <lry, per cord, 

\/:u\>: — p n biir.cl, 



$ 


•,.00 fo $ 


s.oa 




(I.IM) to 


HOO 




1.40 to 


l.lj 




'.).■> to 


1 .00 


. 


."..UO to 


:;..")0 




- 


l.ou 



jgf2* Wo learn there i.s an effort being 
made to ;;ct i:p a joint stoclt company to run 
the S[iCCtator. This cortaitdy would be a 
;jood thin'; fur ITo'.v and Suait, who have 
a tii.K hundred dollar chaltle inort^a;4c on 
that starviii;j concern. Knt we think it 
Miiire than jirnbable ihat Jlra. Fpcctatoi"a 
Siock v.oiiid .soon be aniicted with lltat 
dreadful disease — tho Ilind-crpeot. 



I'mm.cviox or a Kkrosk.xk L.v.mp. — One 
evening last week a kerosciie lamp e.\plo- 
dcd Sit tho s.iloon of ^liehael Corbit, on 
Second St. The light hjid been burning 
over half an hour, and was han'-in;' from 
tiie ceiling when tho explosion took place. 
Mr. CoiLIt was seiling by the vtuve holding 
a .-uiall child. No one cl:;o was in tLe 
room. The oil was set on fire and wass 
di attcre.l about tho room and bar, but none 
was thrown on J!r. Coibit. 'J'lie burniri;; 
oil spread to a tin can of the kerosene 
.standing under the bholves, and the can 
also exploiled and Iilie>I tlie room with a 
blaze of burning oil. The burning oil was 
soon cousumed, and, strange to say, a few 
buckets of wattT thrown on e.\tin<ruishcd 
the lire without the wofid work being set in 
a lila^e allh^iugh it was sonrjwhat bhickcii- 
ed. 

This explosion can be attributed to noth- 
ing except jioor, adulterated oil. There is 
a law of Congress making it a penal olfence 
to adulterate or to sell adulterated kero- 
sene oil. Our dealers ou^ht not t) purehaie 
any kerosene oil unless they know it to be 
pure. It is a crime to sell anything bi.t 
iLe pure article, at;. 1 beaidos, ihc seller of 
an impure aniclc is liable for all damages 
ihat o« cur from its use. The Congres- 
.sional law ap|iiie.s not only to keroseiie oils, 
but to all oils and iluiJs that wUl bum at 
!e-!s than 210 degress of heat. 

We invito the attention of our roadorj to 
another article which we jmblish ihis weok 
on the causes of explo.si.jus of kcro.'iene 
lamps. Also to another short arlielo show- 
ing how to test kerosene oils and tell llie 
pure from the impure. 



Tcj" Among tho most prominent advan- 
tages of the rerrine Plow over all other ', 
is its great duru!)ility. It will last from 
two to three times longer than aiiv coinr 
moil I'lov.' made by any other person. — 
Til is has been often tested by actual use. 
In gritty soil, where other Plows have been 
worn out in plo'.ving from sixty to eighty 
acres or less, it having already plowed over 
two hundred acres of the same ^cil without 
bcini'- half worn out. These I'lotvs can be 
procured at the J lard ware Store of John 
Ml^IuHcu, Shakopcc. 

Ti!Y IT liY ALL Mkans. — If any of OUT 
readers have been troubled to make light 
and uniform biscuit, it is more than proba- 
Ide they do not u.st; D. U. Da J..and i Co.'s 
Ui\il Chemical tSalcalns. "jhat is a pure 
article, not detrimental to health, and sure 
in its etl'ects. Try it by all meaiis. h or 
.sale by D. il. Stoi'.r. 



ti^" The roads leading into the country 
arc ill a most dcpUvrable condiiioa* It is 
almost impossible for teams to gel along. 

-A-C'~ About I'.OOO cords of wood were 
sold at ShaUopoe this week to parlies buy- 
ing for the tt. Paul m.-irket, at \f'i a cord. 

£.-.u)°'The wheat market has had a down- 
ward teudency lor some time, a!.d we think 
it has now touched bottom at $1.40. 

tiS/' Ta.xes Lave been paid up this year 
more raj idly than was cxpeeled. Tiie 
prospect is that the Celimiueut tax list this 
vear will be a small one. 



JChi?" The April Term of the Dislricl 
Court coiamcncos this year oa the "iOih of 
AmU. 



The PiiKK.voi.ociOAL Jovk.val fur M.iirh 
contains u rich freight of literature, adapt- 
ed to the tastes of all reader.^, \\/..: i;Tsrac!i, 
the Ihiglish .Mini.ster; John liriglit, the 
lleformer; Hon. Tinioihy 0. Iloue, U. S. 
h.; Thomas Allen lleeu, tlie te.e'jiated 
hlittrihand Koportef ; ".Jeiiuiu June" — Jtiis. 
.i . C. Crolyj diaries Kean, the Iragetiian ; 
Kiizabeih lilaekwell } A \'k umuii's .Manner; 
What and How shah a .Man Preacl; ; Liter- 
aiy Vt omen ; iiecing, not, iielieving ; .N,j 
business! The ISroad Way; I'aujicrism, 
its Cause and Cure, etc., wilh imuieruus 
portraits uvA illiislralions Only ii;{ a year, 
or HO cents a number. Address b. li. 
\\'i:i.i..-<, hditor, o.-^y ilioadrt'aj', 2\e.v York. 



pj- Mr. Snorer and -Mr. West, v.Iio wont 
out to the Red lliver country several v^eeks 
since to build houses to Becoinmoduto their 
laniilies when spring open.s, returned this 
v/eck. They went in a covered sle'gh, coii- 
taii.ing their bed and cooking stove, and 
fully eCiUippod to camp out on the prairie. 
They were about three weeks in getting 
through r.nd about as long rcturiiing. — 
They re^jort the snow de jp, the ruads oI'Len 
almost impassable. We think Uvo years 
of patient industry and economy at home 
would procure better homesteads, than hve 
years of frontier hardships wiih ail their 
piivations, would aecare. 

{S^^Tbe County CommLssioner.? Lave 
been ia session this week. We shall pub- 
lish their ctlicial proceedings nest week. 



jJSiT- Any one wishing n good investment 
for two dollar.s, had better sui>acribo for 
the Shakopee Argus — thilt hpusehold i.e- 
cessity. 



j^SsT" We learn that ijuite a number of our 
citizens are contemplating going to Mii- 
souri this spring to make a scliiement for 
the rciuaitider ot their days. 



— Miss 1^'la ('ooley, of l)odgc county, 
C(d«d>rated her third birthday on the 'i'fxh 
ult. Her IC.th birthday will occur in tho 
\car UI2I, at which time she will be a 
xouug lady of sixty-four years. 



TuE Waba.sha Herald has the foDowing 
itooi : 

Tho driver of tho down singe on Satur- 
day night lost his way on the lake while 
ero>siiig in the .^torm, and after rotiming 
around the Iargc.';t .share of the night, he 
discoveriMl hiuwelf just going oil" the icc at 
Lake City. 



Siwixt; 5L\rnix!:s. — Notice i.s Lertby 
given that i am agent for the sale t.f 

Singer's Sewing Machine. 1 will i^oll 

tiic.se .Miichines at, ilaiiiifr.ctory prices. — 
.Sale rooms at Schwartz' Clolhiug S<ore, in 
.Shakopoe. 
' Dated Doc.l9, h^O". 

.TOIIX SCHWARTZ. 



FOB S^LE 



By 



WILLIAM HAMILTON, 

A SI'LKNDID 

Young £!tallicn, 

Five ye;irs.->! i.eolor dap; I- Iny, w.!,'i!t I;! bunlred *-. 
ired by " VolJMi lULliKiU" Iron Freneh Canadian 
M.ire. Is well broke. Kiml .-md KiUth, und •! a ,'io I 
.il-rliv^ , .llid W'lile «i.l I ;,t ;i 1..I e.,1 I. Cm lu- se.Ii lit 
Uls f.iriu in Kk'iIo Cr».i.k, three in lies ir^dii ^aai^upee. 
US il 



AtiENT;^ WAXTKl) POP. 

TIIE BLUE-COATS, 

And how they Livod, Pought and 
lied for the Union. 

v, rni 

SCENES AND LVCIDEMTS IIT THE 
GilEAT IliliiSLLIOK^, 

Comprising Narratives of Pcrso lal Adven- 
ture, 'i'lirilliiig iturl tents, l)ariiig K.v- 
pluitri, Heioie Decd.s, Wonderful 
L.-ieajics, Life in the Camp, 
I'ield and Ho.spital ; Ad- 
vtJitures ol ."^pies and 
Scoiit.>, 'i'i)i,i tiler 
with tlie 'Songs, Uailada, 
Anecikites and liiimoroi'S 
Incidents of the W a r . 
Snlnuikilif llliis'ni'.id wifli oivv 100 Fine 
I'urttatts and liuivtij'ui Eiifrriivin^rs, 

Tlicre Isaeertain portion of tlio wartliat will ncvi-i 
;?() iiiti) the riuulur iilslorits, nor Ot- eiii'"> ibd lu fo- 
Mi.ii.iei.r poetry, «l!ih is.-iv.ry rcil part id it.uiiii 
will, il iMiserved.ronvey to siice.edij.ij t;t lu iMllon.s i, 
latler idea fit tlie spirit ol ihc eonflii t liiai many drj 
reports or careful iiarralivis of cvu.t-i, ,;u.i ihis puri 
may b.-»eftl'.' 1 the i;oS;.!;i, ti>e iuii. tU'; pilhr.s of ih<- 
war. I'.ii.-i lllii-t;afes t!:e cli.iraeter oi the hailii*. tli 
humor .f llej soi'ii-rs, tlie •levotimi of won, en. it.i 
bi-.i\ rry el men, the if\iu:\ fit oiir herot!', Hie rutuanvi 
und liiiid ihlps of tlie servi.e. , 

The Vidlant an. I Ilravi Hearted, the I'lc lire sijiie an, 
Hr.im.-.tii-, tlie Wltiy .iiel .>la! v-ioii-, lli • ii'ii;(r uu. 
railietle, and the whole pjiii.,runia ol tin- Mar are hen 
ilirl!'hi:,'lv |,orlr-.>ed in u iiia>l.il> iii.a,i>,-r, ul one. 
hi.-.iiiriLal Mill ruiiuiiitle, ren.brlii;; It the i-i^-st .'iiiipu- 
iinhiiie, hrilllal.t aud reaUuble buuUlh.it tlie v.ur has 
e.tlti'd forth 

Amiisemoiit as well cs Isistrniflon may I-e foiin I It 
evisry |iiiL;e,Uf, Kr.il.bie detail, brdltiint \UI. md iiiilu-u- 
lie Idsioiy, aro ftK.lilaily Uilerwuve.i In litis woili o: 
lileiary ait. 

iSi-n.i for t'ircr.',irs an.! see niii tirino, and a fii'.I di- 
scnpil'ji; of tile wuik. .Viidn's., 

Jo-<lv> lilloiJlKUc & CO., Chkai-o, 11!. 




■i iii ^ y p »; 




T HE D IL O A 1) (J A U ( J K— l)(J UIJL1-: 
TiiACK IIOUTK TO 

And I^'fw fi:cfiS'2:tE2tl CiJat's. 



TUIS KAILWAY ilXTENDS FROM 
Dunkirk to New York -ICQ Miles, 

lUdfulo to New York m Miles, 
Salamanca to New York 11 j .Miles. 

AND IS FROM 

.^' 22 to 27 Miles the Shortest Route 



^H ly-xins run iHrer'.Jy throttph to Xew rorl-, 

'^-'•■" ooO Miles v,iihout change of Coaches. 

«Si - 



Ftcni Ri (J afterXovetnlor 25th,it67, Tralnn will leave 
In coniiecllon wilh all Western Il:ic8, aa follows : 

From Dlniciuk and S.vlam.ixca — liy New 

YorkTiidtf from Union Depots: 
7:30 A. M. Kxprki?.^ Mail, from Dunkirk, 

(.'^iiudMy.. exeeptel). i^tops at IS.ilanianca l'i;iid A. 
M. und colli, I, Is at Ilonu llsvi',f .-mi (i.inliit 
with tlie :,(«! A. .M. Kxprens .M;,!l f,(,ui Luiliilc, 
an i ariivcs in .New \\,ik atT.en A. U. 

2;35 P. M. Lit.'iiTxixr. KxrRKi:.«, from 

Salanianeu. (.*un,|a}s excep^il). f;top» at ll>.r- 
neiisMiii- :,-.V, I". .\l.,(.-iip., iiit, ^se^^il:^' w'tli tin- 
L'.l'i r. .M. train troiu JJuiialu.and airi.eilnNew 
\'>t]- jt T.uo A. .M. 

1:1.") P. .M. New York Xioiit Kxrui:-?;. 

from Dinklrk. (.'iiiiidavs exei'pivd). Slops ... 
Sil.,m,iric;i lit'i r. .M.: i>|.'<i!i, 7.-."> 1'. M.; i.-mi ..} 
Ti.r:iers 9V. ,\. yi (.n'>^ft,). u'ld an injt in New 
»oili at li;.Ui 1*. .M.. loniieetliK w;tli Alt'Tiioon 
Tr.tlns aiid Bt--:inie;s tor liuis;uii and Ntw Jiiiir- 
luiil'.tles. 

D:jO p. M. rixcTXATT: Fxf.ikss from Dun- 

k'..i(. (.S i;id.i\., e.v, .ptci;, lS!..i)s lit .^.ila iiain a 
11. '.'i r. .d., ;iiid loiine-rs Bt II iriielisvlile Willi 
the Zl.-'J P. M. -iruia Irvia liuttaio, arnvlu.; lu 
Atw iul» 3,r, 1'. .M. 

From Ruff.vlo — ]>y New York time from 

l)epol corner Kx. Iian^e and .\IU!ii4aii S'treeta: 

5;-15 A. ^L Xkw Yoi:k D.w KxruH.s.'!, 

(."■'unla>s exe. it.'d). Mops at Ilor.i. Ilsville v.mi 
A. V!.. (IViitl.), Su^•.;:I■dl:lnlla -J 11 p.m. (Dine); 
Tiirner'M 7.V) p. ni.. (Sup.), and arrivi- in >ew 
Vorit Ii).!o p. I.I. fonii.clsat Ureal r.i-nlwith 
UelBwari, l.ieli.w mum .t \V..>ti rn K,tii!.,.id, and 
at .fiTs-y Ciiy Willi Ml.lnlxlil Kxprcs.s Truln of 
Nnv .le.».'y Kaiiruadfur i'lilladelpnia, UdU.iiioru 
ai.d Washliiirtoii. 

3:00 A. .M. Kxi'KKi'i? Mail, via Avon and 

l!..rnel!s\ ll!e. (Sundays iXcepUJ.) Arrives ji 
Ke^v Vurk ut 7. u a. in. 

ri::20 P. .M. LuniTNixc Kxi'Rfps (.Sundays 

exe. ptrii.) Sloj .s :it liwrni'lsville .'• 3 p.i;).. ^v;,. 
a:!d arriie-'.n .Si w York 7.<«i a. in. • .uie.tsul 
Umlra ttiOi Northern t'enliai K.iil'.vjix f.r ll.ir- 
tisbnra. riilladelpnla aii.l the AhuIi. At .lers-.y 
City with Morii.n.; l.x:>riKs J'rain of N.-w Jert.y 
IViDru.it I'lr l.uiliniori, and U ashliKioii, inj-i it! 
K>.v V.irk with uomiiii. Kxpr.ss train i.r B' Ktoii 
ana .New lJ:in;ui„i t'li.L^. 

3:10 I'. M. Nkw York Xkjiit P^xfr «.-*.<, 

J'A.Li: i<toii)at F.rtii.e .s.V» p. le. f Stip.J I'ter- 
steti.iK at ll.irnrliKvUi" wliii i;,i- <;.l.-, j, M.Troii 
Inrii Du::l;li*, ana anivcs iii iNce. iur,. at 12.;iii 
1). 111. 

11:20 P. M. Cwnsy.KTi Fxrni:<?«, (.«nr- 

d-ivN iX'-ejiri'd ) '•t■.•,^ m <Jii!r,.,,.',ai,,n 7n.i a. ni. 
(lll-ft.); liirniri. 1.1:7 p. 1,1 . ( iiiiii ,), h'I I airi\e» 
ll..\l\V Io.'k :l.|.-. ;,. ,:!. (.• ,;,!,,. t, „t |;inili-ii w !l!i 

^orther;l Ofi.trfli i;..'lw«y f..r (i..n!.s|.nri!, I*!i!i.:- 
d,.li)Iij;i, Uaitiniorr, Wii.sliitih'lon mil points rl.ii.lli. 
At Or.-.it Jt.iid Willi Dpi.iw.i'i. I.n.lciiw.iiiii 1 ai.u 
VW-.tern Rallr. a I for .«. r.i|.,ii, Trenl.in ao.l 
rhi'a i.'/ph'a. an ! lit .Ni\v VorKwi'li All-r.ioon 
Ira lis uul ciiviiiers lor li .»i.,u au-l Xew Knjiiai.d 
tit ei«. 

(inly One Train E«,:t on Sun l.iv. leaving llnfTalo at 
3:10 I'. M.. an.l reaehln.; N. w York «t Il;.-«i V. M. 

Boston tiid Now Ligland I'assengor.*', 
with their IJaggago, aro transferred fkle 
OP fliAUOK in New York. 



JEQ^Mr. Ro.s» introJuned a bill in our 
LegislaturS proh.biting the in\rriigj of 
fir.sl tou.-iins. Il might aL'.^ be wl 1 to 
prohibit any young !a<i\ uiarr.xiig her j 



i93*Ti> ple«snrc trav-derii tho Iln.?of the Tr'.e Uall 
w.iy pre.^eiiti many ehjecln of Interest, pissLit; tlirou^di 
Ihu heauli.'ul valleys of the Cheniuiit;. i-usi{utlidnnu, 
I).ljw.i."c an! I\aiji.->.p.> rivers, an ever chatieinij pauo 
r*aia of .\'.;tisre'» beauties e inini.ii.ds ultciitluu. 

r.'i'T Utl Tentitibil end nwnt Li/mriant Sletjiirff 
C'njch.i air Jy Tirt: HOJ.LO'iJt aca-mpan, ait 
AiV/,( TrMnt uHlhis y.'uilirat'. 

DACOAdK CIIKCKKD TI!I^OU(;]I 
j^lud Fare aUc>ijs us Loic as bj any 
other lloute. 



:i. inula I her. 



.2^7-Ask for TiRketj via Erie Rail- 
way, *wa 

W : i. h an h" o'talne.t ,it all IMiiclpal Ticket O.lUe 
II I he W. s' and f. ul..-V\ c: t. 
11 KlDIH.K, U>l. Jl. BAKli. 

lilU'l Ull t tic'i t'oB* .A.,!. 



H FLMB'S 





IKfflTfllT^I^ ^^q 



HOOFLANO'S GERMAN DiTTERS, 



AMD 



L. 



I) ULiliU 



'OU 



Prepared by Dr. C. M. JACKSON, 

i>!;iL.V!)!;Lrui.\, fa. 

riisGrestEietosferallBMs 



or TOE 



Lr/ER, STOMACH, or 
DIGESTIVE OEGANS. 

Hoofland's German Bitters 




•:,:i-. lli.'V im- i»»li- 
triit')\.f Hoots, 
Miikinj; a prr|,mn- 
tnitwl. i«i,.le!itir«tr 
tuimixlurt i^ any 



»r.',-(iii:]i...'icd of tl;.' piir.' jii 
rin^tlly leriiii' I, K-t m. 
IIi'ili.i iind li:irk», I 
tioii. Iii;;lily eoiieeii ' 
fit' frii,:i Alcv.'u>lic 

Sh'oofland's geeman toxic 

Is V r >inhiilition of all (he iii;rredient.s of Ihe Bilteis. 
with tlK> pur.^st ijiMiitv o( \.).''i ("mr liitm, OiaaLie, 
ttc ni:ikin|i.one of the nio^t p!.ia.«aut aud agret al I» 
.rcme.'.iiM ever otten^d to t!;" pnhlle. 

Tlio.se preferri:;:; a Jk-liciae (vim from Alcoholi': 
ad:nixturc', will n.-o 

Hoofiand's German Bitters. 

Ill eriMs of :ierv( us depruaiiju, when soiaealcohclio 
sti:.iiiliis is necessiirv, 

HOOFLAND'3 GERMAN TOITIO 

Bh 'UM he u-el. 

Tlie Bittern or theT 'iiie arel>.dli eqnally good, teJ 
Clit-iiii the Kun.} medic iii.il virtues. 

The stoiiiai-li, fmui a variety ol eaiiseii, gnch a* Tiidi- 
Ijesiioii, Inspepsia, ^^0^y^ Xirvons ludiility, 
etc., is very :i pi to [«f jQ l>avo its fiiiuli.r.!) 
drnirtred. The r»- ^^^|)r bbII of which i--. li'.i-t 
tliu luttleut Bullers firoiu B..veial or lui-ie 

cd" the f illowing disciucs: 

Constip-ition, riatulonce, Inw.-.rd Piles, 

i'alnt-is.s of lUood to tlio Heii>1, Aci'h- 

ty of the Stomacli, Kan.'ieti. lloiirt- 

bura. Disgust lor tho i'ood, 

jTiilness or Weight in the 

Kfomacli. Sour Eructa- 

tiona, yinkinpT or I'lutter- 

inst at tho I'it of tho btomaah, 

BwiinmiuK of t;io Ilo.'d. Hurri.-'d 

or riiHeult J3reathirfc, Ptnttenr.;; at 

tlio Heart, ChokinK or aullocatiri!; Bi-n- 

bationa whoa iu a Ly.Ufl; i'o«;ta:o, 

JC>itnn'j.'->3 of Vision, Dot-j or Webs 

bof.-)ro tho Sicht, Uull Pain in 

tho Head, DeJlcieiicy of 

rer:;pi ration, Vollow- 

neps of ,sj^*«S^ tho Kkm 

and Uyos, 'QJ jlil Pain in tho 

Side, liack, M^tj^ Chest, 

Limbs, etc., S u d d e n 

Fiushoa of Heat, Biirmns in tho Flc.^h, 

Constant ImntiininKS of Evil, and 

Oroat Dtpression of Kpirits. 

Tlieso rwiedicii will efTeetnr.lly cnre I.ivfr 
C..rr,.l lint. Janndioe. DysiK'p^ia, CUioi.io or N.i v..iis 
I)el».lity, i:liroiin; Di:irr!iic:i, l)is;...i><> of Ihe Kilutys, 
and ail Disi-iises aii.-:iii^ from a Diionltred L.ver, 
SUimacli, or lii. -tlii.H. 



l':£»l»»i«il.VTS<i>X«i' TSlKSV.Sa-i-.H, , 
ifMliicoiS l).V So*!'!**' I.ii?>*»r, fknr.l- 
t«lill>H, Jixi»»>.-.uv?, i"ev:'r.'<,<'!e. 

Tli-'ie is no midiciiie extant e.inal In t!ii"i' r.-'iiedie.ii 
in siuli rises. A tone anil_\i;{or is iiiiiwrlel Ui tii*i 
wIimI,- Svsteio. the tanPMW| .\rpi'tiIois plri-n;;tli- 
eii.-l. i"'d is en 'oAM i'y^- "i" H"""!! 
di.'.-ts pr.iiuptly, rjf^ " tlie b;«>il is pill iliid. 
tlie conipli'Xi..ii !""• e o ni i. s Mutid und 

liialthy. the yellow tinire !« erndi^' ited from the 
ey.s, a IiLkhii 'is >;i\en to the cheek.s. and tie- we.ili 
aiid narvous iuv.ilid Ikjcoiiiwj u Blrong aiiJ li.a'.tliy 
Ueint'. 

Pcrsnn.t Ailpnne^fl In I.tf'', 
And f.-eliiii; (lie hii'id of time weiirliini: hi-avi'y t-.pnn 
theni. wilh all its iitteiidHnt ills, will find in tiie m^. 
cif lli.se lirrrKK?*.orllie TIM^, an elixir licit wit 
instill new lif- into ttieir veiii-s. rcstor» in a nna-iirt 
thn eii(r;.'V ml aid..r of niom youtlifiil dvys. l.,iili 
up their siirniiki'ii f .rm-'. and givo U«»altU and liappi 
uess to their leuiiining years. 

NOTICE. 

If is n w^ll-eatil'lishe'l fact tliat fully onr-n.alf of 
I);.. 'tii.Ic p'l'ii 11 if >m'y* ear |,-'pida;i n Mro 
fi'hheii in tii.i ii'ij.'V \iS9 Iiieiit if ^;^»»i li.-dlh; 

)r, I'l use tlii-ir own Jyti— ^fxnn s...'.,ii. "iie.er 
fill w. -11.' Theraro l;in;;uid,dcvidof all 

eneri_'V. extnniely uervons, and liavi' iin ;ii i- tt". 

'I. I this che^.s "of i-rs'ii-i lli" lliTTiUtiS, or tko 
T. >.N IC, lUi' <■; pel idly i.»i,i,iiiie;i.lcd. 

WEAK AKD DELICATE CHILDREN 

.\ti' niM.'e sfroiii' by tin' ii-i- of .-itlier ol li n i:i(>- 

di-i. They will cmo oeiy c.ioO of Jl.Vii.Vs.\ll,S, 
Willi. 'Ill f.iil. 

Tli..ii:-aiiiN of cerlin.-ntes have necninnhito.1 in th<» 
h.ainls of the propii.-ior, lut sp:u-e will allow of tho 
pnhiii-iliun ..f but a !)•». Tiii»i.. it wiii b.- oli>.ivi-.l, 
u;e men of iii.t.- luid ^,l■^ucU slandii.ii th.sl lluy u.u.l 
Iju LeliuvcJ. 



TESiTinOITIAI^. 
no's. «;x:o. \\: w<>c>:>was3>. 

nic/ JuilU;: i.f t'lf Sn\.rr.mj- Ciiil "f J'.t., writivj: 
rUUfMi-Um, MarVh IC, 1H~. 



'• T And 'IIi»iflnnd"s 
a K i'"l t^'uic. II" fill 
rfif.-tivi) orismis, und 
r:is.^ ( f dobiiiiy. :in.| 
aitiuii iu the system 



mLiM^' 



(li'tmin IJitlors' Ig 
in dis..«.M.s of Ihu 
of p. il Uiiefit in 
want of uervoiu 
Yonr« tr.il.v, 

(;i:o. w. vv<X'T>w.\iU)." 

JlUtf/t of Uie Siiprrmf Oitrt r/ rtTii"tlr"»il. 
J-I,iia<l.lj>ltia. April •.><, ls<><S, 
"I ei.rsM,<- 'Ilmit^in.rs (Innnan fitters' a nilnnf'U 
mnlicini- in nuse ot iiirw k- ..f Inli^'. .sti.'U 'V IVv'p'l.- 
fiia. 1 Uiu certify this fiom my cxperiiiicwufil. 
Yours, wilh rii<| ect. 
, J.WIK.-; TIIOMPS^N." 

From noT. JOS. IT. i;r.\?r.\ni>, i>. i>., 

I'-nl'rr nf t'l'' T'lilk H'tjttiit fiiirrh, /•Ai7<i'/,.';-A»'». 
Jtr. .lirkxm — Ii..!ir :^ir : I have Ih'i n freipirnlly r«- 
qn"~t<sl to roiine.-t »iy nam., with rocommendati.ifis 
f.f diiiiTeiif kill is ef'iii.'Wieiiies, but r.-|i:ir.|i:it; tho 
iir:e;tii-e s.) out if my m«b. laa^ "PI ropri itesphiTo, 
I liave in all r.x<e» |l "mL I di-clini-1 : l>"t with 
Bcleiu- pr.Kif In vurl (jJji^fJIU ons in»tmiics an.l 
juvrtic'iil irly in inv caii runily. of tiio 

u>.luliicss of Ur? l!oi P iTid'-i Ibrniiin l!i'ter<. I il.pirt 
for oije.. from n!.V IisiihI renrso. to expie-s my tiill 
ci'iivictiofi \\i:\X. fimj' nrnl .l.l.iiilit n/tlu tyst.m, .ni.i 
ttir, iijli/f.ir Lii-.r I'mj'l'iir.l.it itn nife.iml .iliiiUe 

iirif: ir:li(!>i. In *>n'e nisi-i it niiiyfiiil : but iiscnily, 
doubt not. It will be v.ry bencliciil to thiwt who 
suil'i:r from lUu al"'».' iiiiisos. 

Vuurs, very resiKvl fnll.v, 

J. II in;NXAUT», 

righlll, bidiHT<'o:ili..1l Bt. 

Tr^m Rpv. T.. T*. rKM>%S.I.. 

A:ti.-I'int t:'Ut..r I'l.rhlii* ( -.r-Mt/--, 7 V,i /,„/,/;,;, |-,i, 

I ban- driivml Ois-idud |.ein-tit fr.iMi the use .-I 
Il.^llaiid's li.-in.im Oil!. Th, and f.-.'l il my privi!-.(.'u 
to neomiiieiid lliein iu»aiii.-t vidmihiu t.rti.c. to idl 
who are untreriie,' fr. ni };inoriil dtbdity or Irum Jiv 
iKueis aiiaiiij; fruui Jcraiigc:.;i'iit of the liver. 
Vuurs iiidv. 

K. I). ii:XDALI, 



CAUTION. 

• TTo.fl.indN Oerman Reni'-lieK are ronntorf-ifr |. 
Fe.^ Hint tie- slciiiit <<Wy^««M^ r.fB.if i;. .M. .1.'.."iv- 
J^ilN is. .11 Ihcwnp |t^ jWJ p-r "I oiuli Ih.IiI.). 
All othiT» are conn Jt>^ -jiim tmfeit. 

I'riiieipal Orti,« ■*'"•■■"' nnl Mnnnfietnry 
•t 111- iliniian Jltsliciiif Sti"e, No. CCX .\i;c'il i'lrir.t, 
1'kihulcli.l.ia. 

fllAKF.rS M. KVATS, 
OiTiiian li-.iuiiist. I'ropiiitor, 
Forun-rly C. M. JiCiL»uS k Co. 

Uin.n.inil'ii Oi-rmau Ihllers, p..rb..!no fl 00 

" ■• h'iir.|..7.i'n 5 no 

IIo.lland'sii.'riiii'nTonie. put npin .ii;art I' dtlos. 1 ,"sl 

|K'r U.lll.-. or N h'df d ■/.in r.r 7 SI 

*S- 1)" not f.ipt to ex.iniine well the article you 

liuy, in order t > jjet ti.e (.-I'liuiiie. 

VorStxXe liy nil RrHggJst* Bnrt IKiil- 
ers of ?Ic4liriao!t. 



EI o o r J a n d ^ ^ 




il y m Ji h I 



- r.»: .S,,h. .! hi- 
NKV.- DUL'tJ ^TOIJL .Sll VKOPLr 



t^^mmm^emmtm 



NEW YORK 

CLSIHIiijHOyH. 

Tpring Manufacture, 

mA. f^.,^ \^^ <c::3 o 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 

5ri 



In New York City. 







V e aro preprrcd to oxMWt to the nien-hants of 

this kectlou the best telcctian of C'lotldiig 

ever offiretl in the Xcw York 

Market, coiuhliiin? 

Cheap. Hediuia and Pine Goods, 

.MADi; IN THE Mo.sT SL I'KliloK MA-NNhK. 
Alii nf t-'ii- Wru LuUH i^iyUs- 



Wo jl'.all s"!! npon liberal terms .in 1 ,it 

ANTE-WAR TKICES. 



We fnvlte the attcntl .n of bnycrs. and prcni.sc 
to make It to their liiteri st t'l examine cur im- 
mense ktock bcfjre inaklng th.-Ir purchi'S'S. 

iiifiii. mm k wm 

45 &. ^7 Ghanibers Bt., 

n8-2;iio 



ALBFJTT & "WOODSUPwY'S 

O -^ X^. S^ X ji^. O- ZI! 



-a:<p — 



T 






Re x:> airing, and 

CAnniAGE PAIMTIMG. 



Carriagec and V^'agons, of all dcpcrip- 
tliii.'--, FJoli.-, .S!ci;;h.-!, (.'ntter.^. Sec, nianu- 
faetured to order at short iiidice. 

i'aintirig and Repairing jiron;|)t]y and 
^af i.«I'.irto;iIy doLC. TSj- All Viuik war- 
ranted to be (if tho best quality, and 
prices reasonalile. "O3 

N. D.— CCXSMlTfU^'n done in 
coTiiiOclion v.ith cur establishment. 

Ship on the corner if 

SKCOND A' JJiWl.-^; ST.'^.. 

Pictwcen the resilience of '1". J. Da.T-. 
.iiid t'.e Railloiid. 

T'-J- ileiiieinbcr the fdufO, and give n.' 
a call. ^ J. ;-). Ai.DHiTT, 

n-i7 I F. WoonsiiKY. 



•■'Mf^s'iiL'ri! f-T n?"i 



? 

A N I) 



MINNEAPOLIS RAILV/AY 

Via McGre^tir & Mliwjuikce. 

THE ONLV ALL KAIL LINi: 

And the on'r route by xvhIrU BAGGAUK IS 
tU!;i?K}.I>TUK0Ui;!I to 

AND ALL LASTEKN TOIXT?. 

Passenser.s rleT;ep,iTS f i ly .nt terrlml r'>li ♦». 
t'ins .s. iiiriae 8eit» In c|...;in toa insunj fall ni.siht's 
rest iu si epi:m caisoii .liitlil tr:tli,s. 

Ta.^-e It'll- trains leave uiid wrive a". West St. 
Paul as II 1'. ws : 

i: A s T i: 11 N v: x p ii i: .s .s 

.^Kr.ivr. MP.-.IiT. 

7 45 P.M. 6.35 A. H. 

Minneapolis c^.. St. Paul /..ccoiniaodation 



ARRIVE. 
ll:4o A. U. 
«:.VJ p. M. 
7:45 l: M. 



lEPAIT. 
f:"! .\. M. 
1 4i t.m 

M5 f.H. 



1). r. .^IIKi'AItD. ?i:p"rl!iti.ndLnt. 
A. V. 11 CARi> N. KH, .-. .^. MK; U !., 

•jtu'l r;i«»en»ir A:-'ii t. (liii I Mar.a.-<r. 

CIIA.-. ril.i.VPSil.N. Th ket A^ei.t. I'nl .h i. i:\.t> 
foot of Jacksou street, an.! ou t»;vec. St. I'au!. 



FIXKLK & I. YON 

LOCK S'iKil 

5crjliir( iilac!)tuc 



The (i.MV Macliii.e t-o perfected lliiil 
entire ssili.'^liiclioii is pnaiantccd or ilic 
purchn.--e money rcfniided. 

Wlicrc we have no A^-'cnt n fintnpir 
.V acliine will be sold ul very low price, 
iiid a Lojcal Ago;jl appointed on the 
most favi. ruble ti-rms. 

N. V'. — rend foi Cireuliir. Travciinp 
A<r' iiif Wanted. .Salarv, libeia!. 

r).>7 l)u).»i)w\v New Yolk. 






ioe'F. 



MiiiiiJsoUi Valley ILiiiroud. 



Pntil fiirthor nollpo, Trains will run 
as fulicv.s : 

Li: SUEUi: & MANKATO TRAIN.S. 

A. M. 1'. M. 

Leave Pt. Paul. 71.'. Z-o) 

Arrive at St. i';:ul. ILjO O.tJt' 



.ST. PAUL& MINXLAPOLTS TRAIN.S 

.\. V. ('. M. r. .M. 
TiOnveSilnt T'anl. H.fi'. !.;.'» LI."' 

Arrive :il St. I'ai-I, 1 i.n :].')'■) 7.^.'. 
En.x'erii Kxt>rf.s< le.ivPsSt. i'Hnl.4 15 a nt 

Trains on thi-< road make i:1i>se eon- 
npction at~ M'»ndntn with trniii.s tin Miii- 
nosota CpntninLiiliond fur Minnenpidi^. 
nw:i!nnnn, Vi'itinna ntid all piints .'^niith 
tmd Knsf. ail'"' pt r..e Snenr wilh Mintie- 
.=;ot:i StUjc Ccnipany's Line of Sta::?'? 
fur Le .Sueur. St. Peter, Mankato and 
all )>i>Inls w«'.st and srnithwest. 

Ti-lets can he jine'iri.'d nt Pdinn 
Tieki^t OiTIrp, .Tukson f"'r""t. ihn^p 
drt«ra btdow the Merefanrs Hotel, and 
nt tho T^->K.I ■^i West *J( Pint. 

.L>n\- !••, LINC>JLN, iup't." 
Dec. ft. 1<J7 



-: •— II- 



5 *S Ls» 




DRUG STORE 






T^ 



-^^ •-♦- 



EDWARD G. HALLE, 

Ni:XT DOOR TO GEYEEMANN'S STORE, 

lic^pcctfully niinounccs to the citizens of Shakopee, and Vicinity 
tlittt he has just opened a complete stock of 

Drugs and Mecliciiics, Perfumery, Patent Medi- 
cines, Toilet Articles, Combs, Brushes, 
Stationery, Lamps, Pure Wines and Liquors,, 
nd all other articles usually found in a 



ft 



Drug Store. 



Pctrolenc Fluid constantly on hand and 
for sale. 



T)!;. L. Vt. i\roKno\v keeps his ofTice at the New Drug Store. 



T. 



( 




FY. , 






^ 










Tijy 



0UTLEEY DEALSH, 



CORNEII OP 110LMR.S AND FIP..ST STREET.=«, SIIAKOPEK, MINNESOTA 



J. D. HUNTSMAN. ]- 



^ S. D. now. 






. aus,i <^.Jmit.%masE & Co., 
S II A K P E E M I N N E S T A 



nTTlLERS i.y 



D R Y G Q Q IJ 8 & C L OTHING. 



Zzcdics Brcss Goods, Gtc» 
Don't lorgct the })lacc^ — Cor- Holmes & First St». 



■ BW Py»f J ' m i -iRK-V!, ■. ■ . 



■^^ 3E^ ^J^ 21? 



ra 



^f»m 



ism. 



[CIIAS. II AUK ENS 



ir. S. IU)LTOX-J 

C-crncr cf Hchncs €i First Sts., Bhakcpee, Minnesota 

Eealers m 

Bry Good{^5 Brcgs Goodg, CEolIinig-, 

Groceries, Uoots and Shoes, Hals and Caps„ 

J[s<^ Tl:c hidtest Bu.rket price pt.iJ fur ^Vheut, Furs, and 11 
kinds of country produce. 

.7Sr Call and see. Wo are BOUND NOT TO HE UNDERS/01,I> by any firm in tli-* 

.^Iinne^o!a Valley. 



I J.>— XLUm J.W I 1.I . » !. A.. « J« . XHI » Ml II .!» ■ « l «j p l»»»» i m^ III 



'!JL"a« 



.JACOB IIOFFERT, 



— PK AI.KU I.\- 



^ 



V 







Saddlery iardwaro, 

IforsG Collars, 



«tr i/iPTS^R^OT 




ic, Ac., 

LEAVES STREET, 






lliakoi3ae. Mm. 



Farm for Sale^ 

In tlia Town of Belle Fiaino. 

The SiibscriUi r wifl Sfdl one of hi.> farin.s 
of 120 nrre.* of first rate hind, all fencrd: 
:'.0 acres of timber 20 ai res of ;:ood niei!- 
dow. 14 aeres nnder call ival ion, lo<r hoii.sr, 
stable, and pood water. S!tnated 4 miles 
.^oiilh of III He riaine. For sale cheap; 
j^a.'! cash, pnil oti fiii'p. .'''.'illin 

JOHN HAFLY. 



ALLS 

Veplabls Sicilian Hair Renjwei 

Ilo.'i stood Ihe test of seven years 
trial Itij the public ; and no jtreitO" 
ration fin' the hair yet discovere<T 
icill produce the same beneficial 
results. Jt is a new scientific dis- 
cover ;/, cojnbiiiing the most jtower- 
fnl iiud restorative agents in the 
VEGETABLE KINGDOM. Jt restores 
GRAY HAIR TO ITS ORIGINAL YOUTH- 
FUL COLOR. It makes the s€alj»> 
irhiie and dean; cures dandruff 
aud humors, and falling out of thff 
hair ; and will make it grow ujHtth 
bald heads, except in very aged 
persous, as it furnishes the nutri- 
tive principle by which the hair 
is nourished and »upjH>rtetl. It 
makes the hair moist, soft, atul 
gl(t.Hsif, and Is unsur^possed as a. 
HAIROaESSING. It is the cheapest 
preparation ever offered to tho 
pub/ir, as otie bottle will accom- 
plish more and last longer than. 
three bottles of any other prepara- 

ti07t. 

If is recommended and used hff 
the First Medical Authority. 

The wonderful results produced 
by our Sicilian llair Jleneu'^r 
have induced many let »,*<iJ»WWs« 
WW* pfeiHkrttJ ionfl for tUfi^ Wiir," 
vnder various names /. ana. ii» 
order to induce the trade and th^ 
pitblic to purchase their cotn-^ 
pounds, they have resoxtedtaf*il»e~ 
hoods, by claiming they Vf^re 
former partners, or hftdsoi»e con- 
nection with our Mr, JIaU* and 
their jrrepuratiou was sltnilar tn 
ours. JUt not be tleceived by themf 
I'urchase the origituU : it hns 
Hfvcr been e*/ual/ed. Our Treatise 
on the llair, with certificate*, sent^ 
free by mail. See t/utt each boUle 
has our private Hevenue St4imp^ 
over the top of the bottle, AH othn 
ers are imitations. 
R. P. Hall & Co., Prop's, Nashua, N. H, 

^</</ (jt/ <iU Tyni(X)>*lt 'iii'i f>raier$in ^/rlliri>l^^. 

. C. A. COOK, CHICAGO, ILL ^ 

A ^(-311 tor thr \oi ih* \Ve»lt:ru StKlc% 




\ 

■■ A • — ■ 

I 



7 



im I ■ ^ 



f rt.-T. I ^1 I M I f 



db» 



.^','"'"; a 



■• jgg-Jfe , 




^ ■ rt«if i 



ric^d' t< 



^rf- 1^ *^' 



y 



The Shakopee Argus, 



r%M HENRY HiNrns'. 



OFFIQWL IPWPEB OF SCOTT COUNTY. 



SHJlKOPEE, MAfiCH 19, 1868. 



Protectiom of Foreiffn-Borm Citizans, 

The su!»iect of protecting onr nnlutalnzifA 
citizens when on a Tisit to I'heir old liomes, 
i% before Congress, but malies slow prog- 
ress. The bill, as it has been last reported, 
rrc^ifos that the rijrht of expatri«tion is re- 
•garded by the United States as an inherent 
•one in all persons, and one which the Uni- 
ted States will always protect and defend ; 
that the United States have for ninety years 
invited cmij^raotR from all parts of the 
wttnM, ippira!i»ag 1^»cm citizenship and pro- 
tection, and thMG promises -can not be sur 
rendered ; therefore the American people 
«lce!are that all naturalized clt'izons of the 
Cnlted Stales, are entitled as such, to the 
same national protection abroad as native 
l»om citizeiu could claim, under siniiliir 
fircurastances. 

Jf •re are to Inve war upon this subject, 
let us liav«it direct. We fli«8t abandon 
<iur naturalization laws or adhere to them. 
I ( we adhere to them, then mlier nations 
must decide whether tley will respect ihem, 
rftr take the chances of war. We must ac- 
repl the issue of war with Knj.Mand or 
l*fuss:a as an alternative for our naturali- 
zation laws, or we must abandon our 
jiati(jexaJi2T and let fcrei.»n jiorentments 
<lictate our iufcernal policy. If we are r.ot 
-.WilUi^ .to l£<^it ^ our naturaliziiliou laws, 
let us say ioauul abandon t^eni; if we aie 
prejiared lo deieiMl thera at whatever baz 
ard, let us plainly tell the world so, and 
leave to other ^jovcrnments the alfernalive 
*>f war, or au acceptuucc of our policy. 





\ \ 




Vol. 7. 



SIIAKOPEE, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY. MARCH 19, 1868. 



No. 9' 



[OFFICIAL 1 

Ai-MToR-^ DFFu K. s. •.TT c.fXTT. MiNNE.„.TA. { "Tbe Pcii U Ml-litlcr tlittii tljc Sword.' 

iSptViMi J'ifetwn of Bwtrd oj County Coin-\ 

missiomert krid at the .^vdilor's OJice, 
March lOth, \Bi^. 

IJoard met at 1* o'id&ck a. m.; the fol- 
lowing members vkh^ jKCBetjl : Ct. W. 
Gillenbcc, Chiiirman, Thomas Terry, Mi- 
chael Ley, and Charles Keuncfoct and J. 
J. Ring. 




'S 




IN PltOBATK COURT. 

8TATE OF MIXNESOTA.I 
I Cuuiity <it" Srott. / 

■KOHKVM ' Jn thf MalJtr ftf tlif Kslatc (if Surah A. FitrilmHUand 
1] Ti jiT n Hxrrift FarilMiHlt : 

■ H III \ ' Harriet FarlSaiilt. Ouar.llan of Sarali A. Firilianlt 
1 l! 'V U "»'' Hanl-t F^iril«.iiill, having pn-sontfl lo ih.' Fmbaie 
a AjAvw Court i>f tlie tVuiiiv of !»c»tl nnil Staff of Mliiru'Si'ta, 



DO NOT WEAR OUT, 



a I'ctitlori friiin wliUli It appears to the Court tliat it Is 
necessary to sell tin- North West quarter of the North 



€Oyi^TRY MERCHAI^TS, IFZ HIRSCHER. 

DAmVMEN, FARMERS, ' CABINET MAKER 



COXSiaX YOUR 



A Single One v/ill Last a Lifetime. 



West .luarter of So.tloi. 17. Township jlo. lUnse 13 , , ASHES, BEESWAX, BEANS, BUTTER 
tlieNoitli West iiiiarti-r of the North Kasl i|uarlerot ^ — • ' ^ 



V K ]>i-il.» onil J T \Ior,-;-iin I hault ; nil.l I.ol 1, 111 >ertio:l :;| . .Ill I Lot s In ^e(■tlon .W), 

£.. 1. L»i.»Kca»a J. 1.. .MLrnam, ^fise Eicnance and Denijty are acquired. 2'-"V^'iHn!i. iu.i«ei.^ti.e .so,nh Kast ...i.ricrof t ,^^ 

Mcrriam btatiun, w;vd made, and ' ' -^ ^ ^ Pouih K'st ,,. inter oi .s.<tion 2.1. Town-iiU. lU'. Ka'i,-e 

a discussion, was i:iid over till ■ EceiiY, rLEisiRE AM) I'iwFiT coNsiLTED. lii!';:;.,^^;:''','^'^:.?; ;i":'Nor;h '(v;:;;t'*;p>!!?tV^V 



ExKCUTiox OK Anoheas RossriT. — The 
St. P«teT Tribunf publishes a statement 
TLat the son of Andreas Roesch has cor- 
sJes.-ed that it was himself, and not his 
father, whocommJtied the murder for which 
the father was hung on the 7th inst. We 
know nothing about the confession, but do 
not entertain a doubt but an innocent man 
t IS been hung. Wo are surprised a jury 
could convict on s c'l testimcuy, find us- 
toniijhed t'lat a rovern>r w.mld cons-nit lo 
j%n execution procured on the testimony of 
an idiotic sor. Partic ilarly so, when all 
the evidence except this idiot's, a:id all 
•circumstancea pointed to the idiotic son, 
n:j the luurdercr. 



^•9" The " Volksblatt" contniditls the 
Tiatement which we made to t!ic efLtt that 
Mr. l^Ruar.d was the choice of the m ij'jrit} 
«»f the (lerman dulegatcs in ihc Demoeratic 
Convention, for Elector. The "Volksblatt"' 
»'so says that only two German delegates, 
or perhaps a third, were in favor of Mr. 
Piiiiaiid. Now the factjs are these: there 
wf-re seventcett rieftnan delegates in the 
tonventioit and eleven of theiu were in 
i'avur at Mr. Dunand, and seven of the 
^Jevfii ^pcre from Scott coiintv. 



Application of Judge Chatfield for a 
license to run a ferry across the .Miimosota 
River, for E. F. Drake and J. L 
opposite 
ai'ior som 
afternoon. 

Application of Michael McGrath to re- 
duce his ta.ves on his real estate from 
Sli;.20 to $8.10; the board being satisfied 
that the assessment ou the same was erro- 
neous, srraiited the abatement. 

Applicalioii of I'atrlck O'S'iannesoy to 
have tlu> personal proporty tax of SJ-'^J ' 
refunded, tis die town assessor certified he 
aud Ko pcrsjiiiil property aI)ove tlio amount 1 
exempt by law. 'llm board ordered the 
county auilitor to issue a warrant to tlio \ 
county treasurer in favor of said Patrick 
U'Slianiiosey for iLe sum of i'l!.^,'*. j 

A|>iilicatioii of /jcorge Sycks aud otliers 
fur an alterat-.oa of Scliuol District No. 21 
and 31, bv detacliing from School District 



UY Til Kin xjsn 

THE LABOR OF V/RITING IS REDUCED, 
Greater Uniformity I3 Obtained. 



Section 29. Towiislilp 11(1, Jlan^'e 11; the South Kast 
quai'ter of North West nUirter, ard the North half of 
Sonth We>t oiiartcr aii'l Ihe.x.iuth East (|n:irl.T of the 
I South X\> St •in.irter of Seetlon rt. Township im. Itau'^e 
III. siliiateil III the 0>utitv of Wahasha, Minnesota. nnJ 
Lots I aiKl t.ami the South West i|narter of the North 
r;.i>t ouartei, aiel th" North W.><t (jii irter oltlie South 
We>t iinnrter of Seellon .1. Township l.'.s. Kaliije a'., the 
Kline helm fie pro;o..-tv •f the saM Sarah A. Farl- 
hault; nil. I Lot 1, In Seitio:! :;i . an I Lot s In Section r^ii. 



AND DEAUSR IX 



FILRNITURE 

Holmes St., (near the Levee,) 

Shakopee, Minn. 



The Best, Cheapest and most Durable Instru- 
ments for Writiu;? ever used. 



SENT BY WIASL SAFELY. 

i'ricu, Pi/lg Cift/j o«J lynearti. 



NO T1LAVEL.INO AGENTS EMPLOYED. 

Call nn'l you will Ami Pun* exactly s<Iiiplc<1 to your 

haul anil ntyleof wriliiii;; or cncl-isu stamp for circular. 

A. IWOUTOIV, 

» MAIDKX t..\Xi:, 



.NOTICE OF MORTGAGE SALE. 



:!l, in Township ll1,nnTi«e 15. sItilUel III the Poun y 
o (Joielhii.-. .Miniie-^ota; aii'l the Jiropert.v of Ihu .salJ 
niloor, llirrl' t Farll'anlt. 

It Is tlieruiore ilrlerel that th.> ne\t of kin of the 
S:il<l w ir-'s Sarah A. Karlhanlt ninl Harriet Karlliaillt. 
anil nil persons intere<li'.| In their estate, appear before 
the I'rohate Court of theColi'ity of Scott aiel State of 
.Minnesota, .it ten o'clock In the torenonn of the IU!i 
day of Aim 11. In the vear ISiVS. at the ..fflce of the Jiiilu'e 
of I'loliite of saht (\),intv of Scott, at the Court House , 
In Shakopee, In sal. I County, to M.ow .iinse ^.''V, " ' o/»t>o rrT'\T 
l.lcen.se shoiiM not be Kruiiteil fjr tlio sale o( salil Uc- OlJlUjllL.M, 
Hrrihf.l re il estate. 

AimI It is further or.lere.I th-it noth-eof the hearing • 
ofs.iM petlt:oH hi- !.'iven h.v the pnhllcation of the 
1ore,o.iii:f onler In tlie ShnKfirff Arouf. a iK-wspap.r 
|irltile<l hikI imlillshe.l at Sliakop:—. In iial'l Ciunlyof 
S'olt, lor f .1 r su.-ei'S<lve »• 'eK", the last of which puh- 
Ileal Ions Hhall he at least fourteen ilays before the dav 
of hearlnif. 

Dale t Kebniury 20th. IS<l5. 

L. n. II \WK1XS. 
Ii6 4t .lu l<e of I'robJte. 



CHEESE, EGGS, FLOUR AND 
MEAL, FLAX, COTTO.V, 
FURS AND SKINS 
DRIED & GREEN 
FRUITS, 
GRAIN, WOOL. GAME, POULTRY. 
NAVAL STORES, ITOrS, GIN- 
SENG, FEATHERS, irE>MP, 
PROVISIONS, OILS, 
LARD, TALLOW, 
TOBACCO, 

SEEDS, 
MOLASSES, &c., Jtc, 

TO 



1 " The most complete establishment 
in the Vallev." 



All kinds of Furniture, from the finest Par- 
lor Sets down. Work and repaliing ef everjr 
•leicriptlon done In a superior manner. Pri- 
ces low, aud all work warranted. 



JOSIAn CARPENTER, 



COFFIN S 

Of all sires, auil the latest stvles. niwaj-B on 
hand. Mif Particular atteutiuu |>ald to this 
branch of the business. iuarl9 iitf ly 



jOHij Kmm. 

Merchant Tailor 



I 



No. M Ilia nw tiuartcr^-jf sw (ia;irier, w !i:ilf ' ^'-^^ks ok MoimjAdoRS — TaniM Ei,'nn, and 
of the ne iiunrtcr auJ »v h.ill uf se (juarter ! ^':"T ''•J-'""' '»'* «''''"'^'. of Sibley Couii'y, 

of section ^3, town 114 rsingo 22, and .> .Mmne-ota. 

L-nsof the e half of .so <|uarter of said i -"*»•*•'"■•"••■ -'^I"'"'<;A<!KK—M:itliia.« Marty, then 
.•ctlon, and attach llie saiuu to Scliool ' ^^ Monn.e, Wisconsin. 



PROBATB NOTICE. 

STATK OK MINXKSOrA.I 

Counl.v of Scott. J ss. 

To Probate Cjurt— Special Term, Fcbrn.try 



Mst, A. 



ac 

sec 



442 Washington Street, 

NEW YORK. CITY, 

And receive Ills weekly I'n'rr Cnrrrnt of Pro luce and 

(lio.»ries. tl;e most coiuplele Price Cunelil I'ubllshcd 
in the United Slat .s. 

SE.\D FOR A PRICE CURRE.XT. 

Markini; riiitcHand Cards, furnished free. 



District No. 21 for schoul pLirp(«w's. After 
which, on motion, tlie bo;u-d luJjounied tu 
2 o'clock. 



Datk ok .MouTti.voK — May :{(MI;, .V. 0. ISG:{ 
Saiii .MiiKT(i.v.;K was ivcnided in the ()lli.o 
of tlie Rcols fr of Deeds of .Scott 
"I Couiilv, at eleven o'clock in the fore- 

AKTE«XO0.V -SESSION'. | „oon of iho4il. <i..y of Jlltlf, i„ the 

Hoard met at 2 o'clock aud members all ' >'-"'■ 1 ■"**'•!. i" Book -E" uf .Mortgai,'es, 

present. I , I>ai.'cll.). 

ApitUciilion of Henry Becker for a re- ' '"•• "'i^i'Kii'rro.v of t'lJ m )rt:r i,'c 1 jiromis- 
lieaniiy of ihe road lliioi.oL his laud. Tlie ! 
board rescinded troin the allowance made [ 
last year of five dollars, wliicli he did not | 
draw, and inslead allowed him him fifty 



0. !<•'• ] 

Jii IfiK Au.'.Vr 'if ihc Kitale </ ir/Wt'iim Mickael, Dt- 1 

On rea.llnir snd nin''«l.^liPtl"''""''"''"''^' ^•^•'*'''"''' r -i i » i i n • 

oftiie t'wn of iieieoi iti ;•" founiy "f Scott and Liberal Advaupcs made on Consi<jnmcnts. 
Slate of .Minni-s.t.. setriiii tTti. "'"l urayInK for rea 



FiusT Stuket, Shakopee, Mi.v.v. 

A new and splendid stock of Clo- 
thinsr, Cloths, and Gents' Furnishing 
Goods, 

FALL k WINTER STYLES, 

Jetr" Clothinjr made to order. 
Shakopee, March Ulh, 18G7. 



soi.s therein stated, ih If Letters of ^ "•oi<l»tr.ition on 
theKslateoi t!ies.iid Wlllliin Mi.hnel. l«^ ". tliecM> 
■ •r I it.itff lit tii.% <»»*.. .,t li:iii..i.; .iM.>..>i.iit/* *o.iV lie , 



of titiincy, in Ihe State ol Illinois. decea«e<1. ■"•' 
Kraiiti'ii an<l Issued tu Henry I). .Michae), brotbc 

s.il I deci'ase 



1 

I 1 oeei'ase 1. , 

It is Orierei t'l 't S \tnr| ly. the LMsl dayof Mardi.) 
A. I». i'<:s.at ten o'clock In tin- torenoon, at tli'- "tllec i 
of tlieJii \-if of Prohat'-in I'le Court II »ise in shako | 
le'C. in tlie Sill Coiiiily of Scott, lie nssli^nfi for tiie 
lieurlii;; of sail petition, ant tliat the helrsiit law iif 
I'lesald de e.ise I, aod allotlier person-; lnter>->ted in 



EsTABLisiiKo May Lst, IHIiO. 

First class lleftfrelices given wlieii ru'iuirei. 
ii'J-Iy 



d .liars. 

The ferry fiueslion at Merriain Slation 
was taken up, ami iilier some debate upon 
tbe suliject Uie board yraiitod stiid license 
by the lollowlnj^ resolution : 

Heiulvid, Tliat a license b>; anil is here- 
ly granted to K. F. Drake uii.i .loliii L. 
-Merriam to cstabliali, maintain ami use for 
the term of tiirce yeais, a ferry across the 
Minnesota river, at such point us lliey may 
de em li«st adnjited to the piirp i.se, ttjiiioilie 
or nearly oi)pjsite iho .Men-i,iiii Siatiju, on 



OS is the South ilulf of the Sontliwcst 

Uiiurter cl Socti.>:i Ten, ami tlic .South "I'sall entile, are heredy notiilel and re.inlred t.. ln' 

\.- , ,, , ,. . 1 !• . ,» iires'-nt at .■.aldll an 1 place to sli.iw cause. It Hiiv 

»» L-l t^if.irler ol the ^outli J'.nst t;n;tr- Hoy have, why Ihe prayjr of said petition sliould not 

ter oLSectioii Ten, iill in Townslilp One i"' "ra'''^''- 



, , , , . , Afid It Is fnrtlier Ordered, that notice ofthe hearlns I 

lllinitrcd and rolirtccn, of Range of sal l petition i>e j;lven,hy piildlsliln'.;a copyofthlsi 
'rii-.oitv mil. ..,»ol..;ii;.i.r ...... I,..,. 1». l order in tlie .SVi, it „/,<■,■ .t;-,7«', a weekly new-p.per, , 

lWUiI}-om', COntamiilg om.' hUU'IreJ ,„.i,,ted and puMUI at Shakopee, H, s^ld County of 

Scott, lor thr e sncc.s.lve wi-eks Iniiiie lialely prece I- 
iii'i the lime llxed f'lr said heann?. ' 

Date I February 1'1-t, 1S<>S. I 

L. u. ii\wi;i\5!, 

iiC-J.y Juijje of Probate. 



and twenty aci-t .s, siiu;ito lyiii;.' iiiid be- 
ing in the t'oiinfy of Scott al'oivsaid. 
Said .Moi:TiiA<:K was inide to secufv; the 
j)ayiiieiit of the sum of Eighty Dollars, 
witli interest at the nde of i\\elvc p r 
ecni. p r iiiiiiuin, j)nyal)le in one yiMr 
Iroiii date, acconliiio' to the iiroinis.>-o"y 
note of the said .Janus lOgan, payable 
to liie said Mithias .Mariy, aiul bi.aiin, 
even date with said .Mvrigage. 
VcTiox or procei'iiiiigs liuve been insti 



IN PROB^VTE COURT. 



llie .<um secured by said intrt^aoe or 
any part thereof. 



Baxter as a Legislator- 

" Col. Baxter h.as been four years in the 
-Smwlt* and fro;ii the daj. he tooU his scat 
in that body h.as wicldcil as much influence 
ns any iu<n»l>«r of it, and his efftrts h ivc 
all be^n for the advancement of the inter- 
ests of the people of the cou;ity he t-jsrc- 
«entcd." — ftfy ctiiior. 

.\s Mrs. Spectiitor is the J'aid inlslrcss of 
Baxter aiid the rest of th« flock of bu;- 
cards^ she must do his bidding, and we 
|»re.';ume the above is the opinion Ba.\t(r 
entertaius of himself; but it is not the 
opinion of one sii:gle voter in Scott countv. 
It is notorious that Baxter was the iuost 
iiseicfls member in the whole I^egislature 
and entirely destitute of influence lor good. 

X-c^er did he, wliile in the Legislature, 
devote a single ellort to the interest of the 
jHOple of the State or county. But every 
.-windllng concern that went to the Logis 
litture lo rob the jjoople, found a readv 
advocate in him. He voted for the bogus 
railroad bond swindle, to send the Hastings 
railroad Ojut miles from Shakopee, to have 
r.ilroad mortgages recorded at St. Paul so 
that the people c<.>ula buy railroad land and 
jiot know that there were mortgages on it. 
Whatever was against the interest of tl e 
jM-nple and in favor of private gain, he 
would vote for. He was very fond of 
postage starn^ st&tionerj-, Revised Stat- 
siics, five dollars « day, and was always 
3ib«r«X «i bis votes in all such cases. Dur- 
ing these four years much good might have 
been I'one lor Shakopee, with a proper man 
■ I the Senate, but with Baxter there, Shak- 
opee tvas even deprived of the privilege of 
running a free ferry, because it w.is to the 
lintcrest of Cressey to prevent it. The pub- 
lic btnefilS were always sacrificed to any 
privite gain- 

We know just how and by what promises 
that ferry charter was put through the 
tiIou«e, aud at some other time we shall 
rfliselosc our knowledge. 

St. Patkick's Day. — A grand celebration 
of Si. Patrick's Day was held on Tuesday 
last at St- Paul, Rochester, Faribaul t and 
other places in tbe Sl>»^, by our Irish 
fellow c;ti>;.euij, 

T— : r 1 1 ■- 

The Bait op \,r. ISfEfR. — Mr. J. C. 

fCas^pian and Mr. Roll , of Chntficld, will 
ppen a bank in Le Sueur some time in the 
pioDth of May. 



l.iiuvd in .-aid morlojige a d recorded 

llieiewith and of tlie provisions of *,ho xir wri.'H 
Std'ute in such ca.^c made and provi- ' \y *^*^ * ' ' 
dcil, the said inoit.:ag(! will be foro- 
closcii by a sale id' said morlgaged 
ppini.ses to bt; matio by the SlieriiV ol 
said ("ounty of .Scott, at public v^-ndiic 



Attempted Su^•l^K;^L. L. Bassford, 
whfle at the First National Hotel at .Min- 
neapolis, on Mond'av' "moruVng, stabbed 
himself in the side, tljcn jumped from e, 
three story window to the pavement, got \ p 
ai) I ran some distance, aid cut his throat 
from ear to ear. He was still living at last 
accounts, with little prosjiect of recovei'y.— » 
|Ie was a civil engineer, of good repute, 
liut an inyetcr.ite drinker. Tie rash act 
was probably produced by t'le first attack 
M' dt:lirium treiiicus, 



such 



at 



the Jiiunesila Valley R illrjad, i:i th-j j No 
county of .Scoit, and it sliall be lawt'iii for ' 
tliein to chtrge aad receive ferriag.s lot 
transjiortiiig p rsoiis and p;'o[iiMiy across | 
saiij nver at said Icrrv llio luliovi.ig r.ites, 
lo vvil : 

Kor t'MU) of two horses nrninl'.'s and n-js'tn li cts. I 

fir one iior-,.: oc mole anl wagon 10 cts. ! <.'eiit-, together with the SUIU of 'I'eil 

Koru.ie horse and r-er ID y . Dollars sol'citoi's Icc sccurod lo be 

tor each heal of eaUie. a ct^. I p;iii| l,v ^said mortgaof 

Kor each head sheep or hog -". ^l' ' NoW TlinrKKOKK:, mitico' is hcrcbv glvCU, 

tor eavh fofftnian 2!. cis • n , i • r .• ' . 

An I. he .s..i 1 K K. OrakeanJ J.J..I L. .Me.ria.n having \ "'i" '.'i' . ^Tl'"^' of " I'"'>Vcr o! sale COIl 

uiaUe and dle<l the liond reiiuire.i bv Uw, \%i;li iiatiH \ 
firtor>- sureties. It Itf or.lf.red tiiat Ufion ttie p.iynienl I 
•"■j thesiim of t'lc .lU ii of lifteen .lidlar.s into llie Ireas- i 
ur> of s:»ld lounly, u Ikeiise be s'.iio-il by the Oiair- j 
man of lliis lioar.l ami .-ealeil w. ill the Seal lliereot. ami 1 
altcst.-d by the Au.liior. and ileiivered to tlie s.il.l j 
Drake and sierrluni accor.lii i-ly. | 

And belt fir her ordered 111 it, until otiierw:se or- ] 
dered. Ihouniuiai t.ix upon .-.aid lirry be liltc.n doiU.rs. ' 
payubX' 4n OJ- ki fore tlie lUlh Jrf .Mauti, in lacii year. | 

AppUcalioii ol wiouw II. J. Jei:!>eii Icr p.rlkil reilel, { 
was con>idcred, and she w.is allowij t .Irly doilar.-^ ' 
parlial relief. I 

.^I'pilcatioii of Mary White to hyve her (axes reduceit ' 
on her iiuurlcr acre of land in Sec. ti, t.uj;le Crek Town, j 
the valuation of $.'j5 to $1N/J wuo l;eard and llie aljale ; 
nieiit was .So oxdered. | 

Aiplication of N.Stone ti ii.tve his taxes refunde.i , 
from Lot .No. II, S. 31, T. Ill ll.l'l, for rix .wars past, 
the same .•«->.i){ railroad land. The i.oar.l onlered llie I 
0"Unty Auditor to issue a warranf •'••r the aiiiounl ol 

taxes pHid by the .viid N. «luue on llie ubu\ e ti<'»t.ribv;d l)ixi-"l M-in-li "'1 l'!^^ 
iand.ann.uii lim; to fl2.7s. , . .. . _ '. ' . 

Tlio Boa-d allowed llie t'oniily Surveyor the sum of 
$Hi(W lor slationery fur the >'.x .»ears 41.u1 and thv two | 
}ears eusuins, beini: Ave dollars for eaih year. 

Partial relief was granted to .\oel Jubinvillc to the 1 
anouiit of $;5,ttnd the thtiriiutn niitiiorized to vrant 1 
hiiu furtlier relief if, lu lil.^ Juii^iuent, he slioiid be \ 
•atitied to It. i 

Petition of .f.diu Hentsesanil (driers was p-esenled, 
from School Di>trlc< N\.. Vt aiio it, to dc I ich Irom Iii.>- , 
titit No, 22 tli«' east tialf of the I.erth^ve^t qnaiter ll'e 
west UaJf of the nortiii a.-t iinarterof Scitlon 13, and 1 
west liali ofthe norUiMest tiuarter aii.l lots No. land.'. 
In i^'ection U. all in 3'. lit K. 2:1, and an in x the same lo 
School District No. lu lor Svliool purpjses, which pet. - 
tion wa-- granted. ! 

Petition of Henry Bauer and others \vas p'-eseuted. , 
from School DL-trlct No. 2J and 2?, to detach lioin Uis- , 
t ict No. 2i> the we>» half of Ihe northeast •iuitrler,aial 
east hall of northwe?t ijuarler, the vast had of the 
southeast i|Uarler, northwe.-t nu.irter of sontiicit' 
^nailer, norlhea*! (juar.er of llie m utiiwest tjnarler, . 
Xiie iwrtliw.st of the S'jUlhwesl i|Uarter, aud suulhwot 
of the southwest cjnartir, in Seci ion 33. and llic south 
east (I'l.irier of the •outlica>t iiuaiter of J-'ettlvjii 3.'. aud 
the southw St qnirtor of Section 31. 'f. Ill li. Jl, for | 
school pnrp».sei , wh!..h petition w.ns grained. 

Petition of Charles Senion and oiliers from School 
Distrct N.i.iSianl 37, wa^ pres/Mted,to detach from 
S<hooi District 2'"', the se '^ of se '4, and ll:e»e of sw '4 
of Sec. 33, r. Ill It. 21, and anne.\ the same lo Sciiool | 
D strict 37. T. Ill, It, 24. lor school piti poses, was I 
gramevt. ' 

Pet. tion ot Peter Carrlgan and oilier-, of School D»- 
Irlct 17. was presented, to suo-dlTlde tiie said dl-itrict 

17, by settiii? apart mil detaching troni said dlstrht j F I li S 7'- CI.A S S 

Se lion 1 and 2, the n 4, of L-eet|on 12. T, 111. It. 12. ami 



Sr )TT (,' IL'NTY.— Soi-clil Terin.Fel.mary 27tli, ISiVS. 
//« thf M<iiUr >,f the Kitnle <\f JOllS OAKIUUAS, 

On readni .111 I llli;ii the 11 •tllloii of Peter Carrli.in, 

of S|.rin;' /.ake. in tlo- ('.uiity .ifS-ott, and Stat • of 

Minnesota, pr."ylif.I for reas.ns tifrein sral.-d thit 

I.ett.TS of A IniiiiKlr.illon .ni tlie Kft ile of tin- s.iid 

luted at Jaw, or Othcrwi.se, to leCOVer .teceas-t miy l..- Issnel |.> h!ni,th.' sal l PeterCirrK-an. 

It is opi.-rel that Saturday, the Twenly-llr-t dav of 

a..a^^ v.. M inh, Im'.s, at One ..' clock In t'leaOi-rnoon at the olUce 

ot th- -liiU-eof Prohate in t'l- town of Sliaiopee. In 

,, . 1111 . .-.al I l"on it V il ■ a si iiie.l f.r t'le hearing; of Slid petition 

I UK .VM >1:nT Cliilineil to be due on Sunl note an l tint th • h. irs of l.iv or the s»l t .lecns!!. if «"iy I 

at the diite of tlr« i.riti..|. J« ibo <ii.n .if ""•'■■• »"'. Hi'lall other persons interested In the sal.l , 
ai nil, u.ne 01 in.h nOllCL IS me sum ot ,...;;„,. „,'. reipHrel to be present at t'l it time an I 

One illUldrd and .Si.\ Dollars -linl FortV l>'i>- to show cause, ir my there He, wliy ihe prayer 

of sal 1 petitl.in should n.t be ■.;rante.' 



Cross Plows! 



THE PERRINE CkOS.S-PLO W.S 

Are f.r .Sale hy 



JOHH nilElt. 




At his 



Ilardwari' Sl»rc, 81i!i!40j»ce. 



They are ma le of Uirdened CAST .STKKT. and 
GKKMAX srKi:i.. by 0. K. PKRUINE, at the Miiine 
apolis Plow Factory. 

This Plow Is tlic 



And it, Is further ordered, that not ee of the hearin.; 
I't t.ie said liellllon be udvi'ii he ii'ihlis'itn j a copy ol I 
tills order In llie .S'/in.Vo>j<v ll>/.7.i/ .irj/H.', a w.-ekiy | 
new .p ip -r print.' I and pu'illsh-lat Shakopee. lu sahl . 
eoiintv. f-r three sii-iessive weeks lfimedi.tteiy pre- | any other I'low 
ce.lin.: th.- s li 1 lieario;:. 

D.it- I Feoru-irv 27tli. 1-B». I 

iiii.iw L. it. HAWKINS. .Iul;.-e of Probate 



ni'LST PLOW IN TIIE WORLD, 

.\nd will LVSrfroni tw.) to three times luueer than 



Asents to Sell l>r. WI. SMITH'S 
<« DIctioiinry of lUe Blltlr.'* 



The rejisons f jr its U.IKAT DJit V3ILITV are:- 

Ist. The EXTREME ll.VRDNES.S ofthe 
Stc^d from which it is made. 

2d. The TIIICKNE.S.S & STRENGTH 
of the exposed jiarts. 



Cor. First ani Lewis Streets, 

Shakopee, Jiliiui. 

DEALER IN 

Hardware, 
Stoves, 
Cutlery, 

Tin Ware, & 
Sheet-Iron. 



;J5ir Il'piiring neatly and prompt- 
ly e.xecuted. 



It coat lins over lOfH cl is.-ly printe I, ■louhle rolu nn. 



at ihe fr.i-.t il.iur mI' flm ('..iirl n,»iic<» 1 ceiav.i pa,'es, fro;n new ele.ir. type plates, on coo "p i- 

ai- Mil. iro.ll UOUI Ol Ilie t^OUri llOUaO 1,..^. and l< a;.pro,trlalely Illustrate I with nior.lhin 

in Sliakuoee in sail CoUn'V of Scott. ' -'''d »••'■.''■• vin-'ro.i «ti el an l woo',«nl aseriesof Une, 

. ■ . •^ . I..L..ll.> I.I ILtf .(-.• 



3d. The woo.l work is of the B ICST WIIITK 
OAK 11 M HER. 



i_;, ., . e 41 ■ 1 . . • 1 I • authentic m ips, 4 

ntUie ol .MlllM.S 'ta, at leu O clock lll , li e.ioip ise* the \.|II |i'ti-s. ni ..'riv-ie, (Jeisraptiv, 

the forenoon of the 18tII I» VV of ApHII. •^''t'"''! Ill-t oy. Topi-rarUy. an l Isacomplelc <;yclo 

, , ,,• . . 1 ' . «. ' I'ellaol th.- s.'ripiures. 

Ill t!lO year 1M>5, all'I the Jirocec'Js of It Unecessi'y toeverr nihte r.'iler. IndlspensiWe 

uiwli <-.l.. ..-Ml I ^..l;,. 1 I.. ,1,. ....I-..., ..« ' 'o ev.-re Minl-ter a'll snn.tiy Scliool Teaeiier, an 1 

S'U.li sale Will be ajiolieil to t.'ie pa^ m .•iit , .,„_,,,t ,„ ,„. („ ..^.r,. ,„„(ir 

ofthe sum tllCn due OU said note ami it is hli^hly c.immeu le.l hv ntt leirnet an l emlnenl 

» I .1 .11 .. meii.aii'l by the Press iienerally In all paits of Ihe ..... 

moitgage, ami tiie costs and charges ot ^ eonMry. us tne best iKJoUof the kind in the Knslish I t!'^" Il^e.lollarslwj or three times over. 

fonclostire and saiil sum of ten ibdlars ; '•'"o""''-'-' 

solkilnr's f.-es provided by said inoit- , . ,,.„.. 

„._ , , • i' . .■ .1 I el Owin; to tie ,(■(/>-•'•••■ /■■'i/''< popniirite of thls«or«, 

ga-J-e to be paill OUI ol the proCCcJS 01 i a «/<i <« /J.iy/M'ia'o-.V/m-fiMu in .le.lmo f.rm.of al...nt 



Do not lie Drcelvrd t 



Tliesc <|uaiities make It the 

CHEAPEST PLOIV 

In the Worlil,n» weil as the /lA'.S'T*, Inst as sure ns 
there Is ecoiioniy In p lyln;; six ibdlars once, rather 
hail live .iollars t\v.> or thre 
Its i;reat hardness caus-js It to 

SCOUR 



MOFFAT'S Life Pills 

j Aim PHiEinX BITTEB& ' 

The Host Saecessftil Medicines 
in the World, v *« -* ^^ 

Established in 1885 by one of 
onr Host Eminent Physicians, and 
now nsed thronghont North and 
Sonth America^ with more pleasing 
results than any other Medicine in 
cases of diseased Lirer, Blood or 
Skin,%' Indigestion, ^ Costireness, 
Billons Complaint^' Rheumatism 
and FoTOr and Ague/ v >-*,««. ^ 

Thousands of certificates are in 
onr possession, giYing detailed 
accounts of perfect CUEES effected 
by these inyalnable Medicines. 
They regulate the System and put 
ailethe functions of the body 
in a healthy condition. " O 

Sold tor all Cruggista. White & HovUnd, Fropri« 
otor*,' SuecoMon to Dr. Joha MuSat «ad Dr. "V. B. 
Mofht, I^ew Yoric. 

NOTICE OF MORTGAGE RALE. 

Namk-; of Mortoac.ors — Fredrick I.j»hr- 
man and Kophia Lahrman, bis wife, of 
Scott County, Minnesota. 

Namk ok Moktoaoke — Mathias Marty, ILcu 
of Monroe, Wisconsin. , 

Datk of Mortgage — November 141b, A. 
I>. 1863. 

Sath Mobtgace was. recorded in the office 
of the Register of Dccd.s of Scott 
County, at one o'clock in the afternoon 
of the 20th day of November, in tlie 
year 1863, iu Book "E" of Mortgages, 
page IG8. 

The Descriptiox of the ^^or^g.^ged premis- 
es is the West Half of the North West 

^ Quarter of Section Twenty-one in'l'own- 
ship One Hundred Thirteen of Range 
Twenty-two, conlaitiing eighty acres, 
situate lying and being iu the County 
of .Scott aforesaid. 

.Saio Moijtga<":E wa.s made In ppcnrp tl.c 
payment' of the 8um of One Hun- 
dred l)ollar.\ with iiitercf^t at the 
rate of twelve per cent, pcraimum.pay- 
ablc hi one vear from date, ac 
rording to the promi.«;.«ory note of the 
.said Fredrck Lahrm.in, ju'yable lo the 
paid Mathias Marty, and bearing even 
date with suit! mortgage. 

No AiTio.N or proceedings have been insti- 
tuteti at law or otherwitie, to recover 
the sum .secured by paid iiiorigage or 
any part thereof. 

The a.V(ilxt claimed lo be duo on <;.nidnolo 
at the date of tliis notice is Hie sum of 
One Hundred and Fifteen Hollars, to- 
gether with the sum of 'J'cn dollars 
solicitor's fee secuted to be jjaid by said 
mortgage. 

Now Therefore notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained 
in said mortgage and recorded therewith 
and of the provi.-^ions of the Statute in 
such case made and provided, the said 
mortgage will be foreclosed by a ."^ale 
of said mortgaged premi.ses to be made 
by tlio .Slieriffof said County of Scott, 
at jmblic vendue at the front door of 
the Court House in Sliakopee iu said 
County of Scott, State of .Minnesota, nt 
ten o'clock in the forcnoou of tlie 2^'tii 
DAY OF March, iu the year 1868, and 
the proceeds of such s.ile will be ap[ditd 
to the payment of tbe sara then due on 
said note aud mortgage, and the costs 
ami charges of foreclosure and .«^aid sum 
of ten dollars solicitor's fees proviih'd 
by -said mortgage to be paid out of iho 
proeeeds of such sale. 

D.\TKU February l.Uh 1868. 

MATHIAS MARTY, 
Henry Hind', Mortgagee. 

Attorney for Mortgagee. 
J.icoii Thomas, 

Sheriff of Scott Count v, Minn, 



IN PROBATE COURT. 
SCOTT COUXTy,- Special 



.Moii^M^ce. 



M.VTillAS MARTY, 

HK.SnV lIl.MiS, 

Ittonicv tor .Mort.'-agce. 

ja'coi; tiiu\?as, 

III Tt Siiorid" of Scott Cjunty, Mi :n. 



ur. 
Iki 



THi 



nMlO^i^^ HOTEL 

A T 
& Jti. £X ISL O 3p O O , 

Is now . |> n for th.- ae,-oninio;afi..n of f i- tr.iv. I- 
ii'i: 1 III. lie. ttg- Tills Mouse i< newlv fnmlshe 1 
l!ii'oo;,;hout, and Is the I ir^i Mt iiii.l l>:>>t keiit lIou>e 
In th^ .MlN.NKSUl i \ AILKV. "v* ______j-c 

D- A. BROWN, Proprietor. 



6'm pii-'es, h.i-t h-.-en rei>riiite.| lu tllU coiintrv In hir.:er 
l> lie, mil siir-'ff oV'T s'Ut itittvo pajes, evi.ieiill.v— hy 
making d i.ir,'er ho.ik than Uie orl.'liinl— to i;\\-.- the ioi- 
res-lon e.isler th.it II Is o-ir e lltioj. It his !•'.</ Ih'in 
If If r.'/./i',, / Ml III T 'if tt ift. an I is s>M ••onsl.ier.iMv 
hi.'her thi-i the Ej.'Ii!.h e.lltl.in o| s.iuR' I. ^ok In thin 
i":ritry. ."^ .'o • a; oirs are en !e ivorloi to palm oil' tli!> 
j Iff Hill' i"liliiin f ir oiirs. 

Te leh.Ts. .'u teats. Itetlre.t Cler.;.vnie!i. F.irnier'. nn<l 
en.T.'etii' Wo n ■« till the i-.:-'nev lor this work holh 
pli-asa'il an I lu r.ilive eiiiplo.v neot. Selnl lor circu- 
lar*, nlvloa lull p irfeul ir.s. l>-rins. .tc.. to 

S. S. S.lt.VNrtV X (;.>.. Uiolj I'uMis'ior*. 
inW.1 ly, .\sjiuiu fit.. Ilariio.-.t, Conn. 



CERTAIN, 

AND 

Speedy Ctira 

NEURAL6IA, 

AKl> ALL 

NERVOUS 

DISEASES. 



^^ Dentistry. 

OR, P. J, HUOT I 

Will return from .\"e\v ^'ork, and rom- 

nieiue hiiKinrss In SlLikojiee the niLl-lie ol JallU.iry, 
IM'iS. .^n> in III el of 

It () R K . 




Term, March 13th, 18tJ.S.— In the 
Mitter of the Estate of Nicholas 
Kray, Deceasctl. 

On reading and filing the pelition 
of Wilheliniiia n.iUer, of Sliakopee 
ill the county of Scott and .Slate of 
.Minnesota, praying for riuisons there- 
in stated that Letters of Adminis- 
tration 0:1 the Euate of the said 
decease I may be i.-suod to J. W. 
Sci'.ccrbo.'C. 

It i.s oitl Ted, tliat Sdurday, tlie 
Eleventh d ly of April, 18ti8,"at 10 
o'eloc'i in the forenoon at the ollice 
ofthe Ju.lgj of i'ro'iate in the town 
of Shakopse in said county, be as- 
signed t":ir the hearing of .*aid peti- 
tion, and that the heirs at law of the 
the said deceased, if any there be, 
Fr«.u fon. lo twelve inehes, mot will turn under | and uU Other person.s interested in 
gra«, wet-as .■.n.istuhhte. completely. . ^1,^ said estate, are required to be 
FOR SALE BY present, at that time and place to 
I show cause, if any there be, why the 

JOHN" f^ClMEULIllEil^, ; P'"-'^^'' ^^ ^^'^ petlliou thould uot 

" ; be granted. 



Ill the most liilll nit soli, wacii all other plow . .'nil. 
Tiiose P.ows are 

WARRANTED TO CLEAN 

In any klnl of gnii, or th.- inoiiey will be refu:itle.l. 
It ptuwii at any 

D E r r H 



Ajent, Shakopee, Minn. 



nAtf 





Jin V-fffrtt aro 
Slayicnt. I 

It Is the rxFtlllxo REMEDY In All CKse,^ of XcnraUlii 
K.iel.ilis, olteii enetiliiji a p-rle,:t ctir.- In less than 
iweitv four hours, from llie usu o( iiu iiiiire tliaii two 

OK THRKE I'lLL.S. 

No other form of Xouruljlaor Nervous D;s:.-.is.' has 
faUcil to yiel.l tu thi^ 



wo>:D-.jr.FL-L remi:d:al ai.ext. 



Kven in thf severest mses <ii Chpinic Xenr.-ilaln nn.l I 



,,.,„,.,,,«„.,.., , . , . . cm he sui>pllei witiiont i;uini; to St. I'.inl, iin.l at re 

lliei.',of>c- '^.jr .'^ec.ti.t. hecompo-sedot Lots lan.i ..„.,„„^l,,enile*. nJoJaio 

.1, in s- olion 3.>, and lot 4. ami sw of sw oT «citluii ;!<".. .^ 

Town ll.i, KanKC 22, and thealore^i.] leetlon 1. 1 and 
n 'a of 12, Town 111 Kan«e2?, an. I lots 2 and .1, and 
he ■« of »e U lit •.action .t», and the sw of sw o. sacliun 
jjn, Eai'l'' Creek, 115. Kalige 22. lor Sthool purjioses: E V E II 
whleh was srauted. I 

The folluwing bills were nu<iite.l and alhiwcd : | 

Claries ll.irkens, tor retoidh-K Boio' Si la « • ,,_. , i i • i 

, „ „ ,, . , , - . ' An instnimeiil bv wluiii anv nrr.-Joii tan 

L.. K. Mawkins, schuol e.\aniliu-r. 2 Ua\a, M 03 . i , i -i ' •i-..' i 

r- . „ I. ,,,. , , ,,..„,,. take eorreet l.ikfiies.-ifs or 1 hotooratilis. 

Oeor^e I'arker. carpcnicr woikon Jail Jt Court _,, . . • i ,. ,i - . ■ ' 

Ij„„ji. o ; jj,, Hits instrument with lull in,-<tructions ser.t 

Board .-i.ljjuriicl to WediKs lay niornin-, at y o'clock, ^^y '"■''' '"^^ ""t: dollar. Address, 



Great Discovery! 

: V M A N II I S O W X ARTIST 

A SCIK.NTUTC V.ONDER. 



I Cnnclmlfil nrri i-ri-l, ] 

.\boit AnvERTi.stNi;.— When there is a ' 
severe depression in bti<iiies.-<, how are 
business men to keep ailoat? rritdenee , 
and economy, of course, are the l\\o great 
lessons to bj learned f but there is one ' 
part of th^se lessori.s witieh in dull titnes is 
iespeciaHy apt to bo forgotten. !>.• sure of 
oiii; thing ; whatever you have lo sell, there ! 
are m^ny people ready to buy even in the 
most dcpi-LSiied .seasons. Find them out, i 
show them your wares j persuade iheni lo ' 
buy of you rather thati of .another. When 
buyers are relnetant si-llers must be active. 
It is neither cheap nor sensible to sit be- 
hind the counter and wait fur the bustle of I 
trade to revivo. When i.usine.s.s is dull', • 
that is the rerv time to adverti-ie. In the 
first place, that is when you mj-i need to 

Ti.i. f . <i M .. o 1. I u 1 '^dvtriise; and in the seeoml, t)iat is when 

ll'K t^ity Cuuttcil Mt St. I'aul has passed , p,.^j,,, j,,.^.^ ^^^^^ ,;,,,,^ ^^ ;^^,ij,,_, ^^^^^,^ , 

{tn or-tbnaia-e giving to the \ alloy Railroad j papers, and when your advertlseioenl oon- i 
*he right ot w.iy over a certain portion of ' sequentJy i.s nio.st generallv seen 




C. n. AMKS A CO.. • 
l-^l DioaJway, New York. 

FAIRBANKS' 

sr \.NiI M.ll 



S C ^ T^ E S 



OF \l.t. Kl n:>s. 
('AIRDAXh". UK'X.r.XtRAF Jl-GO, 

■.'2'i .«; j:.' .. tlie St., Cli|i'.;|;i.J, 
nil] 20'.i .Market .>■!. St St.l.on 

JU eitrfful lu li:ij 'unTyX!t« acui^H', ' 



n & 

LAKE SHORE R. R. UNE. 

TOLEDO & CLEVELAND. 

The only direct route to 

iliilll 

and all principal points iu i 

1*^ <-ii I n I IIT- :*'■ ^ r-i f:*i i .i^«-"* oiifii'tiii^.^i-iiiiii-^iiiiiiiiii.— TT I 1 *.T X^ 1 1 * 

{;ri:^;;i,er:n^'ti;):;;;;;;:::^s;^o;i:v/s';:^:^^ \ork aud New Eiidantl. I 

or II l."v weeks .it llie ntni.st, alw.iv< iitl >rds the iii.ist . O 

astoiilshhii r -lii-f. .-iiid v.t\- rarely tails to protiui-'n 

(o-niilete a!i>l 11. rm inent lUre. I J'ST -Ml the i>rinripal Railwiys of the Xorth west and ! 

II I'lntal'is no .Irii-'s or otli-r in iterials l-< »li" stl};ht , Sousi.wesi ronnrcl at tV»iV-iy:/o M ith the Four Dallv 1 
est le.T.-.- inlnrlnns, even t.i the uioit del. latc system, I JCxpress Trains of the MIC111U.4N SOLrUKltS' 
an lean »LW\vs he used with | iiA il.KOAH. Xhe n. ost 

ever put upon a Railway In this country, are in use 
upon tills line, one u: w-lilch will leave Chic^^ju on D ir 
I h.\|>ress at 7.'m a. m., ru mill;,' liirou;;li to Clevelanil • 
wiihoui il.uiiKe. The Urawliii; Room Co.iciies, Sle -p- I 
iiiK Coache.s, and Uay Coaches of tills line, are unsur- 
pas.sed hy llio.~e ot any Railway line in this cuntrv.— ! 
Ihc smooth and perf-ct irarW jcives the advantage of ' 
<)Uick time an. I tniv oiiinf^iniit. I'ass 'I'^iers tor Oelrinl, i 
and all i»oiiits In Cli«u'/rt, and those lor (JItin, I'cnmi/lva- I 
wiVi, .\ti€) lurk- and .\no J-.Ht/lanJ, fli .uld purchase < 

„., ... . ,, , . . „ , „, , tickets VI.-1 Mii.-iinjAy soi/ni.-Hy hailwav.' 

t«hosi%« It t!,..Ir u-Mnn»«l.<i an-l un.iualilie 1 appro-. * huh are ..n sale ai all principal Itaiiway Tick, t Otlhei 
Sent hy mail on receipt of price, an. t pont.ise. 
One packajre. $1 ni, Postace fi cents. 

Sx packa^i ". •"•.'i", " 27 " 



And it i.s furtlier ordered, that 
notice of the hearing ofthe .said pe- 
tition be givcn by publishing a copy 
of this order in the Shakopee Argus, 
a weekly iicw.spapcr printeil and pub 
li.shed at Shakopee, in said eountv, 
for three successive weeks immediate- 
ly prececding the .said heariiKj. 

Hated March Kith, 1H68. 
L. R. HAWKf.N.S, 

Judge of Probate. 



rERFF.Cr SAFKTY, 

It liai Ions I'ocn in constant use t.y many of our 
.MOST EMINENT rUV.sIciAN.-*, 



mikI at the C'lnipuny's Oltlces, 

i Ko. 5C ClnrU Street, Cbtcago. 

I , F. K. MOR.sk, 

Geii'l I'.isj. A;;l., Chicago. 
Trt-elveDack «on. P."". " 4.S •• | GEO. M. GRAY, ii'.Mv 

It U»old by all «hol sat-and ret. II ,le:ilers U .Irns* i O^'"'' ^ ^^^t^u f;is.s. A>=t. M. S. * L. g. I.Inc, Chlcieo 
ami medicines thr.)':i;hoiit tin- I'lilte 1 States, and by 



Dll. CllAS. LOUD, 

Ipljijsiciau aiiir Suvgcon, 

SUAKOiMCH, MINN. 



All profcislonalciil* promptly atleiilct to. 
Jr^ omce at II »W.S Orij! Store. . n^ ; : 



Ty!^V&Fl & CO., Sole Proprietors, 

12" Tkcjioxt »7„ Bi>STox. Maw. 



tho Uvee .ind' through and across certain ♦^•^"»'"^ invested in the cobim is of a g .o i 



«.rc-c-,.. ... that ci.v (or th. li-.tck of their ' '"""^^'^^'i'^ -heh « ,rvbo.|y re..ds. will dr, ' 

_ ■ , iiiMi, , L> ;, >!iij(>i.sli busineii ':. i. 



LF.WISIX DENT. 

A Tw Attorney and Coiin.scllor at I^aw, "-— 

0:Hee at ihe Court Hou-se, Shakopee. \A/ 



Tho Minnesota House, 

At Shakopee. will be SOI.U CHEAP, 

or Tit .VI MOD KOI I A FAK.M. It is a 

large hotel, newly finished, in a gooil lo- any address free 
i Ration, has a gocd Stone JJarn, large yard, 
14 jl'ond WU oi- H.4t,ei'.... und a Kne rtin of 

otjstoio, |i|quf|-o at tfii.-. (iHice or of the 

UWI.CV, JA.MKd JvKARNKY. 



P. Geyermann, 

DEAL K R I N 

DRY GOODS, 

GROCERIES, 

Boots £ Shoes, 

Hats & Oaps. 

Dress Goods, 

ONEBOLL ATI SALE . YANKfclc NOTIO.NS 

of DRV AND FANC\ COOD.S, a W ateh, | 

Qaeensware, 

Cvaoheryty 



ff^e are Coming! 

And will jireseiit to any person sending us 
a club in our (Ireat 



Piece of Sheetitig.Silk Dre.-^s Pattern, ic, kc 

FKEE OF COST. I 

Ca.talogue of (ioodcj and Sample sout to ! 



ALLEN, HAWES & CO.v 
15 Federal street, Boston,, 
]^. 0. Box C. Mass, i 



\\ il'.itt.n I proinpi Iv an 1 1 iithlnlU 



•1 l-esj 



ANIEDt — TE^rriRR.^i, F!Tcf>E\T.s 

.11 I iTh r Ini 'llljent Me-i ao 1 M'onien, In a 
i..isiiie,, pa- III.; iitkl i-i S.>t»| ||..| .i|,.iiiii. .,,-. 
.r.liii:^ to aiiiUiv. F.i p.iiji^n' ir~, .i hii.- ^s 



Wholesal" Dealers in French, Oerman, 1 
and IOn;;Iish I*ty ano Fanjv (Jo'kIs, Cut-! 
lorv, IMaled Wan-. Album'-, Leather I »ood.s, 

I ( 



etc. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



^- «-: ^--^ 


«« ^ 


eto. 


oto 


1 \ 


- 



NOriCK OF AlORTtiAtJK SALE. 

Names ok MonrcArjons — Charles Harlmnnn 
and Ann Hartmann, his wife, of Scott 
County, Minnesota. 

Xame of Mort(;a(;ke — Calhaiina Fchraulz, 
of Scott County, .M innesof.i. 

Date of Mokt»;a6E — Cctober I'jth, A. D. 
ISO'.j. 

Sato WoKT«.\nK was recorded in Use oflice 
ofthe Ke;;ifi'terof Derds of Scott I'onn- 
Iv, at fonr oVlock in the afternotm of 
the laih day of October, A. D. I^CS, 
ill Rook 'E' of Mortgages, on pnpe 363. 

The Desckiption o( the n ortf:af;ed premi.'-fii 
is Lot Three in Jilock 'lliifc, in the 
plat of Shakopee City, on file in tho 
olTicc of the Regi.stcf of Deeds of tho 
County of .Scott, State of MiniiesotB, 
.•-situate lying antj being ia the £aid 
County of .Scott. 

Said MoitTUAOE was made to .secure tho 

faymciit of the sum of Five Hundreii 
)olIars, with interest at the rate of 
twelve ))0r cent, per annum, pnyalde in 
one year from date, according to tho 
promissory note of th<^ said ("harlea 
ILirtmatin, payable lo the said Catha- 
rina Sehrantz, and bearing even dalo 
with said mortgage. 

Xo Action or proceedings have been instl- 
tuttU siX law or otherwise to recover 
t e sum secareti by said mortgage or 
any part thereof, 

TiiK A.M01-.NT cluimeif to be due on Knid 
niortgngc at the date of this nolice iH 
the sum of Five Hundred apd Tweiity- 
two Dollars and Fifty Cents, together 
wiih the sum of ten dollars nolicitor'^j 
fee secured to be paid by said mortgage. 

Now Therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained 
in said inort«:age and recorded therewith 
aiid of the provisions of tlic .Statute in 
such case made and provided, the saiil 
mortgage will be foreclcN8d> by a sale of 
said mortgagetl premises tol»c made by 
the Sheriiir of sai^l. County of Scott, at 
public vendue at the front door of tho 
('ourt House in .Shakopee in said Coun- 
ty of Scott, Stale of Mifinesotn, at ten 
o'elock in the lorcnooi* of the 2.'>tii day 
OF Araii,, in the year LS(J.^, and the 
proceeds of sub .sale will be applied to 
the paymoiit of IJiic sum then, due on 
said note and mortgage, and tlie costg 
and yharges of foreclosure and said sum 
of ten dollars solicitor's fees provided 
by said moitgage to be paid out of tho 
proceeds of such sale. 

Dateii .March 5th, 1863. 

CAT 1 1 ARl \ A SCltR AXTZ, 

He.vry Hi.mi.s, Alortgiigee. 

Attorney for Mortgagee, ub-7t 

JACOB THOMxV.S, 
Sheriff of Scott Cownty, Minnesota. 

DEAFNESS, CATARRH, CQXSUMP- 
TIO.V, A.ND CAXCKU eVK>3. 

A Treitise on D..'arues.<. Cttarrli. Consiiuipt^ou fln<f 
CanciT : IhelrcaiHes, means ol speeily rei!»t, nu.l u Iti- 
liiale cure. Uy « I'upU ofthe Academy »l .Mcilh ii.i , 
.'arid. Sent lo any ad.lresh lor inceiils, 

Letter from Kohert .McMurdy, D. IK, I* fc. I».. CTan.l 
Prelate of Gran. I Kncainpnient uf U. s . ajiil K'.llorof 
the ". National Freemason.'' 

.N'EW YoRj, Sept- 17. ISto— Pn. fiiu.\\\f:vi. w»8 In 
charce of Grace Church Hospital. -Alexandria. Vs., 
diirlni; the war. I Ireqiieu'ly, alai.it dully. i«.r 
mot t 'S, viKited the lloi.-illal. niol had every ineiini. i.f 
knnwinx IiIk reputation for E»riciE.\(.i and kkill. It 
vannf tile nioiit credilalde ehantcler, a.nl hU rurce^H 
in the IreaiDient of patient* wa» remarkable.— Kolt 
3l(,'Mt,-Rt>T. . 

6HGAMIC yieR/VTO«^. 

It fll» \t\*nH\- ft\r, \^H.-it ttrvvpli'il'. rnnnref t'ttan n 
tuiitrt IH Uim hnitl, ami eiinH** deaf perxuiiK t» lu »r 
tllKklnc^ly lit clinrch an<l pnl.lic aK>eiiih!le-:, II N In 
i^trtunenl K-|llohrii pro.luee result < aliiiosi iiiirai nl< ii.<i 
an. I Indeed In nioi^l ca-es .1 loni: .staiidinj: .lenln< fs*-.! t 
win re|i.-\e II. a nhorl lime. It nia.i he a-IJiiMed « ith 
the ease ol ;^I>erlacl. .^. 

nn- •TH.I.« i.ll. will h" prole-'.i.iMally if r.l E.-.kl Wakh 
instonl'Iaie, t■niver^lly Hnildiiii:>. N. V., u»\\\ If lu 















' 


f 

I 








'," 




n 



SUMMARY OF^THE WEEK. 

Meneral r^evra. 

Surratt's trial lias bccu postponed to the 
next term, at the request of the prosecu- 
tion, and is likclj' to go over till ilay. . 

The United States Survey ot appointed 
to establish the boundary between Oregon 
and Idaho, has reported the completion of 
the survey. 

The President has, at the request cf Gen- 
eral Sherman, revoked so much of (Tcne- 
ral Order Na 10 as assigned General 
Sherman to Ihc command ol" the new de- 
partment. 

The United States Supreme Court, on 
the 17lh, decided thai it has Jurisdiction in 
the McCardle case, and will hear the ar- 
gument and pass upon the case iu March. 
The Chief Clvrk of the Postofficc De- 
partment has been sent to Brooklyn, N. Y., 
to take charge of the Postcffice there, and 
settle up the offdirs of the office. The 
Postmaster is reported to be a defaulter to 
the amount of $00,000. 

Tho President sent to the Senate on the 
t^lst among others the following nomina- 
tions : Geo. B. McClellan, of Ohio, Envoy 
Extraordinary and Minister Plenipoten- 
tiary to England ; Jas. R. llubbell, of Ohio, 
Ministtr Resitlent to the Republic of 
Equador ; Major General Geo. H. Thomas 
to be Lieutenant General ty brevet and 
General by brevet. 

It was reported in Washington on the 
21st that the Maryland Legislature was in 
a state of considerablo excitement over 
the action of the Senate in refusing to ad- 
mit Philip R. Thomas. The leading mem- 
bers of the Legislature met in secret caucus, 
and, it was understood, resolved to re-elect 
Mr. Thomas, and send him a second time 
to the door of the Senate, to prcfcnt his 
credentials and demand admission. 

Fractional currency printed f)r the 
week ending February lo, $30,500; 
shipped, $186 OCT ; National Bank notes 
issued, $151,810 ; amount in circulation, 
$2&9,G39,22C. The Treasurer holds in 
bonds as security therefor, $341,319,800, 
and for deposits of public m6ney, 
$37,877,950. Fractional currency redeemed 
and destroyed for the week, $59,770. In- 
ternal revenue receipts for the week, 
$1,452,627 ; aggregate for the fiscal year 
to same date, $123,025,284. 

President Johnson, on the 2 1st, sent a mes- 
sage to the Sanate stating that on the 12th 
of August last, under the authority vested 
in him by the Constitution of the United 
States, he suspended E. M. Stanton as 
Secretary of "War, and now by the same 
authority he had removed Mr. Stanton 
and appointed in his plice, ad interim, 
Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas. The 
following is the order for removal as de- 
livered to Mr. Stanton by General Thomas, 
and sent to the Mouse by Mr. Stanton : 

ExECCTrrE Manmon, ' 
WASniMOTON.i''tb SI, lSb8. \ 

SiH ; By virtue of ihe power and author- 
ity vested in me as President, by tho Con- 
stitution and laws of the United Statt-s, 
you are hereby removed from office as 
Secretary of War, and your function.^ as 
such will terminate upon the receipt of 
thii communication. You will transfer to 
Brevet Major General L. Thoma.s, Adju- 
tant General of the army, who has this 
day been authorized to act as Secretary of 
War ad interim, all records, books, papers 
and other public property now in your 
custody and charge. Respectfully yours, 
Andrew JoH^sysr, President. 
To Hon. E. M. Stanton. 

Considirable excitement existed in 
Washingt in over this unexpected move on 
the part of the President, and the Senate, 
in prolonged Executive session, passed a 
resolution, to be communicated to the 
President, declaring that the removal of 
Secretary Stanton and the appointment of 
General Thomas, without the consent of 
the Senate, was a violation of law. Late 
on the night of the 31*t Mr. Stanton still 
had possession of the War office and an- 
nounced his intention to hold on. Late at 
night application was made on nath before 
Chief Justice Carter, of the District Su- 
preme Court, for the arrest of General 
Thomas, for violation of the Civil Tenure 
law, and the Judge, after considering the 
matter, decided to issue the writ, and it 
•was thought General Thomas would be 
arrested on the 22d. It was believed by 
some in Washington that the question" of 
the right of the President to thus remove 
Stanton would be decided by the court's on 
application for a quo wirranVj in the Dis- 
trict Supreme Court to compel Secretary 
Sianlon to yield. 



under Admiral Farragut at the eastern end 
of the Mediterranean." 

Intelligence having been received In 
London that the Mexican Government 
has determined to repudiate all its foreign 
debts, it is reported that Great Britain is 
seriously contemplating the fitting out 
of a naval expedition to take possession 
of the ports of Mexico and hold them 
until the claims of that country shall bo 
settled. 

Tli« IVest. 
The Waldron House, at IIills«.lale, 
Mich., was destroyed by fire on the 18th. 

The Iowa Democratic State Convention 
will assemble at DcsMoines, February 26. 

Two hundred Mormons arrived at Omaha 
on the 20th, direct Trom Europe, en route 
for Utah. 

The Iowa Republican State Convention 
has been called to meet in DesMoiues, on 
Thursday, May 7th. 

The bridge on the Milwaul»e and Prai- 
rie du Chicn Railroad near Wauwatosa 
was burned on the morning of the 21st. 

The Michigan Republican State Con- 
vention to elect delegates to the Chicago 
Conveu'ion is to meet on the ISth of 
Marcb. 

Five counterfeiters were arrested in 
Chicago on the 20lh, and a large quantity of 
spurious currency, together with plates and 
dies, was captured. 

A large warehouse and contents, and 
several adjoining buildings, in Huron, 
Ohio, were destroyed bv fire on the night 
of the 19lh. Loss, $75,000. 

The Supremo Court of Idaho Territory 
has decided that greenbacks are lawful cur- 
rency, and will be received for taxes tnd 
all kmds of indebtedness, public or private. 

Two thousand armed Indians frcm 
Idaho and Montana are reported to be on 
the war-path, en route for tho Sweetwater 
country. Another Indian war is threat- 
ened on the Plains. 

A San Fraccisco dispatch says that the 
Fenian organization on the Pacific coast 
is being placed on a war footing, with the 
probable intention of making a raid into 
the British possessions. 

A Cheyenne dispatch of tho luth says : 
•'It is reported that gold has been dis- 
covered by laborers on the Union Pacific, 
forty miles west. Several fine nuggets are 
said to have been found. The excitement 
runs high." 

The Indiana Republican State Conven- 
tion asbembled at Indianapolis on the 20th. 
Gov. Conrad Baker was nominated for re- 
election ; William CumDack was nomi- 
nated for Lieutenant-Governor; F. A. 
Hoffman, Secretary of State ; and Nathan 
Ksmbal, Treasurer. 

The Wisconsin Democratic State Con- 
vention assembled on the 19th. Two hun- 
dred and forty -two delegates were present. 
Charles Dunn, of .Lafayette, was nomi- 
nated for Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court, and E. H. Ellis, of Green Bay, for 
Associate Justice. Delegates were chosen 
to the National Convention. The Presi- 
dential Electors are George B. Smith, 
G. L. Park, Nicholas D. Pratt, A. G. Cook, 
Moses M. Strong, H. A. Smith, Sam Ryan, 
Thcordoro Rodolf. 



Tlie Kasl. 

The New York Democratic State Con- 
vention will meft on the 11th of March. 

Resolutions withdrawing the consent of 
New Jersey to the fourteenth Constitu- 
tional amendment have passed the Legis- 
liture of that State. 

A locomotive exploded at Lowell, Mas- 
sachusetts, on the 18th, killing the en- 
gineer, George Spaviluing, and severely in 
juring the fireman and two other persons. 

George Thompson, Thomas Thompson 
aiid William Alexander were capsized in 
an open boat, on the 18th, on the Niagara 
river, and drowned. 

Gov. Bullock has vetoed the bill for the 
repeal of the Constabulary law (liquor 
prohibition) recently passed by the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature. 

Three State elections occur in the 
spring. In New Hampshire on the second 
Tuesday of March ; in Connecticut on the 
first Monday of April ; and in Rhode 
Island on the first Wednesday of April. 

A Washington dispatch to the New 
York Tribune of the 19th states that Gen- 
eral Sherman has written a letter to the 
President, respectfully asking to be relieved 
from taking command, at Washington, of 
the new military division. 



l^oreicm IntelllseKce. 

An Irish Reform bill is being prepared 
and will be laid before Parliament on the 
9th of March. 

A. terrible earthquake has visited the 
Formosa islands ; 30,000 lives are said to 
have been lost. 

Mr. Pigot, of the Dublin Iriihman, has 
been convicted of publishing treasonable 
and seditious libels. 

More Fenian arrests were mace at Cork 
on the 20th, including one Ddvid Murphy, 
recently from the United States. 

Train delivered his first lecture in Dub- 
lin on the 20th. A strong police force was 
present to prevent any riotous proceed- 
ings. 

The House of Commons, on the 18th, 
in Committee of the Whole, agreed to 
renew the suspension of the habeas corpus 
in Ireland. 

Leadiag^'iaembers of the Liberal party 
in England propose to give a farewell din- 
ner to the United States Minister, Charles 
F. Adams. 

A London dispatch of the 20th says ad 
vices to the Ist of January are received 
from the English captives in Abyssinia. 
They were all safe and well. 

Tho Coroner's Jury in the Clerken .veil 
explosion case have rendered a verdi.t, 
bringing a charge of murder against sev- 
eral of the persons arrested. 

The jury in the case of Mr. Sullivan, 
editor of the Dublin Hation, tried for the 
publication of seditious libels, brought in 
a verdict of gudly, on the 17th. 

Late Pekin advices state that at the cap- 
ture of the capital in Shantung 89,000 
rebels were killed, and the imperial troops 
were everywhere victorious. Horrible 
barbarities were committed by the Shan- 
tung rebels. 

Allen, the Fenian prisoner, who was dis- 
charged from custody on the 18th, after 
being examined on a charge of causing the 
Clerkenwell explosion, was soon after 
rearrested and imprisoned on the charge 
of murder. 

A Florence dispatch of the 19th says : 
"A report ia ctirrent that the French gov- 
ernment has detailed a frigate to watch the 
movements ot the United States squadron 



The Soulta. 

Sergeant Bates, the pedestrian, was at 
Montgomery, Ala., on the 18th. 

The election for the ratification of tho 
new constitution in Arkansas is ordered 
to commence on the 15th of March, and to 
continue five days. 

A dispatch from Atlanta, Ga., on the 
20th, says there is a great revival of busi- 
ness throughout the South, consequent 
upon the advance in cotton. 

The Kentucky Legislature on the 18th, 
elected Thomas C. McCreery, Democrat, 
from Daviess county, for United States 
Senator, in place of Guthrie, resigned. 

A hundred Indians, armed each with two 
six-shooters and a Spencer rifle, recently 
made a descent on the little town of Gates- 
ville, on the northwestern frontier of Texas, 
killing ten persons and taking off several 
captives. Among the latter was a wo- 
man, who was stripped of her clothing, 
wbipped,and otherwise shockingly abused. 

CoBsressional. 

Senate not in session on the 15th.. . . .In 
tho Bonso feventl petitions were presented and 
referred Tbc Kentucky election case was de- 
cided by the adoption of the reeolations declaring; 
that Smith is not entitled to the scat, and direct- 
ing that the Governor of Kentuclcy be notified of 
tlie yuciutcf. The currefpoodence between Gen- 
erals Grant aod Hancock, relative to the removal 
ofmpnibers of tha New Orleans City Cooncll, 
wdiS referred to tlie Committee on KccouBtraction. 

.\fter a brief courideration. iu Committee of 

the Whole, of the D16lomatic snd Cooealar Ap- 
propriation blD. tho House adjourned. 

Iu the Senate, on the ITih, petitions 
were presented from freedmen that they be tent 

to Liberia A memorial of German citizens was 

preeented for the abolition of the Presidency of 
tbe United States, on the sroand that it is a copy 
of royalty, and dangerous to the United Htates 
....A memorial was presented from the citizens of 
lllinoiit for Hid in the convtrnctlon of deep water 
commanicaiion between Lake Michisan and the 
Ml»!-l6sipDi Kiver — Bills were Introdnced to 
amend the Ueconetrnctlon act providing that 
hereafter, at auy el«-ction authorized by said act, 
a majority of the votes actoally cast shall de- 
t<>rmme the question of adoption or rejection of 
any constitution, and any person duiy registered 
may vote In any part of the btate; to determine 
ttie Juriediciiuu of the United 8tates Bapreme 
Court, providii'jf that political qnesttons shall not 
b« within thejuri!.diction of the Court, and that it 
rests niin Cungiuss to decioe what government Is 
the ei>tablii>hed one iu a State, 2«; ror the sradtfal 
rednciion of the army ; to prevent th« abnae of 

the lr:inkinp priviliKe After the coDSideratiou 

of some uuimporunt basineBs, the SeoAte ad- 
Juurned. 

In tbe Hoosc, on the 17th, a large num- 
bers of bills and Joint resolutions were Introdaced 
and referred, among them a bill to restore the 
State of Alabfiia to repittentaUop la Consress 



The House went into Committee of the Whole 

on the DiplomaUc and Consular and Appropria- 
tion bill, which, alter debate, was reported to iho 
Uonse und passed Adjonrnod. 

In the Senate, on the 18th, several peti- 
tions were presented and referred, including ope 
for the Improvement of New Buffalo, Michigan. 
.... A bill was referred to amend the postal laws. 

The Houfe bills to reduce the expenses of the 

War Department, and for the pradual reduction 
of the military force, etc , were passed .... Tho 
c:iBe of Mr. Thomas, us Senator from Maryland, 
was considered, .>iudthe Senate adjourned without 
takini; the vote. 

In the House, on the 18lh, a bill was 

referred to amend tbc act cslabllshiih; National 
Banks, in reference to voting by prosy A bill 

was introduced and passed appropriating $50,0(X), 
to bo placed In the hands of tho Secretary of Slate. 
to relieve the wants and defray tbe expenses of 
tbe return to tho United States of destuuta citi- 
zens Imprisoned in foreign countries wlthont 

justice, und discharged without trial The bill 

was passed giving pencions lo certain surviving 

officers and toldiers of the war of 1812 Tho 

Bouse took up the Legirlatlvc and lixecutlvc Ap- 
propriation bill, but no itctiou v.as had Ad- 
journed. 

In the Senate, on the lOyj, a joint reso 
lutlon was Introdaced lo restore Alabama to 
representation in Congress A bill was intro- 
duced and referred, to grant aid to the railroad 
from Brownvillo, Nebraska, and to other railroads 
in that State that are to intersect the Union I'actttc 

Kailroad The bill exieuiiiog the time for tliu 

completion of the Dnl>ui|ue& Sioux CItyltailway 

was paxsed The ca6u of Mr. Thomai', Scnrttor 

elect from Maryland, was taken nn. and, after de- 
bate, the resolution to admit Mr. Thomas was re- 
jected— 21 to "iS Adjourned. 

In the Ilou.'se, on tho I'Jth, the bill to 
establish a Law Department was reported back 

and ordered printed The bill providing for tho 

surrender of persons to other government'', con- 
victed of certain crimes, was passed The Legis- 
lative and Executive Approiiriatiou bill wfts then 
taken up. Amendments were disposed of, and 
the bill passed. . A resolution was adopted call- 
ing upon the President lor all correspondence in 
reference to omferring upon Lieutenant General 
Sherman the brevet ruuk of General, and also in 
relation to the oetublifhiuent of a now military 
dlvlson .. Iu Commltee ol the Whole the Army 
Appropriation bill ^approprialtng an aggregate of 
f33,08i,(j'J3) Was discussed — Adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 30th, a communi- 
cation from tho President, concerning counter- 
feiters pardoned, etc, was referred to the Judiciary 

Committee The bill to establish a National 

Scnool of Minos was reported, with amendments. 

Un motion, the House bill to amend tbe act of 

March 23, IStJT, supplementary to the bill for the 
more efficient guvernintjnt of the rebel States, 
passed March 2, 1867, and to facilitute iheir restora- 
tion, was tnken up and an amendment offered 
making necessary a ten dajs' re»idi!ncc in the dis- 
trict betore the election, befiire a person can vole, 
the bill heretofore published allowing registered 
persons to vote anywhere iu the Statu ... .A reso- 
lution was adopted calling on the Secretiry of 
War to commuuicato the result of the recent nur- 

vey of the Ohio river A hill was introduced and 

relerred, providlcpr that offlcers of tho army may 
hereafter be retired on account of wounds received 
in the volunteer service in tho late war. under the 
same conuiiious as if ihey were serving in the 
regular army Adjourned 

In the House, on the 20lh, bills were re- 
ported and ordered printed, concerning tho rights 
of American citizens in foreign Slates ; to lojiu- 

late the disposition of lands that may hereafter 
be given to aid Ui tho c:)n!<tr«crion of railroads ; 
to remove the disabllliiss from (Sovernor Uoldeu 

and others A large numbwr of bills granting 

pensions to individual, were reported from the 

Committee on Invalid Pensions and passed A 

bill was passed extending the provisions of the 
twenty-first section of the act ol July 17, ISfti. re- 
lating to tbe naturalization ot Holaicrs to those 
who enlisted in the naval or myriiia service of-the 
United Statei", and have been or may hereafter be 
honorably dibcbarged. ...In Committto of the 
Whole the House resumed the consideration of the 
Army Appropriation bill, when the Coromltt« rose 
and reported the same to the llousi:, with amend- 
ments ; an amendment for the reduction of the 
army was adopted ; aud, all the amendments hav- 
ing been disposed of, the bill was passed Ad- 
journed. 

In the Senate, on the 21st, a petition 
Tvas presented from colored citizens of Kentucky 
praying that a law be pessed, or the Constitution 
amended, so that no State shall abridge the privi- 
leges of any citizen of the United States Bills 

were introduced and referred, to provide for the 
registration of electors in Territories ; for chang- 
ing Ihe time of holding the District and Circuit 
Courts in Tennessee ; to organize a commission 
to examine the claims on the War Department 
....A resolution was udojited reqiiesilng the 
President to commonlcate copies of auy corre- 
spondence on the E-uljec" of the abduction of Allen 
McDonald, an American citizen In Canada.. ..The 
Reconstruction bill was taken up and briefly con- 
sidered, when the Semite went into Ksccutlve 
Session, and afterwards adjourned. 

In the House, on the 21st, an interna- 
tional copyright bill was reported and ordered 
printed — A bill was passed granting leave for 
application for the extension of the Smith & Wes- 
son patent A letter was received from the 

Postmaster General, denying, and af-king fur an 
Investigation Into, certain charges of corruption 
made against him in hLs coniraols for carryingthe 

Souiborn malls A bill was Introduced to esinb- 

lish a uniform system of buiall rolns.. . . A bill 
was pafsed making llininlhal, (Missouri), and 
Peoria, (Illinois), ports of delivery for two years 
.. ..The House went into Commillee of the Whole 
on the Naval Appropriation bill, which was briefly 
considered and laid over, and tho Committee ro?e 
. . . A communirauoii vvas received from Mr. Stan- 
ton, enclosing tho President's order for his remov- 
al as Secretary of Wur. heferrfd to the Commit- 
tee on Kocon?truciion ond ordered printed .\ 
petition was presented aud referred from the ciii- 
zens of Koss ana Adelpbia (Ohio), praying Con- 
gress to pass a law to authorize the issuing of a 
cufflcicnt amount of legal tender notes to pay the 
United States bonds.. ..A resolution was offered 
and referred, that Andrew Johnson, President of 
the United States, be impeached for high crimes 
and misdcmt:auoi8 Adjourned. 



POLlXli^AL. ITE3IS. 



A Radical paper in Iowa puts up a 

candidate, " Subject lo the derision of the 
Republican National Convention." 

Tho Montgomery (Ala.) Adtcrtiger 

says the ru.'th at the polls in that city, dur- 
ing the late election, was 6o great that 
two negroes were actually fqueczed to 
death. 

Hood, a colored Conventionist, and 

likewise a Presbyterian preacher in North 
Carolina, distinguished himself in Con- 
vention by moving that a recess be taken 
till the circus had passed the cupitol. The 
circus passed, and Hood cheerfully re- 
sumed the manufacture of constitutions. 

The town elections thus far in New 

York have shown Democratic gains over 
the 50,000 majority ia 1807. The counties 
that have thus far put in a Democratic ap- 
pearance, may be enumerated as follows ; 
Broome, Herkimer, Fulton, Otsego, Mont- 
gomery, St. Lawrence, Steuben, «fec. 

The IforicicJi (Conn.) Advertiser 

speaks hopefully of the success if the Dem- 
ocratic party next April. In its section it 
Bays " the Democratic cause is growing 
brighter every day. Not a day passes that 
we do not hear of or .converse with men 
who have heretofore opposed u:, who are 
now earnest and outspoken in their deter- 
mination to vole for English." 

The Elyto:i (Ala.) Jlcrald says that 

Dr. Thomas Hughes, while going to the 
Radical meeting at Moulton, intimidated a 
respectable widow, at whose house ho 
stopped, into admitting two negroes trav- 
eling with him to her table and beds, say- 
ing that under the new Constitution she 
was subject to a line of $50 for refusing. 
Such are the practical results of Radical 
doctrines. 

Thad. Stevens has always enjoyed a 

prophetic reputation with the Radical 
llepublican party. He now prophesies 
that the Radical Republican party is 
dead ; and that New York, Pennsylvania, 
Uhio, aud several other Northern 
States will go against it at the next elec- 
tion. According, then, to accepted Rad- 
ical belief, the llepublican parly of 
this country has about given up the ghost. 

On the 14th inst. the charter election 

took place in Reading, Pa. Tho Demo- 
cratic candidate f)r City Auditor was 
chosen by 330 majority, a Democratic gain 
of 855 on the veto of last year. Although 
Berks county, of which Reading is tho 
county seat, is the strongest Democratic 
county in the State, the Philadelphia Age 
says such a cl^angc cannot bo misunder-* 



stood. It is not due to local causes. They 
are not powerful enough to produce it. 
Tho reason for the alteration must be 
looked for in the action of Congress, by 
which one half of the Union ia given into 
the hand.s of negroes, and the white men 
of the other half taxed to pay for this es- 
perimcD.t. 

■ The Bound TaUc ifl a weekly jour- 
nal, published in New York city, whose 
cxprcsfcions of opinion are often charac- 
terized by sound judgment. The remarks 
of thia journal concerning the po.:ilion 
taken by Giant in the War Department 
imbroglio con in in a FUfgestion well wor- 
thy of gcnernl cansidcmliou. It is as fol- 
lows: 

" Wc believed him (Grant) strong 
enough to bre.nk through all the snares 
which wily jnUiicians might set. They 
have ttippt d uiia at last. If he does not 
hold himself bound to surrender back to 
the President powers which ho derived 
solely from the" President, he may not be 
ready, at the proper time, to surrender to 
the people powers which they may intrust 
to him. Instead of being a safe man, he 
may be the most dangerous man in the 
country to wh<^.ui the people could confide 
their interests." 

-The SpriitgOeld (Mass.) RtpuUican 



(Rep.) says that, "if the Alabama Consti 
tulion is deftattd, as sctms likely, there is 
no cauie for regret." It gives the f allow- 
ing reasons. 

" The purpos'j of tuc cltctiou Las devel- 
oped more plainly and forcibly than any- 
thing has or could the reasons why the 
Constitution ought not to succeed, and 
why the prefent c:out.^e of reconstruction 
ought to stop. Because it is proven not 
to be reconstruction in any true, adequate 
and lasting sense, and until that is loimd 
and accepted far better military rule and 
'unlimited Gen. Grant.' Alabama and 
the re?t of the seceded States should be 
given Coustitulior.s free from the disfran- 
chising and unju.stly discriminating arti- 
cles of that iio'.v pending, «nd which shall 
aflbid a broad, liberal and permanent basis 
for the Goveniiueut, one which will give 
the right of buflrage to whiles and blacks 
alike, and all mvn on the eamc terms." 

"Senator Drake," says the N. T. 

Tiines, " did his part in the Senate on 
Wednesday toward viadlcatiug the rights 
of colored ladies to seats in railroad ciirs 
reserved lor white people. But he put his 
championship of the lady concerned on 
rather a dillcrent bisis from that taken by 
hid CO crusaders. They insisted on redrccs 
for the wronij li:rause the Euflerer was a 
CDlored person. Mr. Drake declared the 
ciee was one of great hardship because 
th^; lady was of a very superior char:icter, 
• and had no moic tho appearance of a 
negro than many who move in the best 
society iu Wn-liington.' The Senator 
weakened his cisc very much by that ad- 
mission. If the lady is so nearly white, 
what business has she to monopolize the 
attention of tbc Senate for a whole day ? 
We shall have persons who are wholly 
white dcmandinsj redicst presently, if Mr. 
Drake's argument is pas.sed over without 
rebuke." 

The black ILidicals of the black and 



tan Constitutional Conventions are very 
thin 'fcklnncd. In tbe North Carolina 
Convention thiy proposed to exclude all 
reporters for the press who made any dis- 
tinction between mcmbeis by calling them 
negnes and otbcis white. In the South 
Carolina Convention thty excluded frcm 
the floor of the Convention and ihe re- 
porttiirs' desk the reporter of the Mercury 
because he gave sketches of all the mem- 
bers, including the black majority. In 
Richmond an attempt was made to regu- 
late the press by censuring the designation 
of the Macks by tbe uanie ol negroc.s. A 
reporter in the Mississippi Convention 
committed the giave ollence of omitting 
the title of " Mister "' in giving the names 
of nepro delcgAtes. A motion was made 
by the darki'.a to expel any " reporter 
who makes f. distinction iu members of 
the Convention." This motion failed to 
pass by only thr< e votes. 

Another is added to the long list of 

atrocities committed by the negroea at tiie 
South. A constable of Charleston, S. C, 
Mr. Fraser Mnithowp, while attempting to 
execute a warrant agiiust a colored thief 
on a plantation near Beaufort, was met by 
all the negroe.^ on tho place, armed, and un- 
der the leadership of one of their number, 
who were determined to resist his author- 
ity. The most brutal language was used, 
tho lawless mob threatened to " shoot tho 
constable down like a dog" it he persisted 
in the discharge of big duty. The negroes 
seized Mr. Matthews, wrenched tbe gun 
from hi.s hands aud pinioned his arms. 
When thus mridc powerless, the cowardly 
wretches delibeiatcly shot him down, the 
ball enttiing his head just below the ear, 
and he almost instantly expired. The ne- 
gro who tlryd the fatal shen boasted pub- 
licly of the act, and said it was of "no 
more conse-quenca ihan the s-hooting of a 
dog." It ia to such savages as these that 
Congress proposes to entrnsl the govern- 
ing power of the South. 

Tho New York Times (Radical) 

says: 

"It is quite natural that Democratic 
journals sliouMlook to tho ascendancy of 
tho Democratic party aa a euro for all thu 
evils not only ot liidicalism but of every- 
thing else. We, who do not belong to the 
Democratic party, can take no sucii cheer- 
ful view of the caje. We admit that the 
success of that purty at the coming Presi- 
dential election would correct some of the 
evils with which the country is threatened 
by Radical supremacy. It would restore 
to tho Government the checks and bal- 
ances of tho Constitution. It would pre- 
vent the practical deposition of the Ex- 
ecutive, thy overthrow of the authority of 
tho Supreme Court, and the absorption of 
all the powers id tlit; G')vernmcnl by Con- 
gress, without any of the checlis aud re- 
straints upon popular passion which the 
Constitution intended to provide." 

If the succe53 of tho Democratic party 
would do for our distrac'.ea country only 
what the Tmes is willing to concede, this 
is reason enough, and more than enough, 
why every goeid citizen thould vole the 
Democrafic ticket. We want the Consti- 
tution pure and simple, ia all i'.s integrity 
—and the defeat of Radicalism alone can 
restore it to us. 



TuE suicide of Rev. Mr. Brash, at Del- 
aware, Ohio, wa^ committed on a Sunday 
morning, while his congregation were qui- 
etly-awaiting his appearance t«3 condiict 
the opening eieicises of the regular 
ciuarterly meeting. The members having 
waited some time Ml'lcr tbc usual hour of 
commencing se-rvi*:;;, dispitched one ol 
their number to a,c»jrtaiu the. cause of his 
delay, and he WiW found hanging dead in 
hia barn. Another clergyman, ilie Rev. 
Mr. Ryan, at Maiysville, in the county 
aiJjoiuing Delaware, al*) committed sui- 
cide thu same Sunday afternoon, by 
cutting his throat. Insanity is alleged in 
both cases, and in the last named it had 
been for some time apparent. 



CUPPINGS AND DRIPPINGS. 

91l8ceilaneoHi« l(«iaiM- 

—Cheyenne calls itself the " Magic 
City." 

— A blind man near Boston hss thirteen 
blind children. 

—Five bottles of Godfrey's Cordial in 
eight weeks killed a child in Ohio. 

—Central Park, New York city, has al- 
ready cost over ten million ilollars. 

— There is considerable destitution in 
Pittsburgh among the unemployed. 

—One Myers ha; sued the Cincinnati 
t'ommereial for calling him a gas pipe. 

— A total of 1,030 families are furnished 
by the Cleveland Poor Relief Committee. 

— There were recently foity puticnts at 
the Binghampton (N. Y ) Inebriate Asy- 
lum. 

—A divorce was graute<l at Terre Haute 
in less than a minute iiom its commence- 
ment. 

— A seven months old baby fell out of 
bed in New York, and was in;itantly 
kiUed. 

— Aliaska is the uauie leccntly given to 
A ship-of-war building at the Charleston 
Navy Yard. 

— When the Paciflc R.ailroad is complet- 
ed, a traveler may go round the world in 
three.month?. 

— A " fast man about town," in BuHalo, 
aged thirteen, has been arrcsteel far getting 
drunk and whipping his wife. 

— A brook trout, nearly IR inches in 
length, and weighing 7}^ pounds, is said to 
have been caught near Middletown, Ct. 

— The proprietor of a skating rink in 
Cambridge, Mas.'., was finet! $20 and costs 
for refusing to admit two colored men to 
the rink. 

— There is said to be a man in New 
York city who has expended ifSO.OOO on 
tickets of Havana lotteries without receiv- 
ing a cent of return. 

— Tbe revenue cutter Nemaha was 
lately destroyed by lire while otl Wicomico 
river, in Chesapeake Bay._^ Two of the 
crew were drowned. 

—A New York paper says : " At a ball 
up town, a few eveuing.s ago, some of the 
hid its had three servants to hold up the 
train of their dressep." 

— The mother of a family in New York 
city, unable to pay her rent, had her hair 
cut ofi, and sold it to produce the means 
of satisfyiug the debt. 

— Young Steele, the oil millionaire, 
wh ose income three years ago was $2,000 
a day, is now said to be a teamster at the 
oil works he once owned. 

— There is a young woman iu Balavia, 
N. Y., who can play two airs on the piano 
with her right hand, one with her left, and 
sing a fourth, all at the same time 

— A New York letter writer says there 
are fully ten thousand young men in that 
city between the ages of 25 and 35, who 
remain bachelors because they can'i alloul 
to marry. 

— A newly wedded pair arrived on Uie 
Lafayette tiain at Indianapolis the other 
night, of which the husband had, as judge, 
sentenced a former husband of his wife to 
the penitentiary. 

—In Tuscarawa.s county, Ohio, a few 
days ago, Solomon Buirier, a boy of sev- 
enteen, fchol his head to pieces with a mus- 
ket, because his father and mother had re- 
proached him lor not assisting in the farm 
work. 

— A gluttonous Rhode Islander, named 
Ilodijali Biake, recently devoured a tur- 
key weighing nearly eight pound.";!, at one 
sitting. It only took hali' an hour to 
complete the job, aud his price v,as fifty 
dollars. 

— The project of tunneling the Niagara 
river has been revived, and according to 
tho Buffalo Courier is likely to be carried 
into practical cflect, thereby forming a 
direct and uninterrupted railroad con- 
nection betwc!-n that city and Chieuigo, via 
Canada. 

— A man was found lying in the gutter 
in Courtlandt street. New York, at two 
o'clock in the morning, in a state of intox- 
ication. He had on his person at the time 
$32,445. Luckily, an honest police ofUcer 
came along aud took care of both him and 
the money. 

— In New York, Recorder Uackett has 
imposed $250 fine ujion the conductor, and 
a like fine upon ihe driver of a city rail- 
way car which was shown tf> contain more 
than 02 passcngeis. The suit was brougnt 
by the bociety lur the Prevention of Cru- 
elty to Animals. 

— A prominent merchant of Boston was 
recently found nailed by the right enr to 
the doorpost of Dr. Gauneit's £chooI for 
young ladies in I'embcrlon Square. How, 
or by whom u was de)ne was a mystery, 
and the victim would make no explanation 
iu regard to it. 

— A matrimonial mixture has come be- 
f(»r tho Vermont courts for adjudication. 
One Leach cxrhangcd hi.s wife to a fellow 
named Gale for the latter's sister. The 
matter was very amicable and pleasant so 
long as they kept it to themselves, but the 
law has made trouble. 

— Archer Gates, eighty years old, walked 
into Greenville, Mass., on a recent Thurs- 
day, for tbe tlrsl time in forty years, from 
Hahfax, Vt , some twenty miles. He was 
astonished at the changes, and trudged 
back on Friday with his stomach fortified 
with two cents' worth of crackers. 

— A clergyman in an Eastern city re- 
cently took occasion to denounce one of 
tJie places of amusement in Bosttm. 
Whereupon the manaper gave him a com- 
jdimenthty eease^n ticket, with a letter of 
thanks, in which he stated that it was tho 
cheapest and best advertisement he had 
ever had. 

— Vf. B Johnson, a Hartford (Conn.) 
engraver, has engraved the Lord's Prayer 
on one side of an oid-ldshioned silver three 
cent piece, and inside of the iuscription, 
" United States ot America," aronnd the 
margin. Notwithstanding the minuteness 
of the letters, each one is perfect, and not 
a letter is omitted. 

—As a clerk in a Syracusednie store re- 
cently entered the hquor cellar lor the pur- 
pose of drawing some liquor, he discovered 
a large rat standing on his hind legs drink- 
ing whisky as it dropped from a faucet, 
that had not been properly closed. As he 
neared the rat, he made a very awkward 
eH'ort to escape, but he reeled aud stag- 
gered like a drunken man. The clerk, 
pleased with the comical predicament of 
the unfortunate "animal," allowed him, 
after several zigzag movement.?, to enter 
his hole 

—At a donation party at the hou§e of 
Rev. A. P. Field, in Russellville, Boone 
caunty,Ill., while a party of lifty or sixty 
were gathered in a single room listening to 
•music, the floor gave away, precipitating 
the whole crowd into the .cellar below and 
emptying out the burning contents of a 
largo- sized stove. Every mode of egress 
from this unpleasant predicament was 
shut ofl", and to add to the horror, a blaze 
soon became visible, caused by the fire in 
the stove. Luckily, that portion of the 
party which escaped, obtained water and 
quenched the fire, so that the others were 
released without any serious injury. 



t^orelien diOMMlp. 

—The Davenport brothers were lately in 
Maricilics, France. 

—The births in England are now 1,000 
per day ahead of tho deaths. 

— The area of London is more than four 
times tVat of Philadelphia, which is 1(5,800 
acres. 

— A German has established the first 
button factory in Canada, at Berlin, On- 
tario. 

—Two Chinaman at Canton recently 



committc-d stucidc to save Ibcmselvcs the 
expense of a lawsuit. 

— A woman in Australia crushed her 
child to death in her arm<? in her excite- 
ment to see the Duke of Edinburgh. 

—Tho number belonging to the medi- 
cal, clerical, aud legal professions, in 
England, is about the same— 35,000— in 
each. 

— The new red shirts of the Garibal- 
dians will henceforth contain a white "V" 
on the breast. The " Y " means " ven- 
geance." 

— A Lancaster wfjman recently starved 
to death because she was a relation to a 
member of Parliament and wouldn't go to 
the poor-house. 

— At a public-house in Dovwnshiro the 
landlord has it painted up outside his 
door : " Good beer sold here, but don't lake 
my word for It." 

— One of the arches of the underground 
railway of London forms the floor of a 
kitchen above. It was constructed without 
cracking the walls of the house. 

— A stock company iias been formed at 
f aris for the purpose of securing the gold 
and other precious metals burie<l with the 
corpses at the Parisian cemeterie?, which 
are about to be abandoned. 

— There is one poor old shoemaker in 
London who has lived 72 years in the tame 
Utic, and works away daily, only gaining 
nnough to eat, and rarely having clothes 
or fire suflicient for comfort. 

—A vivandiero who accompanied the 
annics of Napoleon I, has died in the 
aaylum cf La Salpetrierc, at the age of 104 
years. She went through the Russian 
campaign and was at Waterl(A). She re- 
tained her faculties to the last. 

— A new sect, terming themselves " Non- 
fighting Men," have appeared among the 
sailors of the British navy. Some of the 
ton years' men of this sect, on claiming 
their dibcharge, were asked why they 
wished to leave the service, aud replied, 
" For the love of the Lord aud liberty." 
There are numbers of non-fighting men 
in the Mediterranean fl^^et at the present 
time. 

—Paris has a population of about 2,150,- 
000 inhabitants. But, wonderful to say, 
less than 734,000 cf these are Parisians. 
There are 34,000 Germans, nearly as many 
Belgians, a third as many Swiss, 0,000 
English, half as many thousand Americans, 
and Italians, Dutch, Poles, and Russians 
enough to make the sum total of over two 
millions of resident inhabitants in that 
modern Babel. 

— The leaning tower of Pisa is said to 
be in a very ruinoui condition and likely 
to fall down. It is not gejierally known 
that there are many other leaning towers. 
In Luebcck, one of tho four free cities of 
Germany, there is not one tower v.hich is 
not more or less inclined from the perpen- 
dicular, and nearly every church In the 
town has two of these crooked fingers 
pointing to the sky. 

— A frightful accident happened at 
Nantes, France, recently. A countryman 
made a bet that he would cross the frozen 
Seine there, driving a cart load of hay. 
Twenty-eight people followed the cart to 
pee the result of the wager. In the mid- 
dle of the river the ice broke aud the 
whole party fell into the water ; nine only 
were rescued. Tlie bodies of the others 
have since been found. 

— Forty years ago a poor man in Paris 
was starving with his family, when one of 
the children broui^ht in an armful of car- 
penter's shavings to buru. An idea seized 
him, and he went to work to mak^ these 
shavings into neat packages, which ho 
sold for kindling wood. 'The cry of 
'^ Copeaux — copeaux a reiulre!" was 
soon familiar to the Parisian world, aud 
the inventor of this branch of industry 
became known to it. He is still going 
about, an extrtm^ly old person, crying 
" iShatings ! " 

— A professor of medicine at the Vienna 
University has succeeded in saving the 
lives of many cholera patients, who had 
already been given up by the other phyei- 
ciau.", by the bo called transfusion process. 
Tho blood of the healthy young men or 
women is infused into the veins of the pa- 
tients to tho extent of about 20 ounces. 
Ill many instances the success was almost 
immediate. The face of tho patient as- 
sumed a more natural appearance during 
the (■peration, the pulse grew more normal, 
and the patient vras entirely well, though 
feeble yet, in the course of a few hours. 

—A paper recently real before the 
Statistical Society of London computes 
that the income of ail cU'.sses ot popula- 
tion ol England, Ireland and Scotland is 
£82 1,37^,000 per annum. The sum appears 
so enormous that wo may well look into 
its distribution It is estimated that the 
upper and middle classes, v.'ho have regu- 
ular incomes from soiue source or other 
varying ia amount from £100 to as many 
thousands, receive £496,000,000 of the 
whole, aud the mutual labor class £324,- 
000,000. The number of people iu the 
former class actually in receipt of incomes 
aud not dependent for their living upon 
others is 2,75y,00(), and in the latter W),- 
9G2.000. 

— A rival for Margueritte Obenreiscr, 
the heroine of "No Thoroughfare,'' in her 
daiing enterprise of descending iu the re- 
cess of Alpine snows, has been fi>und iu a 
Miss Mary Walker, a young English lady. 
Miss Wilker has scaled even the most in- 
accessible peaks of Berne, but her audac- 
ity in overcoming the diflicullies cf ex- 
ploration amounts to fooihardincsg. At 
the summit of a very dangerous glacier, 
leaving the guides, she proceeded to the 
very extremity of a narrow projection of 
ice, resembling a bird's beak; the path 
was incrnsted with snow, and hardly wiiier 
than a steep house top, and here to gratify 
her penscless ambition, she stood with 
thousands of li^et of empty space beneath 
her, while her attendants trembled v.ith 
fright. The accounts of the lady's person- 
al appearance vary ; while one admirer 
pays she is delicate looking aud of slight 
frame, a more impartial observer describes 
her H8 stout, and as displaying the mus- 
cular development of a man. 

Indnatrial. 

— California is trying to raise pine ap- 
ples. 

—There were, a few days ago, 3,S95,0S0 
bushels of grain and 82,805 barrels of flour 
stored in the elevators aud warehouses of 
Chicago. 

— Grasohoppers' eggs are so plenty iu 
some parts of Arkaubas that it is feared 
the State will be plagued, literally, in the 
Egyptian style in the spring. 

— The number of miles of railroad con- 
fetruc-ted in Minnesota in 18G7 were 116; 
previously in operation, 315; total miles 
now built and in operation, 431. 

—A new single branch of business at 
Chariton, Mass, is the manufacture of 
heels for shoes. New machines turn 
them out by hundreds in quick time. 

— The New York Typographical Union 
has increased the sum to be paid upon the 
decease of any member from $50 to $100. 
The Sjciety now numbers 1,200 members. 

— The gum business is a flout ishing one 
in Maine, and is estimated at $dO,0()0 a 
year for the raw material. "OumiBen" 
often clear from $5 to $7 a day gathering 
spruce gum. The best is worth 50 ccKta 
per pound. 

— The Dover (Maine) Observer say a that 
Mrs. Barrows, wife of Jabez BarrowB, ol 
Foxcroft, aged 78 years, the past season 
has woven "l 88 yards of cloth, spun 250 
skeins of yarn, knit 12 pairs ot mittens 
aud 13 pairs of stockings, beside doing 
her house-work. 

— An invention of an American named 
John B. Wickersham is finding great favor 
in Paris. It is a passenger railwav system 
in which the cars can ran on flat rails 
without flanged wheels, while a fifth whsel, 



nnmiDg In a confer raft wlt^ a pr^.oy?'^ 
kept them on ihf traek, and ihat by .^ 
raising this -wnecl they could be venJ ; I 
easily run otl the track to go around ob- 
structions. 

—The coal fctatifitioa for tlic United 
States show that in 1867 the whole sunnlv 
of anthracite was 12,('50,671 loap, b^» 
an increase of 271,081 tons over the pre- 
vious year. Of bituminous and terai-bi- 
tuminous the supply in 1867 was 14,906,- 

300 tons, showing a decrease «»f8!^6W, mi 

der the product of 1866. Qf both kinds 
there were sent to raarltol 14,000,309 tons, 
about one-third not reaching the seaboard. 
The total amount of coal mined In 1867 
was 25,800,000 tons. 

— A rapid penman can wntu thirty 
words in a minute. To do this he must 
draw his quill through the space of one 
rod— UJ3i' feet. Iu forty miiuites his pen 
travelaa furlong; and"iu 5).,' hours one 
mile. We make, on an average, sixteen 
curves or turns of the pen in writing each 
word. Writing thirty worJs in a minute, 
we must make 480 strokes; iu aa hour, 
28,800; and in a day of only five hours, 
144,000 ; iu a year of 300 (Jays, 43,200 000. 
The man v;ho makes l,OCO,G00 Etrokea 
with Ji pen in a month ha.i done nothing 
at all remarkable. Many men make 4,- 
000,000. Here we have in the aggregate a 
mark 300 miles long, to be traced on paper 
by each writer in a year. In making each 
letter of the ordinary alphabet, we must 
make from three to Ecven tlrokes of the 
jien— on an average three and a btdf to 
four. 

— — ■ — ^t-^' . 

IVlxo arc llie Pcoplt; V 

Our Radical opponent.? with remarkable 
self-complacency speak of themselves ai 
" the people," " ihe nation," "the country," 
embellishing their self glorification with 
the title of "the loyal people." Authen- 
tic figures are given which will fake our 
Radical friends down a jieg or two. They 
appear to be in a minority among the peo- 
ple. A vote of nineteen States last fall 
shows l,622,'.i73 Democrats and 1,507,J"66 
Radicals, or a majority of G5,lo7 for 
the Dcmoeiacy. In thrfe nineteen 
States, Indiana and Illinois arc not 
included, for the elections there were only 
local. But the Democratic vote in those 
States was such that if added to the fig- 
ures we have given there would be an in- 
creased majojity. And yet the mon- 
8trou3 injustice appears that, whereas the 
Democracy are iu tho msjority in ihose 
nineteen States, yet they have only seven 
Senators in Congress, while the Radicalg 
havo twenty-seven, and while the Demo- 
crats hfive only foily-two Representatives, 
the Radicals have one hundred and one ! 
'J'he country may well inquire how is thisv 
And as it makes the icquiry it perceives 
that the Radieah have ceased to be " iLc 
people," and that their overwhelming ma- 
jority in Congress ia a contradiction of 
iho " will of the people," as expressed at 
the polls iu 1S07. Congress which so oft- 
en pretends really to believe that it rep- 
resents the nation, is proved, by the fig- 
ures to which we refer, to represent only 
a minority, aud all its legislation now is 
expressive only of the will of the mere 
minority it represents.— J/ty«i)i!rt Iki^ubli- 
can. 

-^a » 

a^iteraiy .^olIccH. 



TuE Atlaktu: Moktuly — Tieknor »L 
Fiddp, PtibliBhcrs, Boston, Ma»i>.— The March 
number contains: "John Chitiam-in, M. D," by 
J. W. Pjlmci; "Kockweeds," by Ctlla Tbaxter; 
" A Conversation on the Stage," by K*tu Field: 
Part Three of "George Silvcmuin"? Kxplanation," 
by Chirles Dicken>» ; "liy-Waye tl Europe," part 
three, by Bayard Taylor ; "Juhu o' tho Smithy," 
by a ^'e^v Confrlbalor, '-The Old rhlladolphla 
Library," by John MeredUh Kead ; " Flotsam and 
Jeteam," part thruo, "CroliU Daj8," couunued ; 
'The Seqaei to an Old English Truil," by L. 
Clarke Dans, "Th'i T-ju'h of January," by K. 
Stuart Thclpd; "Tho Household Lamp;" "Free 
Maeourl," by Albert D. Kictardsm: "Some of 
the Wonders of Modern Sur.^ery," by W. T. IIcl- 
math; "Itevlews and Literary Noilcee." Single 
numbers, 35 cents ; $-lM per j ear ; two coploe j>ei 
year, fT.CO; five copies,? 10.00: ten copies, f 30.00, 
and one copy extra. 

Olh Yocko Folks. —An Jllus-tratcd 

Magazine fvr Boys and Girls— T Icknor & Fields, 
Boston, Mass.— Tnc number for March gives a con- 
tinuation of Dickens' '• Uoliday Komnace," with a 
full page Ulu.'tration; " The C jlorid Mammy and 
her White Foster Child;" " Inho?pltallty ;" 
" Molly Oiir'a Now Drees;" "Itover;" '• Round • 
the- World Joe ;" " William Utury'i Let'rr.i to his 
Grandmother;" "Mischief;" "An^el Children;' 
"The French EspjgiUon for Twenty C'cnta ;" 
"Cast Away In the Cold;" "JIolher'B KitseX" 
Two pieces of Music; " Hounl the Evening 
Lamp;" "Our Letter Box." Tfcc stories In thla 
Magazine arc liberally acd appropriately IIIub- 
tratcd. The third part of "Uoilday IJonjancc " 
will be published in tho April num'n'r. Our 
Young Folks Is furnished to eluglu eubscribcrs for 
$2.00 per year; three copies. $6.00; live coploe, 
53. tX). leu copies, $15 00; twenty copies, f30.00, 
and one copy extra, Single numbers, M cents. 

Gooey's Ladt's Book for March is 
handsomely lUuslrnted and contains the ni^nal 
amount ol valuable lUernry reading, fa.-hlon intcl- 
llKencc, etc. It is an t<xcellent number, t^peak- 
ing of this magazine, the Germanto»n ItUgraph 
says: "Godey's Ludys Book for 1S03, so far as 
received, we regard as the best volame ever Issued 
of this beautiful and popular maga/inc. Indeed 
each succeeding volume thows an Improvement ; 
and this would eeem Impossible were we not fa- 
miliar with tho iiicshausUl'le resources of the 
publisher. While Mr. Codey grows old In the 
Uarn«'i>s editorial, and hia taste becomes more 
matured, they are neverlheleM njor« youthful, 
more ornate, and nore popularly pleasing." 

A New Monetary System : 

lui; oxr.r meaks of seci-rixg the tif.spect- 

iVE RIGHTS i)V LAB'B AND I'KoetP.TV, AND 
O! PKOTE TI.N'O THE r'utiLIC 1 KOM i•l^A^- 
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IiV El>WAIU> KKU.UOO. 

'It presents aa acute analysis of the lurctlor<« ol 
luciuey. and abouiids m Bliiguli>r.y sugitiiilve Ideas, 
wlileb caai'Ot fall lo awaken Uie mt'.reit or tlie rea- 
der."— LN'- Y. Irlbune, Jan. i't. 

"The author lays O.^axat Ihvro' I of Il'c<-\1U of our 
curtrticy and flnsi.clal e}8t>-m. • • • • Woarejust 
now Inn irxiiiltloii !ital« «ltli ri .;i!d t.jcrmnry, hank- 
liijr, national fliiauce, and all sutu bub> et;, and we ara 
111 a no^lilon 10 s'rlhe out Itito any n' w or crlnlnal 
Course that may t e sound Iu theory, or tba'. m«y pr^^m- 
Ise lo be of btnefit to the eonntry . Our • ttttei>nieu and 
public men might fir d vibiaMttbiijg stioDj la the work 
oeiore us."— [^. T. Herald, Juu. ^b. 

6;nt post-paid, on receipt of pile*, by 

A. N. ULELI.OCii;, 
101 Wanhington St., Chicngo. 



HORTICULTURIST ALMANAC! 

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i^ « » « « 



A:itE€l>OTE9 OF IIOGH. 

London Socuty (urnishcs the following 
stories of " Dogs of Note " : 

A Denunciatiog Do?, be&nvy tLe singu- 
lar name of " Bristol," 13 recorJcd in the 
judicial a&nals of the Houth <^f Franrc. It 
dates from the year 171S, 

A Marseilles paper-merchant went to 
make purchases at Toulon. That done, he 
life Toulon to tetorn to MarecilltB His 
wife and son, apprised cf his departure, 
awaited his coming. For four long days 
Ihty waited in vain, in a state of fearful 
and ever-increasing anxiety. On the morn- 
ing of the fifth da}', their dog, who had 
accompanied his master in his journey, 
arrived alone. The poor creature was in 
a pitiable state Every sound of his 
voice, every movement he made, an- 
nounced the deepest grief. He licked his 
mistress' hands, lay down at her feet, and 
began to howl. 

■• Misfortune has come to the house, ' the 
said. " A presettiment of evil chokes my 
breath. If your father should be dead ! 
The Lord have pity on ui- ! " 

" If you wish, mother, I sm ready to go 
m search of him." 

" Gi>, my boy ; go, by all meau.9. Take 
Bristol with you. He will be sure to lead 
yo'i to his master, alive or dead." 

Bristol, hearing what was said, rose to 
his feet and walked slowly towardd the 
door. The yuung man saddled a good 
horse, and set off at once upon hi3 misiion. 
He did not return until the following day. 
During the whole time of his absence his 
mother had prayed and wept. 

" You ^re alone," she said ; •' I under- 
stand what that means. Your father is no 
more, and I am left a wiJow." 

He knelt by her side, and Bristol 
licked their hand^ while thev vrept to- 
gether. 

" Wiiiit infof matioQ have you obtaice-' y" 
she asked. 

' My ffilhcr has been murdered in the 
forest of Coguiou." 

For a whole nioulh the authunlics on 
one band, and thewidow and her eon on 
the other, made every ettoii to discover 
the murderer ; but all in vain ; ihev could 
not tven tfaid out any iDdivtdual upon 
whom they could tis a reasonable suspicion. 
Six months elapstd. The attention of the 
otficers of justice being directed to more 
recent crimes, they thought no more of the 
paper-merchant. But tho^e he had lefl still 
mourned his loss. Bristol had lost all his 
gayety. He spent whole hours sorrowfully 
stretched on a little straw in the court- 
yard of the house. 

One evening, while following his young 
taaster about the town, he entered with 
him into a cafe in which Ecveral strangers 
wtre assembled. The young man took 
his seat at a table beside a couple of ac- 
quaintances, and Bristol, having noihing 
better to do, beguiled the time by walking 
up and down the room. Suddenly, after 
uttering a low growl, he furiously tlew at 
a tall man who was amusing himself with 
a game uf draughts. 

The man, in alarm, c ditd out for help. 
The guests rose from their scats and 
crowded round him. They tried to keep 
the dog back; they beat him .severely 
about the head and loins ; but all to no 
purpose. It only redoubled Bristol's fury. 
lie paid no attention to the persona who 
maltreated him ; all his rage was directed 
■against the man who was playing draughts. 
As soon as he was driven iff, he attac .ed 
him again. He tore his clothes and bit 
his legs. 

" This is insulTerable. abominable ! " 
shouted the bystanders, addressing Bristol's 
owner. '* Call oil your dug, and take him 
out of the room."_V _ ' 

With some difficulty the young man suc- 
ceeded in making the enraged animal 
loose his hold, and could find no other 
means of caiming him except "uy carrying 
him quitQ^out of the cafe. But before 
they had set a hunelred .steps, Biislol lefc 
bis mailer, returned to the cafe, and 
again attacked the tall thin stranger. 
Once more the young man was obliged 
to use force to separate the dog from his 
enemy. 

Amongst the; witnesses of thifl terrible 
scene there happened to be a commercial 
gentleman who had formerly been inti- 
mately acquainted with the paper-mer- 
chant. Pale and trembling with emotion, 
he approached the young man, and in- 
quireet in a wiiiiper, "When your talher 
took hie unfortunate journey to '^'oidon, 
ha<i he thif dog with him v ' 

" Ves," replied the paper-merchant's 
son. "Bristol even reached our house 
before the disaster which has ruined us 
was known." 

During this secret conversation, Bristol, 
whom bia master held io check by means 
of a rope tied rouad hi'* neck, mado extra- 
ordinary ctlbrts to get loose. 

"I nAy be mistaken," the other con- 
tinued, «'but It is just possible this man 
may be jour father's murderer. Bemain 1 
here while all tb^se people are talking! 
amongst themselves aboui what has hup 
peacd ; Twill run to the Commi^saite do 
Police for a force 6uffici<?nt to arrest the 
man." • 

In a quarter of an bourhe came back 
with a po8«e of men, who siirronnded and j 
filled the public-house. The buspected in- 1 
dividual was at once arrested, and con- 1 
ducted forthwith to prison. On searching I 
him, they found upon him the paper-mer- ' 
chant's watch and several other trinkets' 
which were iJentided as having been his 
property. The possession of those articles 
was a strong presumption o( the prisoner's 
gaiJt ; but it was also proved that, on the 
day of the murder, he hail been met by a 
little girl ,13 he came out of the forest" of 
Cognion. Other corroborative evidence 
turned up. He was found guilty, and con- \ 
dtmned to death. After strong and re ! 
iterated protestations of innocence, he ! 
avowed the crime to his confessor at the ' 
last moment, as he was mounting the very I 
steps of the scaffold. ' 

At the present dav, dogs are not a whit 
the less capable of indicating who is the , 
culprit. A gfocer at Boulogne-sur-Stine. : 

near I'aria, M. T^ , lound out that he 

had been robbed for some time past with ' 
out being able to discover the offender. An 
it was daring the night that his shop was ' 
entered, he had it guarded by his dog, an 



■ 1 II MBlMfcM^W— 



SOA'O OF TEE CROAKEB. 

BY UOIUTIO ALeiER, JR. 

An old froj; lived in a di^ma! swamp, 

In a dismal kind of a way; 
And all that he did, whatever befel, 
W«3 to croak tho livelong day. 

Ooak, croak, crotk. 
When darkiie.'s lllkU the air, 

.\Dd croak, croak, croak, 
VMicn iho skit's wero bright and lair. 

" G jod Mr. Fro?, a battle is fonghl. 
And the foeman'a power is broke, ' 
Bat ha only turned a greener hue. 
And answered with a croak. 

Croak, croak, croak. 
When the clouds are dark and diiu. 

And croak, croak, croak. 
In the blaxo of the noontide sun. 

" Good Mr. Froip, the forcea of Rfstt. 
Are driving the hoetH of Wrong," 
Bat he ^av» his head an ominous ehake 
And croaks oat "Awn* Virroiu!" 

Croak, croak, cioah. 
Till tho heart ia fuM of gloom. 
- And cronk, croak, croak. 
Till tho world sceiha but a tomb. 

To poison the cup ol life 

By always dreading; the worst, 
la to make of the earth a dun;;oon damp 
And the happiest life accursed. 

Croak, croak, croak, 
^licn the noontide sun rides hi^b. 

And croak, croak, croak. 
Lest the night come by and by. 

Fa-ewell to the dismal frog, 

Let blm croak as loud as ha may, 
Qj csnnot blot the eun from heaven, 
Mor hinilor the march of day. 

Thoogh he croak, croak, croak. 
Till the heart Is lull of gloom, 
And croak, croak, croak. 
Till the world seems but a tomb. 



I intelligent animal whrt usually slept in his 
private apartments. 

One night (in February, 1867,) being 
awakened by furious barking, he imme- 
diately ro!e, went down to the shop, found 
the street-d.x)r open, and searching in all 
directions, could find nobody. He there- 
fore unchained his dog, who soon hit upon 
a scent, followed it into the street, and then, 
after stopping at a neighboring house, 
came back to his master, gave a peculiar 
and significant growl, and tben returned 
to track the same scent several times over. 
His whole behavior seemed to indicate that 
the individual who had entered the shop 
had taken refuge in that house. This cir- 
cumstance confirmed the suspicions M. 

T entertained respecting hi.s nephew 

O , who lodged in that house, whom he 

presumed to be the author of the various 
thefts. 

Consequently, while acquainting the 
(Jommissaire de Police witii the robbery, 
he at the came-time communicated his sus- 
picions. G was sent for and interro- 
gated. He denied all knowledge of the 
matter, and was highly indignant at the 
accusation. There bemg no proof what- 
ever againnl him, he was on the point 
of being dismissed, when the Commis- 
saire had the ingenious idea of mak- 
ing an experiment which might help 
him to discover the truth. He requested 
seveial persona to come into his office, 
and amongst them he placed the defend- 
ant G . He then caused the grocer 

and his dog to enter. At a signal from the 
Commis-saire, the grocer said to the dog 
one single word, " Cherche ! " — " Find ! " 

The clever creature went several times 
round the circle formed by the persons 
present. Each time he stopped it. front of 

G , giving the peculiar growl which he 

had uttered when he found the trace of 
the thief 

" You see," taid the Commissalre to 

G , " it is useless to d?ny it : the dog 

knows you again." 

Completely upset by this singular evi- 
dence, G avowed that he really was 

the guilty party, and was left to be dealt 
with by the law. 

Poodle — for such was his name, and it is 
curious how fond foreigners are of giving 
English names to their dogs, — Poodle was 
a dog of note in every sense of the word. 

Frederick Schwartz, a merchant retired 
from business in Darmstadt, occupied his 
leisure hours, which were many, almost 
exclusively with music. His passion for 
the art acquired such an intensity that he 
required every one alxiut him to fall in 
with his musical predilections by either 
vocal or instrumental co-operation. There 
was not a member ol his household who 
could not take a part in the family con- 
cert. Even tho maid of all work, in case 
of need, conkl make out one of Schubert's 
melodies or an opera cavatina. Poodle, 
the dog, was the only one unable to render 
any musicdl assistance. 

As worthy Herr Schwartz felt tho utter 
impossibility of making Pooelle afford any 
practical aid, he determined to train him 
to fill the office of critic in his own har- 
monious community. He succeeded, too, 
by an ingenious mt-lhod. Whenever a 
note out of tune proceeded from a voice 
or an instrument : every time that a music- 
al fault was committed by any member of 
the family, — and such faults were com- 
mitted purposely,— the rod was applied to 
Poodle's back, and ho naturally began to 
bark and howl. He was exactly in the 
posiiion of the whipping-boy, who pur 
hued his 6111(31*8 with tho Royal Prince. 
Whenever the Prince made a grammatical 
blunder, the wLippiog-boy had to smart 
for it. 

Before lung, simple threats were sub- 
si ituted for smitings of his (Poodle's) 
back ; afterwards a look sufficed to set the 
creature barking ; and little by little Poodle 
familiarized him.»elf with wro.:g notes and 
other musical atiocities, until at last a mis- 
take' could not be committed without his re- 
buking it either by a bark or a growl. He 
thus btcaiie, as far as music was concerned, 
the most impartial judge, tho most cm- 
sclenlious critic in tho whole grand duchy 
of Hesse-Darmstadt. 

I'nfortunately, his appreciation of music 
al art was completely and solely negative. 
He bestowed no praise, but only blame. 
Sing with expression, perform with talent, 
the dog would remain impassive and cold : 
but at the slightett iucorrectotss of into- 
nation he ground his teeth, lashed his tail, 
growled, yelped, and barked aloud. Bo 
long as he flourished,— and he may flourish 
still, — not a concert or an opera was rc- 
be&rsed in Darmstadt without inviting 
Herr Frederick Schwartz r.nd his dog, — 
but more especially the dog. If the prima 
donna made the filightest sbp, the dog 
I'lOked at his master with an air of disap- 
probmion. If the haulbi^ys came in too 
late. Poodle pricked up his tars ; it tho 
clarionet hurried tbe movement, Poodle 
fidgeted on his bench ; if tho kettle-drum- 
mer broke the time, Poodle uttereel audible 
murmurs, in fact, no piece was considered 
properly executed unless the canine con- 
noisseur remained quiet on his seat. 

Nor mutt it be supposed that Poodle's 
instinct was limited to forming a judgment 
of tho execution only. His intelligence, 
trained by hearing classical works, seemed 
to have penetrated some of the secrets of 
composition. An abrupt modulation, a 
falte resolution, would produce symptoms 
of doubt on Poodle's nozzle : consecutive 
filths mide him .shudder, and a halting 
melody set hia teeth on edge. Sometimes 
Herr Schwartz and his intimate friends, 
in the privacy of a snug little quartette 
parly, would amuse themselves by pro- 
ducing discordant sounds, for the sake of 
tormenting the sensitive animal. On such 
odcasiems Poodle lost all self command: 
his hair sI'XkI on end. his eyes became 
bloodshot, and frightful bowlings answered 
to the discord produced by the fiddles of 
the mystidcators. Moreover, tl)ey were 
obliged to keep within certain bounds. 
Poodle possessed only a limited stock of 
forbearance. If the cacophony waa too 
intense or too prolonged. Poodle, carrying 
out his sen. e of duty, upset everything. 
Music stjind, ii:usic tools, and instruments, 
^ere strewed in confusion about therkom. 

Finally, negotiations are in progress for 
the engagement of Poodle — or, if he be 
superannu.ited and retired on half-pay, of 
one of his descendants — to attend the mu- 
sical entertainments to be given in London 
during the current winter. W« shall see 
to how many the four-looted critic will 
listen Aiih placid and undisturbed atten- 
tion. 

Begging docs are far from rare; wo find 
tuem tt every fair and every market ; but 
they arc beggars of low degree, and if not 
poor (probably often the contrary), at 
least profes6ii3g" poverty. Genteel beggar 
de^gs bemg more uncommon, we produce a 
good specimen of the class. 

Sanelolet, Chevalier de Saint Louis, afler 
STving for nearly forty years under the 
greatest captains of the age of Louis XIV., 
found himself forced to hang ud his sword 
upon a nail. " Forced ' unfortunately 
Wiis tbe word ; for he had grown old and 
feeble, without reckoning a score of 
wounds, the least of whicU. now, w^ould 
pri!cure his admission to tbe Invalides. 
One of his contemporaries has sketched 
nis portrait ; " His wrinkled face is that 
ot a mummified frog. He lost his nose at 
the battle of Fleurus ; his right eye at the 
passage of the Raine ; an arm on the field 
of SleinkeKiue; tbe left thigh at Mal- 
plaquet; anet his lower jaw, carried away 
by a ball at the siege of Valenciennes, has 
been replaced, more or less efficiently, by 
an artificial substitute. " 

It would be difficult to find a nhevalier 
of any order more complolely dilapidated, 
and at the same lime continuing to exist. 
It appears that, in Fpite of his defective 
jaw, Sandolet had an excellent appetite. 
Unfortunately, he has only a franc and a 
half, or fifteen pence, per day, to supply 
his wants. That motlerate income was in- 
sufficient , and it often happened that he 



bad neither roast liaeatln Xh€ cnpboard, 
nor bread on the shelf, nor a sou in his 
purse to keep the Devil out of U. 

Nevertheless, Sandolet had a dog who 
answered to the name of Capucin. Histo- 
ry not having recorded why the name waa 
given him in preference to any other, we 
are obliged to do as hi.'^tory has done. 
Weary of fasting and waiting for the larks 
to fall into his mouth ready to roast, San- 
dolet came to the logical conclusion that, 
since he had a dog, which dog helped him 
to consume his revenue, it was only fair 
that the said dog, for his part, should 
render some service in return. To the 
dog's collar he therefore fastened a leather 
purse, into which when ho put a letter, 
Capucin carried it to its address. It was 
a petition for pecuniary assistance from 
some generous person of tho old soldier'a 
acquaintanco 

When the cupboard was bare, Sandolet 
opened the eloor, and calling the dog, said 
to him, *' Come, Capucin, you see the 
hutch is empty. You must set to work, 
mon ami, and try what you can do." 

At which Capucin mournfully bowed 
h'S head, shook his ears, tucked his tail 
between his legs, and began to bark— a 
pantomime which, interpreted, said, "I 
understand, Ma.<»ier ia hungry, and so is his 
dog," 

The letter deposited in its receptacle, 
Sandolet said, "Go to such or such a 
place." Tne docile mebseuger obeyed, 
and presented huntelf to the party indi- 
cated with a humble and submissive air. 
Ho then raised his head to show th-; letter. 
Often, while waiting for the answer, 
Capucin, to beguile the time, found his 
way to the kitchen, where they rarely re- 
fused him a morsel of meat. VVhen at last 
he got the answer, always inclosing apiece 
of money, he returned to his master as fast 
as hi.s legs could carry him, and would 
contrive to make ten or twelve such visits 
In the course f)f a morning. The collec- 
tion ended, the master and the dog em- 
braceel each other. 

Sandolet then made a grand display 
upon the table of six, twelve, and twenty- 
four sou pieces, and sometimes even of 
three and six-franc crowns^all of which 
now are obsolete— Capucin looking on 
with an approving air. The veteran, slap- 
ping his wooden leg with hia only hand, 
would exclaim, " Bravo, Capucin ! bravo, 
my dog t You have brought me Balm of 
Gilead this morning." 

The rack was stored and the manger 
filled with provisions for se-veral days to 
come. 

But dogs will cater for friends of their 
own species as well as for human proterjes. 
A butcher and grazier, named Drouhin, 
re.-idlngat Semur, istheowner of a capital 
setter called Blaireau, t. e. badger. Blaireau, 
very handsome and thorough bred, would 
make a fiist rale sporting dog; but his 
master prefers to intrust him with the cus- 
tody of beasts which ha turns out to grass 
and afterwards sells in tho environs of 
Paris. At a sign from his master he sets 
off alone for the pasture where the bul- 
k>ck8 are grazing. On arriving, he first 
runs quite round the meadow, then stejps, 
looks at the cattle, and seema to count 
them. That done, he lies down at some 
distance from them, but always in such a 
way as to keep them in sight. At dusk, 
Blaireau quits the pasture and leisurely 
trots home again. 

One day he found along the road an- 
other dog, of about his own size, who lay 
behind a bush uttering plaintive cries. 
Whether through curiosity or a moK be- 
nevolent motive, Blaireau halted and ex- 
amined the stranger, whom he found 
quite worn out and frightfully thin, and 
who had, moreover, a large wound in his 
thigh, which appeared to have been made 
by the blade ot a scythe. The wound had 
ceased to bleed, but it was covered with 
clotted blood and caked over with dirt and 
dust It had been inflicted three or four 
days ago, and, acording to all appear- 
ance, the poor creature daring that time 
had taken no nourishment whatever. He 
evidently suflered quite a9 much from fa- 
tigue and exhaustion as from the effects of 
the wound. 

On seeing another dog approach him, 
the invalid appeared to take courage and 
revive. He j)robably had dragged himself 
to that spot in order to die behind the 
thicket ; and now, when ho believed him- 
self completely abandoned. th»-re arrived 
a friend, perUap.n a savior! lie fixed on 
Blaireau a supplicating luok, and then, 
with a groan, preeenieel his wounded limb, 
as much as to say, 'Only see what a pitia- 
ble state I am in. Try what you can do 
to help me, there's a good fellow." 

Blaireau in his way responded to the 
appeal. He first smelt al the patient's 
wound, and then set to work to lick it. 
Thj operation finished, he tried to lead 
his friend away. Tbe poor creaturo could 
just manage to .stand, but walking waa 
quite out of the question After trying to 
set a step or two he fell back on the grass 
wllh a stifled groan. What was to be 
done now ? Blaireau seemed to reflect for 
a moment, and then set rft' for the town 
as hard as he could go. 

His first care on reaching his master's 
house was to viiit the spot where the re- 
mains left alter meak wero set apait lor his 
use. That day Ihere happened to be noth- 
ing, which was not enough, and Blaireau 
was not the dog to be satisfied with that. 
He therefore boldly entered the shop 
wheie the butcher and his man were cut- 
ting up the meni for to morrow's sale. 

He had formed his plan ; to carry it 
out he began by treating his master to an 
extra allovCance of extra-fond c tresses ; 
and as soon as he judged ihe moment pro 
pitious, he placed his two forefeet upim 
the stall, selected a pit-e^o of meat and took 
possefsinn ed it 

"Blaireau, sirlvou rascally fellow!" 
said the butcher. " Will you please to 
Itave that meat alone ?" 

The dog, instead ot running away like 
an ordinary thief, humbly approached his 
master, wagging bis tail, and still holding 
the meat in his mouth, steraed to be ask 
ing hia permission to keep it 

" You are not squeamish, ma foi i' said 
Ihe butcher laughiuK, "to take a slice of 
beefsteak that weighs five or six pounds." 
The dog kept looking at his master, but 
without losing his hold of the meat The 
butcher then took it out of his mouth, 
and returned it to its place upon the stall. 
Bleareau gave a look ot despair and turned 
to the (loor with a melancholy howl. 

"There is something strange in this," 
said the butcher to himself. " It is the first 
time he has ever touched a scrap of meat 
in the shop. He must have a reason for 
doing it. I should like to find out." He 
I recalled the dog and gave him the meat in 
I question. 

I Blaireau jumped round the shop for joy, 
and then bolted headlong into the street. 
The butcher followed him wiih his eves 
until he disappeared in a narrow lane that 
led out of the town. Bisiieau, like the 
good Samaritan, was soon at the wounded 
wayfarer's side, iuviiing him to parUReof 
the supply, to which the other did not 
require much pressing. He ate, or rather 
devoured three-quirteis of the bee'", al- 
though underdone, afier which Blaireau 
finished what was left. The two dogs 
spent the night together, sleeping side by 
side. 

Early the next morning Blaireau re 
turned to the house, accompanied by a 
dog thai limped on three legs, and whom 
he invited to lake possession of his kennel. 
He then collected bones and scraps in the 
shop, after which the friends enjoyed their 
breakfast together, <me lying iobide the 
kennel, the other without. Nevei theless, 
Blaireau's c^re of bis patient did not make 
him neglect his duty : he watcned tbe 
beasts in the pasture as usual, only be 
returned three «>r four times in tho a)urse 
of the day to make sure that the invalid 
wanted for nothing, and that he was not 
turned out of his resting-place. 

In a week the patient waa nearly cured. 
It is right to mention that the good natured 



butcher hastened his recovery by washing 
the wound. The first visit the companions 
paid to the pasture was a scene ot irre- 
pressible frolic and gambol : Blaireau was 
the happiest dog in the world. 

The rest of the story is soon told. One 
dog could not live without the other, and 
tbe butcher did not care to separate them. 
Observing that they had abandoned tbe 
kennel because there was not room enough 
for them both to sleep in it, he had a larger 
one made for their accommodation ; and it 
was in this that M. Drouhin showed M 
Rir.hebourg the canine inseparables sleep- 
ing side by side. 
Our last anecdote is only a twelvemonth 

old. Monsieur De 8 and Monsieur 

P , country gentlemen residing in tho 

neighborhood of Bordeaux, are great 
sportsmen and great friends. The first 
has two dogp, the latter only one ; and as 
dogs soon fall into their masters' ways, 
they also are intimate acquaintances and 
passionately addicted to the chase. 

One day they came to the understanding 
that they would have a lillle hunt all to 
themselves, for their own particular pleas- 
ure and profit. They started a wild rab- 
bit, whieh ran to burrow, as the most pru- 
dential move it could make. One of M. 

De 8 's dogs followed it so far that he 

could not get out again. There he re- 
mained, stuck in the hole, unable to move 
either backwards or forward.". 

After fcratching in vain to get him out, 
hia two companions returned home over- 
whelmed wi grief. They were depressed 
in spirits, ead beat VNith faigue ; per- 
haps also their consciences pricked them a 
little. Their masters remarked their 
wretched plight, but had n"> means of ac- 
counting for it. 

The next day the two dogs disappeared 
afresh. At night each returned to his re- 
spective domicile, worn out with bleeding 
feet, their coats covered with earth and 
sand, and completely C'fl their appetite. 
The same thing continued day after day. 

M. De 8 , uneasy at the absence of his 

first dog, and surprised at the strange pro 
ceedings of the second, mentioned the mat- 
ter to his neighbor, P , who then told 

him that his own dcg had been doing ex- 
actly the same. 

Early next morning M. De S was 

awoke by several dogs moaning and 
scratching at his door. On going down 
stairs to sscertain the causey he was as- 
tonished to behold the missing dog es- 
corted home by his two companions, but 
weak, emaciated, and reduced almost to a 
s'seleton. Suspecting what might have 
happened, he caused search to be made, 
and soon discovered a rabbit's burrow, in 
which the poor creature had been impris- 
oned for six whole days. The narrow 
mouth of the burrow had been transformed 
into an open cave, evidently owing to the 
intelligent labors of the two dogs that re- 
mained at liberty. 

Southern Livyalists. 



The gentltmen who have been elected 
in ihe Southern States to reconstruct the 
governments appear in many instances to 
have characters which will not bear inves- 
tigation. At Richmond, Charleston, 
Montgomery and Jackson^ the conven- 
tions have embraced some of the most 
precious scoundrels left outside of the 
penitentiary. It was only last week that 
a special Radical pet, the negro lawyer J. 
Alpeoria Bradley, whom Ben. Wade 
elevated in the United States Senate as a 
witness against one of the most worthy 
officers in South Carolina, was expelled 
from the Georgia Convention. The most 
remarkable fact connected with the expul- 
sion is that it was occasioned by his insub 
ordinate and insulting deportment. The 
Radical majority composing the Conven- 
tion do not stem to have regarded Bradley 
as unfit to be a member of the Convention 
or their associate, though proved to be a 
great scoundrel. A committee was ap- 
pointed to investigate certain charges 
made against him. They discharged their 
duties in this behalf and made a report to 
the Convention, which is published in full 
in the Georgia paper-". They reported 
that they had a certified copy of the records 
of the City Court of Brooklyn, New York, 
showing that Bradlej', born near Augusta, 
Maine, was, on the 13th day of June, 1851. 
convicted of a grave oflense and sentenced 
to imprisonment for two years in the peni- 
tentiary. They also report that by a cer- 
tified copy of the records of the Sujjerior 
Court of the county of Suffols, Massachu- 
sells, it appears that Bradley was. on the 
4ih of October, 1856, stricken from the 
roll of atturnevs and removed from prac- 
tice in any court in Massachusetts for con- 
tempt of court and malpractice. A 
minority of tho committee recommended 
that he be expelled for criminal conduct. 
But a majority of the committee made a 
report in which they enter into some 
special pleading, stating that there is no 
law fixing the qualifications of members 
except the act of Congress of March 2, 
18(57, and that act makes but one qualifica- 
tion, that is, conformity to the 3a section 
of the proposed Constitutional amend- 
ment. Ihey say : " It appears to u? Ihr.t 
this Cemvention would be adopting a dan- 
gerous rule to prescribe gmlty of any 
ojrdn«<; a disqualification for a seat." * * 
And this negro lawyer and precious Radi- 
cal was not expelled on the ground of the 
report showing him to be a penitentiary 
bird, for, so far as that is concerned, his 
Radical asaociates do not seem to have 
been disturbed by his presence. But they 
afterward expelled bim for insolence of 
demeanor and contempt of the Conven- 
tion, a much graver oflVnee, in Radical 
estimation, than those proved by the re- 
port. 

In the South Carolina Convention it is 
charged that among the white members is 
one now under, indictment for stealing a 
cow; a second waa lately fined $13,(X)0 for 
a violation of the Internal Revenue law ; a 
third was indicted for illicit distillation of 
whisky ; a fourth hoisted the ConfcHlerate 
flag over Sumter alter its surrender to 
Beauregard, and a fifth Is a preacher who 
used to pray that the Yankee fleet in front 
of Charleston might be sunk into the bot- 
tomless pit. 

A pamphlet of half a score of pages was 
published, with court records, showing 
that one of the loyalists of the Alabama 
Convention was a felon. He was a nomi- 
nee in some meeting for Governor. He 
Is now dead, and out of regard for his 
bones we refrain from naming him. In 
stances of this kind show what sort of ma- 
terial Radicalism uses as its instruments, 
and they show, too, what must be the char- 
acter of the constituency which elects 
such representatives.— Jtmowri RepuW- 
can. 



plosive ; neither are they capable of fur- 
nishing any gas, when placed in lamps, 
which is explosive. Accidents of Ibis 
nature are due entirely to the facility with 
which vapor is produced from them at low 
temperatures. But, the vapor by itself is 
not explosive ; to render it eo, it muit be 
mixed with air. A lamp may be filled with 
bad kerosene, or with tbe vapor even, and 
in no possible way can it detonate, or ex- 
plode, unless atmospheric air has somehow 
got mixed with the vapor. A lamn, there- 
fore, full, or nearly full, of the liquid, is 
safe ; and also one full of pure warm vapor 
1.) f afe. Explosions generally occur when 
the lamp is first lighted, without being 
filled, and late in the evening, when tho 
fluid is nearly exhausted. The reason of 
this will readily be seen. In using imper- 
fect or adulterated kerosene, the space 
above the line of oil ia always filled with 
vapor ; and so Jong as it is warm, and 
rising freely, no air can reach it, and it is 
safe. At bed-time, when the family re- 
tire, the light is extinguished ; the lamp 
cools, a portion of the vapor is condensed; 
this creates a partial vacuum in the space, 
which is instantly tilled with air. The 
mixture is now more or less explosive ; 
and when, upon the next evening, the 
lamp is lighted without replenishing with 
oil, as is often done, an explosion is liable 
to take place. Late in the evening, when 
the oil is nearly consumed, and the space 
above filled with vapor, the lamp cannot 
explode so long as It remains at rest upon 
the table. But take it in hand, agitate it, 
carry it into a cool room, the vapor is 
cooled, air passes in, and the vapor be- 
comes explosive. A case of lamp explo- 
sion came to the writer's knowledge a few 
years fcince, which was occasioned by tak- 
ing a lamp from tho table to answer a ring 
of the door-bell. The cool outside air 
which impinged upon the lamp in the 
hands of the lady, rapidly condensed the 
vapor, air passed in, an explosion occur- 
red, which resulted fatally. If tho lamp 
had been full of fluid, this accident could 
not have occurred. Before carrying it to 
the door, flame might have been thrust in- 
to the lamp with safety ; the vapor would 
have ignited, bul no explosion would have 
taken place. 

■^•^ 

Injurious Efl«ctH of CoHmctlcM. 

An eminent VV^estem physician in a com- 
munication in a late number of the Medical 
and Surgical Reporter, makes the following 
allusion to what he calls a serious evil per- 
vading the American community : 

To heighten their beauty in the eyes of 
admiring gentlemen, the ladies are resort- 
ing to various cosmetics in the shape of 
washes, powders and paints, which are 
put up and lauded to the skies by greedy 
nd unprincipled knaves calling them- 
selves druggists, as being sovereign reme- 
dies for all the evils which beset a fair 
complexion. Now the ladies ought to 
know that all the preparations are more 
or less irjurious to the skin when used 
habitually, and some of them even poison- 
ous and dangerous to health and life. One 
person in this community has suffered 
nearly everything but death for the past 
two years, besides expending a small for- 
tune upon several doctors who did her no 
good because they did not understand 
tbe cause of the trouble. I have satisfac- 
torily ascertained that it was nothing more 
nor less than the use of cosmetic com- 
posed wholly of carbonate of lead and 
water. This is sold by druggists, who ob- 
tain it from New York and Chicago, put 
up in beautiful stained glass bottles, and 
lat}eled with a high sounding name. The 
lady above referred to had the usual symp- 
toms of lead colic, followed by paralysis 
of the flexors of the wrists. Since discard- 
ing this cosmetic she ia recovering the use 
of her bands, and her general health is 
improving. The test used is the following : 
Shake up the bottle and pour a little of 
the mixture into a wine glass, add a few 
drops of nitric acid, which dissolves the 
carbonate, making a transparent solution. 
To Ihia add a few grains of iodide potas- 
sium, and there is produced a beautiful 
yellow, iodide of lead precipitated in a 
solution of nitrate of potasb. 



'I'lie "^ume orCiod in Forl5<eLKlit 
L<an;;ua{;ew. 



As Louis Burger, the well known author 
and philologist was walking in the Ave- 
nue des Champs Elysces he heaid a famil- 
iar voice exclaiming, " Buy some nuts of 
a poor roan, sir; twenty for a penny!" 
IIo looked up and recognized his old bar- 
ber. 

" What ! arc you selling nuts y" said he. 

" Ah, sir, I have been unfortunate." 

" Bul this is no business for a man like 
you!" 

"Oh, iir, if you could only tell me of 
something belter to do," returned the bar- 
ber, with a sigh. 

Burger was touched. He reflected a 
moment ; then tearing a leaf from his 
memorandum book, he wrote for a few 
moments and handed it to the man, say- 
ing, " Take this to a printing office and 
have a hundred copies strufck off; here is 
the money to pay for it. Get a license 
from the Prefecture of the Police, and sell 
them at two cents a copy, and you will 
have bread on the spot. The strangers 
who visit Paris cannot refuse this tribute 
to the name of God, printed in so many 
different waj's." 

The barber did as he waa bid, and was 
always seen al tho entrance to the Exposi- 
tion, selling the following hand-bill : 

THE KAIU or OOD IN FORTY-EIGITr LANGVAUES. 

Hebrew.AVoftimo/vfcVoffA.Olala toDffue, Beu. 

Chaldalc, JilaA. iJerroan and Swiss. ^0". 

Assyrian. Etiah. Plcmlsh, Go^fi. 

Syriacand'l\irlt1gh, ^taA.Dntch, Oodt. 

Malay, .4//a. English and old Saxon, 

Arabic, Alla^. ood. 

LangnaKc 01 (he Magi, Teutonic, Ooth. 

Orii. Danish and Swedish, Gur 

Old Keyptlan, Teut. Norwegian. GwL 

Armorlan. Ttuli. alavic. Buck. 

Modern Egyptian, Ter.n. Polish. Boa. 
Greek. Iheot. Pollacca, Bung. 

Oetau. Thiol. Lapp. JubinaL 

Jiolian and Doric, Ilos. Flnnlah, Jutnala. 
Laiin. Ueus. Bunlc, At. 

Pannonsan, I'lu. 

ZemoUan, I'elizo. 

ilindostaD»e, Jiain. 

Coromandel, Branu 



Tar I a r, Magatal. 
Persian, Sir«. 
Cbtnese, Puita. 
Japanese, Oo'zur. 
Madacascar, Zunnar. 
Peruvian, Puchxicamae. 

Bureer met the bar 



C'auK« orijamp Exploslont . 



The Boston uoumal of Chemittry, in an 
article on the chemistry of kerosene, 
speaks as follows. As an explanation of 
Ihe caus«s of lamp explosions, it is worth 
studying, that these accidents may be 
avoided : 

As has been stated, kere>eene is tot ex- 
plosive. A lighted taper may be thrust 
into it, or flame applied in any way, and it 
does not explode. On the contrary it ex- 
tinguishes flame, if experimented with at 
the usual temperatures of our rooms. 
Kerosene accidents occur from two 
causes: First, imperfect manufacture 
of the article; tecond, adullerationB. 
An imperfectlly manufactured oil 
is that which results when the 
distillation has deen carried on at too 
low temperature, and a portion of tbe 
naptha remains in it. Adulterations are 
largelv made by unprincipled dealers, who 
add 20 to 30 per cent of naptha after it 
leaves Ihe manufacturer's hands. Tbe 
light naplhas which have been spoken of, 
as known m commerce under tbe names of 
benzine, benzoline, gosoleine, etc., are very 
volatile, inflammable, and dangerous. 
They, however, in Utemaelvee, are nov ex 



Low Latin, IHex. 
Celtic and Gdllic, Vlu. 
French, JH«u. 
Spanlch, JJioi. 
Purtucueee, Zfeoe. 
Old German. lH«t. 
Prowncal, j>U)u. 
Low Breton, Ztouf. 
Italian, IHo. 
IrLsh, J>U. 

A few days after 
ber. 

" Well," said he, " has the holy name of 
God brought you good luck f " 

" Yes, indeed, sir. I sell on an average 
one hundred copies a day, al two cents 
each, or two dollars; but the strangers 
are generous ; some give me ten cents 
and others twenty. I have even re- 
ceived half a dollar lor a copy ; eo 
that, all told, I am making five dollars a 
day." 

" Pivc dollars a day ? " 

;' Ves sir ; thanks to your kindness." 

"The deuce!" thought Burger, as he 
walked away. "If I were not a literary 
man I would turn peddler or publisher ; 
there is noihing so profitable as selling tbe 
leatElng or wii of others." 

— — •^•^ 

(jiermnn LivdIeH. 

I have noticed that in Genn«r 'amilies, 
family Kovernment is vtry aila com- 
pared with the theory and practice in 
America on this subject, I may say ex- 
tremely rigid. The rules and regulations 
are few, but they are enforced on all occa- 
sions, and under all circumstances. Un- 
questioning submission to parental author- 
ity lies at the foundation of this govern- 
ment. Children are taught to entertain 
lh«) highest respect for superiors and for 
age. It is beautiful to see the respectful 
manner in which they deport themselves 
in the presence of tbeir superiors and older 
persons. They are also invariably polite 
to strangf rs. 

A few weeks ago a friend and myself 
made aq excursion on foot into ihe coun- 



try, and were surprised at the genuine po- 
liteness of the poor peasants and their 
children. Every peasant and child wc 
met saluted us in the kindest manner pos- 
sible, and readily and pleasantly answered 
all our questions. Children are early 
taught to be industrious and eeil-reliaut. 
They are not allowed to call eervauts to 
do for them things which they can easily 
do for themselves. Every boy is trained 
for some business or profession, and the 
girls are trained to make good housekeep- 
ers and good wives. In the best families, 
servants very seldom wait on the tabic — 
not even when guests are invited. 

I took tea, not long since, at the house 
of a Baroness, with a large parly, and not 
a Ecrvant was to be seen. The Baroness 
made tea after we were seated at the table, 
with a convenient and elegant apn aralus 
prepared for the purpose, and two" beauti- 
ful young ladies, a niece of the Baroness 
and a friend, passed around the table and 
served the guests. 

On a certain occasion, I called on a 
wealthy family, and was received by the 
lady of the house, who told me that her 
two daughters were in the kitchen cook 
ing. They were both to be married soon, 
and a professional cook had been employ- 
ed to come three times a week, to give 
them lessons in the art of cooking, and 
initiate them fully into all its mysteries. 
In five minutes one of these young ladies 
came into the parlor to see me, neatly 
dressed, and conversed with me in beauti- 
ful English. 

A thorough ac£|uainlauce with domestic 
economy is considered an indespensablo 
quahfication in a young lady for the mar- 
ried life. In addition to all this, mothers 
teach their daughters that one of the chief 
duties after marriage is to strive to keep 
their husbands comfortable and happy. 
When a German husband comes to his 
home, at the close of the day of toil and 
anxiety, his wife receives him with a 
smile, arranges his arm chair, brings him 
his study gown and slippers, places before 
bim refreshments, gets him a cigar, and 
while he eata and smokes converses with 
him in the most entertaining manner about 
the events «f the day. What will your 
lady friends say about this picture o f do- 
mestic life in Germany :—Rev. R. K fkiun- 
der«. 



The American Fruit Ctiiturist si'.ys that 
the strawberry growers of Hammoulon, 
N. J., find wood ashes an excellent manure 
for strawberries. 

WoBK FOR Bad W^iiAxntK.— It is well 
always to suit the work to the weather. 
Few can endure to work out ir. rain or 
snow, and if thought be given there can 
always be feund plenty lodoineiaowhcnit 
is unpleasant or stormy out of doors — work 
also that will save many an hour when the 
hurry and drive of Spring comes ; pre- 

f>aring label sticks and stakes ; mending 
ights, making boxes for melons, etc. ; 
cleaning crocks, painting tools, and a 
thousand other thinge, which if done will 
enable a man to drive his work, instead of 
the work driving him. — Ilorticultuntit. 

W. Austin, writing to the New York 
Farmers Club, says: "I always keep 
handy a rod or stick three feet long, with 
a notch or knob on the end for holding a 
swab made of flax covered with a cotton 
cloth, greased, and when an animal is 
choked it is led into the f.lall and held by 
a man, who pulls out the tongue, when "I 
push the obstruction down the throat very 
quickly. I keep over twenty cows and 
feed a good many potatoes, and 1 scme- 
times have three or four cattle choking at 
one time ; but it does not lake me more 
than five minutes to relieve Ihcm." 

Rl!:Movl^•G Stains.— All cloths subject 
to be stained, such as table linen, napkins, 
children's clothes, towels, etc., ought to be 
examined before being put into any wash 
mixture or soap euds, as these render the 
stain permanent. Many stains will yield 
to good washing in pure soft warm water. 
Alcohol will remove almost any discolora 
lion. Almost any stain or iron mould, or 
mildew, may be removed by dipping m a 
moderately strong citric acid, then covered 
with salt and kept in the sun. This may 
require to be repealed many times, but 
with us has never failed. — Cimntry Oentle- 
man. 

Impoktance of Good Digestion.— A 
touch of the dyspepsia, growing out of a 
pig's toot swallowed at midnight, has 
changed a man's whole life, and an irregu- 
larity of the bile has made many an angel 
almost a fiend. If the gastric Juico is all 
right, and tho blood in swimming order, 
the world is a nice, bright, pleasant place, 
and from which nobody is in a hurry to 
move ; but if in that queer, my6lefiou.=t 
fluid there is an alloy, the sky of life is all 
cloud, the winds howl, and everything is 
dark and dismal. If you want to feel as 
happy as a lady going to her own wed- 
dmg, look after your digestive and circulat 
ing systems. 

CoNCEiiNiNG Cheese.— I will tell my 
readers why epicures eat cheese first, 
"Cheese," says Grimod de la Reyniere, 
" has the property of taking away from 
the mouth and palate all tastes that have 
been left by the preceding dishes, and 
thus prepares them (mouth and palate) for 
the succulent and delicate things of the 
desert, and the flivors of the wines." After 
cheese, there is no order for the other plates 
of desert ; they are partaken of according 
to taste. A plate of desert that is always 
relished, especially by gentlemen, is the 
quoLire memdiants. It is composed of dried 
grapes, tigs, baitdenuta and sweet almond.?. 
— Professor Blot, in Galaxy, 

Size ok Potato Sets fob Plantjnu. 
— A late number ot the Journal cf the 
Royal Agricultural Society of England has 
a report of Mr. Maw's experiments on the 
potato crop, to determine the most profit- 
able size of sets, which ia a very practical 
paper, and goes to settle a question t>f 
much importance, about which very di- 
verse views have been held, and defective 
practice followed. Mr. Maw wiis a dis- 
tinguished scholar at Cirenctsler, Every 
increase in the size of the set, from oiic 
ounce up to eight ounce.'', proiiuces an in- 
crease of crop much greater than the ad- 
ditional weight of sets planic 1, The net 
profit in using four ounces instead of one 
ounce sets amounted to between two and 
three tons per acre, and the further profit 
from four to eight ounces averaged about 
five tons. The advantage of large sets 
was more marked in late than in early 
sorts. Small sets yield best when plaiited 
close in the rows, say from six incf es to 
nine inches, and in no case should the dis- 
tance exceed twelve inches. Weight for 
weight, cut sets produce the same v.eight 
of crop as whole potatoes. 

liVhy I>onU Our l-'armers Slndj 
ibeir ProresHion ? 

We ask our cultivators, why is it that all 
who come under tbe denomination of far- 
mers should take so little interest in agri- 
culture? 

Why should the noblest profession on 
earth have for many of its professional 
friends and co-operators those who rarely 
read a book or open a paper, or study a 
line of truth in the science from which 
they f arn their daily bread ? 

No lawyer that would make himself emi- 
nent, but feels the necessity of a good li- 
brary, and secures the opinions of all dis- 
tinguished jurists, courts, &c., and he reads 
the opinions and finds ideas to guide him in 
bis own advancing way. 

No physician but seeks from the prac- 
tical labors of his fellow craft, and from 
their written and printed opinions, light 
and knowledge to guide him on his way. 

No clergyman but that will peruse the 
writings and diccussions of all his own 
sect, and even those that differ from him 
widely, in order that he may select the 
true ud reject tbe fklse. 



No manufacturer or mechanic but that 

stores his mind with information from the 
best books and the journals that treats of 
the science appertaining to his own busi- 
ness. 

But the noblest science, alas for the far- 
mer! he thinks too often that as he has 
ploughed from his boyhood, he understands 
all about farming, and books and papers 
are of little use to him. 

How fatal to his success is this folly. A 
lifetime spent in practical farming only 
shows to the intelligent man that he has 
but just entered upon the threshold of the 
great Temple of Nature, and according as 
he desires true knowledge, so certain will 
be his success ; but the man that folds his 
arms, believing that he knows all. Heaven 
will withdraw the light of truth from him, 
and success can never restuptm his labors. 
— California FaiTttei'. 

Mk. Samuel Loveii, the Irish song 
writer, will soon publish a offmplete edi- 
tion of his poetical works. 

THE MARKETS. 

Nkw Yoam, Feb. 24. 18€8 

COrroN-Mtddllnfr f .23^® f .84 

KLOUK— Extra Western. 9.50 © 11.60 

WIISAT— Spring tJo. a 8 40 <» 2 45 

KYE-Westem l.bti & 1.87 

CORN— New Western Mixed.... 1.22 ^ 1.2;j 

OATS -New Western :. M^ia 

BARLEY— \V;«6tcni S.15 Q 2.20 

POKE- Mesa 32 87 © 24 37 

LARD— Good to Prime 16>. a .15V4 

GOLD- l.«. 

C'HICASO, Feb 24, 1868. 



BEEVES— Pau Gradee t 6 T5 

UOGa-Llvc 6.25 

Dressed 8.75 

BDTTER— Choice S.'J 

BOOy—Frech 30 

FU»L' Jl- White Winter 12 NI 

Spring Extra 8 75 

OIt.\UJ— Com— New 78 

Barley— No. 2 2 09 

Oat»— No. 1 SfiJ^a 

Rye— No. 1 1.55 ^ 

Wheat— Spring, No. 1. 1.98 
" " No. %. 1.% 

LAJIJ) 13 

POKK-McBB 23 25 



.35 

.ei 

13 60 
10.25 



2.08 

1.56 
2.10 

.14H 
23.50 



CiNoorsAn, Feb 

FLOUR— Family |il 00 

WUKAT— Kca Winter 2.40 

COUN-Ntw Ear IB 

OATS-No. 1 (4 

RYB-No 1 1.70 

BAKLKY-FaU 2 30 

PttHK- Mees 23 fO 



LARD. 



24. 1868. 
® $11.25 



.li>/i» 



2 45 

.80 

.tto 

175 

235 

2425 



St. LotJiS. Feb. 24, 18fi8. 

FLOUR— XX f 9 50 ® |10..';0 

WHEAT— Winter 360 ® a.M 

CORN— Khelled 82 O .88 

OAT3 68 O .74 

RYE 105 & 1.70 

BARLEY— Fall 2.50 @ 2 W) 

PORK— Mess 2310 (^ 24 CO 

L^MD 14 & .15 

MJLWAtTKM. Feb. 24. 1868. 

FLOUR-SpriUKEiUa | 8 25 O | 9 50 

WHEAT— Spring 1.92^® l.t)8 

CORN-New 77 @ 

OA'W tb'i® 

RYE— No. 1 1.46 @ 1.4S 

BAUI.£Y 1.05 @ 210 

llOGS-Drosscd 875 (& 9.35 

PORK— Mess 2i.50 (^ 

CLBTELAITD, Fcb. 24. 1808. 

FLOUR-XX Spring fl0.'.5 ® f 11.50 

WUKAT— No 1. Spring 2.30 @ 

CORN-No 1, Sheilod 04 @ .95 

0.\TS-Nol 69 @ 

BARLEY— Nol 2.S0 @ 2.22 

RVa— No. 1 ... 1.55 © 1.56 



]l«-ar in Mind. 

When dlpcase has undermined the health, and 
the physical system has bocomo prostrated, a 
etimnlant that will not only itrentthen but re- 
move tho cause, should be Immediately resorted 
to. Mental dUtreps ia also a fruitful source of the 
breaking down of the constitution, and the rava- 
pes of this enemy to health are truly alarminp. 
ForallPuch maladies HOSTETTER'S STOMACH 
BITTERS have been found unsurpassed. By act- 
in? directly upon the digestive organs, they re- 
move the heavy disagreeable feeling after eating 
60 often com plaint-d of by persons of a delicate 
temperament. As soon a» digestion Is restored, 
the paiieut finds his strength increasing, and his 
general ht«alth Improved. 

Thousands of persons certify that It may be re- 
lied on in all cases of weakness or nerv'oas debil- 
ity attendant upon sedentary habits. The gener- 
ality of Bitters are so di»ugrecable to the taste 
that th"y are objectionable to a weak stomach. 
This is not the case with HOSTETTER8 BIT- 
TERS, nhich will be found mild and extremely 
pleasant. Balsamic plants barks and roots con- 
tiibate their reftoiaiivc juices Io render it sooth- 
ing and strengthening, lis basis Is the only pure 
8timulnnt which has ever been produced coniiiin 
Ing no funll ait, or any other deletci Ions element. 
The most canfnl and skillful chemists hav» 
analyzt-d the Bitter.* and pronounced them harm- 
less. This is scientific tei-timony; but the testi- 
mony of tbe hundreflsof thousands who have ex- 
perienced the preventive an i curative effects ot 

the GREAT VEGETABLIt TONIC and ALTEEATIVB of 

modern times is still more conclusive. In Kever 
and Ague, Dyspepsia, Biliousness, Nerrone Com- 
plaints, Chronic Complaints and general debility 
It is ns nearly mfalliblj as anything in this fallible 
world can be. 



TO COlNfiUIVPTIVES. 

Pie Itev. KUWAKU A. WILSON will send (free ol 
eliarfcu) to all who desire It. tlje presertpUon with the 
dlrpctiong l>ir niuklng mid uslug the simple remedy by 
wUlcli lie WH8 cured of a lunj; aUt-ctlon and that dread 
dtseHse, Cousumptlon. His only object Is to benpflt tbe 
afflicted, and be bo|^>ca every saflerer will try his pre- 
scription, M it will cost them notblng, aud may iirove a 
hleselnir. Mease addru<i« Rkv. KDWAKD A. WILSON. 
No. l<i'> South accond nUeet. WUliamebiirKh. New York 



INFORITIATIOM. 

Inforuatlon ffuaranteed to produce a Inzurtan 
growth of hair upon a bald head or l)eHr(l!e»ii lace, also 
a reeipe loi the n-moval or Hroples, Bloiches, Krup- 
tlons. etc., on the skin, leaving the same sott, clear and 
r>eMutlliil, can be oot^ulned without rbarge by addrcsg- 
Inir TU08. F. CHAPMAN. Chbmibt. sa Broadway N.Y 



FOR SALE. 

Send for Price List of PURE EXGLISH CLl'STER 
Ireefrom New \ork diseases. Hfd mil inHlruftin' n lor 
coltivatlon and curing, tj HOtVAKD H. POTIEK. 
Baraboo, Sink Co . Wis. irwucji. 



HOP ROOTS! HOP ROOTS! 

Kfjin thrl.ly yard-., beeur.-ly oac*cd and delivered 
8. KUlKiurn City dep<jt. Srrl"t att«ntton to ordtri and 
coinaponoence. Tr.c lowest prices eUargei. A>'dress 
WILLI A M S. GRLBB. Baraboo. Sauk Cc.Wls. 

Rc'crenres-Sank Co. Bank, S'ate Bank. M»dl80D. 
Crjrtls Ho-f.e\ P.ttsb.ir^-h, W. P. Westiall, Banker, 
Mlnneapo.l., bji; up| K<i.mcutt, Albany. N.Y., L. Kair- 
ciiibl. Go-,-. \Vi6., .Seior.,1 Miilonai BanK, Clciuto, Jog. 
.;• Hu-spy, Cievclai (I. Ml Plsartsnt B«nk, Ohio, Irvlrg 
Holcemb. II .>ii.N.i„0. S.&S S Orubb.Wllml gton 
D-1.. Hon. Alp.\-. Kandall WasuuigtoD. D. C, Hon. B 
1 . llnpklQfi. V, MfihliiKton. DC. 



mm & FRUIT UNDS. 

The Illinois Central R-i'lroad Company have for sale 
In tracts 01 4u acres acdQpward8.7!.(i,(,uiBcre« of choice 
Unulng and Iruit lauus. all lylnKsaJacent to their road. 
tirsraiu groftirij. Hock-rsSHncr, and every purpose o 
proi-iiil" Hprlcnltu's, these laiiilg possess every re- 
QUmUfcc: :; .ir.'J t:l»uate. 

of Souiticm Illinola is noted for in wonde" ful wrtlllty 
ill tb<i pro aaion or apples, pears, peaebes, bhI all 
Kir.ds ol Irul-ia. IJuilng it.e i-i>a3aD ot IS";?, tbe Special 
truit fcxprcks Trnln tiroueht over 6(0.100 boxes oi 
p^aobe* and TO.OM bashels of strRwt>f-rrle« to Cblcaeo 
alone, from Ibecce farnietiing tho flrnt Jruits ol the 
NeusuD to all the northern mirkets. SO.nou acrwi of 
tbes* Jrult lands are now offered lor sale on favor 
able terms. 

Titlo in Fee from the State. 

|3f~ AH stmlon .izenta are provided wl'h plats, show- 
Ice thH lands lor B»le la tn«;lr vicinity. 

Inlormailou (riven upon all points at the ofBoe of the 
Land D partinent, 58 Michigan Avenue, Clilcaeo. or a 
desT p.lve nampiiletj with maps showing the exact Io- 
e.ilSty 01 all the lands, sent to any person writlnz for 
tbe sujie. In any language, to 

JOi£N B. CALHOUN, 

Land CommleBloner, Chicago. 



for 



SS 000 A. YEAR GUARANTEED ! 
*j^Kf\j\j Employment for LadiM and Gentlemen 
everywhere, by which the above amoont can be 
reilizcd. Ko ilsk, and $10 a day ot:AB»KTittD to 
Agenta. For partlcuiar"*. "prd r>o»t-pald addressed 
envelope to J. W. 2O0K, Oa. Grove, Ul. 



Water Proof Roofing, 

■^ fiUmy tot Cimiv aad feapte •t 
thm Fa per. 

C. J. PAT A CO., 

:=aM*TUM8li., CaaOMt V. Jenqii 



Important Annonncement ! 




A Beautiful. Illustrated Book, vorth « Thousand 
dollars, cent tree to any address on receipt of 2j cents, 
by a-drrsslug Professor JOHN VANbERPOOL, No. 
•Hi Wiuihrup Place, New York City. 

HORSE -OWNER'S FRIEND; OR 
Help In Time of Need: a complete work of 25< 
pages, on the Horse, Diseases and Care, mailed to any 
address post-paid, on receipt of orioe. Bonnd lb 
cloth. IS cents : paper, S« cents. Agvnts vaitted. 
UPJOffiS A TYLER, FnbUahers, 

.Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

IVEW MEDICAL BOOK ON DI8- 

-^^ eases or imprudence, and their boum tKMMDim*. 
worth a journey to New \ ork on loot to otiUtD. Bend 
tree under seal by tuclosing • povtace stABip to PB< 



'•W. 



W 



; }/ 



V 

I 

. _ - 



« 



[ 



tAWMHC&i 



t T«aai itrwt. S«w Tork. 



Ui 




■c; 



*?: 



3=*= 



r 



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■P" ^ »i ^ m m ^ ^ ^ m ^ * 



» - ' r- 



-' - I I n 



O I -GP 





Yovvi^ mx) comrvL 



SHAKOPEE, MAIlCn 19, 18GS. 



1), M. STORi:il, 

l^RORHIETOR. 



SUnkopre Market. 

TI:iT— pcrton, - . $«. 00 to 88.00 

! I'oik— i-cr luiiMlrod, - ■ C.OO to S 00 

Wiioal— prr biisliol, - l.lOtol.lJ 

<',„•„_ .i .. . . '.1.-, xo 1.00 

Wood — dry, por coi>l, - • ^''.00 to .'I'lO 

LiiJiL*— i>fr baiici, - - - 1-00 



STAPLE AND FANGV 

GROCERIES, 

PJtOI'JSKM'S 

WOODEN WARE, 

Yankee Notions, 

c&9C.y ttoo., cfco: 

On liaiiil and fur isilc as cheap iis the 

CH E ^I> KST. 

Jan. 11, \iiC,8. |ii.12 

N K W 

PllO^MSION STORE 



?l2r Ifcv. A. OsTKU will preach at the 
Kngli.sli Catholic Church on Monday, Tiie.s- 
d.ty and Wednesday eveniny.s at 7 o'clock . 



Tlie BO'terslsneil has oppiie>l a new Provision Store on 
SK0O-N"D:STUKKT. (Ol'l'OSITK TIIK DKPOT.) SUAK. 
OI'BK, MIX.NKSOTA, 

XfUi c liL> liilcnils 'icepins a genera! assortmoTil of 

l»rocei'ie» ami fi*rovi?»!Gns, 

\t prices nf Inw »«|ny in Shak'ipce— ami us good 
»ritce*. «lr Ulvc mo* call. 

OE.i. U. SPKXrF.R, 
(» . 5. — Twill mvlp.ivor loki't-i> "II tiaiiii ac»nsliiiit 
b up.jly uf 'Jropn '^iroccricsaml Poultry. ^ 



Proposals fcr Poardins- the Coucty 
Paupers. 

riir.snant to a resolution of the Boarl of 

C'ounly C<iniiiilsN|"»er Bol Scult r-'unty, pnsscil at llitir 
Sp'cUil Si'sslun on .Marili ll'lli, lS4-.>, Se.il<Ml rriipo.>als 
will be rcci-lveil al lliu OtiWo of the Comity .\iiili!or. up 
to five o'clock In the aflcriiooii of the II?A i{uj/ c/ Aiiril, 
lS4->, for t<iklns care of anil l.ojrilin^r the couutv pau- 
per.-', and wa.-hiiih' arul nieuilliii; lor them lUirin:; the 
vflw, coininenciii^' on the ITtli day of .April, l.-'tis. 

The contractor will have the use of the bedaiiiv; an 1 
utensils belonj;inK to tlie Coniilj, aiiU now in tlic I'oor 
House, but no new bv'liiinx or housoliuhl gmuls will 
be furn'slicil by the County. Each biil niuvt ttt.ito tlic 
price per week for each adult pauper, and the price 
per week lor e.iih eliiM uu'ler ten years of age. The 
Comnii»iiioiier!. reserve the rl^lit to accept a bill lor 
either i>f these classes of paupers, and njei I his biti 
for the oilier, proviUeil liis bi>( is lowest foroneciass 
aiiil not for the other. The board must be with gojil 
and healthy f<H>d, and no c.\t:a charge ulluweti for care 
111 CISC o! sickness. 

D.tcd -Mar li ISth, I-GS. 

-M. m:sS DINAND, 

Imiiity Aii'til'ir. 



n.lo-tt 



- .\. N 1> — 

CLERK OF THE DIST. COURT. 

(tjicc at the Court IIouBC,^hahopcc. 



I 



Will in«ke feeds and Mort;:n •:€.>, and 
all Lc;ral piipors. Will pay taxes and sell 
K-'al K-jtate on coniinisaiun. &c. .i2:ly 

Itoli, Itolx, 3:tcl3L ! 

sciiATcii: sciiATcu:: scratch:! 

ill fri«ni IOto4Shonrs. 
Whe iton".s Ointment cures The Itch. 
Wheatoii's Ointm«nt curu.s Salt Hheiim. 
Whoatoii's Ointment cures Tetter. 
"Wheaton'.s Ointment cure.s JJarbors" Itch. 
Whoaton's Oiiittnent cures OM Soivs. 
WUoatou's Ointmeut cure.s Every kiiid 
of Humor like Magic. 

V,-|re .".flceiits a liox : by mail. Ml rents. .\.ldrc' 
WKKI\.< * POl'TKIt. .No. I7<l WasUiuvt^.u Stie '^ 
B .slori M.is-1. lt»- b'or sale l>v all I);u;,'i;ists, 

Uj*ton 3e.it. l>67,— !«p. uollce 1 yr. 




O THE SUREST REMEDY 

lor foashs, fnlds, Srrofnia, (oiisnmptlon, 
Khrnniatisin, (irneral Debility Jlc 

rn.l l.iver OH, uhen perfectly purr, is of such value 
a.- H curative nqeiit in tlie trestnienl of hcuoKi i.a, 
KmaciaTion, ItKONciiiTis, UrmiI!al Dkbiliiy and 
riLMONAKV AFFKCTioNt', as to render all conitnents 
giinc«-cssarv. Tlie itreat snperinrlty of cur brand of 
oil. consists In its lieinc prepared with conscientious 
••nre. fr.mi TufK Con l.ivKiyi, in :» manner that de- 
privesthroll from all impurities, and liie unpleasant 
flavor usuallvexistinj' in all other brands. It is always 
Tastsi.Ess, and can lie. taken by the yonnjjest cliild, 
either as a nutriment or medicine. Jnvai.ios and d^- 
liilitated persons, to whom this oil is unknown, will 
Hurt creat virtue In Its nse. Tnysif ians and their 
patients ran rely upon this oil as beiUK Cue^icali.v 
mid MKfK-iNAi.i.Y l>nrc. ^ „ ^ 

fUrSobl in CiiKAtio, hy all Dkuoci&ts and by 
ilvaiers lu MeUtcine everywhere. 

• JOHN OB AKER& GO'S 

CITRATE MAGNESIA 

■'tAa,ii,ia 1 xaiive in casts of C<^n^tipation, ag a cer- 
l.ii.i cure or.^i k llea<l lelie. and ilmt tnactlvil) it \lie 
liver, wiiich is til- s«r.- pr.i usor «l acMI>- ilisease, 
iioilii'i^ is ,-.|Uil to our CKIKliK \ ll-.I> KKkKUVKM- 
• NtJ CirK.MKOr .MAtiNi;.-^l\. For gi vin:4 Iresiii i ss 
lo a sy>tcm J.iiled by impriiileiici' or iiy toi', it iirove? 
iisell a t'aiiacea. Ills- rtrkliiU awl co"ori< ss— ihtiiiile- 
ly 111 ire va u iliie th.iii C i;;res- \\ .iti-r f.r any nuiose;, 
w h.tievcr, while its tre>. i.ess is KiLiiMnO-i-.l to lie perilia- 
iieni . The trade sUiipib d li-in «.liicai;i'i by ;dl Wholcsi.le 
l»rii,',-lsts. 

JOHN C. BAKEK & CO., 

I' K O f U 1 F. T O K S , 
718 M.\nKKT StUKKT, rilll.ADKl.flllA. 



BGX» Any one liavinj^ l.jO fence posts for 
sale, ciin find a purchaser by im^uiriui; at 
t!ic Ar;;u< ollice. 

^^S- We Icaru that Mrs. Hpeclator one 
eveiiing latit week, was aniicled with that 
terrible disease — the Hind erpe.^f, and e.\- 
hibiled conduct unbecominjr a lady. It is 
hoped bLe will learn better niuiiners or 
keep out of decent society. 

N'kw jidvertisemeuts have crowded upon 
us so fast, that we have biil little room for 
iioiue iieta.i this week, and also were com- 
pellod to oiiiit some i ew advcrtiseuient.s. 

.SiiDYixi; Law. — We understand that 
Mrs. Spectator has conimcncod the study 
cf law and had pro^^resseil so rapidly that 
One evciiin^' la.st week .she yot her head into 
c'aaiicery, and it took lour men to get it out 
a'^aiii. 



pKwixc Maciiixks. — Notice is hereby I 
•riven iliat i am i'frent for the .sale uf i 

Singer's Sewing Machine. 1 will sell 

these .Machines at iMaiiiitketory prices. — 
S;»le rooms at Schwartz" Clolhiny Store, in 
Shakopee. 

Dated Dec. 10, IHf,?. 

JOHN SCHAVARTZ, 



BS^" Anion;,' the most prominent advan- 
ta;,a's of the I'errinc Plow over all others, 
is its great durability. It will last from 
two to three times lonsrcr than any com- 
mon Plow made by any other jterson. — 
This has been often tested by actual use. 
In jrritty soil, where other Plows have been 
worn out in plowing from si.xty to eighty 
acres or less, it having already plowed over 
two hundred acres of the same soil without 
btinff half worn out. The.se Plows can be 
procured at the Hardware Store of John 
McMiillen, Shakdpec, 



FOR SAL 



By WILLIAM IIAJlILrOK, 

A Si'l.KMilI) 

Young SialliGn, 

Five years old. color iliip;ili' b.rv. « ei.-lit ij i:iiiMlred Bis. 
.-Iieil tiy •■ vol .Sli lilLiiKUl" I-"..!!! Kreeeli Caiiadian 
Jlare. I-i well l.r.ike. kinl and tviitb-. anil t a Ki.o.l 
lairiai:'', and will i.e .miM .-a s\ lii'-^uiu. Cm be scin «l 
his farm in Ka'.;!e Creek, llire^' ni.les Iruni tShakopv:e. 
lis It 





Bc%^ The 'i own niccli:iijs this year comes 
0:1 the 7th day of April. 



8^f .\bf>ut nt)on today our str-'ct was 
enlivened liv a runawtiv. .lohn Me.MuHen's 
horse wasataiiuing in the street and stepj-ed 
on a I'tg, which gave such a .stjual that it 
started the horse off at "JrlO lhiou;;h the 
streets. No damage except a broken 
•.vagou. 



£,T7 1**^ • ,-^'' ' -'-■•'^■r. '' -'■ ".."^ .."! 

TIN-; IJllOAl) (lArtJK— DOUIJLK 
" 'JTIACK KOL TK TO 



TlllJi K.\I!.WAY K.XTK.M).' KIIO.M 
Dunkirk to New York ttiO .Miles, 

IjuIVhIo to New York AT.', Miles, 

Salamanca to New York 11 J Miles. 

AX1> IS FROM 

_Z7r '11 to 27 Miles the Shortest Uoute 



^m Tr>i'it.i )Hii itifrtt;/ ti'irriitgti tn Xrw Vnrl-, 

;?ir ."GO Miles wiihout change of Coaehe; 



H FLAND^ 





li A JL JCsJ[«i 



J^lT' We ate In roeeijil of a Catalogac (S 
U:ispberries, IJlackberries, Cirapfvine.«, and 
Fru t and Ornamental 'I'rees, which are 
cultivated by Maim. ox Moox, al Morrisvillc, 
Uucks County, Pennsylvania, This cata- 
logue will be sent free, [lostpaid, by Air. 
Moon to any person sending his address. 
It contains illustrations of the Clarke and 
Philadelphia Uaspberry, of the celebrated 
Kittatiniiy tiud Wilson early. It also con- 
tains lung lists of raspberries, blaekiierries, 
gra'j.e- vines, fruit trees — apples, pears, 
peaches, cherry and i>lniii, ortiamental 
trees, Uuwering .shrtibt, evergreens, and 
roics, with a li.st of prit.-es 

TiiK lliVKi:. — On Moiuhiv the ice in the 
.Minnesota river began to disappear, and 
was all gone out in front tf Shakopee by 
Puesdav noon. 



fei>'" A lot of fii.e Seed Oals for .sale by 
W. (;. Ijriggs. 



Mhuto.n'.s (ioi.k Pi:\s. — Morton's Gold 
Pen is un(!onbtedly the best gold pen in t!ie 
market. We have one which we have useil 
constantly for over si.x years, and we be- 
lieve this pen has dune more writiu'' ihau 
aiy other pen in the State. It stands coii- 
.st.iut wear better than any other pen iu use 
Tlie elastic jioints of the Morton Pen yiehls 
exactly ^o as to produce a lieavy sh:ule or 
a delicate htiir line. There is no scracch- 
iiig or spluttering. They are fully war 
raiiteil. and if any pen does not suit your 
hand, it can be e.xchangetl for another. — 
We find these pens tlte cheapest, as well as 
the best, for our school children. Morton 
makes all sizes and styles of gidtl {)en, 
numbered according to the size and <[uali- 

ly of the gold, but all pointed in the same 
manner and of etimil durability. If you 
once get a .Morton Pen you will never use 
any otiser. We do not know whether Mot* 
ion has an agent in this place or not, but 
if not, a pen can be !ia I by jiddres.sing A. 
Morto.i, 2j Maiden Lane, New York City. 

A FiXK Okca.v.— The M. E. Church 
have procured a line organ for the use of 
their chureh, and they .say it produces line 
music. We know it will make a big noi.se, 
but as we do not know '• Yankee Doodle" 
from " Old Hundred," we are not able to 
tell what the noise is all about, but are 
willing to adt>pt the opinion of good judges 
and call it good music. 

Pox't UfiK Soda — Nor any of the com- 
mon kinds of Saleratus in making bread, 
if you value health and desire to have 
bread that is palatable- Always use I). !$• 
De Laud & Co.'s lifst Chtmictil <S'«/f/«/iia 
at.d you will have a pure article. It may 
be found at the store of D. .M. Stor«.r. It 
is put t;p in full weights, others are short 
weights. 

Wk rKKEK our readers to the advert ist- 

, „., .^ . . , , nicnt of .Jusiah Carpenter. Those having 

i-ni in. I, Jaoob I homa.i. Slienff of f^nid ... .. , -m , i- . 

• Joa.ty of .Scott, at lUoebiek in the forr- ''''y '^^'^'t-i'lUion ol pioduce wul do well to 

no ft of the 'l^tn i>\v ok M.^rcii, in tiie year 
IM;^, al the front door t>f liie Court !lou.-c. 
at Stf.ikopee, in .said County of Scott, will 
.-.ell to the liiihest bidder, the real estate Bo 
k-vicl on uiid.r nn>l by virine of of said 
ex 'cuiion, w'.iieli is dt^st lilted as foUow--, to 
wit : Lot pour in lll.>ck Tweniy-fivc in 
the plat of S!iakop?e City, on file in the 
oniiMif tlif 11 ''/Hter of Deeds of said (.'oiin- 
tv of Siu)'l, to sati.^ty ilie stun Uvn due on 
sai I jiid^ ii«nt ani ••.<ecuiion, v^ith costs. 



NOTICE OF EXECCTIOX SALE. 

Notice is hereby given, that on the 8th 
iKiy of February, A. D. IHfi^, 1 levieil npen 
I'lie f'dlowing described real estate, lying and 
being in the County of Sco-.l, Slate t-f .Min- 
nesota, as the proju-rty of Jau'cs ArnislroiiL'. 
uni.r and by virti;o of an exccitlion is.snul 
• iflt of and un id the .se.il of ll.e Supreme 
t'ourt, of tlie State of .MiniR-iiota, bearing 
datetm the 28th day ol Jainiary. A. D. l^<»y, 
1.)ihe S'l'TilT of the County of Setitt tifni-e- 
sai I, d reeled and leli vcred on tht; •'^Ih day 
.if F« bruary, A. U. 1^08 ; which said cxe- 
fitiiiii was; s i.tl upon a jid^'nionl rOnderc' 
i.i said .S ipremo Cuurt (if the Slate of M'n- 
no>otn, on t'le Elevoiilli day of October, in 
(lie year 18 >."), in an action ihci-ein peiidii g 
t»efween James .Vrm trong, rcspor.deiit and 
Henry Hi i.ls, tif):)el!ant, in favor of said 
appellant an! a:; linst s lid respondent, for 
ll:e su n of TiiirtyiOMJ (hdlars and eighty five 
cents; whic'.i sml j'Hl;rinc:it was tlocketed 
with the Clerk of the District Court o! the 
Fifth Judicial District, in and for the Coun- 
ty of Scolt afjicsaid, o.i the i'th diy o 
Ju iiiary. i:i t'.iC }-oar 18C6, !.y which taid 
ex cuti'Mi tlio Slicrill' of siiil Conuly ol 
Sr ttt is c .luinati leti lo saii>fy the said 
j il.jtncnl with inter.'st and costs out of the 
peraonal ■ pr>perty of Ihc said jatigiixnl 
debtor not »-.xeinpt frjin execution within 
the said Conn'y of S.ott, oi if suITiciciit 
p-rsonal pro;ieriy conbl not be found, then 
out. of the real property not exempt from 
e\ecution in .-aiil Comity of Scott, belong- 
ing to tile .•«aid ju igmeiit debtor on the day 
wlien the .said judgment was so ilocketed as 
uforcs.tid in tiie sind Comity ot Soot', or at 
a:iy time thereafter; 

\' jvv, therefore, fnrllicr notice is hereby 
giv M, th.it u- der and iiy virtue of said exe 



From ai d after Xoveliilcr l'.^lh. Iffi', Trains will leave 
ill connection with nil WesliTii liiie.s, as follows: 

FuoM DcNKiRK A.xi) Sai.a.maxca — Uy New 

York Time from Union Depots: 
7:30 A. .M. E.xi'RKs.s Mail, from Dunkirk, 

(Sunday- excepte I). Stop^ at J^al.iiiiaiica lo.ti(l.\. 
.M. and CO nil I > lit ir>rin ll»\ i' e ;iii I I'oitiill; 
Wl'll the .' liO A. M. Kxpless .\Iiiil floUl l.Ullalo, 

and ar;ivi's in .Niw Vori« at 7.iki .V. M. 

2:;$.') P. M. Lif?iiT.M.\(j E.xi'RKss, fron: 

8ataman.-.i. (.•;uiida>s 1 .\( ep/i (1). Mips ul llor- 
nellsville .'i L'.'i P. .M.,(.»i!p.( Intersei tlou w'thtln 
2.jnc. >l. Ir.iiiilp'm lluil.ilo.aiid ani.es in .New 
iork at T.iNi .V. .M. 

1:1."> P. M. Ni;-.v Y(kk Nkjiit ICxmi: s. 

from D;illklrk. (.■'lllidays ixciple!). Sto;is ii' 
!<.il.iiiia:.i a ivin P. .M.; Ui.ai,, 7::j-, |'. VI .; (^.np., 
Tiin.e/s y.v, A. .M {I5'krt.).and arr|vi,iiiXew 

York at fj:t» P. .M.. coiMoetimj with Alten i 

Trains and Sleaiiieis lor lto5;on and New Kiii:- 
laii ICit:is. 

DiJO P. M. <'ixrixATT. ExpKi;.s.«! from Dun- 
kirk, (!<iiniia>s ex-cpted.. ."itops at .".ilaniatlca 

II. .V> P. M , mill I Ill-its at ll'irn Msville with 

the Jl.-i'i r. ^l. 'Ir.iiii Irom Buil.*i», uiriviiiu in 
New York ;i,l.-. P. SI. 

Fito.M DiFiAi.o — IJy New York time froui 

Itepol cortK r K.xcliati?p aii-l Mlclil;.Mn ?trcef» : 

"):-l.'> .V. M. Ni;w YoitK Dav E.xi-ukss. 

(Sundays e,\c. pted). t'to|« at lli r.i'llsviUe '.i i ii 
• A, .M , (irklt.). Su-i|U-'liaiiiia 2 17 p. in. (It.iie) ; 
Turner's T .'I'l p. m., (..-^up ). uinl airive in .\i« 
York IO.:tii p. ni, Coiiin cts at <lreat tleiid wl;h 
Uelaw.ire. I.iek.iw. una & Western l{;:llro.iil, and 
lit .lers y lily \v;ili .\liduU it K.xpress Tr^iin ol 
New.le-sy l;ai!io,ii! lor l'lii;a..elii;iia, ll.iltiliiore 
and V\ashlii..;ton. 

3:00 A. -M. ExpnF..s.s .Maii,, viti .\von and 

IlorielNville (Su'ilays exceptal.) Arrlv-s In 
Ni w Vi.rk alT. U a. m. 

2:20 P. M. LioiiT.Nixf; Exprkjw. (.Sundays 

excrpteil.) Stops at lli-rnellsville .'■ :'j p. m., S» p 
and arrlv..*in Sew York ".una. in. Coni.ei ts at 
Kliniru wlih Nortlierii Central Kailway lor II. ir 
ri>liurst. Philadelpliia and the South. At .lersi.i 
Citv witli Morirn.i{ K.xpr-ss Train of Nrw Jei>. .» 
Ilallroad tor I'alliinori', and W ashiiiition, ai:d a: 
New York w;t'i >lorni:i« K.\pres.', Ualii p.r lloxion 
and New England Citie.-. 

3:10 P. M. Nkw Yoijk Niciit F'xprkss, 

l>Al.y. ."toisat Peita.e.s.V. p. le. i Sllli | l'.|,.t. 
si'« liii.L- at lloriieilsvill" with the f'.i.'i p lii.Tr.iill 
lro:ii Dir:ki.h, and arrives in .\iH York at l::..'|n 
V m. 

11:20 P. .M. Cixci.xNATT FxPKK.s.', (Sur- 

diiy> ex. epteil ) Stijis at Sn<'pielian!in 7:|iia.ni. 
tl{ Kft.l ; Turner's I.:;" |i. m., (iHiie.), unil airive.. 
ill .New Vork .'t. 1.1 II. III. Coiii'»- ts .It F.linIra uitli 
Northern Cintr.il l!ailwa»-' for ll.irii^bti-;:, Plili;:- 
deiplila. B.i!liliiiire, WasMn^lon an i imirits Soi.tb. 
At lireat iU'lid Willi l>e|.i w.'ire, l.^icka wanna niid 
Western Uailioa I tor S, r.ioton, Treii'.oii ami 
1'liil.i le/phia, it'll at .New Vork with .\rternoon 
Trams an I .Sieaiiiers lor U ■ston .iiid .Vew Kii^laiid 
Cit e». 
Only One Tr.iin KasI on Sun. lav. leavlni; r.uifalo al 
Xlii P. St.. and reachiiw Xi w York at II:."." P. .M. 

IJostnn ! nd Now I'nglaiid ]^ass(>ngrrs. 
with their IJaggagc, are transferred FiitK 
OK I iiAi:t;K in New York. 

«d'To ideas'ire tra /elcrs t'le line of the Krir RaU 
w.iy (iresents many objects of Interest, p isslii;.' throu^ih 
the be.iutlful valleys of the ChemuiiK, t'usi|ueliaiina. 
Delawaie an I 1'an.apo rivers, »o ever chaii:;lnk' paiio 
rtina of Nature's be.iuttes conini ii.ds atteiitluii. 

Tlic liiil V.ii'iliitril ami in"tt Liixiirii'vl Sl:'';)iv<7 
Co.'c/i.K A^- /.V TIIK WOULWiy^ «cc..»ij'(((iy <'<7 
yi'jhl Traiuf mi l.'iis J.'iiilimi/. 

nACiOAOE CHECKED THI^OrOH 
,'lii(t Fare aliciii/f og Low as by onij 
ullicr Hviitt'. 

.?-?r Ask for Tickets via Erie Rail- 
way rUa 

Wlicacau beoMalmd at nil rrliulpal Tiiket OUKe- 
in tle> \Ve>t and foUlh-West. 

It. uiDDi-i:, HM. n. RAnii. 

Ocii'l .Sup'l. tJciiT Pass. .*!!'t. 



HOOFLANO'S GERMAN BITTERS, 

AND 

HOOFLAE'S GERMAN TONIC. 

Prepared by Dr. C. M. JACKSON, 

PIIU.A|li:i,PllI.\, PA. 

Tie Great ReEfc for all Diseases 

OF IME 

LIVER, STOMACH, or 
DIGESTIVE ORGANS. 

Hoofland's German Bitters 

irpeom|Nisi»l of the pure jnii'is (or. as they are i««di- 
-iiially teriiiiHl. A'x .^^V* '^^V' Imrltt »f Hoots, 
Herbs' ntiil Itarks, [W — 'B inakiii;: a Jireparn- 
tioii. Iii^lily eoiieeii jJ^n^j^^ liu'ed. and entirely 
fif.- fiiimAhvliKlie wliiiixfiirt "fang 

HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIC 

Is » ,■ .niliiiiati.n of all Iheiiuie.lient-i .f the Hitters, 
Willi the purest ipi ility of Siiila Cnir Hum. <lra«cr. 
ite.. niakiii;! one of tile nioi:! pleasant and atreeabU 
reiaedies ever ollereil to the pulilie. 

Those preferiini; a Medicine free from Alcoliolic 
id:iii.\tuie, will u-e 

Hoofland's German Bitters. 

In e.ises orie'rvoii^deprea.-iion, wlien Bonieaicole.lio 
still. iiins is neressarv, 

HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIC 

Rli'llld be us«-d. 

Tlie Hitters or the Tonic .trelKith e«inally good, r.«.l 
rottaiii the saine Iiiedieinai virtues. 

Thestoiiiach, from a \ariely of causes. Buch as Iiiili- 
(festion. Dv-iiepsia. y^jj^^j^ Nervous Itebility, 
etc., is veiv apt to UB ]M have its functions 
dmiii-.sed. There- ^^^^ miU of which is. tliirt 
the ikUient snflers fiom severnl or more 

ofthe f lUowiiig diseases: 

Constipation, FlattilencP, Inward Piles, 
FulneMs of Blood to tho llead. Acidi- 
ty of tho Stomach. Ndust-a, Heart- 
burn, DisKUst for the Pooil, 
Fulness or Weight in the 

Bloinach. Sour Eructa- 
tions, SinkiiiR or Fluttwr- 
ing at the Fit of the Stomach, 
SwiinminK of the llcnd. Htirried 
or Difllculi Breathing, Fluttering at 
the Heart, Choking or Suffocating Sen- 
sations when in a Ikying PoKturo, 
Dimness of Vision, Dots or A\cba 
before the Sight, Dull Pain iu 
tho Head. Deficiency of 

Perspirali'^u, yellow- 
ness of ,^^S^ *^° ^)f.\r\ 
ftnd Eyes, 'Q IB *!"•"»" ^''" 
Side, Bttclc. ^^s^ Cheat. 
Limbs, etc., _ . 8 u d d e u 
Flushes of Heat. Burning in the Flesh, 
Constant Iinuginings ot Evil, and 
Urent Depression ol Spirits. 

Tliese reine.lies will elTirlHally cure l.iver 
t^inipi.iilli. .laiindiei'. I>y-pep-i.i. Clnonir ..r Nervous 
l).d»;lity. Clii"iiii«' I'iairiiii-.i. I>is<-a»e of lln- Kidneys, 
mid all l)t-e:ises ari^inj; from a l>i«ioiJercJ Liver, 
:;li>inacli. or IntestiiK''. 

UfiMlliiij; Irom jui.v «'iiii'»«« Mli>«tovor : 

I'uasiit vri<»> Ol tiiicsy.sik.m. 

IndtiftMl l»v SvvtTO l.iilKtr. Ilnril- 
Nlii|i*t, l';x|»«»siir«». F«'*ePM. «••«■. 

Th.-ie is 11.1 mi li.in- extant eijud to these remedii-* 
in --neli i-^is.'^. ,\ tone aii.l vi-..r is iiii|iarte.| to the 
whoU- Sv-teiii. the Ji^p»«g Ap|i-titi.isSlienuth- 
en.sU f.-l is en B-ij ^ J:>'"'; ","• -''"•':''•'' 
ili'ests pi..inptlv. _Str «'"• '•'"<••' "• li'iiihed. 

the complexion i.e ^^ •• IU e s « I and 

healtbv. til., veliow tinse is eradicated fn.iii tiw 
eves li bi.i.iiii is niven to tlie cheeks. nn<l tli.' weak 
ail I nervous invalid becitines antroiii} uiid h«tltli\ 
beiiij;;. 

rrrsnnH Ailrniimt in TAf<', 
Hud fielinu the lian I of time wei-hiiis heavily upon 
theiii. with nil its attendant ill-- will find in the us. 
of tlie«e lUTTKKS.ortlio IMMC. an elixir that wil 
Instill new life into their veins, n store in a mea-iir. 
the ener-v and i«rd.ir of more youthful days, bmli 
up their slirnnkeii firms, and give lio-iltli and happi 
uess to their reuiiiniua year*. 

NOTICE. 

It is n wcll-establi-li.d fact that fully one-nnlfof 
the leinale )H.itioii of ,mam» our |Hipiil:itioii arc 

•eldo'ii ill the <iii.joy B inmt ..ftr'x-l lieapli; 

jr. to use their imn |J^^^^<-xpressi..n, -iieier 
HhI well." Theyaie l.in-uid. devoid.. f nil 

fiiercv extreniilv nervou-i, •md liave lei apiM-tae. 

T.I this cla-s '..f p. rs..ns the liITri:KS, or tho 
T'l.MC. ar.' .■--i^.i-i.illy ri^"..iiiin<'nde.l. 

WEAK AND DELICATE CHILDREN 

Are luvile »troiii; bv the u f eiilu-r of lb reiiio 

Hie, Th.y will cute every ca.«e of .^IVKA.-'.Ml S, 
with. .1 fad. 

Th.iusiiiid- ..f ceitificates li.-.ve arrmnulatisl in the 
linn l« . f 111.' pri.pri..t..r. l-iit sisi.-e will all. w ..f ti.e 
pnlili.iill..ii ..f but a f.w. Tb.-e. it u ill b.- ol.-erved, 
ai.. imii of iMte mid of su.ti standing that they nm.'-l 
lie livlieMsl. 



NEW YORK 

ClOTHINGHQUSL 

Fpring Manufacture, 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 

MEN'S 

In New York City. 



Mo arc prepared to exhibit to the merchants of 

this n'clloti the best selection of Clothing 

ever oti'ered In the Xcw Y'ork 

.Market, conibluliit; 

Cheap. Medium and Fine Goods, 

MADK I.\ TIIK MOST SIIPKKIOK MAXXEK. 
Ani <if tilt t'eri/ tatett l^tvUi- 



M'e shall s'll upon liberal terms an 1 at 

ANTE-WAR I'RlOliS. 



We fnvlte the attenti n of buyers, and prciniM- 
to make it to iln-Ir interest to fxamlne our l»a- 
nielise ►lock b.f jre inaklii;; their piirclias s. 



NEW DRUG STORE 

I3W 



-^« 



EDWARD G. HALLE, 

NEXT DOOR TO GE ¥£11 MANN'S STORE. 

Koispectfully announces to the citizens of Shakopee, and Viciniljr 
that lie has just opened a cojnplete slock of 

Drugs and Medicines, Perfumery, Patent Medi- 
cines, Toilet Articles, Combs, Brushes, 
Stationery, Lamps, Pure Wines and Liquors, 
and all other articles usually found in u 
Drug Store. 



t^:^^ 




45 8c 47 Chambers St., 

i:tj 2nio 



Potrolenc Fluid constantly on hand and 
for sale. 



Dii. L. B. I^Ionnow keeps liis ofTice at (Tic Now Drug Sfcrc. 



T. J. 




ALDEITT & WOODBURY'S 




-0 ^ti:^(. 



- AMI- 



jE3 



Wagon Shop. 

Repairing, and 

CABBiAGE PAINTIHG. 



/foil? 



9 .0 




TfJV 
JfMRE^ 



AHD CUTLERY DEALER, 

COllAKH OF liOLMKS AND FIRST STUEET.S SH AlCOFEE, MIXXKSOTA 

.1. ii. Ill N I.S.MAX. ; ; s. o. now. 

J. B; Himt^man El Co., 
S ]I A K r E E MINNESOTA. 



Ciirri:) free .111(1 \Va2:oii=, of all <Ic.«cr!ji- 
ti.iii.s. j'lili.'--, .*^l(.'ij:Ivs, Ciitlcr.^, .Vt-., iiuiiiu- 
(acliiitil lo ortlrr at sliort notice. 

I'iiii'tir.f.' iiiitl Ht'itiiiriiijr promptly .ninl 
.«iitisl':iftorily tloiio. ;?*.»" All work war- 
ranted to lie of I lie be.st tjuality, and 
prifes reasoiialilo. "T^jfl 

\. ]\—(:U,\SMlTHl,XG done in 
cotiiiettion with onr e.stalili.slitnciit. 

Shop Oil the corner of 

six'dxi) a I.i; wis st.^?.. 

I'otweon I he resilience of T. J. DiiiTy 
ami the llai!ro(i<l. 

7-ir" Ileineiulier th.e jilaro, ami jrivc u.-« 
a call. 5 •^- ''^- Ai.iiitiTT, 

11 17 I F. WooititfKV. 



mm, ST. m 



DKAI.ERS IX 



MINNEAPOLIS 



RAILWAY 



jive Lim a Irial. 

,Z£J~ A house to rent on Fir.st Street, by 
Henry Hlmls. i'jisessioii ^iveii iinine^i- 
attly. 

Farm for Sa\e. 



Datu-tl, Kci-iru irv I lUt, l.-CS. 

.1 \t'Oi; TiiiiM.vs 

S'leriir of ^cotl ('omit; , .M in;. 
11: \ \ iriM»S. 

I 



IJODKRICK OnoWl) %vi!I.se".l bis Farm 

at a tiar^aln. Tlie farm l< !oi:r n.lh s ^outh ul till li- 
lt r. on the i-priin! I*-ike Koad : ciiitaiiis HVi acres ; :<r 
mreK under cuit.vatlon, .'Hi acr»s of Kood uieMdow : so 
aeienol timber, t.i .-.cr. s futiceil : ..;ood vvat.T. ;;..•.. I lo;; 
LlioM«ej«iid raltif slieiLs. Will seji in pan ^ illt 



AOKXrs WANTKP FOl''. 

TIIE lUAIE-COATS, 

And how they Lived, Foujjht and 
lied for the Union. 

WITH 

SCENES AND INCIDENTS IN THE 
GREAT REBELLION, 

Coniprisiii^r Xarrative.s of Personal Atlven- 

liire, Tlirillitiy liici<lent-<. Daring Ivv- 

jiloits, Heroic Doetls, Womlerfi;! 

liacapcji, Life in the Camp, 

FielU ami Ho.spital ; A<1- 

vcntiircs of Spies ami 

.Scout.-!, Together 

witli the Songs, HailaJ.^. 

Anecdotes nnj Iltitnorou.s 

I n c i d e u t 3 of the War. 

Splindidly llluftruUd icith over lOll I'liif 

Purtrails and Bttiuli/ui tliifrrtiviiigr. 

There U a certain portion of the war that will never 
ijo into the rej-'Ular hi.-.torle!i, nor beemboiied lii ro- 
mance or poeliy. which Is a Very real part of It.Mi.d 
will. If iireserved. convey to succeeding Keliemtlonsa 
liell'er Idea III the spirit ofthe contllit than many iiry 
r.ports or .aref.il narrativib ol everts, atel Ibis pan 
may b' called tiie L-os-lp, the tun. tli. palli.>s ol tlie 
war. This l.liislriiles the characi cr oi tl e leaders, the 
huiuor .f lh>' S'll. iters, tin- devotion ot women, ihe 
bravery ei men. tlie |.|iick of our heroes. lUe roiiiaiiie 
dii.l liarti.slil|i« of the servke. ' 

The Valiuiit aim Itrave Hearted, the Pic urrsque and 
Draliiatir. llie Witiy an. I .Marveio'is, tli • I e.iier a.id 
I'alhel ic, and tlie whole Panorama ol Ih" War are here 
thrllllnalv poriave.l in a masterly iiiuiiDer, at once 
hisluricnl met romantic reinierini! II the most ample, 
iinniae, briltlaiil and reaiialde biKik Hint tllcKarltaa 
c illeit Ivrili 

.AiniiMiiieiit as well OH iiiKtruclhin may lie round In 
every pane, as ;:r.i|ihli detai!. I>rli:ialil « it, lie) nutheii- 
lie hi.'.torv. ale ...kibtully i.ilerwvveii in lhl« uo;-'.. ,>l 
literal y ^rt. 

Vend for firculars atid sce niti li ruts, an.i a in'l b. 



TESTIMONIALS. 

IIOX. «JKO. W. W«M»U\V.MII>. 

flilrf Juftirr i.f tlir S»irfHf l-url ./ I'l.. writes: 
J'liil.iil.li-l.iiJ. Man h 111. IW'T. 
•1 find •Iloonan.ls ,/^ (;.riiian Hitters' in 

a K.Nsl t.iiii.-. u-.fiil ^U^ '" •''" ■•' "^ "'" 

dit:estiveor;:»iii. and Jj laHi of ;:r-nt I lit lit 

cas.s of debility. Mii.l want of iietvoiu 

action iu tlte system Voms trul.v. 

(iP.it. \V. WOttliWAP.Il." 
nOX. J.IMFS TII«MPS«»X, 
Juilu<- uf the ^'iipi'iiif l„iiil >■!' lyiin'nlr.iHirt. 
I'liiUvhli'lii"- .\pril >. lM".<s 
"I consi.ler 'Il.v.fl ind's (ieiinan Hitters' a t;ilii,i!,lc 
mnliiiiif in .a-e ..f atta.-ks of ln.lii:e>ti..ri or liv'pej- 
tin. 1 can certify llii< from my evpeiieiicc of it. 
Yours, witli resiie.l, 

,1AMKS TIIOMP.^^X." 
From nov. JOS. II. Ui:\\AKI>. 1>. »., 

■ riirt"r of III'- Trxlh Utylist Cliuy.-h. l1,i!-uUli''>i"- 

Itr. J.|cl«..M— Hear .<ir : I have be.ii frciiientlv ip- 
qiiostisl to r.innist iiiv name with ri-s-.iiiiiiien.lati.iin 
of diflerent ki:i.!< of' m.-.liciiies. but re..'ar.lini; the 
pnutice so out ofi.iy <«■«. -mmd appr.priat.' sphere. 
I hare in nil eii.H.-s ||^k I declined : but «ilh 
a dear prs f in vari r-l-7pJ "if instniin-s an.l 
pnrlieiilatlv in Inv o*n family, of the 

usifuInesH of Dr. lliK.llan«rsr.eniian Ititters, lde|Kiit 
f.ir one- from tiiv usual rcuise. t" expie-s my tnll 
coiiv i.tion that, f.'r irwral ilrliilitif <■/ Ih- sytt.m. i',„l 
tti>c. i.illf fir l.iWr i •»m}Jaiul. it it <• m ff »ii>l .■<il>i-iUt 
fr.jvn-'itu'H. In some cn.s..* it may fail : but in-iially. 
I .|..nbt not. it viill be very lieiieflci il to Ihout vdio 
sutler trom the als ve eau«e«. 

Yours, very reaped full .V, 

J. II KKXXAim, 
F.ighth, l.'l.'VT C.Mteii Ft. 

Fr*m RfV. T.. !». FKXD.tl.I., 

Jtfiflinif hlil'.i- (iiri<ti:i>i rhr.ruiil'-. 7 Vii/k/. //./,i.f. 

I have .l.rivcl de. i.le.l bemtil frnm the n<e .f 
It.iotlan.rs tj.rtnan Hitters, ami feel it niy privibfe 
).. rec.iiiinieii I them as a most valtiilde Ionic, to all 
whoiue -iilleiiii;; fr..iii eeneial debililv ..t from dii>- 
eu.,ea ariaiiij; froui derangement of the liver. 
Yours tinlr. 

K. It. I:K-M)A;.L, 



Via MeCircgor k ^Jilujiukec. 

Till': OXLY A T.I. IJAir. LIXK 

An. I the oii'v route by whhh nA(U!.\(iK lis 
t II ;l'KI It T.iKUltill t.i 

.\ i: \\ \ o It K , iso.sr « .\ 

AM) AM. KA.sfKli.N I'OINTS. 

I'.ifScti?ers clinnce cars it ly at teriiiiiinl points 
thu- Keciirim.' s- iK In cir.tn coa'-li "s and lull nlsbf.- 
re.^l in si eiiinj curaoii nUhl tr.iiiis. 

r.is.-enaer fr.iiiis leave an I arrive a^ AVest St 
i'aiil a.s toll! w» : 

!•: A S T l". U X F. X r R K s s 



.vnr.iv:-. 

7.45 p. M. 



1 I ^UIT. 

6.35 A. M- 



.Minnc.npolis A: St. Paul Accominodatitin 



/ttRivr. 
1 1: in \. N. 
.•t.Vt p M. 
7:-IJ r. M. 



PEr.VT. 
P.tl.' A. M. 
1 4V P. 91 

< li P.M. 



I). C. .SlIKI'AUn. .'SnperlntcmU.-ut. 
A. V. H. CAUl'r N fKIt, .>. .<<. .MKUMll,, 

(.eli'l I'as.Mtiiir A;4ei.t. (.eii'l Manacer. 

C'lAis. TIliiMI'-.t.N, 1 Icket Ajiei.l. rnt-'Hi ftV o 
f.ivt uf Jackson ^treet. aii'l on I., vee. il. IV«:. 



DRY GOODS & CLOTHING. 

Ladies Brcss Goods, etc. 

Don't iovget the place — Cor irolmes & First Sts. 




H s iioi.TOX.l I^'ii-^s- "•V^-^P'^'S 

HARKENS, 

Ccrner cf Holmes €c First Sts., Shakopee, Minnesota 

Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Kress floods, Clolliing-, 

Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps^ 

XLcfxdy-lMCfvcio Olotln-lxis- otc, oto, 

/Ic;^^ Tlio liiiihcst lurrkot I'lice iiaid fyv Who at, Furs, nnd IF 
kiutls of country pio%luee. 

?fr Call ana <«-c. We are DOL'XD XOT TO UF UXl)KR3<')LI) hy any firm in tl»»- 
NFinncsota Valley. 



JACOB nOFFERT, 



— DKAI.KK I.\ — 



FINKT.T: t^- I. YON 

KOCK SJUII 

G c u) i n 9 ill a cl) t u c. 



CAUTION. 

' llfv.flan.rs rirrman Itenie lie, are cunterfeitf I. 

Per that the sii:iiat l^nr*''*!!^ "•'■ "^ ^'- ""[ '] ^^ . 
SO.\ is on thewnp ■ » I er of each UdtU. 

»ll,a>...r.,.r.. ■■,,■„■ JW .^^^ t. lf.lt. 

|'rinei|«il tUli. e """^^ aiil Manuf.rtnry 
at the Cermati .Meilichit Store, Xo. i-l Allt'U .'slre.-t, 
riiiladeljibia. 

( IIABMCH W, F.V.IXR. 

tierniiiii I rii-'i;i-l. I'r.>prn.tiu-. 
KoTUieilv C. .M. J.vctso.v i fil. 

nooflanJ'i Oerman Ititters i^-r bottle $1 "0 

„ u .. half .1 ./.ti a IK) 

Iloodandsr.erman Tonic, rut npin quart Ih.iiIo.. I >• 

p,r b..lile. or a half d. >en f.-r . .M) 

Jtff l>" n.it f .rc<t 1.1 examine well the artich- y.ai 

liuy. in order to jiet tl.e ceiiiiiMc. 

For Snie b.v nil llriiiSgiHts iiikI I»cmI. 

crs of znicdifinct. 



The oxi.v Machine Ml perfecled that 
entire .sati.staciioii i.s ptiaraiitccti vr Ihr 
purclta.M' money rcfiiiided. 

Where we have no A pent a sample 
.Machine will he solil al very low pritv, 
ami a Local Ajront appointed on the 
iiKtst favuriiliie leriii.". 

X. 15. — Semi for Oircnlar. Travclmg 
A;;enis wanted. .Salary, liberal. 

;")S7 UitoADWAY Xcw Vork. 



.-^ 








'«£-S, 








II o o f 1 a II (I ' ^ 

GERMAN 

TONIC! 



r.i P:.h 



TIANDRAKE PILLS. 

■A Si:h.slitufe j'or C<i!oiutl. 

TI.O.V P lit are con:i'>el of'variou." rjots, hannj} 
I'le pjwer lo rc'a.x the fecrtflions of tho liver aa 
p.-<)i. p'U- htJ etf..c:un'ly sa b'eo pTl or nic.-cury, 
and withiut proiIacin< any oi' tlioer d'un^tccolte cr 
daMcerous eO'i,-;* v. 1. ch o-Vaa IcLovr the use o.' tit* 

IVtCT. 

In a'l bil'onf d'fOi-IciTtltMe f\"» may l« n'el w!tl> 
conil loncc. »« they prontole '.'..i liiechar^e of Tlfalcd 
bi'o, anii remove ihofe olvtructioTiB from the liver 
j'lJ b!i'.ar> (l.iots vvh cU are the caiuo cl Liliou.' 
"(Tectior.a in sc::or«i. 

SCIlKNCK'i MANP3VKS riT.T.S cure E'cV 
Ilcilaeiie, la.'n'l diaorilenoi ilte I.'rer, iuiicstcl by 
•Ito'v .k^B, c;i!!l ton;!ae, C3«»ivcnei-a, droivirreM. 
and a senr.-al fecMn; of wefin.wj aii'l ^Siw'tudc, 
eho.vins Iha; ih;^ liver u iu a torp 1 or clM^ructcd 

■M-.vi tlOM. "> 

la short, t'.rx VMt irn- N" av.i n-"ih alvan- 
a;c in all o^-ioa w.icu a p.ii.,a.>\c or a.tci-aiive 
uciiv'nc i» IP |ii re !. 
Pei-c a<'; dr M',-. f-he-vck'n Mvirtmke Pdia," 
nl otMrva that tlie two likeuac^eii ol the Itoctor 
i-e 00 Ihe wieritr. ca. (tamp — » e o hen in the iaci 
ji^e of Connu ..(i.iou, ami the other .11 liii prcMs^i 
icn'ih. 

.So d by all nrnc--f»» and denVr*. Tr'ce S.% cents 
•er K.I. i"r nc pa 0.l;ce, I'.o. l."« ICui.h iKh S.reot, 
.'u.aiep'ra Pit 

teiiern Wi.o'esa'e Apcn'f: Pitna, Bame" ft C... 
i Park Kin .\ew V..rK 6. 8. 1 1 vice, liX P.a'ti- 
lore St.. r.a'il -or-. .44. • .laliii it. lUcIt, N. K 
or. 11 Kounli a-'i V.i;-'!!' r^ . Cnr i;i,ai , ttloo 
Wa«.rr k Ta lor. 1.4 and 1".* Wnriwi Avuiior 
■:h.i.i e. Ml., Cti'-n. P. -vbers. .«iaihiT«»' ■•""' 



Saddlery Hardware, 

Horse Collars, 

CAHRUGE TfilMMINGS, 



&c., 



LFWI.S STRFKT. 



Shakopee, Min 



Fitrni for Sale^ 

I In tho Town of Bene Plaine. 

! The Siitiscrilier will sell one of his farms 
of 120 acres of first rate land, all fenced: 
;!(> acre.s of limlter 2(» ncre.s of iiomX iner- 
How, 14 acres tinder eiiltiviition. lof: house. 
staMp. and t'ond wnffr. P'.liiatrd I miles 
Soitlh fif Helle I'laiiio. For ^h\p ihrjip; 
p\'.t ca.5h. I'arl r.n linir. 



DEFECTtVE PAGE 



mr TT « V, 



T xr 



HALtS 

Veptablfi Sicilian Hair Renewei 

rias stood the test of seven year» 
trial btf the jmMie. ; and no jivejm-^ 
ration' for the hair yet di.seoeere<l 
irill produce tlm tutnic beneiiritiB 
re.sults. It is a new scientific dis" 
coverif, combining the tnost power" 
fnl and rentoratii'e agents in the 
VEGETABLE KINGDOM. Jt restorer 
GRAY HAIR TO ITS ORIGINAL YOUTK- 
FUL COLOR. It makes the scalp 
trhiteand clean; cures dandruff 
and humors, and falling out of th« 
hair ; and will make it grow njtoth 
biUd lieads, except in very aifed. 
persons, as it furnishes the nutri- 
tive principle by which the hair 
is nourished and supjwrted. It 
makes the hair 9noist, soft, anil 
f/losst/, and is unsurftassed as ft 
HAIR DRESSING. Jt w </t« cheapest 
urena ration ever offered to tfie 
public, as one bottle will accom- 
itlish more and last longer tfuin 
three bottles of any othet prepara- 
tion. 

If is recommetuled and used by 
the First Medical Authority. 

The wonderful results produced 
by our Sicilian Hair Jlenewev 
have induced many to manvfac- 
turc preparations for the Hair,, 
under various names ; and «»*, 
itvder to induce the trade and t/ts 
pttblic to purchase their eom- 
■/>ounds, theij have resorted i^tfiulsf- 
hoods, by claiming they vtrre, 
former jMrtners, or hadspmQ C<?lf" 
nection with our Mt\ 4f»^ ******) 
their preparation v/fts simtUtr to 
ou rs. Do n ot be i^.^ved bytl^fninif 
Purchase the origiwd : H nam, 
never been etMaMtd. fkur Treatitu^ 
on the jruir'uMth certificfttes, sent 
free bu n^iil. See ^hai eachbptiU)^ 
has ftMi- pvivate Meveuue •Sf'iMW 
over tti» top of tf^ bottle* Alt Oth^ 
ers are iutitatitnts* 
fl. P. Halt A Co., Prop's, Nashua, N. H, 

tiiM hw nil lh-iif)ui''l*'ii>'i I>i"l'-r$in .Iferfjriiie. 

C. A. COOK, CHICAGO, ILLj^ 

















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f 

f 




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V 



) 



The Shakopee Argus. 



By HENRY IIINHH. 



OFFICIAL PAPER OF SCOTT COUNTY. 



SHAKOPEE, MARCH 26, 1868. 



Meeting of the Democratic State 
Committee. 

Th^re win *• a tn*«llDg of t*e Dctnorratle 8tat« 
Conimlltee ml Owatonna, on tbe 1st J.17 oT April, ISM. 
At 2 o'clock, p. M., to tranMct ImiKirtantliaiAncM. All 
invnibant «re earnest]}- rcqocatoil to Ik> present, 

0. B. FLANUUAU, Chairman. 

Jm. J. Qkux, Secretary. 



THE 



RAMSEY AND DONNELLY 
CORRESPONDENCE. 



An effort has been made to create a new 
LdMil District iu Minnesota, with the ofiSccrs 
located at Alexandria. The rapid settle- 
ment of that part of the State impcrativelj 
(Jctnand the formation of a now land dis- 
trict. Aa it now is, pre-cm))tors h.ive to 
travel a hundred milea to the St. Clond 
Land Office, to make the entry of their 
homesteads. To meet this pressing want. 
Senator Ramsey introduced on the 12th of 
February into the United States Scuate, a 
bill creating the new district. But Mr- 
Donnelly, in the Ifouae, admitting the 
necessity of the formation of the new dis- 
trict, ever true to the instinct of a political 
demagogue, declares he will defeat the bill 
ill the IIou.sc, unless he can have his .say as 
to who .shall l>e appointed to fill the new 
ofTices which the new land district would 
render neces.sary. Mr. Donnelly therefore 
♦writes to Senator Ramsey, rofjuesting him 
4o select the Register and Receiver for tie 
•icw district from a Hot of names which he 
encloses, Donwlly in substance iulimating 
that unless Ramsey agrees to select those 
•officers from the list of names which ho 
liad fcimishcd, he (Donnelly) will have the 
l>ill defeated iu the House. 

Senator Ramsey answers the letter, and 
•urges the great necessity fur the new dis- 
trict ; B.ssures Donnelly that no improper 
appointments to Ell the nuw ollices would 
be confirmed by the Scn;.te, but declines to 
be bound to select from Donnelly's list, and 
urges Mr. Donnelly not to oppose the pas- 
•«a^2<of the bill through the Housu. 

This RnsT.er of Senator Raini^cj seems to 

have called out aiK>ther long and prosy 

•letter from Donnelly, iu which he takes the 

-singular position that the interest of the 

Republican party in this State require that 

t^enatcir Ram.sey— a life-long Republican — 

should not be trusted with the control of 

the appointment of two land officers, and 

'ihat therefore he will endeavor to defeat 

•<hc bill creating the new laud district. 

•It must lit once be conceded that the 

'position assumed by Senator Ramsey is 

that of a statesman, while the position 

ajtanmed by Donnelly is that of o narrow- 

niitided demagogue. The k^y, however, to 

xliis lock between this Senator and Repre- 

•♦eotatiw, will be found in the fact that they 

are both to lie candidates before the next 

Ijogi.-ilaturo for the United States Senate, 

in the place of Ramsey, who.se t<Tm expiree 

ail March ue.\t. Each, therefore, wishes to 

?havo the control of as many Federal ap- 

jKitntmoiits in this State a.s po.ssible, each 

'h«i>ing thereby to be better aide to procuro 

hiiown fcieuds to se.ats in the next Legis- 

daturc Coth are seeking the same end.?, 

duit .Senator Ramsey, iu the position he has 

KtAsumed on pajier, stanas on the firm 

l^round of statesmanship, while Donnelly is 

Houiidering in the (^ua^mire uf the dema- 

J?ogue. 

Be easy, gentlemen, and save your dig- 
•iity, fur the people of Minnesota intend 
next fall to see that both of your seats on 
the 4th of March next, aro occupied by 
lioneat Democrats. 



WUOSE FERRY IS IT? 

On March 10th the l3oard of Cot^ntj 
Commissioners of Scott County granted a 
fi?rry license to E. F. Drake and J. L. .Mer- 
riam, to run a ferry for five years across 
the Minnesota river opposite Mcrriam rail^ 
road station, — which is about half way bo 
tween Carver and Cha.ska. But on the 3d 
of March, the Board of County Comnmsion- 
«ra of Carver County granted a ferry license 
for tive years to L. II. GrilBn to run a ferry 
across the river at the same place. Whoso 
<erry ia it? Either county ha3 jurisdiction 
to grant the license, but the county that 
first exercises the right supersides the 
Juriadictinn of the other. Carver county, 
it would seem, had » full week's atari of 
JScott. 



"The Lai»t's Fkikmi," roii April.— .\ 
lieautii'ul and pathetic steel engraving, 
** |:;»#giiit by the Tido,"i3Cho leading em- 
iie^lj^mewt in the April number of this 
''iQviecu of the Monthlies" — it is a story in 
itself. Thia is followed by the usual ro- 
sined and elegant double Steel Fashion 
I'late — so superior to Fashion Plate* gen- 
.t/3»]iv. " The Day after the Failure," is a 
Vjuching picture. Of course, there are 
numerous engravings devoted to tlie fash- 
ions, and to different styles of lady's and 
<hilb-en's dresses, &c. The music for this 
month is the popular song, " Lady, do not 
Trust the Stranger,'' which is worth of 
itsdf the price of the number. The liter- 
ary eonteutii are eitcellent as mual ; among 
^Ifcra we may specify "The >'o;k pf a 
Day," by Mrs. Uosmer ; " Widows versus 
Doctors," by Frances A. Shaw; "A Dead 
Man's Rule" by Elizabeth Prescott ; "My 
Last pourtjhip;" V 4f ry's Pfiilop^na;" 
^MitoriaJ.s, The Fashions, Receipts, &c., &c. 

Tricie (with engraving) ?2.50 a year; 
^Qur copied (with one engraving) $G.OO. 
fine copy of Lady 'a Friend and one of that 
|i->pular weekly The Saturday Evening 
Post (and one engraving), $4.00. Address 
Deacon k Peterson, 319 Walnut Street, 
Puil«del|>hia. Sample copies, 15 cents: 

Tub FiRar Boat.— The Diamond Jo 
reached Wiitona on Saturday evening last. 
Last year the first boat did not reach Wi- 
nona until the l;ith of Apr.!. The Diamciid 
Juj^-O" litr nM Iu Si. TouL- 






■¥ 



Vol. 7. 



SHAKOPEE. MINNESOTA. THURSDAY. MARCH 26, 1868. 



No.W). 



IlARPER'a Magakive. — The April No. of 
this excellent Monthly Magazine is at 
hand. The plan of the M.%gazino excludes 
Politics and Polemics. Apart from these 
topics, it includes every thing pertaining to 
Literature, Art, industry, Popular Science, 
and Social Life. 

In the April number is commenced a 
series of papers upon Peru, by K, G. 
Sijuier. Tlicso papers will be profusely 
illustrated from photographs taken in the 
ancient seat of Inca civilization by Mr. 
Squit!!-, while acting as a Special Commis- 
sioner from the United States to Peru. — 
These fre.sh rescarchvs of Mr. Squier 
throw more light than anything heretofore 



[OFFICIALl 

AuorroB's Orfici, Scott Cocwtt, Mkijiesota. 
tSpecial Scaswyi of Board oj County Com- 
missioners htld at the Auditor's OJjicff 
' March 10th, 1868. 

WKDsrsnvT MoBsmro. March H, 18fi8. 

Applicatton of Ben]. Jaineii fir partial rtllef waB 
luoitf, and the- Baanl allowe I blin SI5.0U. 

Ap|>:icatljn of Murioretha Dv'l.iii«herty for partial 
relief was allowuil to amount (*f$2ii.)>U. 

Tbe r>tluwin;( bltu were au liluJ ami allnweil : 
Dair A: Strait, 1 brl. nour, by Ulrcctl'JU of Coiuintsslooer 

I.ey, to Doutsc'liut ^ u) 

Frances Wrabcc, gooils to iiaiii>ur s JS 

Mloha<!l .Senionf. for KuolD to pauper, by wilfr of Oom- 

mlRsloniT U;y, a 20 

Ot-ortfc Sohott. 1 pr bootii f'>r paupur Kam>, 1 00 

C. Kmnefect. vInIMiib county pauiier, I ilay 3 00 

Petition for iiarllsl aid to cou:itriu:t a britlKo an. road 
aoroHii Sail 1 Creek, on eS.iU- roa<1, from Ila tiugs to 




pnbli-shed upon the subject of the early ! °""" ^'''''"*\'" ''"''•""''"""' ^'^'^'Schuiuiu.aoiUcn.. 

. ., , ' ■' _ C4M1J wugeranied toatiiount of flOO CO. 

civilization of South America. au... acroew Cnvllt UUvr. near Johu W..#arur»l:!nil, 



Tub "Noruisk Folkkulad," is the title 
of a Norwegian paper, the publication of 
which hits just been commenced by Messrs. 
Leonard &, Booth, of the Rochester Post. 
The paper \i neatly pii.ited and doubtless 
very interesting to those who c;.ii read it. 
I: is Republican in politics and said to be 
the only paper iu the Scandanavian 
langiiage published in the Northwest. — 
Terms $2 a year. 



CERTAIN. 

AMD 

Speedy Oare 

TOB 

NEURALBIA, 

AMD *T.T r 

NERVOUS 

DISEASES. 

Ita BffeeU aro 
Stagical. 

It tR tti« rar&iUHO RUtiDTtnall caaesorNoaralxla 
FuclalU, often etlecilug a purfoct euro In li-ss than 
twenty four Iioura, from the o>e of no more tbau two 
OBTUKXi Hills. 

No oilier form of NearolgUor Nervous DImmc tiu 
failed to yleUl to thU 

WONDERFUL RKMEDIAL AGENT. 



^T- General James Shields, formerly a 
n'sident of thi.s State, and whodi.>ftini.'ui.->hed 
himself by his bravery at Winchester and 
during the Mexican war, is now engaged in 
lecturing for the benefit of the families of 
the Fenians who wore convicted and exe- 
cuted in Great Rritaiii. The General is 
about removing his reai.lence to St. Joseph, 
Missouri, at which place ho was to speak 
on St. Patrick's niijht- 



Ax UxniASED Opin'ion*. — "Whenever we 
read the Sliiiko])ee Spectator, the thought 
strikes us that the fools are not all dead. 
Some woi'.ld Kay he is a literary purp. — St. 
Ptlf.r t-idverti^if 



>t^ A ghost is in the habit la'e'y of 
making visits lo the Winslow HoBse at St. 
Anlaony. Mr. Ghost at first ajipeared at 
ui;^ht, and only lo a young lady, but lately 
has become so bold as to appear in broad 
day light. The lady has shot the ghost 
through the heart, but he does not die. lie 
talks good English and is readily under- 
stood by all, but can be seen only by the 
young lady. The ghost is well dressed and 
good looking, but cdd and in ill health. 



SAINT 



PATRICK'S DAY IN BELLE 
PLAIXE. 



Jortlaii, %V\ W. 

Als",«cro«s Sand Creek, anl on Soctloii line between 
Section 2 and 3. T^iwii 113. RantiF 23. on tlie roH-1 from 
Uolen.i Village to Marystowu and iihukoiMu. tliu sum 
of SIMi m. 

It ImIii;; now tea o'clock, tho Board a^Uou rued to twlf 
pa« two. 

AliTKUNOiN SKSSION. 

Bonrl met nccordliis? to isljM.irnnni.t and mrniiicrs 
all pr. ont. The follow.nf btlU were audited and at- 
low.'d : 

I'elir ijcyernian, ij^iid:* tornnHty pauper $2 70 

J. \V. 8encerlM'X.as.-<Uner, Ac J 25 

11. Uan:iiliu;;er, as p.-r bill, for postiisv ataiiips aiiil 

aeUnowletlKinx tax deed», Tl TD 

The ^'^lloel KxanilneiH from l.^l an-iSl •ll^lrKt^ not 
havlotf iiualltled. tlie^ Uoanl iippolnti-d K. J. ;\Vl.it ock 
for the 1st and Charles Uarkcus for tlieM <i!.-.t.Ut. •« 
wicti School Kx.inilnera. 

Application of W.n. Cressoy, for an aba(<>mcnt of h!» 
persoii.il valuation af (be amount of hlMas.s biln? as- 
sessed, as he lost the same In August l.ist. was preoei t- 
eil.aii'l the U'tarl flndliiiT Ih.- .'<niount to be a.->Se8Sod at 
Sisn. (.r lered nn ubntenienl o: $."i»i. 

Several other applkatlons from d inert- it p irtles wer e 
niaile, for abutcnicnt of taxes, and were rejecte*. 

Th- Hoard took up the Si'Moe and Koud appropri- 
ations. 

4th, Drlscoll's Bridgr, Cedar I-ikr. .Ocriton One, on 
Wheatland and St. Paul road, was ^ranli'd the snm 
of $70 no 

3'h. Urldire across Siind Cre.k, near Kms»' .Mill. In 
Jorlasi City, Sand Creek Tow.i, w. b grai t di t'.ie si:m 
<"■- t 

bth. New .Market, on l^hakopee and Fanbau't 

road, 850 O) 

7lh. >'ur a brMi;e on the Belle PLilne and Le.\t'gtoa 
ro-id the sum of $:.o (lO 

.sth. An Approprbitlon oi two hundred and lirty dollars 
wasyraidel to Mil an i open llie l:ii"'inlh);'0Ti a'i<l Bello 
Plaliie ro;id on Konrth Slroet. between Fuller a'i<t At- 
wiod street, Sliakopee |«ll'i<i cJ 

After which, on liiolloii. the Board adjourned to 
Tlmrsduy inornln:^, at 8 o'clock. 

Till i:>inT :Mor..v:Nn. Marcli 12, I^r.fl. 

Board met at S o'clock, all nif nilMr.s jircsaut. The 
follfiwlns Mils wen- andltcd and allowed : 

Jame.'i De Pne, work on Court IIous'-, |( nO 

J. J. Illn;?, vblilw!; connty iian|>er 300 

Kd. .M i:\eil, work on Court llonse 8 no 

Mlcliael Iiey, vlillin'4 county pauper I ilay, 3 00 

Titoiii.is Terry, removing and Llntilnc out llie Bed. 

bury chlliren,lwo days, 6 00 

F. Mcfiiadc, roconllH^.aitii stationery 13 23 

Jacob Thomas, Sherifl" fees :8 jn 

The pauper onestlon came n p and It wa.- resolve.l that 
the C»iiiity Auditor lie anthori;!ed to puMlsb in th« 

Sliakiipee Ar«us for three wccUs tor r Ivlnj prnpc.ials 

for the board of the C-mnty Pa!i;>ers.np fo Satiirray, 
lull day of .\prll ne.\l , to the l«we.st responsible l«l |.:cr, 
the bids to be sealed and depo.slted wi'h theC'Ufily 
Auditor, up to d o'cliK-k, p. ni.. April llth. ne^t.— 
No person will be considered a responsible bbbler who 
will not himself tak'' car'- «f said paupers, and no P' rson 
«hail be allowed to snb-lot 6«!d pau;>ers lo other lurlltS. 

Tlie followlnu bills were audited and allowxl : 

Dr. J. L. WakeUeia's bill of $10 0» allowed ?6 00 

•* "of 11 00 allowed 12 t.D 

D.L. riow'sbm of89 30 (UJowcd 1 it) 

Dr. Hall's " of «ii 00 alkiweil 40 no 

Peter gpects. dlgj;Uig urave for cennty paopcr S 00 

N. .Mc.MuIlen, drawlu',' Jury list 100 

Henry Hinds' contract fer the County Printing was 
prcsenleU to U»c Board of Cuunly Coiamleslouers for 
approvul. 

On motion. It wa.8 resolved that the Mine \>e scccple I 
and a.lopied by the Hoard, and tliat the Chairman of 
this Hoard be authorised to execute tliu satUO, OU tttC 
part of the Board of CouBty Couimtsslooors. 

▲Iter which the Board adjonroed to 2 o'clock. 
AF tEKNO<JN SESSION. 

Members all present. The followlnif bills were and1te4 
noil allowe<J : 

llolton A llarkCDS, procerles to poor 91 2S 

i. W. Pool, tases refundc'l 2 63 

E. L. Karnham, tixes reiunde>l t 10 

V. \. ll!rschw,dcsk for Rejilslet's olBce 14 00 

Mi>si>s Titus asked for an abatement of his personi.1 
Uses. HestMlud that be llsU-d to the Town Assessor 
$(<0(i In notes, which he bad received In payuiont of his 
land, but tho party buying tho same, being unable to 
pay, ho was compelled to take his land back, and give 
l>ack Ills notes, and bail paid the tuxes on the lanil.— 
Tho Board, aner InTesllgatlug the case, were sutUQed 
ef the transtictlon. Commissioner Kcnnefsct moved, 
anil Ley seconded the iiiolloii, that flve hundred dollars 
,. , , , , "11 • ■' I of M. Tltiis' personal proj.erty valuation be abated, 

JiiTgnoJQ, ana painted by a young German 1 which motion prevalK-! and w«s carried. 
Artist, who visited this place last summer j SUssrs. Sencerbox, McOrade and Ley made state, 
and stripped a few weeks witli the Rev. i "'*"''•'" ''*^'"'"^''' i*!*i'«^'i''<-'io ""od Creek, concerning 
gentleman. It cost about ^5'j 00 whicii, 1 1 * "»•» ""d •'^'I'^l'. t" Pfieot the roa.l from Jorian to 
am happy to say. has been paid by tlie 1 '^''*"'*"^' SuiUon. After some explanation concern- 
Irish Calholicd to their devoted ,„tstor. 1 '"*''"''''''""-'•""' """'■'"■'■'^'*"'* ^" ""*"'"' '^"'"""'- 

Tu:. ;„:.,]„ 1 11 1 1 ' • 1 ^*^ "' t*'" to examine the premises Thomas T»rrT 

IhlS ,8 indeed a nob and truly national .„., MUhael Ley were appointed such commniee. J. Ji 
compluueu paid t« the Insh Catholics of ' „ower ,0 act. After which the BoaM adjonrncd with- 
tms place Ijy iheir Rev. Pastor, and one out day. t:. w. oillenbkck. 

which I Km iurc they ajipreciiile the more, | Attest. aiuirman. 

on account of the Rev. genikman not being j -"^ "^SS DL'NAND. County Auditor. 

an irifchman himself, but nevertheless who ' ♦..^.•_ 

is entirely devoted to the spiiitual and '■ Sciiooi. Moneys — We are indebted lo 
temporal wants of his whole tiotk. The j our County Auditor for the following state- 
example and , meat of the semi annual apportionment of 

School 
School 



Kv(»n In the soverest case* <rf Chronic Nearalela and 

general nervoos d«ran«einent«,— of many years' stand- 

In Section I«. (;k;iidaIo Township, presente 1 by Kdward •"".-""^Pctlni; iho entire system Its use fori, few days 

In, I . cu. ,«. o<. ..« » . J » »"»•» or a few weks at the Utmost, always alforls the most 

"' UKt'inlsliliiii relief, aiiil very rarely fails to prodncf a 



Pruai the Northwestern Chronicle. 

Bk-.L£ Plusk, March 17, 1S6^. 

Dear Sin : Knowing that anything, p(?r- 
laini».g to that National Festival which all 
Iri.ih Catholics, ail over the world, has 
clung to with so much love and veneration, 
and to which thoy still cling with that true 
love, and veneration for Dear Fatherland, 
which is the true and shining charact^'ristic 
of Irish Cutliolics everywhere, has not been 
forgotten in Belle Plaiue. 

The day has been duly observed and 
celebrated by the Catholics of this attract- 
ive; tcvrn, in a t'-ly Christian manner, un- 
der the guidance of their devoted and 
energetic Pastor, Father Cerghold. At ten 
o'clock, tho Holy Sacrifice of the Mass was 
otTered up, in which a numerous and devoted 
congregation assisted. And after the first 
gospel, wo had the happiness of listening to 
one of the most eloquent and feeling dis- 
courses on St. Patrick and his devoted 
children, it has been my good fortune to 
listen to in many a year, and one whieli 
must have brought a thrill of joy to every 
Irish heart. But the most prominent fea- 
ture of the day w,as the splendid picture of 
St. Patrick, placed in our church for the 
first time to-day. This picture is life size, 
being 4.\6 feet, and represents the Saint in 
robes, with Miter and Croziar, and in the 
act of driving serpents into the sea. This 
picture has been gotten up by Father 



ronipl.fti! ami permanent cure. 

If contains no drnirs "r oth'-r m.-iterlaN In the slight 
est deirree injnrions. even to lUo most delicate system, 
and con alwats be used with 



PERFECT SAFETY. 

It It** long bcoQ to constant nse by many of oor 
MOST EMINENT POTSICIAKSt. 



who give It their nnanlmoas and Dn()aaliae<l appro- 
val 
Sent by mall on receipt of price, and postage. 

One package. tX 00, Postage n cents. 

Six packages. 9.00, - T " 

Twelve pack iges. 9.00. " 4S ~ 

It Issold by all whob'sale and retail dealers la drags 
and luedlclius tliroiighoiit the Cnlted ."tales, and by 

TUaHSa & CO., Sele Pifo»prletorj, 

131 Thsmo.nt St„ Uosto.x. Uasb. 



yoni Fie m or ]m\. 



Tho Minnesota House, 

At Shakopee, will be SOLD CHEAP, 
or TttADKD FOR A FARM. It is a 
000 large hotel, newly fini.ihed, iu a pood lo- 
cation, has a gooii Stone Barn, large yard, 
a good well of water, and a fine run of 
I custom. Inquire at this office or of the 
owner, JAMKS KEARNEY. 



ANTED. TKAOnKR.S, St'JDENTS, 

and o'h r I'lt.dll-.'-nt M.-n and Women, in n 
busiiie-a paying' Jlno to $2iX) (ler month, ac- 
C'.rdliig ttialdlily. Kor particulars, address 
ZKIiiLKK. .McCLKOy k CO., Louibaiul Block. Chicago, 
Ills. nib-\m 





FAIRBANKS' 

ST\.NU\HD 

S C A. LE S . 

er Alt KiNni. 

FAIKUANKf>,fiKKKM.RAF,bOO. 

226 .11 ill Lake .<(.. Chlcag... 

ti41J i;oy Market St.. t>t Ht. Lnn 

liecirtifullolnti/ only thf genuine. 



THE 

Haticsal Hotsl, 

Shakopee, 



Is now open for the arcommodRtlon of the travellug 
public, t^ Tills llonse l.siiewlv lornUheil throoaliout. 
and h tlie largest and best kept Uonse In the 

MIHVBSOTA VALLEY. 

D. A. EBOWN Proprietor, 




€0iJ|i3TRY MEBGHAJ^TS, 

OAIRVMEN, FARMERS, 

CONSIQN VOCB 

ASHES, BEESWAX, BEAKS, BUTTER 
CHEESE, EGGS, FLOUR AXD 
MEAL, FLAX, COTTOX, 
FURS AND SKINS 
DRIED & GREEN 
FRUITS, 
GRAIN. AVOOL. GAME, POULTRT. 
NAVAL STORES, HOPS, GIN- 
SENG. FEATHERS, HEMP, 
PROVISIONS, OILS, 
LARD.TALLO 
TOBACCO, 
SEEDS, 
SORGHUM, MOLASSES, &c, kc., 

TO 

JOSIAH CARPENTER, 

EilMl CiffllSSli Mimi, 

442 Wa-hlngton Street, 

NEW YORK CITY, 

A nd receive his weekly Price. Carrmt of Produce and 
Otncwries. the most coiuplele I'rlc; Current l•ubll^lled 
III the Uniteit Slates. 

SEA'D Full A PRICE CUKRE.XT. 

Marklni: IMutosand Cards, furnished free. 



Liberal Advances made on Consignnionts. 
EsTAUM.siiKi) May 1st, 18C0. 

First class llefcrL'tictfS given when rei^ulrel. 
uv-ly 



Cross Plows! 



THE PERRLVE CROSS-PLOWS 

Arc for Sale liy 



J 



ohn MoMuUeu, 



At bis 



Hardware Store, Shaliopcc. 



D, M. STORER, 

PRORKIETOR, 



-:0:. 



They are made of Hardened CAFT 8TEKL and 
OKn.MAN STEICL. l.y C. K. PKltitlXK, at the Mlnne 
apolls PI jw Factory. 

This Plow Is tho 

BEST PLOW IN THE WORLD, 

And will LAST from two to three times longer than 
*oy other Plow. 



The reasons for Its a>lR\r DJItABlLITY aro:- 

Ist. The EXTREME HARDNESS of the 
Steel from which it is made. 

2d. The THICKNESS & STRENGTH 
of the exposed parts. 

3d. The wood work is of the BEST WHITE 
OAK TIMBER. 

Those i]italltlcs make It the 

CHEAPEST PLOir 

In tho World, as well as the PEST. Just as sure as 
there Is economy In piylUR six d .llar.> once, rather 
than flee dollars two or three times over. 
Its great hardness causes It to 

SCOUR 

la tlic most dttBcutt soli, when all other plows fall. 
These Plows are 

WARRANTED TO CLEAN 

In any kind of soil, or the money will be refunded. 
It pi iws at any 

D E P T IT 



STAPLE ASO FANCV 

GROCERIES, 



Frs.ii four to twelve Inches, and will turn under 
grass, weeds and stubble, completely. 

FOR SALE BY 



WOODEN WARE. 

Yankee Notions. 

cf?o.y ci:?o.y c4?oa 

On hand and for sale as cheap as tho 

CH K A.1^ EST. 



same anc 



truly christian _ ^_ 

teachings of our young and talented iiastor ' "C. 'Sl\ "i" ^ ""V . .1 1 

is daily producing its good effects, not only tl-'^.'' ^*'''^! ^"'"' '" H'C several 
" his own congregation, hut even in all | Dislrietd in Seoli County. The 



Jan. 14, 1808. 



fn.- 



netf 



Ajsat, SliakDpee, Mian. 





i 



LAKE SHORE R. R. t.t«E. 

TOLEDO & CLEYELA^'D. 

The only direct route to 



IU 



society. 



A CiTizEX. District 'I'reasurers can draw this money 

T„..~rr^ e ^ T> ^ M-- I . ^'■'>™ *''*-' County Trcasurj- immedialelv.— 1 

Thk editor of the Red W uig Argus h.is I -ri, 1 , , r i 1 1 ',. 

been visiting the County Poor House- ^^° whole number of children reported is I 

What's the matter, Ed. — rf'aba*haio tltr- ' '-^r^'^^^ ^^d toUvl sum apportioned is j 

"^'^- I $2,74 I .ri4, distriliuted to the several School i 

It's all right, neighbor, \Vc were only | Distriels as follows 
examining the; building to see if the quar- 
ters were sulKcient for the many who are 
too poor to take their connty papers. The 
building is large enough to accommodate 
75 of them, and will, when all built, 250. 
It is consoling to know there is a ridiige for 
snch unfortunate people.— 7/ et/ t^mg 
Arfpia. 



O o 23L xroyo,xxoox», 

— .\ X n — i 

CLERK OF THE DIST. COURT. I 



Bcj^The Le Sueur Courier says the 
farmers of that county are making prepara- 
tions to engage in tho cultivation of ho:»8. 
Mr. Timothy Shea, of Dairyman township, 
has ordered roots su.Tlcient to xdant three 
acres, which he procures from the great 
hop growing region of Wisconsin. 

—The Anoka Union says : ** The resi- 
dence of Mr. Cheiiver, near Coon Creek, 
was destroyed by fire recently. The con- 
tentJ of the building were all saved, e.\cept. 
mg the furniture and bedding in tho 
second story. Loss *SOO. PuHy iusured." 

Mr. Cheavcr v.sis formerly a resident of ] 
Shakopes and the owner of th 



No. of 
DlMMcl. 

I 

3 

• 
7 

y 
It 

n 
15 

17 

iw 

21 
t3 
2i 

St 

a 

31 
33 

M 

37 
'*» 
it 
43 
U 

n 

31 

a 

S7 
5V 
CI 



Apl>ortIon- 


No. of ; 


nieiit. 


District. 


$131.53 


2 


»>.< 73 


4 


rw 


• 


;iy :.i 


H 


4<'><lli 


HI 


13-U 


1) 


Sl.«l 


It 


llj<> 


tii 


:*i.4i 


IS 


2i7J 


at 


.•*'T1 


■a 


S-ifiS 


SI 


.1; 7 J 


l-fi 


.1X111 


IS 


4.1» 


yt 


KJ.7<i 


\i 


MJ3 


.11 


33 71* 


Sli 


»'4J 


.%■» 


4<i.:.1 


441 


17.1. lit 


41 


1.1.10 


«l 


.11 vq 


4il 


tf'Ji'^ 


4a 


Itooi* 


k^ 


411 4< 


l> 


ar.*! 


St 


4V.Si 


'A 


♦iHK 


Ai.iJI 


at 


I'JJ.) 


T' 



Appirtlon- 
nienl. 

KT.im 

13 M 

as J* 

S*3t 

yft.ws 

IT.W 

n33 
asj* 

»ja, 

1*M 
IMJ4 
nuite 
»4.l« 
43 »7 
47.4« 
Mil 

ai.a« 

141 M 
iASt 
S3.H) 
Bone 
UM 
IStto 
•1.61 
KM 

.^" 

I nous 

M.48 



Will make Deeds and Morlg.tge.^, and 
all Legal papers. Will pay taxes and sell 
Real Estate on commission, ic. 52:1 v 



**Tbo Ton la nishtler tban Uie SworC.** 



and all principal points in 

New York and New England. 

ffy .4n the principal Tlallwirs of the North wf>st and 

Ojjicc at the CouH Ilousc.Shakopcc. K.r^r,;•'^.f•'^e''Tlcu'ri./^^'' m^lx^ 

•^ ' ^ KAILUOAO. Theiuist ovi-iuani^ 

«l*6A!!tT Q«A.Wt«6 RiOK COAOKSS 

ever put up'iii a Kailway in tlils coniitry. are In nse 
npon this lin.\ one of whidi will leav» Chliawooii D ly 
Kxpri'ks at 7a«i a. «.. runnini; through to Cleveland 
without chanKe. The Oniwin!; Hoom Coaches Sleeti- 
Ina foache!!, and I>ay Tim do* of tld.s Itne.are'unsiir- 
passed by llMwe oi any llailivay line in thUcmnfry — 
The smooth and perl./ct trade (tive« the adv«nU"e 01 
•lUlck time«nd/o(rrt>,«ncrt,V,Bj,. Passei'irers lor IMroit 
I and all points In Onnt't'i, and lho<e for 0'i*o. /'rnnsulia- 
, ntri. ^ctc lurk niid Xrt} Atiol'inti, Miould imrch.se 

I lickiis via MHjiio.ix .v',r/-//t//.v /t^7Ai^•">' 
No. 3C Clark Street 



MOBTOirS m FEE 

DO 3 or WKdn OUT. 



A SiicGLE Oke will Last a Lifetime, 



earn, waj found dead in an out 
tl,A. u... I 1 , " dislillery iy,„ ^aj, ^ „; ,,j ^ j .. „,^„ 

that was burned some three or four yoara i. t. . , . . •""-««- r 

ago. ^ ) *!'*' ^•■^'"'^ t** l^*' J»^tl> ^y foul means, or ! 

died from exposure, is not known. 



— TJie Minneapolis Tribnno says ; " A 

woman whose name we were unablo to 

lot near 

Whether 
she came to her dt^th bv foul 



HY THEIR TTSE 

THE LABOB OF WfilTUiO IS SEDUCES, 

Greater TTnl/omlty la Obtained. 

£<U6, Elc{janc€ and Beauty are acfptircd, 

mm, 2\.im3> 4J? rEon: coi^sciiEa 

The Dest, Cheapest aad moiS^ purablo lustra- 
toootfi lor Writing ercr g8c4. 



and I 



Chicago. 

F. K. MonSK, 
rvn >f r,».w Genl l'a»4. AkI.. Chicago. 

Oen-| M e.«t'n I'sks. Ai.t. M. 5. k L. ?. Line. Chlcsco 



SENT BY MAIL SAFCUY- 



—St. Peter is f,i have no h-ss il,,i„ tbroe 
additional cburwhes built during the coming 



t s '.a-j^ni 



— tJeneral (lonn.m hroko on ; <.f Ins ribs 
a few days ago at Hi: 



NO T&AVEZaNQ AOXNTa BaiPIjOirEZ>. 

Oall aD<1 fna arlll find Tens ex.ictjy •dnptr<I to your 
htr\A stkI «t>Vf>f TrlMn^: or evckMe stamp furdrrulaf. 



¥f*e are Coming! 

And will present to any person sending us 
a club in our Great 

OWE BOLL ATI SALE 

of DRY AND FANX'Y COOD.S, a Waidi, 
Piece of Sheeting.Siik Dress Pattern, kc, Ac. 

FREE OE COST. 

Catalogue of Goods and Sample aout to 
any address free. 

ALLEN, HAWES & CO.. 
15 Poderal Street, Boston, 
F« 0. Box C. Mass. 




Whnl«sal<! Dralers in French, German, 
and Kiiglr-jh Dry a-i'l Fancy (rt>ud4. Cut- 

. UJ^-.l W..*.. . Alluiin. I 



rrK». r: I., 



F. Z HIRSCHEB. 



A.Vn DEAtKR IN 



rURNITXJRE, 

Holmes St., (near the Lcvec.) 

Shakopee, Minn. 

"The mo.st complete C!»tablisLuicnt 
iu the Valley." 

All kinds of Furnllnre, from the nnesf Tar- 
tor t<ets down. \Viirl< and repalrlni: ef ever;' 
deiKrtiillon done In a FU|><'rl<'r uiaiiucr. I'rl- 
ccs low, and all worli warranted. 



CLIMAX! CLIMAX!! 

Page's Climnx SalTC, a Family 
blessing for 25 cents. i ' 

It heals withont a scar.^ No 
family shonld be withont it 

We warrant it to cnre Scrofala 
Sores, Salt Rheum, Chilblains, 
Tetter, Pimples, and all Eruptions 
of tho Skin. For Sore Breast or 
Wipples, Cnts, Sprains, Bmises, 
Bums, Scalds, Chapped Hands, 
&c., it makes a perfect cure. 

It has been used OTcr fifteen 
years, without one failure. 

It has no parallel— haying per- 
fectly eradicated disease .and 
healed after all other remedies had 
failed. It is a compound of Aniica 
with many other Extracts and 
Balsams, and put up in lai^er 
boxes for the same price than any 
other Ointment. 

Sold by DniRfrists eTorywhcre. White & nowland. 
Proprietors, 121 Liberty Street. New York. 



COFFINS 

Of all Rises, and the latest styles. alTr.irs on 
hand, tkg- Particular attention |isld to' this 
branch of the business. tuarfS i.i ly 



JOHH SCiJWilHIZ. 

Merchant Tailor 



First Street, Siiakopek, Mixx. 

t 

A new and splendid stock of Clo- 
thing, Cloths, and Gents* FurnisLinT 
Goods, ° 

FALL & WIN'TER STYLI S, 

S®" Clothing made to order. 
Shakopee, Mareh Mih, list;?.' 



JOHIi 



'iOllfll 




Cor. First and Lewis Streets, 

Shakopee, Minn. 

DEALER IN 

Hardware, 
Stoves, 
Cutlery, 

Tin Ware, & 
Sheet-Iron. 



^^ Repairing neatly and prompt- 
ly executed. 



IX PRODATF, COURT. 

SCOTT COUXTY: Special 
Torm, .March IHth, l80H._In the 
Nlatter of the Estate of Nichola.< 
Kray, Decea.scd. 

On reading and filing the petition 
of Wilholmina IJakcr, of Shakopee 
in tho county of Scott and State o( 
.Minnesota, praying for reason.'* there- 
in 8tat(d that Letters of Admini.s- 
iration on the Estate of the paid 
lecea.sod may be issued to J. W. 
rrcncerbo.v. 

It is ordered, tluit .Salnrdav, tho 
f:ieventh d.iy of April, l,M(;8,"at 10 
o'clock in the forenoon at the" ofiice 
of the Judge of Probtte in the town 
of Shakopee in said comity, be a.e- 
signcd for the hearing of faid pfti 
tion, and that t!ie heirs at law of thi 
the said decciaed, if any there he, 
and all other persons iutorested in 
the .said estate, are rcqnircd to Ik 
present, at that time and place to 
show c;iusc, if any there 1>^', f.liy tlit 
prayer of said petition should not 
he granted. 

And it ia further ordered; iL^: 
aMicc of the hearing of the said pc- 
LiiioD be g.ven by publishing a copy 
of this order in the Shakopee Arguy. 
a weekly newspapir printi'il and pub 
lished at Shakopee, in said countv, 
for three succo?sive weeks inimediutc- 
ly precceding (he paid hearino. 

Dated March 13ih, 18G8. 
L. K. UAWKLXS, 

J udgc of Probalc. 



P. BeyerMann, 

DEALER I y^ 

DRY GOODS, 

GROCERIES, 

Boots & Shoes, 

Hats & Caps. 

Dress Goods, 

YANKEo NOTIOiNS 

Qaeensware, 

Crockery^ 



OXJ TXj El 



iSt'C' 



oto. 



otc- 



NOIICE OF MORTGAGE SALE. 

X.VME.=? or MoBTfiAGORF— Fredrick I.ahr- 
iiian and Sophia Lahrman; his wife, of 
ScoM Connty, Minnes^oto. 

K.vMK OF Ib'oRTGAGKE — Mathios Murtj, ILen 
of Monroe, Wisconsin,^ 

Datr of MouTC.t,oE— Aorcfcbef J4'h, A. 
1>. 1863. . . , , .. 

Sxin MoRTOAGK was recorded In the ofTica 
of the Ecgi.slcr of Deeds of Scott 
Connty, nt one o'clock rn the afternoon 
of the' 20th day of Notembcr, in t; • 
year 186.1, in Book ••E" of Mortgagee, 
rngeleS, 

The Description- of tbe Mortgaged premig- 
63 is the West ITalf of the North We»t 
Q'larter of Section Twenty-one in Town- 
«iiip One Hundred Thirteen of Range 
TweiiTy-two, containing eighty acroi, 
eitnate lying and being in the Countj 
of Scott aforesaid. 

.-i.\ii) MoRT(;.\GE w.ns made to pecnr*' the 
pnyment of the Funi of One Hun- 
dred Dollars, with intere.«t at the 
rate of twc'vc per cent, per anDnm,pay- 
able ill one year from date, aVj 
cording to the promissory note of (l.e 
said Fredrick Lahrman, jmyabie to tie 
paid M.itliias Marty, and bearing eveo 
date with said mortgugc. 

No AcTio.v or proceedings have been insti- 
tuted at la^ or otherwise, to rpcovor 
the .';tiin peciircd by said mortgage or 
any pari thereof. 

TuE v.MoLXT claimed lo be ^lucon .said note 
ut the dale of this notice is the Pom of 
One Hundred and Fifteen Dollars, to- 
gether with the sum of l*''" dollars 
solititor's tc secured to be paid by said 
morfg.ige, , 

Now TiiKUKFORK notice i.s liercby givcn.llint 
t»y virtue of a power of .safe contninod 
in said mortgage and recorded tberewilli 
and of the provisions of llie Statute In 
puch cose made and provided, the paid 
mortgage will be foreclosed by a wilo 
of said mortgaged premii^es to be made 
by the Sheriff of said County of Scott, 
at public vendue at the front door of 
the Court Iloa.sc in Shakopee iu naid 
Countv of Scolr, State of Minnepota, at 
ten o'clock in the forenoon of the SPrn 
PAY OF MxRrn, in the j-ear 1868, and 
tho proceeds of such sale will be npplicd 
to tiic payment of the sum then diie on 
siiid Dote and mortgage, and the costs 
and charges of foreclosure and paid sum 
of ten dollars solicitor's fees provithd 
hy paid mortgage to be paid out of tho 
propeeds of pneb sale. 

Dat .u Fcbrusirv l.^th. IP6P. 

MATH IAS MAnTT, 
TlrvnY HiNnP, Mortgage*, 

.Vttorney for Mortjfn'gec.' 
Jacor TnoMAR, 

Sheriff of Scott Connty, Minh, 

NOTICE OF AiOiiTGAGE SALI^r" 

Names of Mgrtoagors— Charles Hnrtmnnn 
and Ann llnrtmann, his wife, of Scott 
County, Minnesota. 

Xamk op Mobtoagkk — Cathnrlna Schrante, 
of Scott County, Minoe.t'ota. 

Dak of Mobtoaoe— Cclober 19fh. A. I>, 

1SC5. 

Said Mortgage Trn.s recorded in the oBico 
of the Register of Deeds of Scott Coun- 
ty, at four o'clock in the afternoon of 
the 19th day of October, A. D. If-f.fi, 
in Dook -E' of Mortgages on page .163. 

Tir : DK.=cnii'TioN of the mortpngcd prcnd.-ies 
is Lot Tlirec in Block Three, in the 
ld:it of Shakopee City, 6n fil6 m the 
office of the Regipter of Deeds Of tho 
County of Scotf, State of Minnepofn, 
pitnnte lying and bcrog in the Puid 
Connty of Scott. 

Said Moi:t<:.\(;r was made lo secure the 
iiayn-.ent of the sum of Five Hundred 
Dollars, with interest at the rate of 
twelve j.cr jioiit. per annum, payable in 
one year iVom date, fiecordii.g to the 
nrondssory note of tho snid Cliarlcs 
l/a:tmanr., payable lo the said Cat |i«. 
lina Sclinntz, and bearing even date 
with said morlgago. 

.Vc A Tiox or procccdinfs have be<n insti- 
t ted at law or otherwise lo recorer 
t c sum secured by paid morlgogc or 
nny part thereof. 

TiiK A.\ior.\T claimed io be dae on snid 
mortgage at the date of thip notior iti 
the snm of Five Hundred and Twenly- 
tMO Dollars and Fifty Ceiit.s. togollior 
with tho pum of ten dollars solicitor'n 
fee secnred to be paid by paid ihorlgage. 

Now 'i'uERKKoRK, notice is hereby given.'thal 
by virtne of A ptiwer of pale contameiJ 
in said mortgage and recorded therewith 
and of the provisions of t,lie Statute in 
su( h Ciise made and provjdei^, the paid 
mTtgagc will be forccitxsed by _a pak'of 
said mortgaged premises to be rpade by 
the Sheriff of said County of Scolt. at 
public vendue at the front door of tho 
Conrt Houpe in Shakopee in said Coun- 
ty of Scott, State of Minnesota, at ten 
o'clock in the forenoon of the 2.'>Tn i»at 
OF ArRu., in tho year l-^fif*. aiid the 
procccde of such fafp will be applied to 
the payment of the ^um then due on 
s:tid noic and mortgnge, and llie costs 
and charges of forcciosure, and said .^ium 
of ten dollare solicitor's fees provided 
by said moitgnge to be paid out of tho 
procoeds of snch pale. 
Datkii March .>th, 18(;8. 

CATHARINA SCIIRANTZ, 
lIr..\i;Y Hi.vD.s mortgagee.. 

Attorney for Mo Ig gee, ii6'i 

.lACOU TlJUAlAd, 
Sheriff of Scott County, Minnesota; 



DEAFNESS. CA' 
Tio.v. A\n I 



CATARRH, C0XSU51P- 
caxctcu ctbkd.^ 

A Treatls.on De.nfnesn. Ostsrrh. Consnfn'rf Ion aai 
l^ucrr:(helrv:iu»es. mf.insnrjipredr feilss.snd ultl- 
iiial. cure. By a I'upil ..ftlte Acxirniy o/ Mcdklu*. 
Tiirif, Sent (o.^I,l■a,l,|r,■^<f.,r nicpiini, , 

Letter rn.ni R..I.ert Mi Murdv, D. D.. J..I, HL. Osaiwl 
Pre!,fe..f drsfwl Kiicnninmrut of l'.»..»iid KUItor of 
th*" .N»t1i>rmll'r«nia«Mn." 

Nbw Ti»«k. S^j»«. 17, ifl»i:.— !>».• Frtiiwjnt. w«» in 
chars* OI Ur.^c* Clnir<<A HAS|*ltsl. AInsnrirla. V» 
dnrlnjr the war. I rro(|«r»«l<r, almasl dally. fcV 
inoiithf, vIsitH^ the UonpUal.'niid had every mrann .r 
knowing his rr|>utatioii n>r r.rrinr.Ki T and sBiu. !• 
was'if tli< Hiost credfta'df «h«>Mct.>T. aM4 hUsurreii« 

In (lie treatntentof patieuts was rvatkrkaUe.—MoL* 
McMtntDv.^ * 

ORQANIC VIBRATOR. 

Itflts IntotheeMr, l« ,W pmfr^iMr. rrmnrtt fininnp 
n-xff >n thf Ai--^, «ud pnal.l.-s <i«>af persons tn hfsr 

.ll^lll.e^ly .-.t cliiir.!i Hna i.iil.lU ^^►en.t.lie.i. ThU In 
Ktiiiiiieiil vvill.iluri |,r..,|ii, rri,.iiIt.;iiiMe,.t n.ira. nlnux 
Mn'iinilee<t in ni...i , a>i'^ •.! Innc nhiiKlinc 'leafnrss It 
will reircvi In .i»l.,.ri itnie. It may he •<IJOBted wl't i 
I lie ease nl >i>e. (.i.-|. >. 

lit;. -Tii.L«£M " •" I •• T>r .f.-. -lotialljr.-itjUJSmUB^tW" 
I % ' 



i 



/-/ 



V 



/ 



The Shakopee Argus. 



liar HENRY III N OH. 



OFFICIAL PAPER OF SCOTT COUNTY. 



SHAKOPEE, MAItCII 26, 1868. 



Meeting of the Democratic State 
Committee. 

ThMc win *• a tn*etlDg of the DomocratJc State 
Committer at Owatotroa, on the l5l Jj\y oT April, ISft^. 
at 2 u'clxk. r. M„ to tmniact tmt>ortAnt botHucM. All 
mfmt>«r« arc earncatlj' rc(jnp»(e<l to Ik> present. 

C. B. FLANUUAU. CUdlrmatt. 

Ja(. J. Qkmzv, Secretary. 



THE RAMSEY AND DONNELLY 
CORRESPONDENCE. 



An effort has been made to create ft new 
Lniid Diatrict in Minnesot.i, w'uli the officers 
located at Alexandriri. The rapid fiettlo- 
meni of that part of the State im^Kiratively 
detnand the furmatiori of a now hind dis- 
trict. As it now U, pro-cinj)tor.s have to 
travel a hundred miles to the St. Cloud 
Land Office, to make the entry of their 
homesteads. To meet this pressing want. 
Senator Ramsey introduced on the I'Zth of 
February into the United Stales Foualt", a 
bill creating the new district. But Mr. 
Donnelly, in the J louse, admitting the 
necessity of the formation of the new dis- 
trict, ever true to the instinct of a political 
demagogue, declares ho will defeat the bill 
ill the Hou.sc, unless be can have his say as 
«o who .shall be ajipointcd to (ill the new 
uflices which the new land district would 
render neces.sary. Mr. Donnelly therefore 
^writes to Senator Ramscj-, roquesling him 
4o select the Register and Receiver for the 
•lew district from a lijt of names which be 
enclo.ses, Donwlly in substance iiitiiiiatlng 
thai unless Ramsey agrees to select those 
officers from the list of names which he 
J»ad fr-irnjshcd, he (Donnelly) will have the 
iill defeated in the Uousc. 

Senator Ramsey answers the letter, and 
•Mrgea the great necessity for tlie new dis- 
iricf-, a.ssures Donnelly that no improper 
appointments to fill the new ollices would 
be confirmed by the Scn;.te, but declines to 
lie bound to select from Donnelly's list, aud 
urges Mr. Donnelb' not to oppose the pas- 
•fcag^i-of the bill through the Houso. 

This nnsT.er of Senator Rani.so? seems to 

have called out aiK>thcr long and prosy 

'letter from Donnelly, in which he takes the 

-singular position that the iut«rest of the 

Republican l^rty in tbi.< State recjuire that 

h^enator Ramsey— a life-long Republic an — 

should not be trusted v.iih the control of 

the appointment of two land officers, and 

'that therefore he will endeavor to defeat 

•<he bill creating the new laud district. 

•It ast bt once be conceded tliat the 
^silion assumed by Senator Ramsey ij 
that uf a statesman, while tho position 
a.tsumed by Donnelly is that of a uarrow- 
iiiindeil demagogue. The ki'V, however, to 
ilii.t lock between this Senator and Repre- 
tH.'Otative, will be found in the fact that they 
i»re l>oth to be candidates before the next 
I<ogislaturo for the United States Senate, 
in the place of Ramsey, whose lirm expires 
fill March next. Each, therefore, wishes to 
Ihavo the control of as many Federal ap- 
ijKjintmants in tliis State ai po.ssiblc, each 
'hoping thereby to be betiicr able to procuro 
hi<i own {cietids to scat? in the next Legis- 
'Iftturc Both are .seeking tho same end.^ 
.but .Senator Ramsey, in the position he has 
rfcflsuraed on paper, slaim.s on tlio firm 
>;round of statesmanship, wliilo Donnelly i.s 
tlouudering in the (^u.ai^mirc uf the duma- 
jfogue. 

he co.sy, gentlemen, and save yonr dig- 
•iity, f(»r the people of Minnesot.'i inten<l 
jicxl fall to see that both of your seatd on 
the 4th of March next, aro occupied by 
lionest Democrats. 



WUOSE FERRY IS IT? 

On March 10th the lioard of County 
Commissioners of Scott County gran led a 
ferry lic«n«ti to E. F. Drake and J. L. .Mer- 
riam, to run a ferry for five yeara across 
the Minnesota river opposite Merriam raif- 
road station, — which is about half way be- 
tween Carver and Cha.ska. But on tho 3d 
of March, the Board of County Commission- 
tTS of Carver County granted a ferry licen.se 
for tive yenrs to L. II. Griffin to run a ferry 
across the river at the same pbace. Who.so 
tfcrry ia ii? Either county haa jurisdiction 
\o grant the license, but the county that 
first exercLses the right supersidea the 
Jurisdiction of the other. Carver county, 
it would Hctim, hod a full week's start of 
tJcott. 



"The Lai»t's Fkikmi," roa April.— A 
Itenutjful ana pathetic steel engraving, 
** iitN^^if. Ly the Tide," is die leading em- 
M.l??iJhi«ei^t in the April number of this 
''iQvccu of the .Monthlies"' — it is a story in 
>4.self. Tiiia is followed by tho usual re- 
ined and elegant double Steel Fashion 
|*late — so suj>crior to Fashion P»ate.4 gen- 
i/aiiy. " The Day after the Failure," is a 
t^juching picture. Of course, theio are 
iMimerouH engravings devoted to tlie fash- 
ions, and to dilferent styles of lady's and 
children's dresses, &c. The music for this 
month is the popular song, " Lady, do not 
Trust the Stranger,"' which is worth of 
itself the pric« of the number. The liter- 
ary contents are CKcelleijt ».s usual ; among 
^Vem we may specify " The Vojli of a 
I»ay," by Mrs. Uosmer ; "Widows versus 
Doctors," by Frances A. Shaw ; " A Dead 
Man's Rule" by Elizabeth Prescott ; "My 
Last Courtship;" " Arry's Pliilop.-cna;" 
/vlitorials, The Fashions, Receipts, &c., &c. 

l*r»oe (with engraving) ?2.j0 a year; 
^''^nr copied (with one engraving) $G.OO. 
fine copy of Lady'^ Friend and one of that 
|>'>piiliir weekly Tho Saturday Evening 
Puat (and one engraving), $-4.00. Address 
I>eacon k Peterson, 319 Walnut Street, 
Pttil»del|>hia. Sample copies, 15 cents: 

Tat First Boat,— The Diamond Jo 
reached Winona on Saturday evening last. 
La.^t year the first boat did not reach Wi- 
nona until the l;ub of April. The DiamciM 
Jo w on htr uyy tu gi. I'^mi^ 






Vol. 7. 



SHAKOPEE. MINNESOTA. THURSDAY. MARCH 26, 1868. 



No. 10. 



Hakper's Maoazike.— The April No. of 
this excellent Monthly Magazine is at 
hand. The plan of the M.agazino excludes 
Politics and Polemics. Apart from these 
topics, it includes every thing pertaining to 
Literature, Art, industry. Popular Science, 
and Social Life. 

In the April number is commenced a 
scries of papers upon Peru, by E. G. 
•Sijuier. Tiieso papers will be profusely 
illustrated from photographs taken iu the 
ancient seat of Inca civilization by Mr. 
Stpiier, while acting as a Special Commis- 
sioner from the United States to Peru. — 
These fresh researches of Mr. Sqnier 
throw more light than anything heretofore 
publi.shed upon the subject of the early 
civilization of South America. 



LOFFICIALl 

ACDrroB's OFrici, Scott Cuvwtt. .Mwnesota. 
Spfcial Session of Board oj County Com- 
missioners held at the miuditor't OJicfj 
March lOth, 1868. 




CERTAIN. 

AJSTD 

Speedy Oure 

roB 

NEURALQIA, 

AMD -AT.y. 

NERVOUS 

DISEASES. 



which has jnst been commenced by Messrs. 
Leonard & Booth, of the Rochester Post. 
The paper i^ neatly pii.ited and doublle.-is 
very interesting to those who e;.ii read it. 
I; is Republican in politics aud said to be 
tho only paper in the Scandanavian 
langnage published in the Northwest. — 
Tcrais $2 a year. 



,^'^ General James Shields, formerly a 
ri'sidcnt of this State, and whodi.stingui.shed 
himself by bis bravery at Winchester and 
during the Mexican war, is now engaged in 
lectuiiiig for the benefit of the families of 
the Fenians who wore convicted and exe- 
cuted in Great llritain. The General is 
a!)oui removing his residence to St. Joseph, 
Missouri, at which i>!ac*e ho was to speak 
on St. Patrick's niirht- 



Ax Um!Iased OiM.viox. — "Whenever we 
read the SImkojiee Sprntalor, the thought 
strikes us that the i'ools are not all dead. 
Some woiild say he is a literary purp. — St. 
Fetter .'idverthtT' 



Tub "NoKuisK Folkkblad," is the title 
of a Norwegian paper, the publication of ■^•■'"""" ^ '""' '• T"wi" ii3. R«nce23. on tiierotvi ir»m 

tlolfii.i Yllliige to M.tr.v:itotvu aid iiliak(>jM.'u, thu sum 
uf tlUl ID). 

ltlniii« now ten o'clock, tho Bt>:irJ a U'JUrueJ to lialf 
pan two, 

A»TKRNO<tX SK.'<.'5I0N. 

n«>nrl mi't nccor.llii!; to ;i IJi.iriinii>!,t an<1 itirnittcrs 
alt pp s'-nt. The follow.iij bliln wire uullltJ uul al- 
low.vl : 

IVi'-r licyiTiiian, .•t""'!^ to mnuty p.iii;>eT, $2 70 

J. W. SotK-i-rlit.x, iis.'Uiiei", itc 2 1*5 

U. lluUiiilia;;i.T, as p.T Mil. for pii.-,lii!;v itt.ttiipi. aii>l 

a<''.>iii>wlc-i|j,'iiix tax ileoUs TITO 

The h'rliriBl K.\:im!iiei.s fn>iii I.-.1 urcl S I illstrl> tH n<>t 
havliii! inuim.'.l. tliu^UiiMnl uppulritril F. J.;^VI.It ofic 
f'lr the IslMinl Cliiirlts Uiirkius for theSil il!»t.ltt.«4 
silcli Scli')ol Kx.iniiiiera. 

Appllratlon of W.ii. <?r<'Sdi'y, f..r nn ali.a()-inent nf li'« 
piTsoii.il valuation af II. i- iiiiiuurit of lil.Has,s biliiga^- 
M'sseil. lis lie !(.st llu' saim- In Aiiv'ii.-t l.i>l. w.-iu prc»ei t- 
(■'•l.unil tlip U.iiirl nii'llii^ ilo- .•rii'iunt to In.- a.-*!. Vdeii at 
$li«i, or !ore<l an uliat'-niciit o! $.'iO. 

fpvfral other appIkatloiiA from dlirpmt p irtleii were 
ma.lc, fiir aliutemcnt of ta.xca. atwl wi-rc rejf-rte*. 

Th'/ llourJ took up tin' Briloi- aO'l I'.oail approptl- 

UtiOILS. 

^tll. Drlscuirs BrMge, Ce.lar t~^y.r. .«<Tiion Ore. on 
WhoatluO'l an<l St. Paul road, wa.i Kraiilol the sum 
of $:o IS) 

5ih. UrM;-'e ncros-j Saii'l Crfti-k, iifar F.isj.' .Mill. In 
Jorlaii City, S^ainl Ci»'''k Tow.i, w B Brai t- 'It tjo .Hi:in 

of- $:oouo 

«itU. New .Market, on i^hakopou and Farihan't 

roail, $50 oi 

7lti. Fura brMK"' on the Belle ffcilneauil l.e.\l' rIoo 
ro;nl till" .sum of $:o in) 

^th. An appropriation o| two huiulr>Ml and tirty dollars 
wa.s ;;raiit»-'l t» 1111 an 1 open llir J'liH-inlhK'o-i a>iil Bellu 
I'laliie TOit'i on Foiiitli Street, hetwi-.n Fiilicr aipl At- 
whmI hireet, .*<liakopce $.Z*t {.) 

After wliUlt. on mottoii. the lloarl uoJourucU to 
Tliur:i'laj- iiioriilir,', at 8 o'clock. 

Tin i>i'\T ."MoR-Niyf:. Marra 12, Iv.fl. 
Board met af 8 o'clock, all iiK-mlMrji prc.iaiit. The 
follnwln:,' •'III.'' were nn'llled and al'.owc'l : 

.lanie.-< De I'ue. work on Court llous'', ft OD 

J. J. IJIiiif, vl>llli.s connly pauper 300 

Kd. .McNeil, work on Conrt House 8 no 

Michael I.>'y, vl^^Uiii'.; county pauper I day 3 Wl 

Tliuiii.i.s Terry, rciuovln? an I tInOliii; out t'.ie Uc'l- 

Utiry children, two tlays goo 

F. Mc<iiai!e, rccorlln.;, anij stationery i.l a 

Jae'ibThoniiWi. Sheria' fees, ig jn 

The pauper (iU''Stloti cauie u p ami It wa.- re.solve.l that 
the t;«»iiiity An. liter he aulhorixe.l to puhUhb In the 
Sliakopi-e Ari,'Us for three weeks lor rr'-i'lvin; pr"i)f>.«al3 
for the board rif the C'>unt.y l'au:«ers.np to !->atiir' ay, 
lull duj- of .\prll ne."ct, t'l the Iwwest re>v>.in3lhle hi |.:er, 
the bids t') be gealel iim>I diiio.slted wi'h llieCiunly 
Auditor, np to S o'clock, p. ui.. April 11th, ne>.t.— 
No person will be coiiwhiered a responslblp bidder who 
will not hini.seirtake cai-'' «f s.iM paiiperji. and no p. rson 
«ha!l be allowed to snb-let &uM pau;>«'rs lo other partii 8. 
Tlie following bills were audited am! alloWi^l: 

Dr. J. L. Wukeaeld's bill of $10 OJ allowod ?0 OO 

" of II no allowed 1-i I.J 

D.I.. Uow'ebill of89 30 ttliowcd 1 lO 

Dr. Hull's '• of »i 00 allowetl JO mi 

I'otei- fpecfrt, dlg^'lrig (,'ravefor connty puapcr ICO 

N..Mc.Mullen, drjvrlu- Jury bst 3 U) 

Henry Hliida' contract f»r the County rrlutlii;; wa3 
presented to tLo Board of County Commt«dlouers fo[ 
appro V(il, 

On motloo. It wee resolved that Ibc &\mo l.o ncccple 1 
and udo;,iei| by the B<jard, and that the ChalrniBUof 
Iblii liuard be authorUed to execute tliu saiUO, OU ttlC 
part of the Uo.ird of Cuur.ty Commlsslooers. 
Alter wlilch the Board aljonrned to 2 o'clock. 

AFIKU.VOON SES.siON. 
Members all present. The futlowlnit bllla were aiidlte4 
Olid allowed : 

Ilolton A Ilarkenn, pr^cerles to {>oor tl 2fl 

J. W. I'.Kd, taxes retuinle-l 2 63 

E. L. F.-irnhum, taxes reiunded S lo 

V. X. tl!rsch«»r,desk for Retlslei's olBce 14 on 

M'tes Titus asked for on abatement <if his persont.I 
taxes. lie stated that be llsU'd to the Town At:s"i$(,r 
too In uote8, which he liad received In payment of his 
land, but the party buying the same, being unable to 
pay, ho was compelled to take his land back, and give 
liack his notes, and had pal I the taxci on tlie land.— 
Tho Board, after InregtlgatlnK tho case, were sutLQed 
of the transaction. Cominlssl'Oier Kcnncfoct nioreil, 
I anil Ley secon.led the iiiollon, that live hundred dollars 
P , ,, , • '- , 1 " - j of M. Titus' perbunal proj.orty valnatloQ be abated. 

JJi'.rgboJci, ana puintAid by a young German | which motion wrevull.'.! and w«s curried. 
Ajtldl, who visited this place last summer j Messrs. Soncerbox, .Mctiraile and Ley raade 6tati>- 
and stopped a few weeks witli the liev. i "'*"''•'" ''^'•"'"^''' "^'i'*^'"i''*^''" i**"** t)reek.concerninK 
getitlemau. It cost about ;J;j5 00 which 1 i " "*"" "'"* "•"'^l'' l'* protect theroa.J from JorUn to 
am happy to say. has been paid by the | '''''*"'*'**^' StaUon. Afur some explanation concern- 
Irish Catholics to their devoted pastor 



WETisrsnvT MoRinxo, Marcli n,18r.8. 

Application of BenJ. JaO'ioii fir partial relief was 
made, and the Bi^aril allowe I him Sll.on. 

Appiicatljn of Mar^areth-i D.'l.iii;,'hcrty for partial 
relief was allowed to amount of $io.iio. 

Tlie following' bills were audited and allowod : 
Balr ii Strait, 1 brl. flour, by direction of Coiumls'doner 

Ley, to Deutsvhut $y no 

Frances VVrabcc, goods to pauper j 7» 

Michael Heni(in«. for K<>0<la to pauper, by order of Oom- 

nilssiloner Ley, $ 20 

Oi-'orse Soliott. 1 pr boots f'lr paupur Kane i 00 

C. Kennefect, vlsltlne county pauper, 1 ilay 3 CO 

Petition for parll.il aid to construct a brldce an* road 
a.jroBS San 1 Creek, on iJ.ite road, from il.i tings to 
Belle I'l.dne, as jier petition of I'eter Schulta and olUcrs, 
wua Kranied to amount of iPlOO Ui. Hvon In th» S"vere»t caaet ol Clironlc Nenratela and 

A ls< I, across Credit Klver, near John Wmdrull's l::n'l, (teneral nervonii iloran»ement*,— of many years' stanJ- 
In Section Ift, (Jlcn dale Township, prcsente 1 by Kdward «>"-'.7airectln,: lt»<" entire system Us use for a few days 
, , .,, »•»■ . >■ "V > . J . u-B.v. „, a few weeks at the utmost, alwavs atforls the niost 

Jordan, $5<i IIO. 

Also, across Sand Cr.'ek.nn I on ."octloii line between 



Xta Effort* aro 
Slagical, 

It 18 the rsrAiLi.fO RBMtDr In ell cases of NcnraUcta 
Taclalls, often elfecrtii); a P'jrfoct euro In less than 
twenty four hours, from the Oso of no more than two 
OR TUKSK Hills. 



WONDEKFCL REMEDIAL AGENT. 



.^■':^A ghost is in the habit la'ely of 
making vigils lo the Winslow IIoHse at .St. 
Anthony. .Mr. (J host at first appeared at 
night, and only to a young lady, but lately 
haa become so bold n.n to appear in broad 
day light. Tho lady has shot the ghost 
through l!ie heart, but he docs not die. He 
talks good Kiig'ish and is readily under- 
stood by all, but can be seen only bv the 
yonng lady. The gho.<t is well dressed aud 
good looking, but old aud in ill health. 



SAINT 



PATKICK'.S I).\Y 
I'L-MXE. 



IN BELLE 



From tlio Northwestern Chronlcla. 

Bk'.L£ 1*lvi!«k, March 17, 13f.-*. 

Dear Siu : Knowing that anything, per- 
laijii».g to that National Festtvul which all 
Iri.sh Catholics, all over ibe world, has 
clung to with .so much love and veneration, 
and to which th'-y still ding with that true 
love, and veneration for Dear Fatherland, 
wiiich ia the true and shining characteristic 
of Irish Catholics everywhere, has not been 
forgotten ia Belle Plaiue. 

The day haa been duly observed and 
celebrat.'d by the Catholics of this attract- 
ive tviVn, la a t.^uly Christian manner, un- 
der tlie guidance of their devoted and 
energetic Pastor, Father BerghoM. At ten 
o'clock, tho Holy Saorliice of the -Mass was 
otTereU up, in which a numerous and devoted 
congregation assisted. And after the first 
goHpol, we had the happiness of lisfcuiiig to 
one of the most eloquent and feeling dis- 
courses on St. Patrick and his devoted 
children, it has been my good fortune to 
listen lo in many a year, and one whieli 
must have brought a thrill of joy to every 
Irish heart. But the most prominent fea- 
ture of the day was the splendid picture of 
St. Patrick, j.laced in our church for the 
first time to-day. This jiicture is life size, 
being 4.\6 feet, and represents the Saint in 
robes, with Miler and Croziar, and in the 
act uf driving serpents into the sea. This 
picture has been gotten up by Father 



OAtBVMEN, FARMERS, 

CONSIGN YOCa 

ASHES, BEESWAX, BEANS, BUTTER 

CHEESF], EGGS, FLOUR AXlJ 

MEAL, FLAX, COTTON, 

FURS AND SKINS 

DRIED & GREEN 

FRUITS, 

No other form of Neuralgia or NervouaDUoMc lias GRAI.V. WOOL. GAME, rOULTRY. 
fatlcu to yield to this ,» v »./«-.•*.»» i 

NAVAL STORES, HOPS, GIN- 
SENG, FEATHERS, HE. MP, 
PROVISIONS, OILS, 
LARD.TALLO 
TOBACCO, 
SEEDS, 
SORGHUM, MOLASSES, &c, &c., 

TO 

JOSIAn CARPENTER. 

SIIEMl HISSl lUDu 

442 Washington Street, 

NEW YORK CITY, 

And receive his weel;Iy ]\icr. rurrnit of Proloce and 
fJroi-i»rles. the moHi tomplclel'rlce Current I'ubllshe.l 
In tile United Slates. 

SEjXD Foil .? PRICt: CVRRE.XT. 

Marklnn Tluton and Cards, furnished free. 



ast.inlshltiK r"llef, and very rarely fatU lo produce a 
roiii|)li'te and permanent cure. 

If contains ii'i drnss or oth-r materials IR the sllfrht 
est deirrei' Injurious, ivon to the must delicate 8>i»tcni, 
and can alwav:) be used witit 



PKRFKCT SAFETY. 

It Itaa long !>coa la constant use by many of oar 

MUST KMIN£NT PUY8ICIAXS, 

who f^tve It their nnanlraons and on(ia.illl)c<t appro- 
val 
Sent by million receipt of price, and poslace. 

One package. t\ 00, Postace fi cents. 

Six p.»cl;ai;e8. 5,(I0, " 27 " 

Twelve pack tges, 9."n. " <S " 

It Issold by all wholesale and retail dealer* la drn^s 
and medicines throuj;huut the Cnlted ."tales, and by 

TUaHSa & G<?.,ai<?tePpoippi.etorf, 

I2II Thimu.^t St., Uusto:*, M.^s. 



iniFseifORTiiiof. 



Tho Minnesota House, 

At Shakopee, will be SOLO CHEAP, 
or THADKD FOR A FARM. It is a 
large hotel, newly fiui.'ihed, iu a good lo- 
cation, has a good Stone IJarn, large yard, 
a good well of water, and a fine run of 
custom. Inquire at this olTice or of the 
owner, JAMKS KEARNEY. 



W 



ANTED. — TKAnnpR.s, Stuoents, 

umI ii'st Int.'lll'.'.'iit .Men ^ind Women, In a 
biis!!ie,» paylo;; iliHJlu $-JiX) per month, ac- 

„ ^'.■'''',''17 '."..-"'''"y' •'"'■ I'rtrlltulars, a Idres.- 

ZKlliLKll, .McCUKDYiiCO., Loinbaail III >ck,ChUaBO. 
Ills. n35-liu 




FAIRBANKS' 

htV.'VaMlD 

S C A. JL.E S . 

or Alt KiNns. 
rAIKKA>KP, GKKKM.RAP A CO. 

r:« .V Til Luke .-^t., Clilruuo. 

\-A\\ -i'v.! .Miirkcl ht., St 8t. Lon 

Ik O'lriJ'ul lo bui/ onlv ihr genuxnt. 



THE 

Haticnal Hotel, 

Shakopee, Minn-> 

la now open for the Bccomniodatlon of the traveling 
public. <jr Tlil«« IloiKHJ i.siii'wiv lornUheil tnroQjj boat, 
and h Itic i:treodt and boat kept House in the 



KIKVESOTA 

D. A. CBOWN 



VALLEY. 

Proprietor. 



This is indeed a noble and trub- national 
compliment paid to the Irish Catholics ol 
this place by iheir Rev. Pastor, and one 
whith I am sure ihey appreeLile the more, 
on account of the Rev. geiakmun not being 
an Iribhman himself, but nevertheless who 
is entirely devoted to the spiritual and 



' Ing thesume, the Unard reiiulvoil to appoint a comnilt- 
te»' of two toexninlne the prcmlbes Thomas T^rry 
ant Michael Ley were a|>poliitC'd such comnilttee, with 
power to net. After which the Hoard ttdjoiirncd with- 
out d.iy. C. W. UlU.K.NIlECIi. 
Attest. Chulrmun. 
.M. HESS Dt'NAXD, County Auditor. 



Sfiiooi. MoxKVs- — We are indebted to 









D. M. STORER, 

PRORHIETOE. 



F- X HIRSCHEB. 



A.N'n DKALEIl IS 

rURNITTTRE, 

Holmes St., (near the Lcvec,) 

Shakopee, Minn. 

"The most complete CbtablisLment 
in the Valley." 

All kinds of Furniture, from the nnesf Par- 
lor tetn ilown. Work and repulrliij; ef ever;' 
ileiKrt|iilon ilone In .i iiup< rh-r manner. Pri- 
ces low, aud all work warranted. 



COFFINS 

Of all pliea, au'l the latjest ftyJrs.nlvr.ivs on 
hand. 4b#* I'artlcular ultentlun puld to' thU 
branch of the business. uiarlSt 1.9 ly 




Liberal Advances made on Consignments. 
E.sTAUi.wiiKi) Mav 1st, IHGO. 

First class References alven when renulred. 

n'J-ly 



Cross Plows! 



JOHN SCHI^iRIZ. 

Merchant Tailoe, 

FlKST SmEET, SlIAKOPEE, MlX\. 

a 

A new and splendid stock of Clo- 
thing, Cloths, and Gents' FurnisLin" 
Goods, ° 

FALL & WINTER STVLI S, 

©5?" Clothing made to order. 
Shakopee, March 1 Ith, lt<U7.' 



JOii 



\m[[\ 




THE PERRINE CROSS-PLOWS 

Arc tiX Bale by 

John S^IcS^llllen, I Cor. First and Lewis Streets, 

Shakopee, Minn. 

DE.U.ER IN 



At his 



Hardware Sforc, .Shakopee. 



■:0:- 



STAPLE ASO FANCY 

QRQCERIES, 

pjtonsiojys '°^^^ sscmullem 



They are ina-lo of liar len ' 1 CA.<»T BTBKI, and 
OKItMAN STEia. iiy C. K. I'UIl.U.Nh:, ut the Mlnne 
apolls PI )W Factory. 

This Plow Is tho 

RK.ST PLO.V IN THE WORLD, 

And will liASTfrom two to ttircc times lunger than 
any other Plow. 



Tho reasons for IU Q.lRAr UJ:iABlLITY aro:- 

Ist. The EXTREME HARDNESS of the 
Steel from which it is made. 

2d. The THICKNESS & STRENGTH 
of the exposed parts. 

3d. The wood work is of the BEST WHITE 
OAK TIMBER. 

Those Qualities make 11 tho 

CHEAPEST PLOir 

In tho World, as well as the r.K.fT.iwsi as sure as 
there Is economy In piylnw ."In d .liar.-, once, rather 
than Uve dollars two or tlir-'e times over. 
It* great hardness causes It to 

SCOUR 

la the most 'llfflculv soli, wticn all otlicr plows fall. 
These Plows ure 

WARRANTED TO CLEAN 

In any kind of soil, or the money will be refunded. 
It pt jwa at any 

D E P T H 



Fre.-n four to twelve Inches, and wi;i turn under 
Brass, weeds and stubble, completely. 

FOR SALE BY 



Hardware, 
Stoves, 
Cutlery, 

Tin Ware, & 
Sheet-Iron. 



WOODEN WARE. 

Yankee Notions, 

C&^O.y cft;<3.9 C4303 

On hand and for s.ale i\a cheap tis the 

CH P:: .A I> EST. 

Jan. 14, 180H. (n.')2 



nf. tf 



Ag:3nt, Shakopee, Mian. 



society 



A ClTlZKX 



bi.strict Treasurers can draw this money 

T.„,. , I't r .^ T:» ^ ,f '. , I '^'■""^ *''•-' County Treasurj- immedialelv. — 

TnK editor of the Red W ing Argus has i tu i i ; r i-ii 

been visiting the County Poor House- *^ whole number of children reported is , , ,r n 4 TT Ql l 

What's the matter, Ed.-,TaraA';r//;r- -^^^^^^ ^^^ t"^^l s"m ^pp,,rUouc<l is\ Oj/icC at tkc Court IIoVSC,ShakopCC. 
'^^'i- : $2,7-1 1. 1;4, distriimted to ibe sevcr.al School 



M:. MAYER, 
O o 33.xroya,n.o oxr, 

— AND — 

CLERK OF THE DIST. COURT. 



It's all right, neighbor, W"e were only 
examining the building to .see if the quar- 
ters were sulhcient for the manv who are 
too poor to take their county jiapers. The ' 
building is large enough to accommodate | 
75 of them, and will, when all built, "iSK. | 
It is con.^oling tu know lliere i.s a rrfu;;.' fur 1 
snch unfortunate 
Arfpia. 



Iv 1 Districts as follows 



people. — lied ff mg j 



ficy The Le Sueur Courier says the 
farmers of that county are making prepara- 
tions to engage in tho cultivation of hons. 
Mr. Timothy Shea, of Dairyman township, 
has ordered roots su.Ticieut to plant three | 
acres, which he procures from the great ' 
hop growing region of Wisconsin. j 

—The Anoka Unioq say.^ : " The rosi- ' 
dence ol ^Jr. Cheaver, near Coon Creek, 
was destroyed by fire recently. The coii- ' 
tents ol the building were all .saved, excei.t. 
ing the furniture and bedding i„ tho 
second story. Loss $.«^0(). VMj iusured." 

Mr. Chcaver was formerlv 
Shakopee and the owner of the distillery 
that was burned some three or four 
ago. 



No. iif 
DtM'ki. 

I 

3 
« 
7 
» 
II 

I'. 

17 
I'i 
21 
Z3 

to 
» 

31 

u 

37 
."« 
II 
4S 

a 

ii 
*9 

M 
S3 
.%4 

87 
9V 

ei 



Ap;M>rtIun. 

Illellt. 

$l:«i.%2 

•Si' rs 

r W.' 

;i«;s 

4<''l||i 

u.u 

SI. 91 
1 1 .so 
.'•141 
:U73 
.Tl'Tl 
.Vfi3 

s'.; T'j 

.liln 
4.1.Irt 

.•vt.7'; 
r.-i.in 

1.^(13 

.'ii m 

li'Mie 
4" 4i 

<V..M 

*i.Ul 

TJM 



No. or 

Dialrlct. 

i 

t 

M 
IM 
12 
11 
l>> 

9) 
X! 
St 

'^> 
IS 

y> 

.12 

36 
?■■< 
W 
43 
ii 

m 

ia 

I; 

a* 

a» 

T-i 



Apportlon- 

illenl. 

tiT.iiii 
UM 

»JS 

V5.VS 
JT.u:; 
2333 
SSJt 

»ja 
luai 

none 
S4.I9 
43 »7 
47.t« 
*4 4> 
M.M 
141 CV 

uaa 

S3.KJ 
Bone 
14.69 

Km 

4».BT 

• *»" 

I nuM« 

01.43 



Will make Deeds and Mortgages, and 
all LcL'al papers. Will jmy taxes and sell 
Real Estitte on commission. &c. '» 



**Tbo Ten U niehtler than the SworC.** 






DO yOT WIIAR OUT. 



MICKIGim SOUIHIRH & 

LAKE SHORE R. R. U«E. 

TOLEDO & CLEVELAND. 

The only direct route to 
and al! principal points in 

New York and Now England. 

fiir An the priiirlpal Rnllwiv! of the Xorllin-.-st and 
Smill.Wfut n-n>i>xt at r.Mct^,, irltli the Kmir Dillr 
Kxpr.-.H Trains of t:ie. .MICIIKJA.N SUfniKKN 

««,fe6AMT OBA.Wtr«C RiOB GOACHSS 

evi-r put uyiin a JLillwa.v In thi8 ciMintry, are In use 

ii;.|>M thi.s till.-, one nf whirli will leav Ch'ciiM on I> .y 

Kxpr.-.ss m 7j«i .\. M.. running throii;jli to Cleveland 

).!,. I wiilmnt ch.in«H. Tl..' lyniwiu- Itaoni (;.>.iclu'« Slcpp- 

-•'.» , Uiii ti.acli.s, and I>iiy C.i^.chi!* of ttils lliiH,«re un-iuV 

I Ji;'*'*'^' ^^' I'"'"'-'"'' •■'"y lluilwa.v line In tlil.<c mntry — 

The smooth ami pi'rl,« t trirk kivi-h the advanU ••• ol 
iiuifk timv unit nirfr^mnc'-.tinB.'i. I>u^.s"i'i.'er>i lor Jtrfr-iit 
.-irid all points In Oi uwl'i , an.i thos,. f.ir O'lio. /'rnnsuliui- 
niii, .\ctc lurk niid .Ww J-uijInnd, (.lioul,! i,nrcha<e 
llck..t» Ma MlrtlKJ.XS SOrniLuy RAILWAy 
*liKli areiin s.ilc- at all prh.. ipalll;ttil\vuj-Tkkit Olllcci 
and«t the Cuiipaiiy s .ntl'-i-s, _; i "»"<-'-» 

No. 30 Clark Street, Clitengo. 

y. K. .MOItSiK, 
rpn V PI. iv «e.il 1'asi.AKi.. Chicago, 

"■-nl VnvM'n I'as.. Apt. M. .«. & I,. 8. Line. Chlrnpo 



A Single Oke will Last a Lifetime. 



— Tlio Minne:i|HjIis 'i'ribuno says ; " A 

I woman whose name wo were unable to 

a resident of loam, w.ts found dead in an out 

liig I^ke, a night or two since. 



lot near 
Whether 



13Y TIIKIR USE 

THE LABOB OF WEITIKQ 13 BZLUCED, 

Greater TTnlfonnlty is Obtained. 

Ea36, Elc{jnnc€ and Beauty are actptircJ. 

mm, PJ.!\S11i2 AX? PEOfI! COTlSriTEtt 

Tb« Oe»t, Cbeapeet aad mo^ Durablo Iciitru- 
meot£ lor Writing erer jiBc4, 



SENT BY MAIL SAFELY. 



—St. Tet.r is t.i 1, 



j dkd from exposure, is not known 
•' nave no le;^s than throe _(; .,„„..i ,. 

ad'iitional churJivo built durin.i,» the couii:) - ., ., ,^ •■.,,. 



meaas, or 



Jt.rinan broko otio of hi.^ ribs 



I70 TBATSLaVQ AGSNTS EMPIiO'TED. 

0»lt asil ffin viVi flod IVna vji\etlf adaptc^l to your 

h»-}A an<1 irtyVnf »rt1tns". avrackjaotaiup ^JT circular. 



If^e are Coming! 

And will present to any person sending us 
a club in our Great 

OFE BOLLAPi SALE 

of DRY AND TAXCY GOOD.S, a Watch, 
Piece of Sheetiii^'.Silk Di-e.ss Pattern, ttc., Ac. 

FREE OF COST. 

Catalo;rue of <«oodi and Sample sout to 
any address free. 

ALLEN, HAWES & CO.. 

15 Federal Street, Boston, 

P< 0. Bdx C. Mass. 



Wlidlnsab 

and l'!i::'i^! 



Dralcrs in French, German, 

I'r-v- a ; 1 l".i!, v (, i.vl^, Cut- 

'.V.r.. . \il.iiii.. I ..•tt\<„mtl-tuu\^ 



^^g- Repairing' neatly and prompt- 
Iv executed. 



I.V PROHATK COURT. 

SCOTT COL XT Y: Special 
Torm, .March li^th. lS('iM. — In the 
Matter of the Estate of Nichola.- 
Kray, Decea.scd, 

On re.ading and fillnjr fhp petition 
of Wilholmina Hak-cr, of Shakopee 
in tho county of Scott and State o( 
.Minnesota, praying for reasons there- 
in 8lat(d that Letters of Adminis- 
tration on the Estate of the Faid 
leceasod may be issued to J. W. 
.Sencerbo.v, 

It is ordered, tlutt Saturday, tlio 
r;icveiith d.iy of April, lH(;K,"at Id 
o'clock in the forenoon at tlio" ollicc 
of tiie .lutlge of Prolitte in the town 
of Shakopee in said county, be a.e- 
sisrned for the hearinjr of said pfti 
tion, and that the heirs at law of th< 
tho said deceased, if any there be, 
and all other persons interested in 
the .said estate, are required to In 
pre.'icnt, at that time and place to 
show cause, if any there b^, -,vhy tlit 
prayer of said pctitiuti should not 
'le jrraiifcJ. 

Aud it is further oKkrctl, iL..! 
J?ticc of the licaring of the said pe- 
tition be j».ven by publisliinir a copy 
of this orcler in the Shakopee Arjru.«. 
a weekly new.«tpap< r printed and j»iib 
lished at Shakopee, in said county, 
for three .sueccs.sive weeks immediate- 
ly preceeiliiiijr the snitl hoarinc. 

Dated .March KJlh, lS(i8. 

L. K. hawki.vs, 

Judiic of Probafo. 



P. Geyermana. 

DEALER I y^ 

DRY GOODS, 

GROCERIES, 

Boots & Shoes, 

Hats & Caps. 

Dress Goods, 

YANKEt) NOTIONS 

Queensware, 

Crockery^ 



CLIMAX! CLIMAX!! 

Page's Climax Salre, a Family 
blessiog for 25 ceuts. f " 

It heals i^'ithout a .scar.^ No 
family slionld be without it. 

We warrant it to cure Scrofnla 
Sores, Salt Rheum, Chilblains, 
Tetter, Pimples, and all Eruptions 
of the Skin. For Sore Breast or 
Kipplcs, Cuts, Sprains, Bmises, 
Burns, Scalds, Chapped Hands, 
&c., it makes a perfect cure. 

It has been used orer fifteen 
years, without one failure. 

It has no parallel — having per- 
fectly eradicated disease and 
healed after all other remedies had 
failed. It is a compound of Arnica 
with mauy other Extracts and 
Balsams, and put up in lai^er 
boxes for the same price than any 
other Ointment. 

Sold by Dru^jTist."; ovcrywhcrc. Wliito & Ilowlanil, 
Proprietors, 121 Liberty Street. New York. 

XOIICE OF IklORTGAGE SALE. 

X.vME.=? or MoRTfiAonitF— Fredrick Ijihr- 
iiian pnd Sophia Lahrman; bis wife, of 
Pcolt County, Minnesota, 

.\'.\MK OF SionTGAGKE — Mathias Marlj, Hen 
of Monroe, W;scon.sin. 

Datb of MouTC.iuE— AovciiiL'er H'b, A. 
I). 1863. 

Said Mortgage was recorded in fbc office 
of the Rcgi.<;tcr of Deeds of Scott 
{'oniity, at one o'clock in the aficrnonn 
of the '20th day of November, in t' a 
year ISCH, in Book "E" of Mortgages, 
r.ifjc 168. 

The Desckiptiox of (he Morf;;npcd jtrpmiH- 
C3 is the West Half of the North \Vr*4 
Q'jarlcr of Section Twenty-ono in Town- 
^mp One Hundred Thirteen of Range 
Twenty-two, containing eiphty ncrcp, 
Bifuafe lyirifT and being in the County 
of Scott aforesaid, 

.-^.Mn MoHTG.^oE was made to pccnrc the 
payment of the Funi of One Hun- 
dred Dollar.*!, with intere.«t at the 
rate of twc'yc per cent, peraunum.pny- 
ablc ill one year from date, nVj 
rordin^ to the proinis.sory note of the 
Raid Fredrick Lahrinnn, laiyablo to tl e 
.•said Mathias Marty, aud bearing t'Teu 
date with said inortf,'age. 

No .\(Tinx or proceedings haye been insli- 
(ntcii at law or otherwise, to recover 
the snin .seemed by said mortfnige or 
any part tliercof. 

TuE x.MoLXT claimed lo be duton paid nolo 
at the date of thi.s notice i.s the 8ani <if 
One llniidied and Fifteen l)olIars. fo- 
getl.er with the s-\\u\ of Ten dollar.i 
solititor'd tcsecuicd to be paid by said 
morfg.nge. , 

Novy TiiKUKFORF. notice I.s liercby giyon,that 
Ity virtnc of a power of .safe conttiined 
ill .said niortjrapeand recorded thcr-witli 
and of the proyi.sions of tho Statute in 
pneh Cji.sc made and provided, the Miti 
inertfrofrc will be foreclosed by a wilo 
of said mortpapcd prend.se8 to be made 
by the Sheriff of eaitl County of Scott, 
at public vendue at the front door of 
the Court IIoOsc in Shakopee iu Raid 
County of Scott, State of Minnesota, at 
ten o'clock in the forenooti of the SPtii 
p.vY OK MARen, in tlie year J86H, and 
the proceeds of such sale will be applied 
to flic payment of the sum then due on 
said note and mortgage, and the costs 
nnd cliai-rrcs of foreclosure and ."aid sum 
of ten dollars solicitor's fees provided 
by .Slid inort-rage to be paid out of tho 
jirnceeds of such sale. 

Dat .1) Fcbninrv 1.1th. I8CP, 

Mathias map.tt. 

TlKNr'.Y TIiNnp, Mortgage*. 

.Vtlorncy for Mortj*f»gee.' 
Jacoh Thomas, 

Sheriff of Scott County, Minn, 



OXJ TU E3 n. 



0"tc. 




oto. 



otc- 



NOTICK OF A10iiT(JA0E SALK. 

Xames of Mortgagors — ('hnrles Ifnrtmnnn 

and Ann llartmann, his wife, of Scott 

County, MiiiiieKotn. 
Xame of Moktgagkk — Cathnrltia Scbrautr, 

of Scott C'ounty, Minue.«'ota. 
Da K OF MobtuaJe— October 19th, A. I). 

18C.5. 

Said MoRTctnE wn.s recnnTed in the ofTce 
of the Register of Deeds of Scott Coun- 
ty, at four o'clock in the afternoon qf 
the 19th day of October, A. I>. D-rr,, 
in Book -F' of Mortgage.'^, on page n03. 

Til : DK.-(\';irTioN <A the moiigngetl premises 
is Lot Three in Block Three, in the 
jdat of Shakopee City, on fil6 in Iho 
office of the Kegi.sfer of Deed.« Of tho 
County of Scotf, State of Minnesota, 
.^itnnte lying and being io the said 
County of Scott 

SviD Mokt<;.\(;k was made fo secure Iho 
t)ayii:ciit of the sum of Five Hundred 
Dollars with interest nf the rale of 
twelve ])br (ioiit. pef annum, payable iti 
one year from elate, necording lo the 
mond«sory iiole of lli'> said Cliorhs 
raitinann, payable lo the said Cath.v 
lii'.a Schr.'.ntz, aud bearing even data 
with said mortgage. 

N'o A Tio.v or proceedings have been insti- 
t ted at law or otherwi.sc lo recover 
t c sum secured by *^uid morlgogc or 
any jtart thereof. 

TiiK A.Mot NT claimed to be due on Mid 
mortgngc at the date of lhi.s notico in 
the sum of Five Hundred and Twrnlv. 
two Dollars and Fifty Cents, logellirr 
with the sum of ten dollars solieilor'H 
fee secured to be paid by said ihorigago. 

Now 'J'iiERKK<yRK. notice is hereby given,! hat 
by virtne of ri p<iwer of .^.-^.le contained 
in iaid inortfage and recorded therowilb 
and of the provisions of t,he Statute in 
such Ciise made and provide!^, the said 
mortgage will be foreclo-ccd by a sale of 
said mortgaged premi.<!es to be made by 
the Sheriff of said County of .Scolt. at 
j)ul)lic vendue af the front door of the 
Conrt House in Shakopee in said Coun- 
ty of Scotf, State of Minncsofn, at ten 
o'clock ill the lorenoon of the 2.^tii dat 
OF Aruii,, in tho year •l'*t'.s, aiid the 
proceeds of such fafp will be applit^ to 
the payment of the .jjuni then due o» 
said iioic and mortgage, and the costs 
and charges of foreclosure, and said sum 
of ten dollars .solicitor's fees provi«led 
by said moitgnge to be paid out of tho 
proeeetls of *ucli sale.' 
Datko .March .".th, 1808. 

OATIIAULNA SCnHAXTZ, 
IIf..vi;y Ih.sDs, JdortgufftS*. 

Attorney for Mo Ig gee, udTt 

JACOIJ TIJUAIAS, 
Sheriff of Scott County, Minnesota 

DKAFNES.S. CATAllUn, COXSUMP- 
TIO.V, A.VI) CAXt-KB CfRKI). 
A Troalisi-.iii D-.TfiioK^. Catarrh. Coniinni'pf Ion i«B«t 
Uiiic. r.llieirt JUKI*, means of ^(.^edjr reil*««.«ii>l ultl- 
iiiai. ture. Ly a I'lipil urtlir Ac»<ieiiiy uI Mrdklii*. 
l'iiri.% f-iiit t<l.^Ill■a,|,lrl■^«l„r i(u-,.|ii,i, , 

I,.itt.r fpini K.Iurt M. Miir.lv. D. D.. J..I. IIl..O»»»-1 
I'r.i.if, .iMlrsrifl J?„c:inipni<iitoI U.S.. Mild Editor of 
ttif .V.-itlonn! rr«>»tiij««..n." 

x«w r.*«K, g<>iw. 17, m»i: — n».'FT>iiwri.L. wji« in 

cli»rjt*i r,( tJr.ic* Onrcli N»i>l>rt«l. AkTt«n«1rl». \, 
diirlior the w.ir. I riO(|TH-»«h , aliiKot Uallr, f,V 
inoiithti, vIMti^l Ihp'llfiipltal.'niiil had every wipaiik ,., 
knouiii;: liis rrixiiutlnti lur rrfinrjciT and aliu. 1* 
uasiif llii Riu;tl creiUtaMi- fhiinirtrT, and lilhtiirrrria 
In ti*>- tri'.-ttnietit ol {)jitieuU was rtau>rk«l*l('.— Kol* 
McMin»DV. * 

ORGANIC VIBRATOR. 

Itflt* Int.JtlK'eMr, Is ,w ivneptihh. rnm>rtt ffnoiftm 
nrntis ,n ti.f h'-.til. «iid pii.tl.l.f <l.>af p.rwvus fo i,».,r 
.li>>iM<il.v :,t cli'iiili «i,.l i.,;|,lii n>>,.i„l.lir,<, 11,1k In 
slKiiiii-iil nill.ili,.'! |ir...|M, iT.-siilt' iiliiiosi niirai iiloun 

••""Oi'l I ill iii.i.i ra>./^..t li.nc iiI;iihIiiil- iti.ilnriiB II 

will I.-1I.V1 Hi .1 R|,..ri il,„e. It nia.v lie aillnrlPd wl't i 
tlif ran- 111 v|ni l.irl. .1. 

nil. -Tii.L»i;i I « III hi i»iii>».i.«taJ!r.-'t 3i >:ai>i Vmii- 
I ' 



SI 



» I 



SttMMAlY OF THE WEEK. 



NEirs. 



0/ 



If 



■»IJfnii'-l OBNERAI- 

• " ""^A-djutant General Thomas was present 
at the regular Cabinet meeting on the 

aoth. 

Fractional currency issued for the wcelc 
nIii^'>«N3ding March 14, $482,600; shipments 
^^mudil^o and notes, |740,798; National Bank 
l P notes iMued, $ 13 1,390 ; fractional currency 
redeemed and destroyed, $392,200. 

Major General Hancock arrived in 

Washington on the afternoon of the 20th, 

«''*"*^ accompanied by Colonel Mitchell of his 

staff. Getaeral Grant, by order of the 

O President, has detailed General Halleck to 

succeed Hancock at New Orleans. 

In the United States Supreme Court in 
caae No. 11, original State of Georgia vs. 
General Grant, the Secretary of War and 
others, on motion of Mr. Black, a process 
•was ordered to Issue in this cause. The 
motion for a preliminary injunction was 
held under advisement 
/ The United States Supreme Court, on 
the I6lh, decided unconstitutional the law 
of the State of Nevada, levying a tax of 
one dollar on every passenger leaving the 
State by coach or railroad. The court 
granted leave to file a bill in the case of 
the State of Georgia versus General Grant 
^i.snd others. 

The receipts from customs for the week 
ending March 14th, were $3,549,232. The 
amount of National Bank notes in circu- 
lation.March 10, was $299,693,506, of the 
following denominations : One dollar notes, 
$8,431,050; twos, $5,668,030; fives, $112,- 
969,583 ; tens, $77,730,723 ; twenties, $48,- 
673,325 ; fiaies, $19,977,595 ; one hundreds, 
$25,299,700; five hundreds, $5,944,500; 
one thousands, $3,019,000. 



b 

T 



\ 



I' 

« 
.1 



I* 



» 



R 







I 



1*1 
I 



FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. 

The war between the Turks and Cretan 
insurgents is reported at an end. 

Jefil Davis arrived in Havana on the 
I4th, from New Orleans, en route to Balti- 
more. 

The jury, in the case of Captain Mac- 
kay, on the 20th, brought in a verdict of 
guilty of treason. Sentence was deterred. 

Admiral Farragut left Naples on the 
16th, for Rome. He was escorted to the 
railway station by the principal citizens of 
Naples. 

Captain Mackay, recently tried at Cork 
on a charge of murder, and acquitted, was, 
on the 16th, put on trial on the charge cf 
treason and felony. 

Thompson and Mnllaly have been con- 
victed at Manchester of being accessory 
to the murder of police Sergeant Brett, 
and sentenced to be hanged. 

W. Johnson, the Orange Secretary, who 
was imprisoned in County Down for tak- 
ing the lead in an illegal procession, has 
been made candidate for Parliament from 
;the city of Belfast. 

Advices from Annesly Bay, March Otb, 
give a report from the advance post of the 
British lorces that General Napier was 
about to make a dash on Magdala, hoping 
to rescue the captives. 

A Naples dispatch of the 14th says the 
eruption of Vesuvius is increasing in 
power and grandeur, the volcano throw- 
ing up vast quantities of fire and but 
little lava. The detonations are loud and 
frequent 

The American Minister, General Dix, 
has returned to Paris. His visit to Eng- 
land was not of a diplomatic character, as 
reported. He went to London to be pres- 
ent at the marriage of his son, Charles 
Temple Dix. 

Four men of the crew of the Jacmel 
packet, arrested near Dungarvon, all nat- 
uralized citizens of t he United States, of 
Irish birth, have been discharged and will 
be sent home at the expense of the Amer- 
ican Government 

The Prince of Wales will make his ex 
pected visit to Ireland during Easter holi- 
days. It is intimated that the occasicm 
will be signalized by a royal proclamation 
granting a partial amnesty to political 
oflTenders in Ireland. 



I'l 



Jftckjou, colored, th» ttewarti. wu blown toma 
diitiacce in the air, ;ot fonuuatcly e»cftp«d any so- 
rioua iDJary, although be Is Bllj^htly wounded ; 
William Burton, bartender, badly bruixed about 
the head and face : .Tames McF.nrland, Terre Haute, 
lad., severely Injured ; \V. D. Hose, Uiegln»port, 
Bilghtly ; Mrs A. N. Fulton, Miss Wild, fire. Wild, 
ana Mrs. Martin, tli£htly ; James McMullen, 
slijjhly; Mr. Mirnwks, colored, both tniRhs bro- 
ken ; Franlt Bruell, of Cincinnati, badly scalded : 
H. Abbott, ecaldtd; Thomas Cnrwin, burned 
very severely ; A. T. Cos, ^<li«htly ; C. D. Arm- 
ftron?, slightly; U. Mayo, slightly ; — Low, slight- 
ly ; O. H. Huston, badly Injured; O. W. Kerr, 
badJy injuredr Mr. Martin, alighUy. 

THE EAST. 

The New Jersey Republican State Con- 
vention met on the 18th, and selected del- 
egates to the National Convention and de- 
clared for Grant for President 

The Vermont Republican State Con- 
vention met on the 17ih, and selected del- 
egates to the National Convention and 
declared for Grant for President 

A man from Westport, N. Y., was "con- 
fldenced" out of $770— his entire pile— in 
the enterprising city of Chicago, on the 
19th. A bogus check was the instrument 
used. 

Rev. Stephen H. Tyng, Jr., was publicly 
reprimanded by Bishop Potter, in New 
York, on the 14lh, for the violation of a 
canon of the Episcopal Church, in ofliciat- 
ing in the parish of another minister with- 
out his consent There was an immense 
concourse. The Bishop cautioned Mr. 
Tyng against a repetition of the offense. 
Mr. Tyng sat in the aisle in a plain cos- 
tume. He manifested no emotion, and 
made no remarks. Rev. Stephen H. Tyng, 
Sr., has filed a protest against the decision 
of the Ecclesiastical Convention in the 
case of his son, and the approval thereof 
by Bishop Potter. He makes a solemn ap- 
peal to the supreme and final decision of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States. 

THE SOI' TH. 

The South Carolina Convention ad- 
journed sine die on the 17lh. 

Judge Reese has accepted the Demo- 
cratic nomination for Governor of Georgia. 

Sergeant Bates, with his flag, arrived at 
Columbia, 3. C ., on the atternoon of the 
18th. 

Hon. Thomas T. Ashe has accepted the 
nomination for Governor of North Caro- 
lifaa by the Conservatives. 

The election in Georgia, on the new con- 
stitution, ia ordered by General Meade to 
begin April 20, and continue four days. 

General Canby has designated the 14th, 
15th and 16th of April for holding the 
South Carolina election on the Constitu- 
tion and for Congressman and Slate offl 
cers. 

Judge E. Stams,the distinguished jurist, 
and formerly Judge of the Supreme Court 
of Georgia, was killed on the 20th, by the 
accidental discharge of a gun in the hands 
of his SOD. 



I THE WEST. 

-J . The Michigan Republican State Con- 

^1* »>Tention assembled on the 18th and eelected 

delegates to the National Convention. A 

aeries of resolutions was adopted, one in 

'^'fcvor of Grant for President. 

A grand wolf hunt came off in the coun- 
ties of Lake, Illinois, and Kenosha, Wis., 
on the 14th instant About five hundred 
!•<* sportsmen were in the field. Five wolves 
were parlLilly entrapped, but succeeded 
"-f in making their eseape. According to 
accounts in Chicago papers, the hunters 
captured one skunk, three rabbits and a 
'prairie hen — but no wolf. 

A funous storm of wind and rain, ac- 
companied by thunder and lightning, 
^...passed over a great portion of the West 
on the night of the 16th. In many places 
4hria lUinoifl, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, 
t>*( Michigan, etc., houses were unroofed and 
** -blown down, cars thrown from the rail- 
road tracks, bridges demolished — and 
''"'* human life, in some Instances, destroyed. 
In Chicago, a large number of dwellings 
were blown over — mostly unfinished and 
unoccupied. One occupied house was 
blown down and the inmates buried in the 
ruins, a woman killed and a man seriously 
injured. The iron roof of the new ma- 
chine shop of the C. & R. I. R. R. Com- 
pany was lilted bodily and thrown to the 
ground, and the building seriously dam- 
aged. The Chicago papers say it was the 
severest gale ever experienced in tiuit sec- 
tion. 

The steamer Magnolia exploded her 
boilers when about twelve miles above 
Cincinnati, on the afternoon of the 18th. 
- • There were on board over one hundred 
t*\ passengers and* a crew of ferty. Of 
these only fifty-seven persons were, on the 
d»y of the accident, known to have es- 
caped. The greater portion of the cabin 
ail '■ ^''** carried away by the explosion, and the 
boat took fire immediately, and after the 
remaining upper works were destroyed, 
some powder in the magazine exploded, 
destroying everything but the hull, which 
soon sunk. Many of the passengers jumped 
overboard and were drowned, while others 
were burned to death. Tfie following is 
a list of those of the passengers and crew 
who were reported, on the 19th, as injured 
and lost or missing : 

jLo«<— Captain J. H. Prather, Jamei StcTens, 
second en^Deer; Perrr Miller, second mate; Wm. 
JIvtuie. barkeeper ; Mary Coptn, chambermaid ; 
Jobn Beea, off Felicity, O., was drowned; WUllam 
Sfana, boatman, is miaaing : Mlas Retta French, 
of Mason connty. Ey., la sappoted to be drowned ; 
B. Bradford, of^Blpley, O , is also reported lost. 
Six deck hands, whose names are nnknown, are 
also reported ioat, whlcb makes a total of fifteen 
llTea. 

/;^ur«d— Henry Clark, mesaeneer of Adams 
Bzprees, badly wonnded and brtnsed aboat the 
head and body ; B Oardner, one of the owners of 
the boat, baflly hurt ; A. Connor, pilot of the boat, 
dropped from the pilot bonse into the boiler room 
tad WM wrloaaly bamed and bmlaed; Jobn 



CONGRESSIONAL. 

Senate not in session on the 14th In 

the Honse, the day was devoted to general debate 

The qnestions of the Treaty-Making Power, 

Impeachment, Finance and the passage ot the 
late amendment to the Judiciary bill were dls- 

cnseed With regard to tlie said amendment, 

Mr. Boyer «aid it was offered and adapted with a 
viewol depriving the Supreme Court of jurisdic- 
tion in the Mc< ardle case, and ihatlt would never 
have been sntfered lo pass without objection had 

its real charactir been explained Mr. Blaine 

thought Mr. Boyer"* po»iliua was simply that his 
Bide oi' the Hou^e was not awake to »ee the point 

contained in the amendment The debate on 

this question was participated in by several mem- 
bers on both Bides of the House, and aomo re- 
marks of a personal nature were indulged in — 
Adjoiuned. 

In the Senate, on the IGth, a petition 

was presented from the South Carolina Conven- 
tion, asking for the repeal of duty on rice, and a 
communication from the Georgia Convention ask- 
ing an appropriation of j;iiX),(KO, for the repair and 

construction of certain roads. Both referred 

The bena'e insisted on its amendments to the bill 
to facilitate the piiyment of poldiera' bounties, and 
also to the Pention bill, which had been disagreed 
to by the House A bill was reported from Com- 
mittee on Finance amendatory of the currency act 
of June 3, 18ti4 ...The Bouse bill to exempt cer- 
tain manutactures from internal tax, with an 
amendment, was reported from the Finance Com- 
mittee a. MU was introduced and referred to 

frovlde for a survey of the Mississippi river 
'ending discusMoo on the bill relating to Central 
Branch of the Union Paciac Kailruad, the Senate 
went into Executive 8cB^ioa, abd soon alter ad- 
journed. 

In the House, on the 16th, under a call 

of States, several bills -fere Introduced and ro 
ferred, among them one repealing a piortionof the 
act fixing the number of Judges of the Supreme 
Court, which provides that no vacancies be filled 
until the number of Associate Justices in reduced 
to six: one refunding the amount paid by private 
snbsci lotion toward the improvement of the har- 
bor ol Michigan City; one authorizing the erf c- 
tion of a marine horpital at Cairo ; and one pro- 
viding that the officers of the army, including those 
of the veteran reserve corps, be entitled to be re- 
tired under the same conditions as officers wound- 
ed in the regular army.... A memorial was pre- 
sented from Uie Wiscunsin Iiegislatare for the 
reimburaemcBt of Milwaukee for certain expendi- 
tures on her harbor.... A petition was preHented 
and referred from one hundred and nine German 
citizens of Cleveland, asking that the Constitution 
be so amended as to abolish ihe ofiBce of President 

of the United States A preamble and sixteen 

resolutions were ofiered by Mr. Koss, of Illinois, 
reciting that the Fortieth Coneress has been 
charged with disloyalty to the Government with 
the purpose to subvert and destroy the essential 
principles and just balance upon which it 
rests, and declaring Ihe Constitution Is the su- 
preme paramount law of the land ; that Congress 
will faithfully abide by and strenuously maintain 
the essential and fundamental principles of free 
government; that Congress will oppose ail cfTtUta 
to render the military independent and superior 
to civil power; that it will oppose all eiTorts 
to deprive the people of the rii;ht of the habtoB 
eorpvn and trial by Jury ; that it wUl oppose the 
encroachment of one department of the Govem- 
ment or another ; ttiat free speech, a free press, 
and a free ballot are essential to liberty, ana can- 
not be snrrrndered ; that Congress is oppofcd to 
a large standing army; that speculation and fracde 
on the Treasurv ebonid be stopped ; that each 
State shall regulate suffrage within it«own limits ; 
that no Government bouds shall be issued not 
subject to the same rate of taxation as other prop 
erty ; that the National Bank notes shall l>e witii- 
drawn, and legal tender notes substituted. 
The House refused to second the previous ques- 
tion, and also to lay on the table, and, on motion 
of Mr. Ashley, of Ohio, they were referred to the 
Juaiciary Committee A preamble and resolu- 



tion were adopted in reference to lands granted to 

the State of Iowa for railroad purposes by 

of May 15, lt:<<iti, directing the Secretary of the In 



H '» 



|.35,400fi>r tbo improvomeulof Ihehurboi Of MicLI 
gsu City A number of proi««tg of Union sol- 
diers were presented against the bill introduced by 
^^enator Wuson In relation to bounties, etc.. ..Ad- 
journed. 

In the Senate, on the 18th, a petition 
waa presented and referred from the Cleveland, 
Ohio, Manufacturers' Convention, prayln;; for a re- 
duction of the Internal revenue tax — The Com- 
mittee of Conference on the bill to facillUte the 
payment of soldiers' bounties, reported certain 
verbal amendments, which were cnncurred in — 
A telegram, dated Jaiiuiry 13, ISW, from General 
Meade, was read, sutiug that if the bill pending 
before Congress was piifsed, directing MillUry 
OoittBtanders to fill the ofhces with those qualified 
to take the oath, its rxecution will be entirely 
impracticable. Keferred. ... Ihe bill to exempt cer- 
tain manufacturers from internal tax was passed 
in Committee of the Whole, and reported to the 
Senate Adjourned. 

In the House, on the 18th, Mr. Broomall, 
of Pennsylvania, moved to reconsider the vote re- 
ferring to the Judiciary Committee a bill intro- 
dncea by him July 11. 18C7, to guarantee to the 
several States of the Union a repubUciui form of 
government. After debate on the bill in question, 
nie motion to reconeider was withdrawn — A bill 
was reported from the Committee on Keconstrnc- 
tion, to admit the State of Alabama to represenU- 
tion in Congress, which was ordered printed — 
The Uoase receded from all its disagreements, ex- 
cept one, on the Consular Appropriation bill — A 
report was made, and agreed to, on the bill to 
facilitate the payment ot soldiers' bounties — A 
rd.«ol»tion was adopted calliuit on the Secretary of 
War for a revised ectimate for river and harbor 
ImprovementB Adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 19lh, resolutions of 
the Wijconain Legislature were submitted, in- 
structing her Congressmen to adhere to their pres- 
ent policy. and endorsing the course of Mr. Stanton 
... The proceedings of a meeting of the citizens 
of Wisconsin were presented, in favor of the pend- 
ing bill for the removal of the tax on manufactures 
. . .The bill to relieve certain manufactnrs from in- 
tenial tax waa taken up, amended and paeaed.... 
Adjourned. 

In tho House, on the 19th, the bill pro- 
viding that in case of vacancy in the office of Chief 
Justice of the Supremo Court, tJO Associate Jna 
tlce of said Court whose commission Is senior in 
time, shall ofUctate until the inability shall have 
been removed, or another appointment shall be 
duly made, and a Chief Justice duly qualified, 

was passed The House proceeded to the 

consideration! of the bill to continue for an- 
other year ttie Freedmen's Burean, which was 

pussed— 96 to 67 The Civil Appropriation bill 

Wis called up, amendments paaaud upon, and the 
ilouse adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 20th, a memorial 
was submitted and referred, asking appropriations 
for repairing the levees on the Mississippi river 

Petiiions of colored men from various pans of 

Delaware were presented, asking to be secured In 
their rights, and the Judiciary Comittee waa in- 
structed to inquire into the authenticity of the 

petitions The bill authorizing the Peace Com- 

misdioners to conclude a treaty with the Navsjoe 
Indians near Bosquito, and appropriating $15,1100 
for their removal, was passed — Executive ses- 
sion and adjournment. 

In tbe House, on the 20th, a resolution 
was adopted that the House, in Committee of the 
Whole, will attend, with the Managers, at the bar 
of ihe Senate, during the impeachment trial — 
Bills were reported, ordered printed and recom- 
mitted, to equalize the bounties of soldiers, sailors 
and^arines ; to amend cortain acts in relation t6 

the navy and marine corps Bills we^e intro- 

dnced and referred, additional to the act giving 
lands to aid in tbe construction of railroad and 
telegraph lines from Lake Superior to Pugefs 
Sound, by tbe northern route ; to allow certain 
drawbacks on copper in pigs, bars or ingots, ex- 
ported from the Uuitcd States: toproviae a reme- 
dy for the loss or destruction ot judijments, re- 
cords or decrees, appertaining to proceedings in 
the United t^tates Court The Sundry Civil Ap- 
propriation bill was considered, amendments dis- 
posed of, and bill passed An amendment to the 

till relative to the rights of naturalized citizens 
abroad was ofl'ered and referred Adjourned. 



poi.ti'ricAi. iTE.ns. 



terlor to inform the House by what authority the 
lands have been certified and conflriaed under 
such grant, in violation of the act requiring a cer- 
tain branch to be built. . . . A resolution was intro- 
duced and referred providing that an amount of 
legal-tender notes equal to the amount heretofore 
retired shall be issued and restored to the ctirrency, 
and that the amount of legal-tender notes so re- 
stored shall be used only In purclming for cancel- 
lation any of the gold interest-bearing bonds 

The conference report on the bill appropriating 
$15,000 for tbe benefit of Mrs. Q«n. Anderson was 
agreed to— TT to 69 A resolution was adopted 
that the rules may be suspended during the pend- 
ing of the impeachment trial, to proceed to the 
consideration of any matter which ma^ be reported 
by tbe managers on tbi; part of tne House of 
itepresentaiives Adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 17th, petitions 
were presented and referred from citizens of 
Michigan, and from clUzena of lUtDols, for the re- 
duction of the expenses of the Qovemment and. 

of taxaUon Petitions were presented and re-" 

ferred from the Wisconsin Ijegislature, praying for 
an extension of time in relation to certain lands 
granted to railroads, and asking an appropriation 

for harbor Improvements BlUa were introduced 

and referred : To provide a Government for the 
Territory of Alaska ; to amend the act to prevent 
and piuiish fraud* on the revenue, passed March 
1, 1863 ; to grant lands to tha SUU of Nevada for 
th« oonstmction of a railroad and telegraph line 
from the Central Pacitlo Railroad to the Colorado 
river; to provide a temporary government for the 
Territory of Alaska — The House bill to exempt 
certain mannfactores from intem&l tax was called 
up, several amendments added, and the Senate 
aqjonmad. 

In the House, on the 17th, the bill for 
the removal of disabilities Imposed by law upon 
Governor Holdea, of North Carolina ; Governor 
Orr, of South Carol I na: Ooremor Brown, of 
Georgte; OetMrtl Longotreet, and others, was re- 
committed for a statement of the reasons of the 

committee for recommending relief The bill to 

continue tbe Pnsedmen's Bur««u was considered 
and went over.... The bUl for the admission of 
Alattama was discussed and recommitted, and a 

substitute was offered and referred Several Kx- 

ecative communications were presented, Indnd- 
lay a rtoomawadatioB of an appropriation of 



The Xew York Tribune speaks of 

" the force of Gen. Butler's hand " as hav- 
ing been felt in the South during the re- 
bellion. His hand was not particularly 
forcible, but what it lacked in force it fully 
ma>le up in nimbleness. 

A Washington telegram of the 20th 

says : " The cdunsel for the Presideat have 
nearly completed the ground-work of his 
defence, and it is considered by certain 
prominent lawyers who have been made 
acciuaintcd with the outlines of it, as very 
strong." 

A special to the Chicago Times of 

the 19th says : " The President's counsel 
were again in session to-day. They deny 
the truth of the publication purporting to 
give the points of their defence, and add 
that as fast as its details are arranged they 
do not rush off to the newspaper corre- 
spondents to publish them." 

Speaking of the late election in New 

Hampshire, the Boston Post says : " The 
Democrats reduced the Radical majority 
nearly 1,000 votes, gained for their own 
ticket 4,000, and made a net'gain of 24 Rep- 
resentatives in the Legislature. This is 
doing well, and tbe same ratio of reduc 
tion and increase will give the Democracy 
the country in November." 

At the city elections held on the 

20tb, in Corry and Titusville, Pa., the 
Democrats elected tbo Mayor and a major- 
ity cf the Council in both places, which 
were never known to go Democratic be- 
fore. At the election in Bedford, Pa., on 
the 20th, the Democrats carried the bor- 
ough by 65 majority— a gain of 41 from 
last fall. Harrisburg, Pa., also went Dem- 
ocratic on the 20tli. 

The desperation of the impeach- 
ment fanatics is shown in the ridiculous 
stories put afloat by them relative to an 
expected raid on Washingten from the 
Virginia side of the Potomac The only 
raid on Washington, says the Chicago 
Times, from which danger to the public 
welfare need be apprehended is a raid 
from the opposite direction, and which is 
even now inaugurated by the legion of 
Jacobin adventurers who expect to get 
fat offices tinder " President Wade." This 
raid threatens to be one of the most for- 
midable assaults upon the capital that has 
ever been known. 

•loliBsoB-Granv Correspondence 
Abroad. 

The London Saturday lieview thinks that 
General Grant " on his own showing has 
been guilty of some rather sharp practice 
toward his superior." The actual admis 
sions which Grant makes, and which have 
been so prominently placed before Ameri 
can readers, are repeated, while, with re- 
gard to Grant's conduct in not resigning 
his position as Secretary ad interim and 
restoring the place to the possession and 
disposition ol the President from whom 
he derived his appointment, the Saturday 
JReview says : 

"Even if no promise had been given, 
General Grant ought not, with the full 
knowledge of the President's intentions 
possessed by him, to have hesitated a mo- 
ment about resigning his oQice as soon as 
he found he could no longer act as an in- 
trument for carrying out those intentions. 
So long as his resignation was withheld 
the President naturally counted on his 
support ; and, for the long argument which 
he describes himself as having held with 
the President on Satiuday, the 11th, there 
should have been substituted the most un- 
mistakable act of resignation. In this re- 
spect it is impossible to acquit Gen. Grant. 
It is to regretted that his present relations 
with the Republican party should supply 
an obvious motive for conduct of which, 
in the absence of that pressure, he would 
probably have been incapable." 

"The apparently moderate way of " put- 
ting it " is as catting as it is quiet. 

—The direct results of Christian mis- 
sions in India are of the moet gratifying 
character. There are now in India some 
50,000 oommanicants of all churches. 
There are congregations of 850,000 people, 
together with 200 clergy. 



mi 



The Pariy Heft*.*, to Plead. I CLIPPINSS AND DRIPPINGS. 



The Jacobin majority In the House of 
Representatives was placed in an awkward 
predicament, on Monday, by the declara- 
tion of republican principies propoaed 
by Mr. Ross, of Illinois. 

It is a favorite habit of that party to 
proclaim its surpassing loyalty, when such 
proclamations will amount to nothing. 
When windy utterances of patriotic senU- 
ments will not stand in the way of unpa- 
triotic actions, no party in the world was 
tver more fond of emitting patriotism in 
fettts. 

Mr. Ross seems to have thought it prop- 
er to bring tliese partisan pretensions to 
a more practical test. The mode selected 
was to propose certain declarations of 
fundamental truth, underlying our repub 
Kcan system of government, and wnich 
cannot be departed from or denied without 
repudiating free government itself. To 
show the propriety of a Congrestional af- 
firmation of these principles, Mr. Ross re- 
cited the well known fact that " The For- 
tieth Congress has been charged with dis- 
loyalty to tbe Government, and with a 
purpose to subvert and destroy the essen- 
tial principles and just balance on which 
it rests." 

That such charge has been made against 
the Fortieth Congress, is a fkct well known 
to every member of this Congress. It is a 
charge that has been repeated, ngain and 
again, in all sections ; in every State ; in 
ways so general, and by a body of the 
people so numerous, respectable, and in- 
fluential, that it cannot be put away by a 
llippant word or scornful sneer by the 
parties inculpated. It is a charge of 
very serious nature. It is a charge involv- 
ing not only a large and powerful majori- 
ty in Congress in, at the least, constructive 
treason ; but involving the rights and lib- 
erties of more than thirty millions of peo- 
ple. It is a charge that ought to be met 
and answered in a more substantial and 
dignified way than that of denunciation 
or ridicule by irresponsible journalists and 
claqvem of the pirty in power. It is a 
charge that is either true or false. Mr. 
Ross sought to give the parly iu Congress 
an opportunity to convince the country 
that it is false, and thereby to vindicate the 
proclamations of loyalty and patriotism 
which the men against whom the charge 
is brought are so fond of making when 
tbe making thereof will amoimt to noth- 
inc. 

If the charge be false, then tbe party in 
Congress can have no oljection to second- 
ing an authoritative declaration that "The 
Constitution is the supreme, paramount 
law of the land." 

If it be false, then the party can have no 
objection to declaring that " Congress will 
faithfully abide by and maintain the essen- 
tial and fundamental piinciples of free 
government." 

If it be false, then the party cannot ob- 
ject to declaring that " Congress will op- 
pose all efforts to render the military 
independent of, and superior to, the civil 
power." 

If it be false, then the party cannot ob- 
ject to declaring that "Congress will 
oppose all etlbrts to deprive the people 
of the rights of habeas corpus and trial by 
jury." 

If it be false, then the party cannot ob- 
ject to declaring that " Congress will op- 
pose the encroachment of one department 
of the Government on another." 

If it be false, then the party cannot ob 
ject to affirming that "Free speech, free 
persons, and free ballot are essential to 
liberty, and cannot be surrendered." 

If it be false, thtn the party c&nnot ob- 
ject to assuring the country that "Con- 
gress is opposed to a large standing 
army," — that InMrument of despotism 
which is always dangerous in a republic. 

If it be false, why did not the party in 
Congress say so, by promptly adopting 
these declarations of the fundamental 
principles of 'American republicanism, 
so clearly set before them by Mr. Ross ? 

Instead of doing so, the party voted to 
refer them to the Judiciary Committee. 
Every ones knows what that means. Ref- 
erence to a partisan committee is the con- 
venient " tomb of the Capulets " where all 
partisan inconveniences are put to rest, 
and from which it is not intended that 
even the trump of Gabriel shall ever 
bring them forth. It is to that mausoleum 
of dead hopes that Jacobinism is hasten- 
ing the constitutioniil liberties of the 
American people. — Chiettgo Times, IHth. 
♦•-♦ ■ 

Advantaceti of l>runkeniies». 



If you wish to be always thirsty, be a 
drunkard ; for the oftcner and more you 
drink, the oftener and more thirsty you 
will be. 

If you wish to prevent your friends 
from raising you In the world, be a 
drunkard; and that will defeat all their 
eflbrts. 

If you would effectually counteract your 
own attempts to do well, be a drunkard ; 
and you will not be disappointed. 

If vou are determined to be poor, be a 
drunkard ; and you will be ragged and 
penniless to your heart's content. 

If you wish to starve your family, be a 
drunkard ; and then you will consume the 
means of their support. 

If you would be imposed upon by knaves, 
be a drunkard ; for that will make their 
task easy. 

If you would get rid of your money 
without knowing how, be a drtmkard ; and 
it will vanish insensibly. 

If you are determined to expel all com- 
fort from your house, be a drunkard ; and 
you will do it eflectualiy. 

If you would be hated by your familv 
and friends, be a drunkard ; and you will 
soon be more than disagreeable. 

If you would be a pest to society, be a 
druntard; and you will be avoided as an 
infection. 

If you would smash windows, break the 
peace, get your bones broken, tumble 
under horses and carts, and be lucked up 
in a stution-bouse, be a drunkard ; and it 
will be strange if you do not succeed. 

If you wish all your prospects in life to 
be clouded, be a drunk^d ; and they will 
soon be dark enough. 

If you would det-troy your bmly.be a 
drunkard ; as drunkenness is the mother 
of dlfitasa 

— An ingenious but unsuccefsful French 
writer, lately, tired of the hostility of the 
oiticfl, repaired to a distant province, took 
lodgings at a farrier's shop, and worked 
a little every day at the forge and anvil. 
But the greater part of his time was se- 
cretly devoted to the composition of three 
large volumes ot poetry and essays, which 
he published as the works of a journey- 
man blacksmith. The trick succeeded ; 
all France was in amrizement The po- 
ems of this " child of nature," this " untu- 
tored genius," this " inspired son of Vul- 
can," as he was now called, were immense- 
ly praised by the critics, and were soon 
purchased by everybody. 

— A New York paper notices the singu- 
lar fact that Barnum 'a Circassian Beauty, 
who was a marvel of taciturnity while the 
Museum was standing, being beyond the 
reach of any remarks whatever in the Eng- 
lish language, made a " statement " in very 
plain Anglo-Saxon to the reporters, and 
thinks it a proof of the value of heat as a 
means of education. It is certainly a little 
remarkable that a lady supposed to know 
no language but tliat spoken in Circassia 
should be able to impart her cxperienca in 
English after " going through the fire." 

^•m 

— A man, sixty years old, let the train 
leave him at Palmyra, Mo , the otner day, 
and he ran after u some distance, but fail- 
ing to overtake it, returned ahnott out of 
breath and asked if there would be another 
train that day. Receiving the answer, no, 
he exclaimed, " Gone ' gone ! gone !" and 
Imxnedtetely expired. 



JtliMsellaneons Item*. 

— Cleveland is making iron for the 
Pacific Railroad. 

—There were over 17,000 births in 
Philadelphia last year. 

—The Artemus Ward monument is to 
be placed in Central Park. 

— An Albany physician saya negroes 
never have the ddirium tremens. 

— The Astor estate is valued by one who 
professes to know, at $144,000,000. 

— West Point has famished 26 college 
Presidents and 35 railroad Presidents. 

—The Wisconsin Fenians will hold a 
State Convention at Madison, April 14. 

— mere are m Ohio 1,U00,000 children, 
and but one-third of them attend Sunday 
school. 

— A New York paper suggests that the 
" game laws " be so framed as to protect 
Indians. 

—A tax title question having been in 
litigation forty-eight years in an Ohio 
court, has lately been decided. 

— An oil well in Pennsylvania has been 
burning more than two years, all tfiorts to 
extinguish the flames having failed. 

—The Atlantic Works, at East Boston, 
recently contracted to build engines and 
machinery for ten steamers to run on the 
lakes. 

— It Is estimated that Louisville has 
more atiorneys-at law, according to its 
population, than any other city in the 
country. 

—Georgia puts into her new Constitu- 
tion a provision that no divorce shall be 
granted without a concurrent verdict of 
two juries. 

— The business in distilling fnirita com- 
menced in Boston in the year 1700, when 
West India molasses was converted into 
New England rum. 

— A man in one of the Hartford cotton 
mills opened a bale of cotton, the other 
day, and found a wallet containing |5,000 
iu Confederate bills. 

— A Cuba letter cautions American mer- 
chants against Spanish doubUx>iis of light 
weight which b;ive been sent to the Uniied 
States for circulation. 

— Brigham Young has advised the bish- 
ops and Mormon people to lay up from 
two to seven years' supplies of wheat 
and flour, as he expects a great famine. 

— Two hundred dollars a year, each, is 
the tax which Brigham Y'oung exacts 
from those men who prefer single blessed- 
ness to the state of polygamica! wretched- 
ness. 

—The Internal Revenue Department 
has decided that the proceeds of Mr. Dick- 
ens' readings are not liable to the 3 per 
cent, tax which some assessors have levied 
on them. 

— Michigan has 144 newspapers, of 
which 73 are Republican, and 37 Demo- 
cratic. All arc printed in English, with 
the exception of five in Dutch and three 
iu German. 

— Massachusetts, with 38,000 farms, 
averages only 94 acres to a farm, being in 
this respect the most minutely divided of 
any State in the Union. Rhode Island 
averages 9(> acres to a farm. 

— A Baltimore merchant, whose son lost 
1 1,370 at a faro bank in Cincinnati, has 
received a verdict in the Common Pleas 
Court for the full amount, with interest, 
against the proprietors of the gambling 
house, 

— A man in San Francisco attempted to 
shoot a fellow who had thrown vitriol on 
a lady with whum he was walking. The 
vitriol thrower escaped, but the injured 
man was fined $500 for shooting in the 
streets. 

— During a recent flood on the Moke- 
lumne river in California, accurate obser- 
vation showed that the water was four feet 
higher on the north than on the south bank. 
An explanation of the phenomenon is re- 
quested. 

— The consumption of manufactured 
tobacco in this country last year is esti- 
mated at 130,000,000 pounds, which at 
forty cents per pound ought to have yielded 
$52,000,000 revenue ; but only $15,350,000 
were collected 

— No mind so bright but drink will be- 
fool It ; no fortune 'so ample but brandy 
will beggar it ; the happiest it will fill with 
misery ; the firmest health dissipation will 
shatter; no business so thriving that 
whisky cannot spoiL 

—A flinty critic of " No Thoroughfare " 
informs the New Orleans Times that the 
moon was not at the full November 30, 
1835; in fact did not fill until the 5th of 
December. The Timen thinks it is of no 
use to be so particular. 

— New York has a Police Bureau 
especially devoted to the finding of missing 
people. No less than 239 cases of lost 
persons have been reported to this bureau 
within the past four months. Of these, 89 
were adult males, 35 adult females, 63 boys, 
and hi girls. 

— Tho new Postofflce Directoiy shows 
that there are 25,712 Postofficea in the 
United States in actual operation, besides 
over 300 in the Southern States that have 
not been re-opened since the close of the 
war. Of the whole number, 1,220 are 
money order offices, and about the first of 
the coming June two hundred more of 
this class will be opened. 

— The systems of signaling and tele- 
graphing adopted by Government are now 
uniform in both our army and navy. The 
cadets at West Point and the midshipmen 
at Annapolis receive the same instructions, 
so that when they become offlcers in nny 
contiaecncy of land or naval service, they 
will beable to open and maintain commu- 
nication, by codes of signaling and electric 
telegraphy identical in their operation. 



Forei«:u GoM«lp. 

—London has 253 newspapers. 

—Lady Fitz Maurice is said to be the 
best looking woman in England. 

— Capital punishment and flogging have 
been abolished iu the kingdom of Sax- 
ony. 

—Nearly all the London theatres are 
now occupied by celebrated preachers on 
Sundays. 

—Queen Victoria and the Kine cf 
Abyssinia didn't marry, but they fight as 
much as if they had done so. 

— Punch defines hippophagy as the eat- 
ing of hoise-fiesh ; and hypocrisy as the 
saying horse-flesh is very good. 

— The false eyes put in the embalmed 
body of Maximilian were taken from the 
image of the Virgin, and didn't match. 

—In 1865, in Great Britain, 1,200,000 
postage stamps got loose from letters and 
newspapers in tlie postofflces, and 700,000 
in 1866. 

— Sirilorton Peto, in 186.3, had an estate 
worth $2,000,000, and a business balance of 
over $2,0(X',000. He is now hopelessly in- 
solvent. 

— Queen Victoria has ordered her 
" Highland Journal " to be translated into 
French. She is liighly pleased with its 
large sale. 

— An English boy sent the Princess of 
Wales a " true lover's knot," carved out of 
wood, asd she returned her thanks and a 
check for $50. 

— A troop of servant girls stopped the 
team of a water-carrier in Montreal, the 
other day, and plundered him of the 
precious fluid. 

—A sculptor in Paris recently choked 
himself to death by getting a bit of clay 
into his windpipe while playfully blowing 
pellets at a mark. 

— ^They are making an immense knife at 
Sheffield, which has already 1867 blades, 
and one is added every year, it was not. 
begun in the year one, however. 



DEFECTiye^AGE 



— Mex'.fto is said to be getting on better 
than ever before. The debt is $81,032,500, 
and all expenses of the government do not 
exceed $13,000,000 a year. Payments are 
promptly made. 

— 4>ne issue of the London Times lately 
contained the announcement of the death 
of six persons whose united ages were 521 
yean>. Two had attained 94 years, and the 
youngest was 80. 

— Du Chaillu says there is a species of 
ant in Africa, afraid of the sun. If they 
come upon a sunny spot in their march, 
they dig a tunnel under it and then go on 
in single file as before. 

— The Empress Carlotta has addressed 
to the Pope a touchincc letter. Imploring 
his prayers for the soul of her unfortunate 
husband. The letter is written in very 
good Italian, and exhibits no traces of the 
late lunacy of the Empress. 

— A woman In Vienna has lately con- 
fessed that duiin^ the last ten years she 
and her father had committed sixteen mur- 
ders for money. Under her direction a 
search has been made, which resulted in 
the finding of all the skeletons. 

— Mr. Peabody's first £100,000 has pro- 
vided comfortable homes for more than 
fifteen hundred of the London poor, and 
his second, which is to be applied in West- 
minster next year, will double the amount 
of service rendered by this boon. 

— A chap in London has been making a 
living by fumishiDg sham certificates of 
death to the mourning relatives of missing 
persona. One man whom ho had killed 
by breaking a fictitious blood-vessel, turned 
up alive and spoiled his little game. 

— A Paris morning paper contains an 
advertisement, of which the following is a 
literal translation : " A young lady of 4S, 
having a moderate income, but possessing 
a patent for a nev7 invention, wishes to 
marry a gentleman of 05, well versed in 
chemistry." 

— Geiman red-tape Is illustrated by an 
instance in which the citizens of one town 
ran twelve miles to another town to get 
some fire engines to put down a great con 
flagration, and then were refused the en- 
gines until they went back and brought a 
written requisition. 

— A young man in Halle committed 
suicide a few weeks ago in order to escape 
from the slow tortures of consumption. 
He killed himself by inhaling the smoke of 
coal, burning in a hermetically closed 
room, and carefully noted down his sensa- 
tions up to the moment that he became 
unconscious. 

— A little girl in Quebec, the other day, 
while gathering chips in a shipyard, 
thoughtlessly darted forward to pick up a 
block of wood from under the descending 
ax of one of the laborers. While in the 
act of grasping the piece of wood, she re- 
ceived the full blow of the ax on her 
shoulder, being literally nearly cut in two, 

— One of the most touchingly simple 
wills was left recently by the German pas- 
tor Holzapfel, of Reifnitz, It consists of 
this line only : " My soul to God, my 
body to earth, and my money to our Deaf 
and Dumb Hospital." The property of 
the deceased, who had led a most rigorous- 
ly abstemious life, amounts to about 70,000 
florins. ;-;-:., 

— Du Chaillu discloses the fact thatin 
some parts of Africa betrothal takes place 
when the bride is two years old, and the 
first whipping she receives from the hus- 
band is an indication of her future connu- 
bial joys, and is given with a four-foot raw- 
hide. Women in 'Africa take 24 hours to 
arrange their chignons, but only make 
their toilet once a month. 

— A new locomotive engine for common 
roads has recently been exhibited in Edin- 
burgh. It has three wheels, weight about 
five tons, and is said to be capable of go- 
ing over the roughest roads, climbing the 
steepest hills, and traveling over ploughed 
land with perfect ease. The power is due 
to tho fact that it has tires of India rubber 
five inches thick and two feet broad, which 
take hold of the ground like an elephant's 
foot. 

— A fast young gentleman in Paris re- 
cently made a bet that he would secure 
his own arrest without committing any 
crime. He won by going to a fashionable 
ca_fe in a shockingly rakish costume and 
pulling a roll of large bills from his boot 
when called upon to pay for what he had 
eaten and drank. Notwithstanding his 
protests he was carried before a Justice, 
and had to procure testimony to his re- 
spectability. 

— A gang of women robbers has just 
been suppressed in Paris. They were un- 
der the command of a stout, middle-aged 
woman, named Catherine Keller, who 
planned the operations and distributed the 
parts. Her Lieutenant, who uid the ac- 
tive work out of doors, was a young Gen- 
evese girl, who found an ally in her sweet- 
heart, Eugene Doulvaux. The various 
women used to be posted at the omnibus 
stations of Paris. 



smee, and, retiring behind a warL-hoiig/p, 
spent the day In druokennC'^s, corat«>; oul 
towards night with bruispd and bloody 
fices. 

— Dr. Carnochan, a disUngulshed New 
York surgeon, has come near dying from 
the consequences of a poisoned wound — 
his system having received the virus, in the 
course of an operation, by a small junc- 
ture in the right hand. 

— The Memphis Aoalanelti has he«B 
shown a centiped or " thousand less," 
which was recently ejected iixim theetom- 
ach of a lady, of Raleigh. Some three 
weeks previous the same woman disgorged 
eight or nine "hots'.' ox "earthworms" 
from her stomach. 

— A German named Charles Oehm, em- 
ployed in Miller's brewery iu Galena, 111.* 
fell into a vat of hot beer, and was so badly 
scalded that he died in five hours. Ho was 
alone at this time. Jumping out of the 
vat, he ran to a pump and pumped cold 
water upon himself. Ilis Euuerings were 
intense. 

— A party of huuters from San Fran- 
cisco were chased by a grizzly on the 
Coast Range, and one of them dropped a 
bottle from his pocket. The bear stopped, 
smelt of the bottle, set himself down on 
his haunches and taking the fltsk in his 
paws drank like a sensible human being, 
rubbing his hirsute stomach in Eatisfactloui 
utterly forgetting his enemies. 



Godey's Lady's Book for April. — 

Among the pmbelllehmentB in this nnmher are 
The Kustlc Belle— a etecl plate, and a bandsums 
one, too. Colored Fashion-plate, conlaiuiag eix 
figures. A large Extension sheet, contalnins: 
thirty-nine engravinc ; amonR ihcm will be found 
designs for eleven dresee*, suitable for every occa- 
sion ; bonnets, caps, hcaddreseef . larncs' waiets, 
children's garments, embroidery, braidinsr, etc.; 
etc., alao occupy their place upon it. Sisterly A& 
fection— a beautiful tinted picture for the juve- 
niles. Country Joys ia another flue enjjraving for 
our young friends. In the fancy work department 
will be found designs for a key-bae, note-case, 
spectacle case, knitted bracelet, crochet kuittins 
bag, plncushioa, lady's cap-bag, wheelbarrow 
match-box, and jewel case. A Cottago, In lh» 
pointed (style, is also given, with the plan. Tho 
literary department is made up of articles from 
the pens of some of the besi ma^axtnc writers of 
tho day. Terms : One copy, 1 year, $3.00 : two 
copier, f 5 50 ; three, f7.M ; four, $lu.00; five, and 
one copy extra, f ll.OJ. L. A. Godcy, Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

LIBRARY AND BOQK AGENCY. 



A.. 2Sr. KIELLOGQ, 

101 ^V.VSniNGTON STREET, CuiCAGO, ILL., 

COMMISSION AGENT 

For purchasing Pooks by tbe hnndn <1, or single cop 
t'cr Ui^rarles or (Jilvuti- ute. S;u)ilc ci'piLS ol any »or 
i-eiit poHt-paid on lecclpt of retail price. Lurge order 
tilled ut a dlscuunt. 

APPLETON'S EDITION 

OF TUB 

WAVKRLY NOVELS, 

NOW PUBLISHING, ' ■ 

Flora new Blereotvpe Plate", nnlforra with tlio Ka 
Edition 01 UlckViis, coiuaiiiiu^ all ltieNoli'«ol 
ttte Author, aiid printed ironi tliu luteiil 
edition mi the AuiUorized lext. 

To be Cntnjtlrteil in Tivcntij-Tire Voltinirt 

Price 25 Cents Each. 

Printed on fine white paper, clear typp ftii<l convcnirn 
klze. Pionouiiciiu •• A ilir-iclc uf Clitapiiit-.." 



ORDEi: OF ISSUE. 



1. WAVKRLY. 

a. IVAXIIOK. 

8. KKMLWOKTH. 

4. l.iy .MANNKi:iNO. 

5. ANTlyrAKY. 

6. KUB I UY 
OLD MOl.TALITT. 



lli 



VS. PEVEKIL OF 

PIAK. 
16. Qt-ENTIXm P.WARn. 
i7. ol'. l;ONA>'.S UELL. 
m. HRDUAI NTLET. 
1». THK nEvi;uiiiEl>. 

and n 10 H LAND 

WIDOW. 



Art and Science. 

— A Frenchman has invented a kettle in 
which water is boiled in six minutes, by 
friction, without any fire. 

— A German doctor has invented an ap- 
paratus by which thunder is made vieible 
through the object glass of a telescope. 

— Palmer, the sculptor, is in Utica, N. 
Y., engaged upon what promises to be one 
of his finest works, *' The Angel at the 
Sepulchre." 

— One of the latest inventions is a life 
and swimming apparatus, consisting of the 
combined use of breast and back floats, so 
arranged as to be under tbe swimmer's 
control, and of finned gloves and sandals. 

— Nobel, the inventor of nitro-glycerine, 
has a new blasting powder which he calls 
dynamite, and states it to be a solid of the 
same power, less danger and greater facili- 
ty for use than nitroglycerine. 

— A Boston fireman has invented a self- 
propelling steam fire engine, which will 
run almost noiselessly along the streets, 
up and down inclines as well as on a level, 
and round the sharpest corners. It burns 
the liquid (petroleum) fuel, and emits no- 
smoke while in operation. 

— Mr. George B. Lindsey, of the Des 
Moines Register office, has recently in- 
vented a self-locking galley, which is so 
simple, and yet so complete and perfect, 
that it is bound to Eupersede the old-fash- 
ioned side-stick and quoin-locking galley 
wlierever it is introduced. It excites the 
warmest praise from every printer who 
sees it, says the Register. 

— A resident of Maine has invented and 
applied for a patent for a contrivance 
which promises to do away with the com- 
mon buttonhole in the collars, cuffs and 
all articles of outside wear where the but- 
tonhole ia tised. It consists of a small 
and durable eye upon the stud or sleeve 
button, and is eecured by a movable 
swivel, which can be fastened or undone 
instantly. 

Incidents and Accidents. 

— A child in Grafton, Vt., owing to a 
cold, lost both its eyes, which ran out, 
and became deaf and dumb, and has 
lately died after an illness of two months. 

— A man in Chicago named Bross re- 
cently nndertook to draw a load from a 
gun, when the powder exploded, discharg- 
ing the load into his body, causing instant 
death. 

— A man in the Cincinnati jail cele 
brated the beginning of his 10 year term 
to the penitentiary by marrying a 
girl to whom he had been some time en- 
gaged. 

— " Poor little fellow, aren't you cold ? " 
said a pretty young lady to a newsboy of 
whom she had mSe a purchase. *' Yes 
ma'am, I w<» before you smiled," was the 
gallant response. 

—Two Sandusky boys, of the age of 10 
years, took a jug of whisky a few days 



> TUEUI.ai K nwAHF, 

► nil A LKtiENO OKSO. THK TAl.rKMAN. 

N!oNTH().SK. Jl. WOOL'fc'iUl ii. 

9. BUlDii Of LAMMEU-lia F A IK MAID OP 

MOOU. ' J KUril . . 

10. 111-. A hT OF MIDU) vB. AN .\K OF GIBS- 

TIUAX. BX*1N. 

11. THK MONA8TEKY. bt. COlNl ROBERT Of* 

12. THE AUISOT. PAUIS. 

13. THK PIUATK. «. THE Sl'HOEOH'6" 

14. KORnNESofXIGRL.l DAUGllll-li. 

On receiptor BIX DOLLARS we will seid the entire 
?et of Waverly No vela, as published, uud a copy Ola • 
new 

STEEl-PLATE PORTRAIT OF SIR W iLIER SfOIT, 

from a painting by Sir Thomoii Lnvaence. (nitabls for 
framliiK ; the iJoi ks and Eiipravjii;: t<. be m.ui irte of 
po^tntje to any putt oi tlie Lnitcd butti,. 

Either ol tlic ^uioveBHit tn ai y addrtoson rectlpt of - 
the price, 85 centBj>cr vt.lunie. 

On receipt of TRN DoLLAHS, ft contilc-te net of 
DicKKNs (n oidtoiiu ^tvle>, li voluiiKS. and W.vvaELV 
NuVKLs, k5 volume*, will tie sent lo.-t pjiirt. The (.iieap- 
est Ten Dollars' worth to lie loiiLd in the whole i:ini:ii 
of Literature. Foiiytwo volumes lor $1C. 

|3)^ Extraordlnarj; oppcrtntilty for thfl iiiillioTi to 
purclm-ie » set ot Sir waller Seoll'ii w or Jd-renowiicU 
Waveriy Kovels. 

CLliB RATKS. J. 

One COTrpIcte Set, 2j vo!-.FiveConirlotegcts, 25 vol- 
ume*, »>: .00. t nnip»,»2«.00. < 
Thrte Complete Sets, 2j.Te;i Comphte het>', ar. vol- 
voluuiet, $ 6.0U. I nnie8, (oO.OO. 
Mailed at our cxpeiisi-. 

Any person olitaintng lonn^nliscrllycrs for the Wa\t.b 
Li NnvBL,H, and riiulltn« lis ^fil, wl:l I'e tnUHcil to » 
s«t of DlOK£>M, 17 vols., Ult'AlIS. All inalhrd at our 
expense. 

Any person obtaining flRht enbscriti^ri. and remit- 
tint; fix, will receive a ropy ol the " Wh vtrly (j«iil^i j." 
containing 'i& SStt-fl Kneravinifc ol Ttie Feii ate IhxTfif- 
tiT8 In the V\ avirly ^ovcl8, IJcuud lut^it-csint ui«iuccv» 
price $15. 

tanvHBFers wanted in every town In tin T'liltrd S!at<;.. 
A t:ieat opportunity Is ullbrcU d to Im'ngtrionii men and 
wdnieii to umke inoiey. ■■•h evL'r> man, woman und 
child will pureliiue the Wnvwly Novels at tills low 
price. 

For fpecial rates, apply to the Publlsherg, 

D. APPLETON & CO., 

<4.9 mid 44Ji Broadwa.1t, X0U> York. 
The Great Book for 1868. 



GBN. GBANT'S LUTE. 

Wc knew that, sooner or later, the ti-np wrlttr wonlU 
appear, and relate the true itory. We have not baa 
very long to WKit, lor Uif woi li whose tlt'e we liave '•■H 
down above, is honest, able, and acrnrate to a cC;;rte.— 

I Washing ton Chior.ii.Ie.] 



D. APPLETON & COMPANY, 
Noe. 443 & 445 Broadway, New York, 

BAVB JX7ST PTBU.'^HKD 

The Military History of 

ULYSSES S. GKAKT,, 

From Apnl,lbCl, to April, l.'^tio. . 

■ ifl 

Colonel, and Abldir-Camp toll.. G' t.rriO Jn-Cif I, 
Bmvet lin2adicr-(ieii(j-;.lliii|tt.;ubtiile£ Araiy. 

♦ 

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lorturie to be ilac'-rt on Gcti. (. He 

is ttlll attached, baa MTitleri li.' .Ida* 

chief, with nnnsual perconal < pi-f ili;r.Ii.ei, ol l.ili.? not , 
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very clear and gra; hie mmiiier, liut lar beyond the 
style we estiniate the reliabllily of bi» work." 

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NEW AND DESIRABLE BOOKS 

For Fanners and Gardeners. i 



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Fuller's Grape CuUore > ,«»..wJ..i.«.«. IJjj • 

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Todd's Farmer's Manual— Vol. I , i **« 

Todd s Farmer's M intial— Vol. 11.. ..•«-. •«.•.«•••" *5jj 

Hnsmanu's Grapes and Wine ...; ....1.50 , 

Henderson'b OardeniuK for Proht.. -.»•.•.'..■»••.>•. IM ' 

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A New Monetary System ; 

THJE ONl>r MEANS OF BECtrursfo THE BF8PECT 
IVK RIGHTS OF LAB' -U AMJ PlJOfKirfij^ AM> 
OF PKOTECTIKG THK PUBLIC Fl^iM FI^AK- 
CLAL KJiVDLftlONS. !>6Cpp. Price, $..i5. 

Bt Edwabo Ekuogo. 

•'It preaenbs an acute analysis of the fnn^^'c.ns oJ 
njonej, and abounds !n siiignlarlr ^Wi-""'*" i*^ • t 
which canrot fall to hwakeu the bte.'e..t oi the rea- 
der."— [N. Y. 1 nbuua, Jan. iJ- 1 

"The aottor lays t^« ai at the ro;t of t'^e evil- of our 
currency and nnanclaJsystHin. • • • • vfe aw Inat » 
now In /tri..siil..i fiate 'ttT, f-''" '/'/^^""7'J^ , , 
ing, national Auanee, and ai; suca »uW«^. tjio we aw I 
In a position to strl^f out n.to ary n;w or or1(rta»l 
Surse that may ' e sound In theorj.or ^Uf a^iy proa,. » 
ise tobe of b. ricflt to the rourtry . Our 'la'esvien and 
Dubllc men might And valunMeeuwrestlous m th« work 
beJoreu8."-[»'.Y, Herald, Jan. :(.. ^ . r- 

Bent poat-pald, on receJpt of price, by 

A. N. KBI.L.OCM3, ' ' 
101 WathiwffUm 8t.i CMdvvo. 




T 



V 



t 



..vSOMMABK OF THE WEEK. 



•flijnu'-I, 






••• ■** 



1 



Adjutant General Thomas was present 
at the regular Cabinet meeting on the 

20th. 

Fractional currency issued for the week 
ending March 14, $482,600; shipments 
ditto and notes, |740,798 ; National Bank 
notes issued, 1131,390; fractional currency 
redeemed and destroyed, $392,200. 

Major General Hancock arrived in 
Washington on the afternoon of the 20th, 
accompanied by Colonel Mitchell of his 
stafl. General Grant, by order of the 
President, has detailed General Ilalleck to 
succeed Hancock at New Orleans. 

In the United States Supreme Court in 
case No. 11, original State of Georgia vs. 
General Grant, the Secretary of War and 
others, on motion of Mr. Black, a process 
was ordered to issue in this cause. The 
motion for a preliminary injunction was 
Ti"»;-theld under advisement. 

The United States Supreme Court, on 
the 16th, decided unconstitutional the law 
of the Stale of Nevada, levying a tax of 
one dollar on every passenger leaving the 
State by coach or railroad. The court 
granted leave to file a bill in the case of 
the State of Georgia versus General Grant 
«ud others. 

The receipts from customs for the week 
ending March 14»h, were $3,549,233. The 
amount of National Bank notes in circu- 
lation,March 10, was $299,693,506, of the 
following denominations : One dollar notes, 
$8,431,050; twos, $5,668,030; fives, $112,- 
969,583 ; tens, $77,730,723 ; twenties, $48,- 
673,325 ; fifties, $19,977,595 ; one hundreds, 
$25,299,700; five hundreds, $5,944,500; 
one thousands, $3,019,000. 

FOREIGN INTEIiLIGENCE. 

The war between the Turks and Cretan 
insurgents is reported at an end. 

Jeff. Davis arrived in Havana on the 
14th, from New Orleans, en route to Balti- 
more. 

The jury, in the case of Captain Mac- 
kay, on the 20th, brought in a verdict of 
guilty of treason. Sentence was deterred. 

Admiral Farragut left Naples on the 
16th, for Rome. He was escorted to the 
railway station by the principal citizens of 
Naples. 

Captain Mackay, recently tried at Cork 
on a charge of murder, and acquitted, was, 
on the lOlh, put on trial on the charge of 
treason and felony. 

Thompson and Mullaly have been con- 
victed at Manchester of being accessory 
to the murder of police Sergeant Brett, 
and sentenced to be hanged. 

W. Johnson, the Orange Secretary, who 
was Imprisoned in County Down for tak- 
ing the lead in an illegal procession, has 
been made candidate for Parliament from 
the city of Belfast. 

Advices from Annesly Bay, March 0th, 
give a report from the advance post of the 
British forces that General Napier was 
about to make a dash on Magdala, hoping 
to rescue the captives. 

A Naples dispatch of the 14th says the 
eruption of Vesuvius is increasing in 
power and grandeur, the volcano throw- 
ing up vast quantities of fire and but 
little lava. The detonations are loud and 
frequent. 

The American Minister, General Dix, 
has returned to Paris. His visit to Eng- 
land was not of a diplomatic character, as 
reported. He went to London to be pres- 
ent at the marriage of his son, Charles 
Temple Dix. 

Four men of the crew of the Jacmel 
packet, arrested near Dungarvon, all nat- 
uralized citizens of t he United States, of 
Irish birth, have been discharged and will 
be sent home at the expense of the Amer- 
ican Government. 

The Prince of Wales will make his ex 
pected visit to Ireland duruig Easter holi- 
days. It is intimated that the occasion 
' -wilJ be signalized by a royal proclamation 
granting a partial amnesty to political 
offenders in Ireland. 



THE WEST. 

The Michigan Republican State Con- 
vention assembled on the 18th and selected 
delegates to the National Convention. A 
series of resolutions was adopted, one in 
favor of Grant for President. 

A grand wolf hunt came off in the coun- 
ties of Lake, Illinois, and Kenosha, Wia, 
on the 14th instant. About five hundred 
sportsmen were in the field. Five wolves 
were partliUy entrapped, but succeeded 
In making their eseape. According to 
accounts in Chicago papers, the hunters 
captured one skunk, three rabbits and a 
prairie hen — but no wolf. 

A funous storm of wind and rain, ac- 
companied by thunder and lightning, 
passed over a great portion of the West 
on the night of the 16th. In many places 
in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, 
Michigan, etc., houses were unroofed and 
blown down, cars thrown from the rail- 
road tracks, bridges demolished — and 
human life, in some instances, destroyed. 
In Chicago, a large number of dwellings 
were blown over — mostly unfinished and 
unoccupied. One occupied house was 
blown down and the inmates buried in the 
mlns, a woman killed and a man seriously 
injured. The iron roof of the new ma- 
chine shop of the C. & R. I. R. R. Com- 
pany was lilted bodily and thrown to the 
ground, and the building seriously dam- 
aged. The Chicago papers say it was the 
severeet gale ever experienced in that sec- 
tion. 

The steamer Magnolia exploded her 

boilers when about twelve miles above 
Cincinnati, on the afternoon of the 18th. 
There were on board over one hundred 
passengers and a crew of forty. Of 
these only fifty-seven persons were, on the 
day of the accident, known to have es- 
caped. The greater portion of the cabin 
was carried away by tho explosion, and the 
boat took fire immediately, and after the 
remaining upper works were destroyed, 
some powder in the magazine exploded, 
destroying everything but the hull, which 
Boon sunk. Many of the passengers jumped 
overboard and were drowned, while others 
were burned to death. The following is 
a list of those of the passengers and crew 
who were reported, on the 19lh, as injured 
and lost or missing : 

Lost— Cuptnin .1. H. Prather, James Steyeng, 
MCond enRineer ; Perry Miller, second mate ; Wm. 
KvtiuB. barkeeper; Mary Copln, chambermaid; 
John Eeea, at FeJUity, O , wa» drowned; William 
Evans, boatman, is misding: MUe Retta Frencb, 
of Maaou county. Ky., Is sopposed to be drowned ; 
B. Bradford, of Ktpley, O , Is also reported lost. 
Six deck bands, whose names am nuknown, ar« 
also reported lott, wblcb makes a total of fifteen 
ItTes. 

//(/ured- Henry Clark, messenger of Adams 
Xxpresa, badly wonndfd and ornised aboat the 
head and body ; B Gardner, one of the owners of 
the boat, baoly hurt ; A. Connor, pilot of the boat, 
dropped from the pilot bouse into the boiler room 
and was serloaslj burned and braised; ' "^ 



%>> 



I.:, 






Jackson, Culored, tlit^ steward, was blown lomA 
dirttdcce in the air, jct fortunately escaped any so- [ 
rioaa Injury, although he Is sIlKhtly wounded , , 
William Burton, bartender, badly bruieed about 
the head and face ; Jamefl McParland, Terre Qaute, 
Ind., severely Injured ; W. D. Koso, Hiffplnsuort, 
siighlly; Mrs A. N.Fulton, Mies Wild, AItk. wild, 
ana Mrs. Martin, slightly ; James McMuHen, 
elii{hly; Mr. Mirraeks, colored, both tnlnhs^bro- 

ken; Frank i. -- 

U. Abbott 

very severe. ^ ...... ^ ... ,, ^ 

strong, sUgbtly ; U. M.iyo, slightly ; — Uow, sliifht 
ly; G. H Hu^rou, badly injured; O. W. Kerr, 
badly Injured; -Mr. Martin, slightly. 



Mr. Mirraeks, colored, both tninDS Dro- 
it Bruell.of Cincinnati, badly scalded : 
t, ecaldid; Thomas Ctirwin, burned 
rely; A. T. Cox, ^?ll»^htJy; C D. Arm- 



TIIE EAST. 

The New Jersey Republican State Con- 
vention met on the 18th, and selected del- 
egates to the National Convention and de- 
clared for Grant for President. 

The Vermont Republican Slate Con- 
vention met on the 17ih, and selected del- 
egates to the National Convention and 
declared for Grant for President. 

A man from Westport, N. Y., was "con- 
flJenced" out of $770— his entire pile— in 
the enterprising city of Chicago, on the 
19th. A bogus check was the instrument 
used. 

Rev. Stephen H. Tyng, Jr., was publicly 
reprimanded by Bishop Potter, in New 
York, on the 14lh, for the violation of a 
canon of the Episcopal Church, in ofliciat- 
ing in the parish of another minister with- 
out his consent. There was an immense 
concourse. The Bishop cautioned Mr. 
Tyng against a repetition of the offense. 
Mr. Tytg sat in the aisle in a plain cos- 
tume. He manifested no emotion, and 
made no remarks. Rev. Stephen H. Tyng, 
Sr., has filed a protest against the decision 
of tho Ecclesiastical Convention in the 
case of his son, and the approval thereof 
by Bishop Potter. Ue makes a solemn ap- 
peal to the supreme and final decision of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States. 

THE SOI'Tn. 

The South Carolina Convention ad- 
journed 6ine die en the- 17lh. 

Judge Reese has accepted the Demo- 
cratic nomination for Governor of Georgia. 

Sergeant Bates, with his 11 ig, arrived at 
Columbia, 3. C, on the atternoon of the 
ISth. 

Hon. Thomas T. Ashe has accepted the 
nomination for Governor of North Caro- 
lina by the Conservatives. 

The election in Georgia, on the new con- 
stitution, is ordered by General Meade to 
begin April 20, and contioue four days. 

General Canby has designated the 14th, 
15th and 16th of April for holding the 
South Carolina electron on the Constitu- 
tion and for Congressman and Slate offl 
cerd. 

Judge E. Stams.the distinguished jurist, 
and formerly Judge of the Supreme Court 
of Georgiti, was killed on the 20tb, by the 
accidental discharge of a gun in the hands 
of his SOD. 



L- L- J *l 



John 



CONGRESSIONAL. 

Senate not in session on the 14th. . . .In 

the nonse, the day w.is devoted to general debate 

The questiona of the Treaty-Making Power, 

Impeachment, Finance and the pa«f"a?e ot the 
late amendment to the Judiciary bill were dis- 
cussed Wlih regard to the said amendment, 

Mr. Boyer said it was offered and adepted with a 
viewol depriving tUo Supreme Court of jurisdic- 
tion in the MC ardle case, and that it would never 
have been sntfered to pass without objectiou had 

its real chaructt r been cspluined Mr. Blaine 

thought Mr. Boyer'si position was simply that his 
side of the Hon^e was not awake to pee the point 

contained in the amendment The debate on 

this question was participated in by several mem- 
bers on both side:! of the House, and somi re- 
marks of a pergonal natutu vrerc indulged in — 
Adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 10th, a petition 
was presented from the South Carolina Conven- 
tion, asking for the repeal of duty on rice, and a 
communication from the Georgia Convention ask- 
ing an appropriation of JloO.Ou), for the repair and 

construction of certain roads. Both referred 

Thfi Sena'e insisted on its amendments to the bill 
to facilitate the payment of solaiers' bounties, and 
also to the Pension bill, which had been disagreed 
to by the House A bill was reported from Com- 
mittee on Finance amendatory of the currency act 
of June 3, 18Ij4 ...The Uoiise bill to exempt cer- 
tain manulactures from internal tax, wiih an 
amendment, was reported from the Finance Com- 
mittee a. I'ill was introduced and referred to 

provide for a survey of the Mississippi river 

Pending discusiiioo on the bill relating to Central 
Branch of the Union PaciQc liailroad, tho Senate 
went Into Kxeculiye session, aiid soon alter ad- 
journed. 

In the House, on the 16th, under a call 

of states, several bills -?ere Introduced and re 
ferred, among them one repealing a portion of the 
act fixing the number of Judges of the Supreme 
Court, which provides that no vacancies be filled 
until the number of Aspociate Justices is reduced 
to six: one refunding the amount paid by private 
snbscilntion toward the improvement of the har- 
bor ot Michigan City ; one authorizing the erec- 
tion of a marine horpital at Cairo ; and one pro- 
viding that the officer J of the army, including those 
of the veteran reserve corps, be entitled to be re- 
tired under the same conditions aa oflicers wound- 
ed In the regular army.... A memorial was pre- 
sented from the Wisconsin Legislature for the 
relmbureemeBt of Milwaukee for certain expendi- 
tures on her harbor.... A petition was pi-ewented 
and referred from one hundred and nine German 
citizens of Cleveland, asking that the Constitution 
be so amended as to abolish ihe ofllceof President 

of the United States A preamble and sixteen 

resolutions were oilcrcd by Mr. Koss, of Illioois, 
reciting that the Fortieth Coneress has been 
charged with disloyalty to the Government with 
the purpose to subvert and destroy the essential 
principles and juat balance upon which it 
rests, and declariiig the Constitution Is the su- 
preme paramount law of the land; that Coiigresa 
will faithfully abide by and strenuously maintain 
the esseniiil and fundamental principles of free 
govemmeot; that Congress will oppose ail cfTorta 
to render the military independent and superior 
to civil power; that It will oppose all efforts 
to deprive the people of the riiiht of the habtas 
corpus and trial by Jury ; that it will oppose the 
encroachment of one department of the Govern- 
ment or another ; that free speech, a free uress, 
and a free b.iilot are essential to liberty, and can- 
not be surrendered; that Congrecs is opposed to 
a large standing army ; that speculation and frands 
on the Treasurv should be stopped; that c«ch 
State shall regulate sulTrage within its own limits; 
that no Government boiids shall be issued not 
subject to the same rate of taxation a.a other prop 
eriy ; that the National Bank no;es shall be with- 
drawn, and legal tender notes substituted. 
The Uouse refused to t^econd the previona ques- 
tion, and also to lay on the table, and, on motion 
of Mr. Ashley, of Ohio, they were referred to the 
Juaiciary Committee A preamble and resolu- 
tion were adopted in reference to lands "ranted to 
the State of Iowa for railroad purposes oy the act 
of May 13, 186<i, directing the Secretary of the In- 
terior to inform the House by what authority the 
land' have beei» certilled and confirmed under 
such grant, in violation of the act requiring a cer- 
tain branch to be built. . . .A resolution was intro- 
duced and referred providing that an amount of 
legal-tender notes equal to the amount heretofore 
retired shall be issued and restored to the cnrrency, 
and that the amount of legal-tender notes so re- 
stored shall be used only in purchasing for cancel- 
lation any of the gold interest-bearing bonds.... 
The conference report on the bill appropriating 
tl">,00ll for the benefit of Mrs. Gen. Anderson was 
agreed to— 77 to GS A resolntion was adopted 
that the rules may be suspended during the pend- 
ing of the impeachment trial, to proceed to the 
consideration of any matter which tnav be reported 
by the managers on the part of tue House of 
Kepresentailves Adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 17th, petitions 

were presented and referred from citizens of 
Michigan, and from citizens of lUinola, for the re- 
daction of the erpenaes of the Oovemment and 

of taxation. .. .Petitions were presented and re- 
ferred from the Wisconsin I/egislature, prajing for 
an extension of time in relation to certain lands 
granted to railroads, and asUing an appropriation 

for harbor improvements Bills were Introduced 

and referred : To provide a Government for the 
Territory of Alaska ; to amend the act to prevent 
and pouish frauds on the revenue, passed March 
1, lb03; to grant lands to the State of Nevada for 
the construction of a railroad and telegraph line 
from the Central Pacide Railroad to the Colorado 
river; to provide a temporary government for the 

Territory of Alaska The Uouse bill to exempt 

certain manafaciures from internal tax was called 
up, several amendments added, and the Senate 
adjoonied. 

In the House, on the 17th, the bill for 
the removal of disabilities Imposed by law npon 
Governor Bolden, of North Carolina; Governor 
Orr, of Sontti Carolina ; Oovenior Brown, of 
Georgta; Oenerrl Longsireet, and others, was re- 
committed for a siateuiint of the reasons of the 

committee for recommenoiug relief The bill to 

continue the Frtsedmen's Bureau was considered 
and went over — The bili for the admission of 
Alabama was discussed and recommitted, and a 
I substitute was offered and referred Several Ex- 
ecutive communications were presented, Inclad- 
iDg & recommendatioB of tn appropriation of 



musm 

J..M,400fur the Improvomeuiof liifcLnr'uC/i of Mkti! ! 

gau City A number of protasts of Union sol- | 

diers were presented against tho bi!l Introduced by I 
Senator Wilson In relation to bounties, etc.... Ad- 
journed. 

In the Senate, on the 13th, a petition 
was presented and referred from the Cleveland, 
Ohio, Manufacturers' Convention, praying for a re- 
duction of the internal revenue tax — The Com- 
mittee of Conference on the bill to facilitate the 
payment of soldiers' bounties, reported certain 
vert)al amendments, which were cciucurred in — 
A telegrrtm, dated Jaiiu try 12. IStW, from General 
Meade, was read, suting that if the bill pending 
before Congress was pnssed, directing Military 
Commanders to fill the ollices with those qualified 
to take the oath. Its execution will be entirely 
Impracticable. Iteferred....lhe bill to exempt cer- 
tain manufacturers from internal tax was passed 
in Committee of the Whole, and reported to the 
Senate Adjourned. 

In the House, on the 18th, Mr. Broomall, 

of Pennsylvania, moved to reconsider the vote re- 
ferring to the Judiciary Committee a bill intro- 
duced by him July 11. 18C7, to guarantee to the 
several States of the Union a republican form of 
government. After debate on the bill In question, 
Uie motion to reconsider was withdrawn — A bill 
was reported from the Committee on Keconstruc- 
tion, to admit the State of Alabama to represenu- 

tton in Congress, which was ordered printed 

The Uo'iee receded from all its disagreements, ex- 
cept one, on the Consular Appropriation bill. . A 
report was made, and agreed to, on the bill to 

facihtate t!ie payment of soldiers' bounties A 

rasolution was adopted calling on the Secretary of 
Wur for a revised estimate for river and harbor 
Improvements Adjourned. 

In tlie Senate, on the 1 9 th, resolutions of 
the Wijconaln Legislature were snbmitted, in- 
structing her Congressmen to adhere to their pres- 
ent pollcy,and endorsing the course of Mr. Stanton 
... The proceedings of a meeting of the citizens 
of Wisconsin were presented, in favor of the pend- 
ing hill for the removal of the tax on manufactures 
. . .The bill to relieve certain mauufacturs from in- 
ternal tax was taken up, amended and {lasscd.... 
Adjourned. 

In tho House, on the 19th, the bill pro- 
viding that in case of vacancy In the office of Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court, tao Associate Jns 
tlce of said Court whoso commission is senior in 
time, shall offlctalu uiitll the inability shall have 
been removed, or another appointment shall be 
duly made, and a Chief Justice duly qualified, 

wad passed The House proceeded to the 

consideration' of the bill to continue for an- 
other year the Freedmcn's Bureau, which was 

passed— 96 to «7 The Civil Appropriation bill 

Wis called up, amendments passed upon, and the 
House adjourned. 

In the Senate, on the 20th, a memorial 

was snbmitted and referred, asking appropriations 
for repairing the levees on the Mississippi river 

Petitions of colored men from various pans of 

Delaware were presented, asking to be secured in 
their rights, and the Judiciary Comlttee was in 
Etructed to inquire Into the authenticity of the 

petitions The bill authorizing the Peace Com- 

misvloners to conclude a treaty with the Navejoe 
Indians near Bosquito, and appropriating tl5,li00 
for their removal, was passed — Executive ses- 
sion and adjournment. 

In the House, on the 20ih, a resolution 

was adopted that the House, in Committee of the 
Whole, will attend, with the Managers, at the bar 
of the Senate, during the impeachment trial — 
Bills were reported, ordered printed and recom- 
mitted, to equalize the bounties of soldiers, sailors 
antf^iarines ; to amend cortaln acts in relation t6 
the navy and marine corps Bills were intro- 
duced and referred, additional to the act giving 
Linds to aid in the construction of railroad and 
telegraph lines from Lake Superior to Puget's 
Sound, by the northern route; to allow certain 
drawbacks on copper in pigs, bars or Ingots, ex- 
ported from the United States; to provide a reme- 
dy for Ihe loas or destruction of judgments, re- 
cords or decrees, appertaining to proceedings in 
the United States Court The Sundry Civil Ap- 
propriation bill was considered, amendments dis- 
posed of, and bill passed An amendment to the 

bin relative to the rights of naturalized citizens 
abroad was offered and referred — Adjourned. 



IMHi 



il.ePariyHeft..e.toPIeaJ. (yppiMOS AHD DRIPPINOS. 



poL.rri(;Ai> irn.ns. 

The Xcw York Tribune speaks of 

" the force of Gen. Butler's hand " as hav- 
ing been felt in the South during the re- 
bellion. His hand was not particularly 
forcible, but what it lacked in force it fully 
ma-le up in nimbleaess. 

A Washington telegram of the 20th 

tays : " The caunsel for the President have 
nearly completed the ground-work of his 
defence, and it is considered by certain 
prominent lawyers who have been made 
acquainted with the outlines of it, as very 
strong." 

A special to the Chicago Timea of 

the 19lh says : " The President's counsel 
were again in session to-day. They deny 
the truth of the publication purporting to 
give the points of their defence, and add 
that as fast as its details are arranged they 
do not rush off to the newspaper corre- 
spondents to publish them." 

Speaking of the late election in New 

Hampshire, the Boston Po.4 says : " The 
Dimocrats reduced the Radical majority 
nearly 1,000 votes, gained for their own 
ticket 4,000, and made a netjgain of 24 Rep- 
resentatives in the Legislature. This is 
doing well, and the same ratio of reduc 
tion and increase will give the Democracy 
the country in November." 

At the city elections held on the 

20lb, in Corry and Titusville, Pa., the 
Democrats elected the Mayor and a major- 
ity cf the Council in both places, which 
were never known to go Democratic be- 
fore. At the election in Bedford, Pa., on 
the 20th, the Democrats carried the bor- 
ough by 65 majority— a gain of 41 from 
last fall. Harrisburg, Pa., also went Dem- 
ocratic on the 20th. 

The desperation of the impeach- 
ment fanatics is shown in the ridiculous 
stories put alloat by them relative to an 
expectcl raid on Waahingten from the 
Virginia side of the Potomac. The only 
raid on Washington, says the Chicago 
Ti7nes, from which danger to the public 
welfare need be apprehended is a raid 
from the opposite direction, and which is 
even now inaugurated by the legion of 
Jacobin adventurers who expect to get 
fat oflBces under " President Wade." This 
raid threatens to be one of the most for- 
midiible assaults upon the capital that has 
ever been known. 



•lohBson-Cirant Correspondence 
Abroad. 

The London Saturday Jieview thinks that 
General Grant " on his own showing has 
been guilty of some rather sharp practice 
toward his superior." The actual admis 
sions which Grant makes, and which have 
been so prominently placed before Ameri 
can readers, are repeated, while, with re- 
gard to Grant's conduct in not resigning 
his position as Secretary ad interim and 
restoring the place to the possession and 
disposition o! the President from whom 
he derived his appointment, the Saturday 
Review says : 

"Even if no promise had been given. 
General Grant ought not, with the full 
knowledge of the President's intentions 
possessed by him, to have hesitated a mo- 
ment about resigning his otlice as soon as 
he found he could no longer act as an in- 
trumert for carrying out those intentions. 
So long as his resignation was withheld 
the President naturally counted on his 
support ; and, for the long argument which 
he describes himself as having held with 
the President on Saturday, the 11th, there 
should have been substituted the most un- 
mistakable act of ret-ignalion. In this re- 
spect it is impossible to acquit Gen. Grant. 
It is to regretted that his present relations 
with the Republican party should supply 
an obvious motive for conduct of which, 
in the absence of that pressure, he would 
probably have been incapable." 

The apparently moderate way of " put- 
ting it " is as catting as it is quiet. 

— The direct results of Christian mls- 
alons in India are of the moet gratifjrlng 
character. There are now in India some 
50,000 communicants of all churches. 
There are congregations of 250,000 people, 
together with 200 clergy. 



The Jacobin majority in the House of 
Representatives was placed in an awkward 
predicament, on Monday, by tho declara- 
tion of republican principles proposed 
by Mr. Ross, of Illinois. 

It is a favorite habit of tliat party to 
proclaim its surpassing loyalty, when such 
proclamations will amount to nothing. 
When windy utterances of patriotic senU- 
ments will not stand in the way of unpa- 
triotic actions, no party in the world was 
tv^r more fond of emiiting patriotism in 
feU ts. 

Mr. Ross seems to have thought it prop- 
er to bring these partisan pretensions to 
a more practical test. The mode selected 
was to propose certain declarations of 
fundamental truth, underlying our repub 
lican system of government, and which 
cannot be departed from or denied without 
repudiating free government itself. To 
show the propriety of a Congressional af- 
firmation of these principles, Mr. Ross re- 
cited the well known fact that " The For- 
tieth Congress has been charged with dis- 
loyalty to the Government, and with a 
purpose to subvert and destroy the essen- 
tial principles and just balance on which 
it rests." 

That such charge has been made againet 
the Fortieth Congress, is a fact well known 
to every member of this Congress. It is a 
charge that has been repeated, again and 
again, in all sections ; in every State ; in 
ways so general, and by a body of the 
people so numerous, respectable, and in- 
duential, that it cannot be put away by a 
llippant word or scornful sneer by the 
parties inculpati-d. It is a charge of 
very serious nature. It is a charj-^e involv- 
ing not only a large and powerful ui'ijori- 
ty in Coneress in, at the least, constructive 
treason ; but involving the i ights and lib- 
erties of more than thirty millions of peo- 
ple. It is a charge that ought to be met 
and answered in a more siibstantial and 
dignified way than that of denunciation 
or ridicule by irresponsible journalists and 
daqvers of the pirty in power. It is a 
charge that is either true or false. Mr. 
Ross sought to give the party iu Congress 
an opportunity to convirce the country 
that it is false, and thereby to vintlicate the 
proclamations of loyalty and p.ntriotisui 
which the men against whom the charge 
is brought are so fond of making when 
the making thereof will amount to noth- 
ing. 

If the charge be false, then the party in 
Congress can have no ol jcction to second- 
ing an authoritative declaration that "The 
Constitution is the supreme, paramount 
law of the land." 

If it be false, then the party can have no 
objection to declaring that "Congress will 
faithfully abide by and maintain the essen- 
tial and fundamental piinciples of free 
government." 

If it bo false, then the party cannot ob- 
ject to declaring that "Congress will op- 
pose all efforts to render the military 
independent of, and superior to, the civil 
power." 

If it be false, then the party cannot ob- 
ject to declaring that "Congress will 
oppose all ellorts to deprive the people 
of the rights of habeas corpus and trial by 
jury." 

If it be false, then the party cannot ob- 
ject to declaring that " Congress will op- 
pose the encroachment of one department 
of the G.wernment on another." 

If it be false, then the party cannot ob 
ject to affirming that "Free speech, free 
persons, and free ballot are essential to 
liberty, and cannol be surrendered." 

If it be false, then tlie party cannot ob- 
ject to assuring the country that "Con- 
gress is opposed to a large standing 
army," — XhtX fnp'rument of despotism 
which is always dangerous in a republic. 

If it be false, why did not tlie party in 
Congress say so, by promptly adopting 
these declarations of the fundamental 
principles of 'American republicanism, 
so clearly set before them by Mr. Ross y 

Instead of doing so, the party voted to 
refer them to the Judiciary Committee. 
Every ones knows what that means. Ref- 
erence to a partisan committee is the con- 
venient " tomb of the Capulets " where all 
partisan inconveniences are put to rest, 
and from which it is not intended that 
even the trump of Gabriel shall ever 
bring them forth. It is to that mausoleum 
of dead hopes that Jacobinism is hasten- 
ing the coEStitulion.il liberties of the 
American people.— CAm/^/o Times^ IS.'A. 

Advantaecst of l>runkcniieH«. 



If yoti wish to be always thirsty, be a 
drunkard ; for the oftener and more you 
drink, the oftener and more thirsty you 
will be. 

If you wish to prevent your friends 
from raising you in the world, be a 
drunkard; and that will defeat all their 
efforta 

If you would effectually counteract your 
own attempts to do well, be a drunkard ; 
and you will not be disappointed. 

If you are determined to be poor, be a 
drunkard ; and you will be ragged and 
penniless to your heart's content. 

If you wish to starve your family, be a 
drunkard ; and then you will consume the 
means of their support. 

If you would be imposed upon by knaves, 
be a drunkard ; lor that will make their 
task easy. 

If you would get rid of your money 
without knowing how, be a drunkard ; and 
it will vanish insensibly. 

If you are determined to expel all com- 
fort from your house, be a drunkard ; and 
you will do it effectually. 

If you would be hated by ycnr family 
and friends, be a drunkard ; and you will 
soon be more than disagreeable. 

If vou would be a pest to socisty, be a 
drunkard ; and you will be avoided as an 
infection. 

If you would smash windows, break the 
peace, get your bones broken, tumble 
under horses and carts, and be locked up 
m a Et;;tion-house, be a drunkard ; and it 
will be strange if you do not succeed. 

If you wish all your proEpects in life to 
be clouded, be a drunkard ; and they will 
soon be dark enough. 

If you would de^-troy your body, be a 
drunkard ; as drunkenness is the mother 
of disease. 

— An ingenious but unsuccef.sful French 
writer, lately, tired of the hostility of the 
critics, repaired to a distant province, took 
lodgings at a farrier's shop, and worked 
a little every day at the forge and anvil. 
But the greater part of his time was se- 
cretly devoted to the composition of three 
large volumes ot poetry and essays, which 
he published as the works of a journey- 
man blacksmith. The trick succeeded ; 
all France was in amazement. The po- 
ems of this " child cf nature," this " untu- 
tored genius," this "inspired son of Vul- 
can," as he was now called, were immense- 
ly praised by the critics, and were soon 
purchased by everybody. 

— A New York paper notices the singu- 
lar fact that Barnum's Circaswan Beauty, 
who was a marvel of taciturnity while the 
Museum was standing, being beyond the 
reach of any remarks whatever in the Eng- 
lish language, made a '' statement " in very 
plain Anglo-Saxon to the reporters, and 
thinks it a proof of the value of heat as a 
means of education. It is certainly a little 
remarkable that a lady supposed to know 
no language but that spoken in Circassia 
should l)e able to impart her cxperienco in 
English after "going through the fire." 
^♦■»- 

— A man, sixty years old, let the train 
leave him at Palmyra, Mo , the otner day, 
and he ran after it some distance, but fail- 
ing to overtake it, returned ahnost out of 
breath and asked if there would be another 
train that day. Receiving the answer, no, 
he exclaimed, " Gone ! gone I gone !" and 
immediately expired. 



JHEiiicellaneou* Itenas. 

— Clcvelatul is linking iron for the 
Pacific Railroad. 

—There were over 17,000 births in 
Philadelphia last year. 

—The Artemus Ward monument is to 
be placed in Central Park. 

— An Albany physician says negroes 
never have the (hUrium tremens. 

— The Astor estate is valued by one who 
professes to know, at 1 114 ,000,000. 

— West Point has furnished 26 college 
Presidents and oj railroad Presidents. 

— The Wisconsin Fenians will hold a 
State Convention at Madison, April 14. 

— mere are m Ohio l,ui)0,000 children, 
and but one third of them attend Sunday 
school. 

—A New York paper BUggesta that the 
" game laws " be so framed as to protect 
Indians. 

—A tax title question having been in 
litigation forty-eight years in an Ohio 
court, has lately been decided. 

— An oil well in Pennsylvania has been 
burning more than two years, all efforts to 
extinguish the dames having failed. 

—The Atlantic Works, at East Boston, 
recently contracted to build engines and 
machinery f)r ten steamers to run on the 
lakes. 

— It is estimated that Louisville has 
more attorneys- at law, according to its 
population, than any other city in the 
country. 

—Georgia puts into her new Constitu- 
tion a provision that no divorce shall be 
granted without a concurrent verdict of 
two juries. 

— The business in distilling iiiiirits com- 
menced in Boston in tho. year ItOO, when 
West India molasses was converted into 
New England rum. 

— A man in ore of the Hartford cotton 
mills opened a bale of cotton, the other 
day, and found a wallet containing 1 5,000 
in Confederate bills. 

— A Cuba letter cautions American mer- 
chants against Spanish doubU>oiis of light 
weight which h:ive been sent to the United 
States for circulation. 

— Brigham Young has advised the bish- 
ops and Mormon people to lay up from 
two to seven years' supplies of wheat 
and flour, as he expects a great famine. 

— Two hundred dollars a year, each, is 
the tax which Brigham Y'oung exacts 
from those men Vi ho prefer single blessed- 
ness to the state of polygamical wretched- 
ness. 

— The Internal Revenue Department 
has decided that tlie proceeds of ilr. Dick- 
ens' readings arc not liable to the 3 per 
cent, tax which sonic assessors have levied 
on them. 

— Michigan has 144 newspapers, of 
which I'-i are Republican, and :37 Demo- 
cratic. All arc printed in English, with 
the exception of five in Dutch and three 
in German. 

— Massachusetts, with 38,000 farms, 
averages only 94 acres to a farm, being in 
this respect the most minutely divided of 
any State in the Union. Rliode Island 
averages 96 acre.s to a farm. 

— A Baltimore merchant, whose son lost 
1 1,370 at a faro bank in Cincinnati, has 
received a verdict in the Common Pleas 
Court for the full amount, with interest, 
a.^ain&t the proprietors of the gambling 
house. 

— A man in San Francisco attempted to 
bhoot a fellow who had thrown vitriol on 
a lady with whom he was walking. The 
vitriol thrower escaped, but the injured 
man was fined ^500 lor shooting in the 
streets. 

— Daring a recent flot^d on the Moke- 
lumne river in California, accurate obser- 
vation showed that the water was four feet 
higher on the north than on the south bank. 
An explanation of the phenomenon is re- 
quested. 

— The consumption of manufactured 
tobacco in this country last year is esti- 
mated at 130,000,000 pounds, which at 
forty cents per pound ought to have vielded 
|i;j2,O0U,O0U revenue ; but only $15,250,000 
were collected 

— No mind so bright but drink will be- 
fool it ; no fortune so ample but brandy 
will beggar it ; the happiest it will fill with 
misery ; the firmest health dissipation will 
shatter; no business so thriving that 
whisky cannot spoil. 

— A flinty critic of " No Thoroughfare'' 
informs the New Orleans Times that the 
moon was not at the full November 30, 
1835; in fact did not fill until the 5th of 
December. The Times thinks it is of no 
use to be so particular. 

— New York has a Police Bureau 
especially devoted to the finding of missing 
people. No less than 239 casts of lost 
persons have been reported to this bureau 
within the past four months. Of these, 89 
werj adult males, 35 adult females, 63 boys, 
and 52 girls. 

— The new PostofBce Directoiy shows 
that there are 25,712 Postofflces in the 
United States in actual operation, besides 
over 300 in the Southern States that have 
not been rc-opencd since the close of the 
war. Of the whole number, 1,220 are 
money order offices, and about the first of 
the coming June two hundred more of 
this class will be opened. 

— The system.^ of signaling and tele- 
graphing adopted by Government are now 
uniform in both our army and navy. The 
cadets at West Point and the midshipmen 
at Annapolis receive the same instructions, 
so that when they become oflicers in any 
contingency of land or naval service, they 
will be able to open and maintain commu- 
nication, by codes of signaling and electric 
telegraphy identical in"their operation. 



ForcitfU CiiorMlp. 

—London has 253 newspapers. 

— Lady Fitz Maurice is said to be the 
best looking woman in England. 

— Capital punishment and flogging have 
been abolished iu tlie kingdom ol Sax- 
ony. 

—Nearly all the London theatres are 
now occupied by celebrated preachers on 
Sundays. 

— Queen Victoria and the King cf 
Abyssinia didn't marry, but they fight as 
much as if they had done so. 

— Punch defines hippophapy as the eat- 
ing of horse-flesh; and hypocrisy as the 
saying horseflesh is very good. 

— The false eyes put in the embalmed 
body of Maximilian were taken from the 
image of the Virgin, and didn't match. 

—In 1865, in Great Britain, 1,200,000 
pr stage stamps got loose f-f-om letters and 
newspapers in the postoflices, and 700,000 
in 1806. 

—Sir Morton Peto, in 1S03, had an estate 
worth $2,000,000, and a business balance of 
over 12,000,000. He is now hopelessly in- 
solvent. 

— Queen Victoria has ordered her 
" Highland Journal " to be translated into 
French. She is highly pleased with its 
large sale. 

— An English boy sent the Princess of 
Wales a " true lover's knot," carved out of 
wood, ar.d she returned her thanks and a 
check for $50. 

— A troop of servant girls stopped the 
team of a water carrier in Montreal, the 
other day, and plundered him of the 
precious fluid. 

—A sculptor in Paris recently choked 
himself to death by getting a bit of clay 
into his windpipa while playfully blowing 
pellets at a mark. 

— ^They are making an immense knife at 
Sheflleld, which has already 1867 blades, 
and one is added every year, it was not 
begun in Um year one, however. 



—Mexico 19 said to be getting on better 
than ever before. The debt is |8l,032.500, 
and all expenses of the government do not 
exceed .?1 3,000,000 a year. Payments are 
promptly made. 

— One issue of the London Times lately 
contained the announcement of the death 
of six persons whose united ages were 521 
yearp. Two had attained 94 years, and the 
youngest was 80. 

— Du Chaillu says there is a species of 
ant in Africa, afraid of the sun. If they 
come upon a sunny spot in their march, 
they dig a tunnel under it and then go on 
in single file as before. 

— The Empress Carlotta has addressed 
to the Pope a touching letter, Imploring 
his prayers for the soul of her unfortunate 
husband. The letter is written in very 
good Italian, and exhibits no traces of the 
late lunacy of the Empress. 

— A woman In Vienna has lately con- 
fessed that during the last ten years she 
and her father had committed sixteen mur- 
ders for money. Under her direction a 
search has been made, which resulted in 
the finding of all the skeletons. 

—Mr. Peabody's first £100,000 has pro- 
vided comfortable homes for more than 
fifteen hundred of the London poor, and 
his second, which is to be applied in West- 
minster next year, will double the amount 
of service rendered by this boon. 

— A chap in London has been making a 
living by fumishiug sham certificates of 
death to the mourning relatives of missing 
peiBons. One man whom he had killed 
bj' breaking a fictitious blood-vessel, turned 
uj) alive and spoiled his little game. 

— A Paris morning paper contains an 
advertisement, of which the following is a 
literal translation : " A young lady of 4S, 
having a moderate income, but possessing 
a patent for a rev/ invention, wishes to 
marry a gentleman of 05, well versed in 
chemistry." 

— German red- tape Is illustrated by an 
instance in which the citizens of one town 
ran twelve miles to another town to get 
some tire engines to put down a great con 
flagration, and then were refused the en- 
gines until they went back and brought a 
written requisition. 

— A young man in Halle committed 
suicide a lew weeks ago in order to escape 
from the slow tortures of consumption. 
He killed himself by inhaling the smoke of 
coal, burning in a hermetically closed 
room, and carefully noted down his sensa- 
tions up to the moment that he became 
unconscious. 

— A little girl in Quebec, the other day, 
while gathering chips in a shipyard, 
thoughtlessly darted forward to pick up a 
block of wood from under the descending 
ax of one of the laborers. While in the 
act of grasping the piece of wood, she re- 
ceived the lull blow of the ax on her 
shoulder, being literally nearly cut in two. 

— One of the most touchingly simple 
wills was left recently by the German pas- 
tor Holzapfel, of Reifnitz. It consists of 
this line only : " My soul to God, my 
body to earth, and my money to our Deaf 
and Dumb Hospital." The property of 
the deceased, who had led a most rigorous- 
ly abstemious life, amounts to about 70,000 
florins. r-^- 

— Du Chaillu discloses the fact that"in 
some parts of Africa betrothal takes place 
when the bride is two years old, and the 
first whipping she receives from the hus- 
band is an indication of her future connu- 
bial joys, and is given with a four-foot raw- 
hide. Women in 'Africa take 24 hours to 
arrange their chignons, but only make 
their toilet once a month. 

— A new locomotive engine for common 
roads has recently been exhibited in Edin- 
burgh. It has three wheels, weight about 
five tons, and is Eaid to be capable of go- 
ing over the roughest roads, climbing the 
steepest hills, and traveling over ploughed 
land with perfect ease. The power is due 
to the fact that it has tires of India rubber 
five inches thick and two feet broad, which 
take hold of the ground like an elephant's 
foot. 

— A fast young gentlenian iu Paris re- 
cently made a bet that he would secure 
his own arrest without committing any 
crime. He won by going to a fashionable 
cafe iu a shockingly rakish costume and 
pulling a roll of large bills from his boot 
when called upon to pay for what he had 
eaten and drank. Notwithstanding his 
protests he was carried before a Justice, 
and had to prccure testimony to his re- 
spectability. 

— A gang of women robbers has just 
been suppressed in Paris. They were un- 
der the command of a stout, middle-aged 
woman, named Catherine Keller, who 
planned the operations and distributed the 
parts, iler Lieutenant, who aid the ac- 
tive work out of doors, was a \ oung Gen- 
evese girl, who found an ally in her sweet- 
heart, Eugene Doulvaux. The various 
women used to be posted at the omnibus 
stations of Paris. 



since, and. retiring behind a w.ir,:. •'^, 
spent the day in drunkenness, corafMgoul 
toward.^ night with bruisod and bloody 
fices. 

-Dr. Carnochan, a di.stinguished New 
York surgeon, has come near dying from 
the consequences of a poisoned wound — 
his system having received the virus, in the 
course of ao operation, by a small punc- 
ture in the right hand. 

— The Memphis AsaUnicJn has been 
shown a centiped or " lhou.s:ind leus," 
which was recently tjected from theetom- 
ach of a lady, of Raleigh. Some three 
weeks previous the same woman disgorged 
eight or nine "bots" or " earthworma " 
from her stomach. 

— A German named Charles Oehm, em- 
ployed in Miller's brewery in Galena, 111., 
fell into a vat of hot beer, and was so badly 
scalded that he died in five hours. Ho was 
alone at this time. Jumping out of the 
vat, he ran to a pump aud pumped cold 
water upon himself. His Euuerings were 
intense. 

— A party of hunters from San Fran- 
cisco were chased by a grizzly on the 
Coast Range, and one of them dropped a 
bottle from his pocket. The bear stopped, 
smelt of the bottle, set himself down on 
his haunches and taking the flnskinhis 
paws drank like a sensible hum;\n being, 
rubbing his hirsute Ptomach in satisfaction, 
utterly forgetting his enemies. 

Godey's Lady's Booe toh Arnn,. — 

Among the embeUiehmente In thie nninl)pr are 
The Kustic Belle— a atecl plate, aud a handsoDM 
one, too. Colored l-'jishion-plaie, conlalniiiii six 
figures. A larse Extension >-heet, containlnj; 
thirty-nine enj^ravinc ; amon^ them will be found 
designs for eleven drc^ecr, suitable for every occa- 
sion ; bonnets, cap?, hcaddresse*. ladles' w:iitl8, 
children's parmente, embroidery, braidine, etc., 
etc., also occupy their place upon it. bisterly Af» 
fection— a beautiful tinted picture for the juve- 
niles. Country Joys is .inothcr line cnfjraving for 
our young friends. In tho fancy work dopurtmoDt 
will be found designs for a key-bae, note-case, 
spectacle case, knitted bracelet, crochet knitting 
batf, plncnshiod, lady's cap-hnj:, whceibarrow 
match-box, aud jewel case. A CottaKo, in tho 
pointed btyle, lt> also givcc, with the plan. Tho 
literary department U mado up of arlick-a from 
the pens of some of the besi mssazine writers of 
the day. Terms: One cojty, 1 year, $;i.(Xl: two 
copier, J5 51; throe, 57.50 ; four, §lu.0ii ; live, and 
one copy extra, fll.OJ. L. A. Godcy, Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

LIBRARY AND BOOK AGENCY. 



Art an<l Kclence. 

— A Frenchman has invented a kettle in 
which water is boiled in six minutes, by 
friction, without any fire. 

— A German doctor has invented an ap- 
paratus by which thunder is made visibie 
through the object glass of a telescope. 

— Palmer, the sculptor, is in Utica, X. 
Y., engaged upon what promises to be one 
of his finest works, " "The Angel at the 
Sepulchre." 

— One of the latest inventions is a life 
and swimming apparatus, consisting of the 
combined use of breast and back floats, so 
arranged as to be under the swimmer's 
control, and of finned gloves and sandals. 

— Nobel, the inventor of nitro-glycerine, 
has a new blasting powder which he calls 
dynamite, and stales it to be a solid of the 
same power, less danger and greater facili- 
ty for use than nitroglycerine. 

— A Boston fireman has invented a eelf- 
propelling steam fire engine, which will 
run almost noiselessly along the streets, 
up and down incUnes as well as o» a level, 
and round the sharpest corners. It burns 
the liquid (petroleum) fuel, and emits no- 
smoke while in operation. 

— Mr. George B. Lindsey, of the Des 
Moines lieffister oflice, has recently in- 
vented a self-locking galley, which is so 
simple, and yet so complete and perfect, 
that it is bound to supersede the old-fash- 
ioned side-stick and quoin-locking galk-y 
wherever it is introduced. It excites the 
warmest praise from every printer who 
sees it, says the Register. 

— A resident of Maine has invented aud 
applied for a patent for a contrivance 
which promises to do away with the com- 
mon buttonhole in the collars, cuffs and 
all articles of outside wear where the but- 
tonhole is used. It consists nf a small 
and durable eye upon the stud or sleeve 
button, and is secured by a movable 
swivel, which can be fastened or undone 

instantly. 

< 

laicid«Bti» nad Accidents. 

— A child in Grafton, Vt., owing to a 
cold, lost both its eyes, which ran out, 
and became deaf and dumb, and has 
lately died after an illness of two months. 

— A man in Chicago named Bross re- 
cently undertook to draw a load from a 
gun, when the powder exploded, discharg- 
ing the load into his body, causing instant 
death. 

— A man in the Cincinnati jail cele 
brated the beginning of his 10 year term 
to the penitentiary by marrying a 
girl to whom he had been some time en- 
gaged. 

— " Poor little fellow, aren't yon cold ? " 
said a pretty young laidy to a newsboy of 
whom she had m«le a purchase. " Yes 
ma'am, I was before you smiled," was the 
gallant response. 

— Two Sandusky boys, of the age of 10 
years, took a jag of whisky a few days 



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aiTB JD8T m»UHHFD 

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y :^' 






T9(! 



V/ 



^ ; iiT J. W. WAT80*.* 

Hark! 
. 'Tld <1arlt. 
A ham 
" ' UoUi co(D« 

Like bf««- 
f The t)fe««o 
^ Blows round 
Xhe sooad. , 

Tfirow op the saah ! 

A di.oUnt cra»h 

Cornea on the wlod ; 
Yi . tc'sviBff behind 

• The game dull hum 

Like niuilled drum ' 

It grows more load, 
-^ ^fiastecing the crp^d. 

•I Midraftw tirotiBh aB th4 8tr«ef. 
1 a-ro is the sound of feet, ' 
M , Afid tvMJdit.' thron^h we air 
»1 ' A'straoi^e, mioanhiy blare, 

Whilo fronv lh« Oistance swcIIb- 

o « Tha toll of inuDBter bells, ( 

• ■ Vhoiie voice, as thneder lotid. * 

(juidea the fast burrylug crowd. 

"No^ from ItP bwtel* and its holes 
The city pours its thou(>aDd soala ; 
Each eas«ir la the race to gaze 
Upon the fast devouring blaze? 
Each lappin? up, with bungrv ayes. 
The flames that swet-p the mtdnii^ht skies; 
E*ch fltrcely Btrivinsr for the van, 
, To feast upon a ruiued man ! 

Atlkst; tkroneh filth and rime, the spot is fonnd, 
AuJ trapinj^ iiiDueands All each inch of erroand. 
Each recklfssrufilHii da!>he8 through the throng, 
Si-f kin;; by fi>r;o lu thrust his way alons ; 
WhlM at your feet »Jie playful, bursting hose. 
Soaks through your boots and wets your nether 

clothes ; 
And overhead some wrongly angled stream 
Falls like a flood and washes out your dream. 

The fierce names mount, like climbing Sends, to 

Hl^vi'ii .s bl;;hdome. 
And every licking tongne destroys a human home. 
The hearthstone, where tUeir faUiers sat, the 

dream of year?; 
The spot so often hallowed by their smilM and 

tears; 
VUero they were born, amd wed, and where they 

hoped to die. 
They ^t f in flames and cinders on the angry sky. 
TUcy stdud, unsheltered, in the street, to lose their 

all, 
A.ad gt-e a bO;0tin^, lih^^.T crowd enjoy the tall. 

i!u2za! theAuM^ flli^es are done, the .sturdy 

wsUs are oown ; 
2no looser glare they on the sky, to frighten all the 

lovva. 
The claT-.gcf engines, one by one, falls off upon 



At)d pTifflng steamers cease to blow toeir whistles 

shiill and clear. 
The flremen r< st upon their work, or gossip round 

in groups ; 
Some se»red on their loved machines, and some on 

nei^bbormrstooae ; 
They wait fur orders from th^ chief " Take up, 

and boftieward go; 
Once more we've conquered in the strife our old, 

persistent foe." 



I»IAlU£IJ::i> OA 1I£IK 
UIICTIIUAl. 



T£3rXll 



Wherever a f'jw men are tlirown togeth- 
er in very close ami constaut aaaociation — 
as, for example, in the management of 
diderent departments of the same busi- 
ness— they 1^11, aa if by gravitation, into 
cerUinrdttiiite and fixed relationships to- 
vcavds each other, which soon become so 
well recognized and admitted that any in- 
ersion ol them would seem unnatural. 
And ip'^4 e»»ich small socielie?, whatever 
.ypesT>5(fiarHCter are missing, we may 
•ou;.*"v;i'h otrteiaty oa-Jiading the wit and 
ae^ott. 

Inilc'.'l, I undertake to say with confi- 
dence that the reader never knew any 
half score of nien, exclusively associated, 
one of whom was not recoguized as the 
saytr of -f mart thin^, and another as the 
►:o<xl-"Hfttartd, stupid fellow on whom it 
was alwaj s safe to crack your joke. 

Ai tlie ' MUtWaL tnent of Tovey and 
Brother, in the Borough, lhc.=o two char- 
acters were as well known a,3 Tovey and 
Broihcr themselvep, and I propose now to 
miike them known to the reader. 

I lak*»UTfjr granted that he does already 
know Tovey and Brother, and is not one 
of those who ujiikc the gross mistake of 
calling that tminent firm Tovey Brothers. 
Tosp^ak qf "Tovey Brothers" is, in 
fact, to be cotHy of a very uniustifiable 
misrepresentation— as if the brothers were 
on Mj^u&l footing. 'Whereas the title 
'* Tim-yuud Brother" explains itself, and 
enables K!)y reflecting person to under- 
fctand that, "Tovey" is Tovey pare and 
simple — the head of the firm; while 
" BruUie^'.' though Tovxy, too, is only 

l5*tnfe house itself the one is always 
known as Mr. Toyey, and the other as Mr. 
Chai^l Ah^it thQ reader lias any thought 
of flpfenui^ an account with the firm, it 
mry be useful to bear that in mind. 

Unless, Jiewever, he is hmisclf in a con- 
siderable way of business, Tovey and 
Brother will not thank him for his ac- 
cou^, they being only wholesale, and 
wholesale on the very largest scale. 

\Vh'..u jou enter their place of business, 
yoi*«»i«'»*^ wonder (if every one did not 
know aireacy) what it is they deal in A 
few scores of little bottles ranged on 
shelves, and filled with various colored 
Ti ^(lll^lJa»ll pmrilMrn) ■ fnT scores of lit- 
tle polished mahogany cases, each with its 
printed Latin label ; this is all in the way 
of stock that meets the eye. 

But when you see the long array of well- 
bound ledgers, journals, cash-books, you 
need no further assurance that they do deal 
in soQkSthic:: more tlian little bottles. 

Wiien V. a see Mr. Tovey and 3Ir. 
Chftrl*--, j'oa need not to be told that they 
are pr. sperous m6V, and that their rosy 
faces and I'ortly shapes are those of men 
who iim^ it^ijg known something about 
bi^^eOottics than any you see upon their 
sheiv'flL 

Ordnnrily, however, you might go in 
without'Bttuch chance of seeing either of 
them. 'i'?> get to their private offices, you 
have to ^o liirongh the ck-rka' ufflce first, 
and then tbronirh 31 r. splutter's. And 
unless yourj^JiWiaess is of very unusual 
importance, you will lind it quite withiu 
lY^Q ouu^MiOi one of tiie clerks, or, they 
failinnoik«$rUinly within Kr. Splat- 
ter's, wmiout interruption to the newspa- 
per c<r^»nher of the principals 



I n»y«8jf oonf«9 that I nevCT In point of I Rev. Kdwar 
fact «>t IwTond the dermis* ofiice, and have 
alwayrhad a very consiricrable awe of Mr. 
Splu»«*T, the great men's great man and 
manaigtr. 

Nc^'teat he w^ «vcr anything but very 
civil to mc wben.hjj saw me ; but he had a 
singcflv iGa^iitty some times to s«e me 
even^heij Crushing close past me, and 
thisutW *" ''^'*'^' -f "^irti perplexity as 



Boy a* Z wu, I dare mj most of thM« 
had to be diluted to suit my comprehension 
before they were told to me, and suffered 
in the dilution ; but even yet, as then, I 
think of Mr. Rasper as a feilow Of infinite 
mirth. 

1 suppose his humor must have depended 
much on manner, tone, and little accidents 
of place which could not be rendered on 
paper; for it was generally understood 
that Mr. Rasper was an ill used man in 
that he could never get any of his good 
things into print. 

But not the less, whether his wit were 
up to or below the standard of the comic 
papers, he served that office with fun 
enough, and poor Mr. Bog with more than 
enough. 

He did not often say ill-natured things ; 
but every wit must have his butt, his anvil, 
on which to hammer and sharpen his darts, 
and Mr. Bog did duty in that capacity. 

Jester and jestee were as unline in all 
respects as any two men well could be. 

Mr. Rasper's work, and his way of doing 
it, were like his conversation, light and 
sprightly. He moved about with an elastic 
quick step as if he had a difficulty in re- 
fraining from dancing. lie adorned his 
writing with flourishes till it was hardly 
legible. And when Mr. Splutter tried to 
make him discontinue those embellish- 
ments, he gave such whimsical reasons 
for their continuance that he always 
laughed the manager out of his attempt to 
find fault. 

Mr. Bog was heavy and solid. His 
h.indwriting was as regular as engraving. 
Uis ledger had not a blot in it from begin- 
ning to end. And when any figure in it 
had to be altered it was done so neatly as 
to be almost an improvement. He was a 
ploddinrr, thoroughly reliable man; as 
punctual as the clock, and as grave m all 
his ways ;— slow in all things, but happily 
above all things "slow to anger." 

Jlr. Bog had never been known by any 
one in the oflice to make a joke ; and had 
not often, they said, been made to compre- 
hend one. Mr. Raspar never made anything 
else, and saw them where others intended 
no such thing. Mr. Bog made up, however, 
for his dullness by the frankuess with 
which he admitted it, and by hia invariable 
good temper 

It was quite impossible to put him out, 
and when the suspicion came across him, 
as it did now and then, that Rasper had 
been hammering at him for an hour or 
more, he bore no malice, which was, in- 
deed, a feeling into which he could not 
enter. 

There was, however, one matter in 
which all in the office concurred that they 
had a right to find fault with Bog. Ue 
was unmarried, and all the rest were mar- 
ried men. 

And on this shortcoming of his one and 
all were determined that he should have 
no peace. Not a day passed but some 
new hypothesis was started as to the rea- 
son of his continuing a bachelor; not a 
day without some new name being sug- 
gcited to him as that of a lady with whom 
he might yet have a chance. To all of 
which suggestions Mr. Bog persistently 
and good-naturedly turned a deaf ear. 

A respite came to him twice a year 
(which must have been very welcome) 
from all this worrying. 

Twice a year Mr. Bog went on his trav- 
els, for about a month at a time. For it 
was the custom of the house to let their 
traveling be done by the clerks, instead of 
keeping travelers to do nothing else. In 
this way one or two of them were always 
out, and all of them in turn hid a pleas- 
ant relief from the monotony of office life. 
"Now, Bog," Mr. Rasper would say, 
"you must really try and manage it this 
journey. Represent your case once more 
to that Leicester girl, and perhaps she'll 
change her mind." It was one ot Mr. 
Rasper's friendly assumptions that Mr. 
Bog had been rtjected in every town he 
went to, and Leicester being m his round 
it was uaually the Leicester girl who was 
recommended lor a second trial. 

Mr. Bog would answer in his stolid way 
that if she really did relent he would let 
Rasper know ; and so they would part, and 
though they all missed Bog when he was 
on his travels, no one missed him more 
than Rasper, or was so glad as he to see 
liioi back again. 

And thus the joke wa.? repeated year af- 
ter year, until at liist Mr. Bog's case came 
to be considered by all of tliem so thor- 
oughly hopeless that if he had come down 
some morning in a pink vest and lemon 
colored lights no one would have thought 
it half so surprising as that he should real- 
ly take Mr. Rasper's advice. Mr. Bog, in- 
deed, at forty- five was held by one and 
all to be utterly impervious to female 
blandisLuisnts. 

Let the reatler judge, therefore, for him- 
self, with what effect this bomb-shell lell 
in the office four days after Mr. Bog was 
supposed to have started on one of his 
journeys. 

Tiie missile came by post, in the shape 
of a newspaper addressed to Mr. Rasper. 
It was li p rovincial paper, not from Lei- 
cester, but from a city in quite another 
quarter. 

Mr. Rasper had unfolded it and looked 
it carelessly over- had read several items 
of load news, town-council gquabbles, 
workhouse board meetings, and other mat- 
ters in which he took not the slightest in- 
terest, and was about to toss it into the 
waste basket, when his eye caught sight 
of a couple of crosses evidently made for 
the purpose of attracting attention. 

But even then he did not at once hit the 
right column. " Hunting fixtures for next 
week:" what on earth do I care about 
them ? " Hops two pounds a cwt. higher "; 
well, if they don't raise beer it doesn't mat- 
ter to me. What does the old goose mean 
by marking these V 

At last, however, he did find it, and was 
struck for a moment speechless. 

" Well, by Jove," he said at last, " this 
is something. But 1 don't believe it. Here's 
Bog gone and put a notice in the paper to 
make us believe he has got married. Lis- 
ten, here it is." 

" ' Same day, nt St. Ambrose in thU cUy, by the 
d Wheeler, the rector, Mr. ThomaB 



Whfi ii 



Frederick Bolt, of lligbury, to Emily, only daugU- 

fhiiiips, Esq., of Kings- 




Good morning' 

hat bet' 're i c^uld quite make up 

f h"e 'had Usually gone. 

Mr. Toyey and Mr. Charles, I 

k,thty ever; did Bee me. 

to my fHther'that my visits were 

'"tised to call on my way from 

iftfd gohcrally had to wait a few 

i before he was ready to walk home 

Re was ode of their young men 

iks' offlro. Th^e were, if I re. 

rls-itlj- ahout ten of them, all of 

i<\ been yotfng men a very con- 

.tiiae, and x^iXi^ of whom had 

youogvr Aieh and 'women at' home, their 

Ingp **ycs of ■ the hoc?e, however, any 
oae ^^.'^ a young rr.a,n nnder sixty.. 

I rOrticm'bPT Xiij-t, office as a model of 
8tai<.l 'cIl" '.Bd gravity.' fiverythiig 

wentjP^^.- -ymacWnery. There wasa 
time Wgg ^rrthl'ig, ^'^3 everything done 
in it.s lime? A pliQo for everything, and 
cvery'hiTig In lU place. I c^mld have 
foun'^ it easv to believe that the very height 
" clerk's c-Uar was regulated by 
^ and the style of each chain 
' fiieispecificitloa. ,, 

hn- f.t.T j\;t ■b-.eumaag,'how- 
^.-/,'.A.sJUuiun^t^augh iait; 
d \.t«;B.l y( f;iuiei fun went on 
3^(j monotcny of business. Many 
aJE passed ;oanifrom stuol to stool, 
Tt i never called there onCe with- 
in some ntw wiltlcifim or flome 
latest J|pk£ of ^T. jasper's. 




ter cf the laf Theodore 

ton, Jamaica.' " And then, as if that were not 

enough, here's a note a]>pended, editorial appar- 

r«ntlv. 

'•[■Unusual interest attached to this wedding 
from the fact of the bride being married— as we 
are permuted to state— on her tenth birthday.'J" 

" Very fair, indeed, Mr. Bog, said Ras- 
per, as he finished ; " very creditable for a 
first joke — only it's a little overdone. 
You'll do better next time. Now, my mer- 
ry men, what do you think of it V" 

Not one in the office believed a word of 
it, of course. " Neither do I," said Rasper ; 
" but it really is very fair for Bog. 1 must 
go and show it to Splutter." 

But at that moment Mr. Splutter came 
n, and on l)cing tendered the newspaper 
waived the ofler, and said, "Ah, ah, I 
know all about it. Bog's wedding— that's 
what you want rae to look at, isn't it ? 
Bless you, I've known it for more than a 
week. Bog told me and Mr. Charles, but 
made tis promise to keep tbe secret till it 
was all over. He goes mooning with his 
bride for two or three weeks, and then ho 
takes her with him on his round. You 
won't see him here again this six weeks. 
He was married the very morning after he 
left here. He asked me to be present, but 1 
could not go. Now, Mr. Rasper, how do 
you feel now ? Your occupation's gone, 
you will have nothing to chalT him about." 
And Mr. Splutter, chuckling very loudly, 
and rubbing his hands with glee, was re- 
treating to his own apartment. 

** O, but stop a minute," cried Rasper. 
" Do you know all about this, too ^" And 
he read him the editorial note about the 
" tenth birthday." 

It was Mr. Splutter's turn now to be sur- 
prised. 

•* Nonsense l" he said; "let me see." 
And, taking the paper, he read it for him- 
self. " It must be a mistake. It can't be 
true.' 



***Lti»tit R;ifi£«toa, Jamkld*.' 
sbeT" asked Rasper. 

" Some family connection, I understood 
him," said Mr. Splutter. " Th^ do marry 
very young, 1 have been told, in those hot 
climates. But in England— it is impossi- 
ble; it would not have been allowed. 
And Bog would not have done such a 
thing. It is all nonsense— nonsense I" 
And he shut himself into his own room. 

And, in sbort, that was the conclusion 
to which all in the office came to, namely, 
that this editorial note was a piece of very 
ridiculous fooling, which Bog had pur- 
posely had inserted for their mystification. 
Considering which Mr. Rasper, who, io 
long as he nad disbelieved the marriage it- 
self, had pronounced the whole to be 'pret- 
ty fair for Bog,' said— now that the mar- 
riage was an eitablished fact— that the 
ioke about the bride's age was also quite 
inexcusable, though Bog's first. 

During the six following weeks of Mr. 
Bog's absence he furnished more conversa- 
tion to the office, and was the subject of 
more jokes on the part of Mr. Rasper, even 
than if he had been present. 

Speculation exhausted itself as to the re- 
ality of this extraordinary editorial note. 
But I am sorry to say that at last the con- 
viction gradually established itself that the 
fact was literally true ; that Bog, having 
married .some mere child from a boarding- 
school — having, in fact, probably run olF 
with her for the sake of her money, and 
knowing that he could not possibly con- 
ceal the fact of her being a child, had im- 
pudently determined to brazen his mis- 
deed out in this way before them and the 
world. 

And poor Mr. Bog accordingly fell not 
a little in the opinion of his fellow-clerks. 
They were agreed, one and all, that he had 
done a thing which, in a man at his time 
of life, was unpardonable — positively im- 
moral — and surely must also be illegal ; a 
thing, in short, for which it. would behoove 
them all on Mr. Bog's rett^n to give him 
the cold shoulder and the cut. 

" I'll be bound he'll bring her down to 
the office in a short frock, " said Mr. Ras- 
per, " and carry her in on his arm." 

In anticipation of which very remark- 
able advent I wil', for a little while, leave 
Mr. Rasper and the office. 
n. 
While his own character was thus suf- 
fering, and while his fellow-clerks were 
thus discussing the chances ot their find- 
ing in him on his return any small re- 
mains of honor and morality, Mr. Bog's 
travels with his bride were drawmg near 
to an eai. 

The reader would, indeed, have been 
able. to infer this much had we, without 
explanation or comment, merely com- 
menced this closing chapter with the fol- 
lowiiig letter which 3Ir. Bog wrote from 
one of his resting-places. 

■'Jlydear Mr. Splatter, — I purpose being in 
town again on Tuesday evening next, but shall 
noti come back to business until the beginning ol 
the following week. Will you oblige me and my 
wife by giving us yonr company on Friday eve- 
ning, and by inviting for me all ray eopfreret of the 
oflice ior the same evening. I hate thu ceremony 
of carding, and callinjj, and sitting in state to re- 
ceive visits from old friends, and so does my wife. 
If they wUl all take it, therefore, in this informal 
way that we shall be glud to see them,— well, glad 
we shall be ; and if they won't, we shall be sorry. 
'• Friday evening nt seven ; for what we will call 
our 'small and early'; being, in fact, for oflice 
people only. Yours ever. T. F. B." 

This letter, which came on Monday 
morning, was dealt with by Mr. Splutter 
in his usual prompt and business-like way. 
He simply turned up one corner of it, 
wrote on the back of that corner in red 
ink, " I shall go, and hope you all will," 
and sent It out to Mr. Rasper to be handed 
round. 

The decision come to unanimously, in 
spite of the sentence ot condemnation 
p>488cd on poor Bog, was that they would 
go, all who could, if it were only for the 
sake of having an early sight of the bride, 
and giving the bridegroom one chance of 
reinstating himself in their good graces. 

When the evening came, therefore, they 
look a couple of cabs, and all went down 
together— Mr Splutter, my lather, Rasper, 
Qibbs. and all the rest of them— they 
having agreed on a convenient point of 
meeting before they left the office 

it was Jlr, Bog himself who received 
his company in his cos}', well furnished 
drn wing-room up stairs, for he was a man 
of some little meanp, and had everything 
very comfortable -about him. 

" Well, Rasper," ho said, af er the firat 
hand-shakings, "your constant dropping 
has worn away the stone ot List. 1 could 
not stand it any longer, you see. Is it to 
be peace between us now, or war ?" 

"i don't quite k-jow," sai.-l Rasper, laugh- 
ing: " we sliall see." 

" You had better not make it war," said 
Mr. Splutter, "for Bog's holid.ay seems to 
have put Lim iu rare fighting order; bet 
ter say peace." 

Whereupon Bog, in his clumsy way, 
sparred at Rasper on tho hearth-rug, as if 
to demonstrate with what ease he could 
d )uble him up. 

" 1 shall think about it," said Rasper ; 
" and, before deciding, should like to see 
the UUrrima cansa btUiy if that is what my 
old Latin grammar used to call another 
fair one." 

" Here," said Mr. Bog, " in good time 
she comes. Friends, allo'iv me. My wife, 
Mrs. Bog, and her cousin, Miss Wheeler." 
And in came the two ladies as he spoke. 

One was of middle age, or apparently 
somewhat over the middle age, wearing 
spectacles, with a matronly look and a 
good-tempered face that was very pleasant 
to look upon. "The cousin," said Mr. 
Rasper, "who comes to keep house till 
the child-wife is of age. Just as I thought." 
The other was a merry, lau.;;hliig young 
girl, seemingly of sixteen ot seventeen, 
though possibly she might be younger. 

Rasper shook his head and looked grave 
at sight of her. "Exactly us we pre- 
dicted," he aaid to his neighbor; "she's 
quite a cliild. Really this is a bad busi- 
ness ; b'it it's always so whpn men put off 
too long. Ah, Bog, Bog, 6he'll be a hand- 
some young widow, my old friend, when 
you and I are gone." 

He went over, nevertheless, and made 
small talk to the young girl by the piano. 
"Been long in England r" he asked her, 
among other things. 

" No," she said ; " only about a month 
before the wedding." 

" Known Mr. Bog before ?" Mr. Rasper 
supposed- 

" No ; she had only seen him for the 
first time when she was up in London with 
her cousin about a fortnight before the 
wedding. Her couiin had known him 
many years." 

" You will find England very different, 
I suppose," went on Mr. Rasper, "from 
Jamaica?" 

"Jamaica?" she said, laughing ; " I dare 
say I should if I had ever been there. I'm 
only from Edinboro'." 

"O, iudeed," he replied; "I beg your 
pardon. Then I suppose the late Mr. — " 
" I say, Rasper," called out Mr. Bog from 
the other side of the room, " I want you 
to come and say something clever to my 
wife." 

" Your wife ?" exclaimed the startled 
Rasper, " I thought I wa-s — " 

"Not talking to her*" said Mr. Bog. 
" Don't say, now, th*t you tbonght I had 
married little Rosy," and be went off into 
a fit of laughter <»f 'onr diusiion. " Rasp- 
er," ha said, on ge'r.irjf uh breath again, 
" you reall/ did rot think that— 0, O, O," 
and then went ofi° into a longer laugh than 
ever, in which we all joined him. 

"Then what on earth," said Rasper, 
brought to bay, " what on earth was the 
meaning of that newspaper note?" 

"Ea, wiiatf No? Now you really 
don't mean to say you've never guessed 
what that meant? You don't mean to 
say that when you read ' same day at ' so 
and 80, you never carried your eye up to 
look what day that was ? " 

" No," said Sir. Rasper ; " but what mat- 
ter could that make ? 



w«ra married on th« twMty-nlath of 
February { that ia my wife's birthday, 
and you know it only comes once in four 
years." 

"Well, Bog, upon my word I never 
tliought of that ; and I have been nursing 
all manner ol wrath against you." 

" Splendid ! " sdd Bof, "splendid ! I 
did not think It posaible to swindle the 
swindler so completely. The longest life 
I hoped for my joke was a life of about 
five minutes ; and in the hope of that I 
got my friend the editor to print me that 
one copy of the paper with a note special- 
ly intended for you." 

♦' 1 then Mrs. Bog's age is not pro- 
claimed to all the world," said Rasper. 

" Not exactly," said Bog ; " though for 
that matter she would not in the least have 
cared if it had been." 

" Not at all," said Mrs. Bog ; " I'm 
long past caring who knows now old 
lam." 

That is the story of how Mr. Bog mar- 
ried his wife on her tenth birthday. 

" Really, Rasper," said Mr. Splutter, as 
they walked home together, "that was 
very good indeed lor Bog." 

And Rasper admitted unreservedly 
that it really was very clever, indeed, 
considered as Bog's &tbL— London Society. 



Conin'C*'' 



and the 
Court. 



Hopreaae 



dMpotlsm differs tronx ftreedom, !■ found 
in the relation of the judges to the Gov- 
ernment. Justice between prirate parties 
is as fairly administered by the judges of 
France under Louis Napoleon, as it is in 
England or America. It is only when the 
Government has an interest that rights 
are insecure in the courts of a despotism ; 
and Mr. Scheilck's maxim that our courts 
have no right to decide a case against the 
wishes of the political department of the 
Government, will, if accepted, reduce this 
country to a condition as abject as that of 
£ngland when the in&mous Jtfiries was 
the abettor.of rcgaltyranny. Theframers 
of oar Constitution, with this portion of 
Bngliah history fresh in their minds, in- 
tended to make the judiciary a barrier 
against govemmental oppression as well 
as a dispenser of justice in private cases. 
What but jealousy of the Government led 
them to give a Ufe-tenurc to the judges 
and to protect their salaries against dimi- 
nution ? And even with these' safeguards 
they feared the subserviency of the courts 
to the Government, and guaranteed a trial 
by jury la all criminal cases. And these 
barriers are all to be swept away, because 
Congress is impatient of any judicial re- 
straint on its absolute will \—2f. T. Wo7-ld, 
mh. 

The Poison of Kattlesnakes. 



HOBIB. FAKM AlVn (pABDBN. 



The running debate in the House on 
Saturday— chiefly between Mr. Boyer and 
Mr. Schenck— respecting the legislative 
trick by which the decision of the Su- 
preme Court in the McCardle case la at- 
tempted to be forestalled, chillenges at- 
tention. Schenck's jeering defense 
amounts to nothing; nor does his frank 
confession of the purpose of the trick de- 
servo even the poor credit of boldness 
The purpose is so apparent, that denial 
would have been ridiculous ; and it is not 
boldness but impudence that makes a 
shameless avowel of what cannot be con- 
cealed. Mr. Schenck said he had "no 
confidence in the majority of the Supreme 
Court ; " which means that he had no ex- 
pectation that the Supreme Court would 
sustain the Reconstruction [acts. Those 
acts are so clearly, so flagrantly unconsti- 
tutional, that no tribunal at once honest 
and Independent could fail to declare them 
void; and this sudden trap has been 
sprung to prevent a decision which 
would foil the designs of the Republican 
party. 

Schenck's attempts to smooth over the 
trick were wholly unsuccessful. The bill 
for giving the Collectors of Internal Rev- 
enue the same rights in the Supreme 
Court as the Collector of Customs was 
entirely proper and unobjectionable ; and 
when Mr. Schenck asked for unanimous 
consent to take it from the table and put 
it upon Its passage, there was no objection. 
But Schenck knew, and all his accom- 
plices in the trick knew, that no Demo- 
cratic member would have consented, if 
he supposed it was designed to tack on an 
amendment for taking the McCardle 
case out ot the Supremo Court. The ap- 
peal to the courtesy of the Democratic 
members was Iraudulent, and the abuse 
of their courtesy after consent was given, 
disgraceful. It ia not correct to say 
thai the tricK was of little consequence 
inasmuch as the Republicans have majority 
enough to have passed the amendment in 
any event. They could have pasted the 
amendment; but without the unanimous 
consent obtained under false pretences, they 
could not have pas^sed it so soon. In this 
stage oi the controversy time is a vital 
element, as much so as It is in militaiy 
operations when a few hours' diflerence in 
the arrival of troops may decide the fate 
of a battle. The McCardle case is already 
in the Supreme Court ; it has already been 
argued ; the Court is deliberating on their 
decision ; and if it should be announced 
before tuis amendment becomes a law, the 
Reconstruction scheme topples to the 
ground. A single day may make all the 
difference between success and total defeat. 
The President is entitled to ten days to 
prepare a veto, and every day which might 
have been added to those ten would have 
increased the peril impending over the 
Republican party. If the Democrats had 
not given their consent to take up the in- 
nocent bill upon which this sinister amend- 



Dr. 8. W. Mitchell, of this city, has just 
completed a second carefully conducted 
series of experiments upon the venom of 
the rattlesnake. The principal conclusions 
to which he arrives are as follows: 1. 
There is no antidote to this poison, the 
remedies usually applied being nearly or 
entirely useless. Carbolic acid, applied 
externally, sometimes delays the fatal re- 
sult— merdy, however, by affecting the 
local circulation. Used Internally, it, as 
well as the sulphites or hyposulphites of 
soda, so much recommended, have no anti- 
dotal power. 2. The poison is absolutely 
harmless when swaJlowed. It is even given 
internally to many different animals with- 
out any tffect whatever; while several 
cases are known where scientific (we 
might, perhans, add foolhardy) men have 
taken it themselves without injury This 
innocuous result is due to the fact that the 
poison is mcapable of passing through th« 
mucous surfkce, as well as that it is so 
altered during digestion as to enter the blood 
as a harmless substance. Applied to the 
rectvun of a pigeon or the conjunctiva of 
animals, it had no effect. 3. The poison is 
not injurious to the rattlesnake it£elf,or to 
any other of its own species. 

This confirms the conclusions of Guyon, 
corroborating also the testimony of Chas. 
Waterton, who made a venomous South 
Ajnerican serpent bite Itself, .\lthout inju- 
rious result to it. It is to be regretted that 
Dr. Mitchell pronounces against the value 
ot any internal remedies, after a careful 
discussion of those most generally accepted. 
For the best treatment of a case ol serpent 
poison we must refer to his memoir, mere- 
ly remarking that he attaches considerable 
value to alcoholic stimulants, especially 
where the patient was not intoxicated 
at the lime of being bitten. — PhiXadelplda 
Ledger. 

91ore About Alabama Voting:. 



ment was so suddenly and dishonesty 
clapped, it must have gone over under tUe 
rules, auvl the Republicans raia;hl have lost 
time enough to insure tlie death nf their 
policy. The asking far unanimous consent 
was as deceptive a trick as was ever prac- 
ticed. The amendment is entirely f -reign 
Ui the purpose of the origiual bill. What 
connection has the McCardle cas9 with suits 
to which Collectors of Internal Revenue 
are parlies ? Who could have suspected 
that two subjects so totally unrelated would 
be jumbled together in the same bill? 
W hen unanimous consent to take up the 
bill had been obtained, there was no possi- 
bility of heading ofi' the amendment, a fact 
which would have prevented men of honor 
or fairness from obtaining the consent by 
fraud. 

It remains to be seen whether the Re- 
publican party gains any immediate ad- 
vantage by this dishonest trick. So all de- 
pends now on whether the Supreme Court 
announces Its decision be lore the expira- 
tion of the ten days allowed the President 
to consider the bill. We suppose the Court 
will neither hasten nor delay its judgment 
in consequences of this legislation ; but If 
the bill becomes a law before the judg- 
ment is pronounced, the silence Imposed 
upon the Court will have the usual effect 
ot an adverse detl?ion. Such a bill is a 
confe-ssion that the Reamslructlon acts are 
unconstitutional, and that the Supreme 
Court, if permitted to decide, would de- 
clare them 80. 

When Mr. Schenck says he has " no con- 
fidence in the majority of the Supreme 
Court." the country will understand him 
as admitting that the legislatiim of Con- 
gress Is repugnant to the Constitution. 
This implied admission is bottomed upon 
solid reasons. The Reconstruction law 
aabstitutes trial by military commissions 
for trial by jury. It requires no learning 
in the Supreme Court, but only honesty 
and independence, to adjuge these mili- 
tary commissions inconsistent with the 
declaration of the Constilutioa that " tJie 
trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeach- 
ment, .SHALL BE BT JURY ;" and inconsistent 
with the farther declaration tbit "in ail 
criminol proxe^utions. Vie accused ihall enjoy 
the rigfU lo x spbkdy akd pui'.i.ic trial. 
BY AN IMPARTIAL JVRY qftheStaU and dis- 
trict wherein the crime smR have been com 
mitted." No honest court can decide that 
the.se plain declarations of the Constitu- 
tion are not contravened by a law which 
takes away trial by jury in criminal prose- 
cutions. Schenck's want of confidence in 
the Supreme Court is easily accounted for 
on the principle that "no rogue e'er felt 
the halter draw with good opinion of the 
law." The Rcpublic.m party is a fugitive 
from justice, and, like all fugitives from 
justice, it has no confidence in courts. 

Schenck said, in his remarks on Satur- 
day, that the Supreme Court has no right 
io de<Adc political questions. 'The question 
whether persons accused of crime are en- 
titled to a trial by jury is not a political 
question, but a question of criminal law. 
Wliat SchcLck probably meant wa«, that 
courts had no right to stand between the 
Government and citizens, but only to 
decide cases in which the Government has 
no interest. Such a maxim is the very 
essence of tyranny. Even the infamous 
Jefiriea, whos^. name has so long been the 
synonym of judicial disgrace, was an up- 
right jadge In private controvcrsijw. The 
judicial iniquity for which Jeffries is 
"damned to everlasting fame" consisted 
only lu lending himielf to be the tool of 
the Government in prosecutions against 
private Eubjicts. The same remark is true 
of all the infamous judges under the Stuart 
dynasty, 



A correspondent of the New York 

World, who attended the polls in Alabama 
during the voting there, and who has been 
collecting information in regard to the 
manner in which the election was conduct- 
ed in different portions of the State, pre- 
sents the people of the North with this 
pleasant reminiscence : 

" Something like a third of the entire 
vote cast in the State was received on no 
better evidence than tffldavits of registry 
In other counties, and, for my own 
part, I saw several administered. This 
was the procees. Enter Timbuctoo. 

" • What's your name ? ' 

" ' Pomp.' 

" ' Pomp what ? ' 

" • Pomp Jones, sah.' 

" * Show your ticket,' and a great paw 
would reach out a ragged sleeve, and 
thrust a dirty scrap under the judge's nose. 
No such name as given would be found 
upon the list, and then would come the bal- 
ance of the formula. I quote from the 
printed document : 

-"I, , do solemnly swear thst I i»m duly 

registered as a quallfled voter in the county of , 

in tbis Slate; that 1 now reside in this couuiy, 
and that 1 have not voted at this election, so help 
me God.' 

" Pomp, or Cuff, or Cudjo would swal- 
low It all, meekly taking off his hat as he 
was bidden, and holding up his hand and 
nodding like a toy mandarin at every 
other word m the oath. In would go his 
vote ; and now take him out and ask him 
what • solemnly ' meant, or ' qualified,' or 
• reside,' and Pomp's big mouth would 
open and his eyes would ttretch, and nine 
times in ten would tell you, ' Fore God, 
mas'r, I dunno nuffin 'bout all dis yer, but 
dey tole ue we mus' come and put de ting 
in de box or dey would fine us or put us in 
de jail.' " 

And these are the kind of people the 
Radicals wish to make the rulers of the 
Southern States ! 



It is said that bees will n<it build comb 
on a painted surface. 

Thk State Fairs of Ohio and Illinois 
have both been appointed ior September 
21st to 25th. 

Experience is one of the best teachers ; 
yet we ought not to allow ourselves to be- 
come its suvcs, as is the great tendency of 
farm life. 

Making wagon wheels of thoroughly 
seasoned weod', and soaking the felloes in 
linseed oil, are recommended as the best 
preventives of trouble from loose tires. 

A correspokdbkt of the CouTitry (Jen- 
««na» urges the establishing of a "Wheat 
Growers' Association," something of the 
plan of Dairymen's Associations. 

Cream Cake.— Break two eggs in a 
coffee cup and fill the cup with sour 
cream; one cup sugar, one and a half 
cups flour, one teaspoonful soda, one cream 
tartar; to be baked in layers, whipped 
cream or frosting to be put between each 
layer. 

To Fry Chickens.- Cutup the chickens 
and let them lie m salt and water twenty 
minutes, drain and season with salt and 
pepper ; prepare six eggs well beaten, and 
five crackers, rolled fine, stir well together, 
roll each piece in this, and fry brown in 
hot lard. 

The Rtv. W. T. "Wylie, of Newcastle, 
Pa., recommends grape culture as an em- 
ployment suita-le and profitable for 
women. He says that an apt and diligent 
woman could earn ten times more money 
in a year by raising grapes than by plying 
her needle. 

Abparagus, in order to produce large 
shoots, should have plenty of rocm in the 
bed, the crown of the root be kept six 
inches below the surface in very rich, loose 
soil, and the shoots cut deep in the ground 
when the tops are not more than an inch 
or two above the surface. 

Venttlation. — Every warm and clear 
day, at this season of the year, should be 
taKen advantage of to throw open doors 
and windows, to give thorough ventilation 
to apartments that have been closed almost 
constantly during the long winter months. 
Many houses need ventilation in the spring 
as much as the hold of a ship after a long 
voyage. 

Cement.— Alum and plaster of Paris, 
well mixed with water, and used in a 
liquid state, will form a very useful cement. 
It will be found handy in the laboratory 
for many purposes. It forms a very hard 
composition, and for fixing the brasses, «tc., 
paraffin lamps, nothing could be belter. — 
American Farmer. 

To Make Tocon Beef Tender.— To 
those who have worn down their teeth 
masticating poor, tough beef, we will say 
that carbonate of scSa will be foimd a 
remedy for the evil. Cut the steaks the 
day before using into slices about two 
inches thick, rub over them a small quan- 
tity of soda, wash the next morning, cut 
into suitable thicknesses, and cook to 
notion. The same process will answer 
for fowls, legs of mutton, eic.— Exchange 

Test your Kerosene. — In view of the 
many lamp explosions resulting almost in- 
variably from the use of bad kerosene we 
urge upon the heads of families the im- 
portance of testing their oil before use in 
the lamp. This may be readily done by 
any man, woman, or child, by means of a 
thermometer, a little warm water and a 
tablespoonful of the oil. Fill the cup 
with warm water, the temperature of 
which is to be brought to 110 deg. Fah. 
Pour the oil on the water ; apply flame to 
the floating oil by match or otherwise. If 
the oU is unsafe it wUl take fire, and its 
use in the lamp is dangerous, /or it isliab'.e 
to eiplude. But if the oil is safe and good 
it will not take fire. All persons who sell 
kerosene that will not stand the fire test at 
110 degrees are liable to prosecution.- 
Scientific American. 



befbre he wUl »»in torn hk ,»ttw»iton o 
scientific reMM^Bi In tb* palTerfmtioii ot 

powder. 



THE MARKETS. 

Hsw Toazt March ts, 

COTTON-MiddliBg S M^aS •>& 

FLOUB— Eztn Weatera. 9.00 a lUO 

WH&iiT-Sprlng Ka S ISS O 

KYB-Weatera 1.90 e 

CORM-New Western Mlxad.... l.SS « IJMH 

OATS -New Weatem '.. .»l^f| .83 

BARLEY— Western S-SO ^ S-St 

PORK-Mess t850 $ S4.8T 

IjARO— GoodtoFilB* I6ii^ Mii 

GOLD— 1.38 .». 

CnoAM. March S8, 1868. 

BEEVES— Fair Grades $600 

HOGS-Llve 6.00 

^Dressed ».60 

BUIVER— Choice .40 

EGQii — Fresh -SS 

FLOUR- Wblte Winter 18 00 

Spring. Xztra « 835 _ 

GBAIM— Corn^'ew SS^a 

B«rley-NaS S45 q 

OatB-No.l .675iO 

Bye-No. 1 1-60 O 

Wheats-Spring, Na 1. S.OO O 
" Ko. S. 1.»1H ~ 

LARD 16H 

FORK-Mess S8&0 



8' 

I 



I 



700 

8.8S 

lU.OO 

.43 

.SS 

ia.«o 

10.00 
.8J« 

a.4» 

1.66 

1.9a 

.16 
M.0O 



FLOUB— Fai 



-Family.. 

WHEAT— RedW inter. 

Ear 



CXHOmun, March 83, MS. 



flO.TB 
S.46 

CORN— New Ear 86 

OATS— No. 1 70 

Kit j»— No !■• ••••••••••■••••••• i*o 

BARLBY-FaU t ».70 

PORE-Mess S400 

y.ARr> .^ .16 



a $1100 
o a.6u 

o 

& l.TS 
& X.7B 
9 i4.t0 



FLOUR— XX 

WHEAT— Winter, 
CORN- SheUed... 

OA.Ta •■■■«■■•••••< 

RYB. 



ST. Loun, March SS, 1808. 

flOOO ©flLBO 

S.60 O t-IO 

....••.••..•■. .87 a vvo 

^ .71 O .75 

1.65 O 1.70 



BARI.KY-Spring 2.85 

POKE-Mess 2400 

LARD IB 

KnwAXTXSS. March 93 

FLOUR- Spring Extra f8.75 

WHEAT— Bpring 1.67 

CORN— Now .64 

OATS-No.a 59 

RYE— No. 1 IM 

BARLEY 8.40 



M.Q0 

.15H 

188B. 
9.T5 
1.94 






.60 
l.M 



CLivxiJJn), March 33, 1888. 

FLOUR-XX Spring JlO.00 O fll.tt 

WHEAT— No 1, Spring S.30 & 

CORN— No 1, Shelled ICO ft 

OATS-Nol 70 d 

BARLEY— Nol «.60 & S.flO 

RYE-No. 1 1.55 a 1.60 



It l8 AmaastBK 

That the feeblest should totter, with oncertaln 
steps, over the face of the earth, In danger every 
day of falling Tictlma to the morbid Inflaences by 
which wc are all sorroanded, when a tested and 
proven vegetable tonic, capable of endowirig them 
with the vigor they need, is procttrable in every 
city, town and settlement, it might reasonably 
be thought that after the twelve years' experience 
which the world hns had of HOSTETTEK'S BIT- 
TERS, ILL wonid know that its effect is to pre- 
vent disease. 

At this season tho atmosphere is surcharged 
with the seeds of intermiltents, remittents, rhae- 
matism, pulmonary disorders, bilious complalntB 
and the like. Persons whose nervous systems are 
relaxed are the first to succumb to these distem- 
pers. Brace up the physical energies then with 
this potential vegetable tonic. It is the most 
powerful recnperant which the botaolc kingdom 
has ever yielded to patient research and experi- 
ment. Tnv It. The blindest disciple of tho eld 
medical dogmas will at least admit that a tonic 
and alterative, compounded of approved herbs, 
roots and barks can do no harm, while the tasU- 
mony of thousands invites a trial of its vlrtaea. 

Vigor is the thing most needed in these caaea aa 
well a» in dvspepeia and nervous affections, and 
HOSTETTER'S BlfTEKS is the safest, sureatand 
most wholesome strengthening preparation that 
human skill has yet concocted. 

Hundreds of physicians have abandoned ail 
the officiual receipu* and prescribed this harmless 
tonic as a preventive and cure fur all cases of 
CMlls and Fevers. 

* 

TO CONSVniPTIVBS. 

The Hev. KDWAKD A. WILSON wUl send (free of 



charge) to all who desire It, the prescription 
directions fur making and using the simple remedy , 
whfch he vit cured of a lung affection and that oread 



dUiase, Consnmptlon. His only ot>)ect is to beoeflt the 
afflicted, and he hopes every sufferer wUl try his pre- 
•crIptioQ, as It -will co8t them nothing, and m ay pr ove a 
blessliiii;. Please ad dress Bsv.BDWlLRD A. WU^BON, 
No. ISO South ^iucoDd street. WlUlamsborgb. New Tort. 
♦ ■ • 
INFORIHATION. 

guaranteed to prodaoa a loxarlai.t 
■ ■ ■ ■ ad o] 



Inftjrmatlon 
{Towth of tialr upon a bald head or t)eardleas tace, atso 
a recipe tor the removal of Pimples, Blotches, Brap- 



Xime tor IHilkUiK C^ows. 



•' How often shall cows be 
has been agitated from 



nous, etc., on the skin, leaving the same soft, clear and 
l>eaTitifUl, can tie obtained wTthont charge by addreas- 
Ine TUOS. F. CHAPMAN. CHBMm. 8S Broadway, H.T 



Age ol' Animals. 

The average of cats is 15 years ; squir- 
rels and hares, 7 to 8 years ; a bear rarely 
exceeds 20 years ; a dog lives 20 years ; a 
wolf 20 ; a fox 14 to 16 ; lions are long-lived 
the one known bv the name of Pompey 
lived to the age of 70 ; elephants have been 
known, it is asserted, to live to the great 
age of 400 years. When Alexander the 
Great had conquered Poms, king of India, 
he took a great elephant and named him 
Ajax, dedicated him to the snn, and let 
him go with the Inscription : "Alexander, 
the son of Jupiter, dedicated Ajax to the 
sun." The elephant was lound with this 
inscription 350 years after. Pigs have 
been known to live to the age of 20, and 
the rhinosceros to 20; a horse has been 
known to live to the age of 62, but aver- 
age 25 to 80 ; camels sometimes live to the 
age of 100; stags are very long lived; 
sheep seldom exceed the age of ten ; cows 
live about 15 years. Cuvier considers it 
probable that whales sometimes live 1,000 
years ; the dolphin and porpoise attain the 
age of 30 ; an eagle died at Vienna at the 
age of 104 ; ravens frequently reach the 
age of 100; swans have been known to 
live 3(X) years. Mr. Marlertcn has the 
skeleton ol a swan that attained the age of 
20^3 years. Pelicans are long-lived ; a tor- 
toise haa been known to live 107 years. 
< ■ » 
Not Prof ASK.— "Just what a linker's 
dam is I have no means of knowing ; but 
I believe it to be something very worth- 
less indeed," says Mr. Thorn. White, in his 
" Little Sermon," in Putnam's tor March. 
Mr. Thom. White's ignorance can, per- 
haps, be enlightened, and his belief shown 
to be sound. The tinkers used to tramp 
about England mending pots and kettles. 
They masticated and moistened a morsel of 
bread, and used it as a dam around the 
hole to be repaired to prevent the solder 
from running off. After being thus em- 
ployed what value remained in the " dam ?" 
Can anything be Imagined more worth- 
less* Uence the proverb. If this expla- 
nation, definition, or conjecture be not sat- 
ififiietory, let somebody ravor an inquiring 
world with a better. — Boston Transcrijyt. 

— A Southern clergyman who officiated 
at a Cincinnati church two Sundays ago, 
stopped in the middle of a long and tedious 
discourse, tsad. raised his hands as if to 
pronounce the benediction, to which the 
congregation responded by rising, kneel- 
ing, «Sbc. But the motion was made only 
to adjust his surplice, which being dona 
he resumed his discourse, and the congre- 
gation, with a general giggle, resumed its 
pofihion for listening.^ 

A. young man, discharged from the 

Ohio Penitentiary, went to a book-store 



The question, 
mllktd, dally? 

time to time, from the fact that when calves 
are running with their dims, the times 
of milking are more frequent than under 
the common, artificial system, which is 
twice a day, ordinarily, while it may be 
four or five times a day when the cows are 
sucked by their progeny, and ofcener, even, 
when there is a shortness of supply, as In 
poor milkers. 

Cows, it is said, by an EiigUah writer, in 
a luxuriant pasture, where they can soon 
fill their bellies, invariably feed four times 
a day, first, early in the morning, again 
before noon, in the afternoon, and late in 
the evening, and the calves suck on these 
8c7eral occasions, on the ccws rising from 
rumination, to replenish their txbansted 
stomachs. This order will vary in lees 
luxurious pastures. 

The writer referred to gives the follow- 
ing in regard to artificial management : Ist, 
when cows and calves are separated and 
brought together morning and evoning ; 
2i, when separated as above and brought 
together morning, noon, and evening ; 3d, 
when cows are milked twice by hand, 
morning and evening ; 4th, when milked 
three times a day, morning, noon and 
evening; 5th, four times a day, making 
seven hours between the night and morn- 
ing milking, or a little more, and about 
five hours and a half between the others. 
Of the first four times of milking, our 
author says he has had varied experience. 
The writer wished it borne in mind that 
his observation was conlined to cows 
highly ltd, his query bein^ whether cows 
thus treated are more liable to grow fat 
and dry up, when milked only twice, than 
if milked three times a day ? According 
to his experience, there arc 11 hours be- 
tween evening and morning with but 
two milklngs, and 10 between morning 
and evening; in summer, 13 and 11 hours 
between milkings. 

In further discussing this suljeci, he 
says, it should be borne In mind, that the 
manufacturing of meat, as it were, and of 
milk, arc continuously going on in tlie 
healthy cow, so that it does not retiuire 
much force to turn the balance either way. 
especially when there is a tendency to the 
secretion of fat ; in such cases it must be 
adverse to the secretion of milk. Hence, 
with healthful cows, with proper and high 
feed, three mllklDgs a day are better than 
two, provided milk is desired, in its brgest 
quantity. 

The present system of milking but twice 
a day took its rise when cows were less 
highly fed than now, and gave much less 
milk per day ; hence, its inapplicability to 
deep milkers of the present day. Four 
times a day is better, even, than three, 
wh'en cows are kept on luxuriant feed, as 
intimated above, when milking should cor- 
respond with "the periods of healthy 



STiniPSON'S SCIJBNTIFIC PEN. 




1 iloJ!. Pens (asdorted points), anu inn rcialmng Held- 
er mailed prepaid, on receipt of 50 c- nts. 

A. S. BARNK8 & CO., New York. 



SAVE MONEY AND TIME 

By using Tl-e iVPmvKD SILVHR'3 PATENT BROOM. 
A'^antrd to city or country at"! w^rraniej thP CH h AP- 
iST, HEST, and .MOSf BEAUTIFUL BCOOii in 
America. It is so himflx that a child o*.n put n' 
TOGKTBKB, BUd the brugh U so 
Plastic that It wears twice as 
long aa the old fashioned tied 
broims, sweeps with half tlio 
eflort, and di.ea not wear the 
carpet one-lonrth as fast, thoa 

tAVIKO MOUmY AND TLMK. 

Hon. Horace Greeley says : 
" I predict Its 8urr<*s." The 
Anierlcau AKrlculturist says : 
"They are adopted as a fami- 
ly Instliutlon." The An.arlcait 
Inslliute Farmers' dub says: 
" With Silver's Patent, a child 
ten ye.irg old c^n make a 
new broom In ten minutes." 
The Patent Brass Mctallc parts, which last a lifetime, 
sent ( wnere we have no Agente), with full Instructions 
for pattln;; togethrr, l.y mall, pre-paid for $1.23. or the 
agent's complete outfit, by express, lor ».'. An Acent 
w-Rntcd in every county. Lnst year 850 agents were 
eolliniit. making f5 tof5 psrday. At oar KEDUCiiJ> 
PKlCJiS. every Mgent can dp as weU this year. 

For full particulars send for our pew Illustrated cir- 
culars, nimlne the first, second Mid third chol« of 
countres. to C. CLEGti « CO., W Fulton street, (P. O. 
Box 09S5; Sew Yorlc. 

fiisiiiiufflM; 

— • — 

The Illinois Central Railroad Company hare for sale 
n tracts of 40 acres and upwards, ISO.CU.' « 




In tracu of 40 acres and upwards, 750.00".' acres of Choice 

,yli: 

„. ._ _. Afi 

prorttible agriculture, these lands poaseaa every re- 
quisite ol sou and climate. 

TBE FRUIT RECtlOTV 

of Southern Illinois Is noted fbr Its wondsrftxl fertility 
In the prooncUon of apples, pears, p«sch«i, Mf «} 
"^ -■ — ■ — oilS*'!, the Bpeciai 



In the pi 

kinds of 



fruits. 



During the season < 
Krolt KrpreM Train brought over COO.OOO toxes <V 
pesohea and XO.OUl buahels of sUawberrtes to Chicago 
alone, ITom ihencn famishing the first rrnlt» of the 
sesson to all the nortb«m markets. 300.00) acres of 
thpse fruit lands are uow offered for sals on favor- 
able terms. 

Title in Fee from the State. 

or All station asrents are provided wltli plats, sttOH- 
teg the lands for sale In their vicinity. 

InlormaUon given upon all points at the office of tha 
liand Department, 58 Michigan Arenne, Chicago, or a 
descriptive pamphlet, with maps showing the exact 1«>- 
callty of all the lands, sent to any person wrltlnj; tor 
the same, in any language, to 

JOXIIV B. CJlLHOUN, 

Land Commissioner, CUcago. 



Water Proof Booflagi 

■(LTora A ■Anna rAraa, 
gia« SU^ tn ClKvlw tmt i ifli »t 

C. J. FAT * CO., 

3M*Vlas Ma., OaadM, >. 




Importamt AiuaowKceaaeBt !' — 

A Beantinil. Olnstrated Book, -worth a Tboosand 
dollars, sent free to any address on receipt of 85 oenta, 
by addrf-Bsing Professor JOHN VAMDKBPOOL. Xo. 
886 Wlnihrop Place. New York City. 



•' AU the matter," said Mr. Bog. " We 1 The most characteristic mark by which • and bought a Bible and hymn book. 



rumination, digestion, aecretion ot milk 
and rest." What objection can be raised 
with regard to dairies kept for their milk, 
called in England, "Commercial Dairies," 
to milking three, or even four times a day, 
when cowd are kept and fed especially for 
their milk, whether for the supply ot the 
milk market, or for making butttr and 
cheese, either or both?— the cow in such 
casea being regarded as a milk making ma- 
chine, whose use is to convert forage into 
good milk. — Boston Caltivaior. 

^ e ♦■ 

—A. shrewd ma* in West Penn Town- 
ship, Pa., the other day, undertook to 
grind some coarse blasting powder in hia 
ooffee-miU. He had not made many revo- 
lutions of the crank before there was a 
noise heard, and the room was filled with 
flyiag fragments of coffee-mill, window 
gUas, furniture, crockery ware and Dutch- 
man. The ingenious experimenter was 
not killed, but he was badly burned, and 
we have no doubt that some time will elapse 



WEBSTER'S PLANS FOR LAYING 
Oat and BesntUylng Gardens and Oeneral 
Catalornes of Shrubs Rjses, Ornameotal Planta, and 
beeat, for the spring of 18S8, Is now ready for malUDg 
to customers frte^*I'd^„aa_olherB_on rec^pt ol ten 



cents. Address WM. WEBSrEB, Itf State 81 
ester, N. "i 



. Boca- 



BARREL MACHINERY— Greenwood's 
Patent SUve and Headtng llachlnerr. for llckt 
and Slack Work. G. L. Benton's Patent a>nvex Every 
Wheels, for Oummlnir and Sharpeoter Baws. JOOH 
CREENWOOD, Bo3ieater Barrel JtoddM Work* 
EocUester, N. T. 

XJ0R8B - OWNER'S FRIEND; OR 

XX Help In Time of Xeed : a complete work of SM 



Dasei. on the Eorse, Diseases and Core, maUed to any 
itddreas. postpaid, on reoelpt of pdce. Bond In 
eiotb. 'B ceBU -tPaP«''< ^ Of^M. Agents wasted. 
^^ UPJOHN " 



A TYUEB, PabUshaxs, 

AOB ATtwr. MlekUtaa. 



VTEW MEDICAL BOOK ON DIB 
X^ eases of Imprudenoe, and thsir son 



eases of Imprudenoe, 1 

a Jowiiey to Kew To 

xder seal by Ineloslnj 



worth 

true oEoer 

I>AWBKNCK.a 



'ork on toot to ob«ala._ - , 
by Inclosing a post«e kmjp «> D|i. 

I fU«t Tenth »trnM. »•• Ynrtr- 




f/ice fS^H^'m be^'s^Id-fSr^ Tone Grover * Baluj 
BcwlngMacUlne, never nsed, price |C^-fi>r fBO. Ad 






it* 











.■■« -» . ^ 




dteM 



Pi^Ibng. 



• ik^ 



vir,K. 

4* 3. yr. wATSOH. 
Hakk : 

A hnm 
lioUx come 

Like bt'M. 
The br*e«o 
Blowu round 
The 8oaud. 

Throw np the eash ! 
A dis'tant crash 
C>-mca on the wind ; 
l('avlnsr bchitid 
Tho same dull hum 
Like niuillcd drum ! 
It crows more loud, 
• r 1 llaslening the crowd. 

- ' '^teii'l now tftrotgh an the street, 
Tp' T" i* the eomid of feit, 
At ' 't'-^-T^it' throui(UUi« air 
'A unearthly blare. 

^ I the oistance swcile 

Tilt) loU oi tQon«ter bells, 
Vhoae voice, ts th«T)dt>r loud. 
ijruides the I'aai hurrying crowd. 

'v -"T from lt»> bt>rel* and lt9 holes 
'Mty pours its thousand ii>oula; 
. :i tMSur In the race to eaze 
Upon the fast dovoiirini: blazoT 
Each lappiuE up, with hun^rv eyes, 
Th'- fl-tmos that >iwei p the midnii;hta^ea ; 
Eich fltrcely strivinir lor the van, 
. To rc.i>t upon a rained man ! 

Afrlftss. tkroncb filth and rime, the spot le fonnd, 
AuiJ srapinij iiioui'ands Ull each Inch of ground. 
K'leh rcikli-ssrulVuiij dashi-* throuirh the throng, 
Si-fkini: liy f.ir-c lutbruijt hU way alonj ; 
While at your feet 'he playful, bursting hose, 
i<'uak9 throuijh your buots and wuta your nether 

clothes ; 
And ovrerheart some wrongly angled stream 
i'aila like a d jud and washes out your dream. 

Ihe " " - mount, liko climbing Bends, to 

,U(louie, 
Anii I .lij ,.^«...5 loneuc destroys a human home. 
'^''Ue hearthstone, where their fatiierd sat, the 

dreum of years ; 
The spot so often hallowed by their emiles and 

tears ; 
.Vliere they wfrc born, and wed, and where they 

hoped to die. 
They >tc- in fluint-s and cinders on the angry sky. 
Thfcy ?iaud, unsheltered, In the street, to lose their 

all, 
AaJ 8je a hooting, jibing crowd enjoy the fall. 

done, tho .alurdy 



:s)n. illsnes ar> 

i;i-y on the sky, to frighten all the 



tliiasi! t"^ 

V. r 

2so lonsi : - 

tOkVU. 

The clarg cr enalnes, one by one, falla off upon 

ttia car. 
And pnifiii^ steamers cease to blow their whiatiss 

shiUI and clear. 
The firemen r. at upon their work, or fiojelp round 

in t'roups ; 
borne seli'i d ou tli-ir loved machines, and some on 

neighboring stoom ; 
They wait lor ordi-ra from their chief " Take np, 

at)d homeward go ; 
Once more we've conquered In the strife our old, 

persistent foe." 



UIICTIII>.%.1 . 



I. 



X£3(T11 



Wherever a fjw men are thrown togetli- 
cr in very close aoU constaut association — 
as, for example, in the management of 
ihii'erent departments ot' the same busi- 
ness — they tail, a3 if by gravitation, into 
certain Jcliaile and fixed relationships to- 
wands each other, -which soon become so 
well ricofinizeti and admitted that any in- 

CiSidu ol tbem would seem unnatural. 
And in^U fittch small societie!?, ■whatever 
.ypesr)f'(fiar'icter are missing, we may 

•lui iv;\\h. ctrtaiaty oalioding the wit and 

indeed, I undertake to say with confi- 
dence tnat the reader never knew any 
btti!" score of men, exclusively associated, 
oi3t' ot wLnm wfis not, recogui/ed as the 
sayf r of smai i tbiepip, and another as the 
f^ ootl-i!»turcd, stupid fellow on whom it 
was aiwy}s fsik- to crr.ck your joke. 

Ai tttt establishment of Tovey and 
Brot'jer, in the Borough, lhc?=o two char- 
acter., were as vrell kuown a3 Tovey and 
Brother thtinstlvep, and I propose now to 
make ihem known to the reader. 

1 lake i& tVir granted that, he does already 
buo^ Tovey and Brother, and is not one 
of those -who. iU'.ko the prosa mistake of 
c•■1^1'n^- tba* eminent firm Tovey Brothers. 
To sprak of "Tovey Brothers" is, in 
iact, tJ bj cuilty of a very unjustifiable 
misrt-prcscnt:ition — as if the brothers were 
on »ii#:qual fodting. Whereas the title 
'•■iovcy uiid Brother" explains itself, and 
enablea any reflectiug perton to under- 
Etiinu that "Tovey" is Tovey pure and 
iimple — the head of the firm; while 
" BrojJaer," tlioogh TOTey, too, is only 
Toi^s^FHb a limLUitinn. 

In the house itself the one is always 
ki:own as Mr. Tove}', and the other as Mr. 
C'iarka ; aniJit tho reider has any thought 
of Opt:nlGg an account with the firm, it 
ra.^y be uscfnl to bear that in mind. 

Unle.=.'', Jioneyer, he is huasclf in a con- 
siderable way ».f business, Tovey and 
Brotiier will not thank him for his ac- 
cocrfr, they being only wholesale, and 
wh^desale on the very largest scale. 

Wiuu Aou enter their pUice of business, 
yo'*«ii<ht. wonder (if every one did not 
kn.'W aiit,*( y) what it z^ they deal in. A 
few scores of little bottles ranged on 
shrives, and filled with various coU^red 
iiq\uc!3^MMt«pawdMi ; -a few acoree ot lit- 
tle poli'^hed mahogany cases, each with its 
printtd Latin label ; this is all in the way 
of stock that meets the eye. 

But when youeee thelongarray of well- \ 
bouud ledgers, journals, cnsh-books, you 
reed no i'aFther assurance that they do deal 
ui t^attihiBg more Umn little bottles. 

Wnen yoa see Mr. Tovey and Sir. 
Chr.rlt'S, yoa need not to be told that they 
are prosperous luen, and that their rosy 
I'dccs and portly shapes are those of men 
who l^c long known something about 
bi^goAottles than any you see upon their 
shel v-^L- 

OrJ^-ttarily, however, you might go in 
without jnuch chance of seeing either of 
them. T?> t^t to their private offices, you 
have to go ihrctigh the clerks' office .^rat, 
and then t^ou?h Mr. Splutter's. And 
unless Vf u. busiBeas is of very unusual 
importi'tue, you will find it quite withiu 
the cas^ityof one of the clerks, or, they 
failiri|3j|lMf'^<. Certainly within llr. Splut- 
ter'?, witbout interniption to the newspa- 
per (* oHher of the principals. 

I i-.tyBeJf conf«9 that I never in point of 
iV. ', '»ot beyond the clerks* ofllce, and have 
a: wu^B had a very consirlerable awe of .Mr. 
Spluwfer, the great men's grp.at man and 
manager. 

Not that he was €vcr anything but very 
civil to mc wbephji saw me ; but he had a 
sineit^v Ina^iltty somt times to sec me 
evea'ithen brushing close past ine, and 
this used to rib fill me with perplexity as 
to wfilrth;V / ^liould .s'ny " Good morning " 
or n(fl:ff' ' " ' Te I ould quite make up 
my iBfr- i 1 n - aal ir gone. 

Au'W Mr. Tovey and Mr. Charles, I 
dorrtTB^ik they ever did see ma. 

It "mti to my fHther that my visits were 
paif..*T "tsed to call on my way from 




jtnd g'cncrally had to wait a few 
i before he was ready to walk home 
He was oneol their young men 
feiks' office. There were, if 1 re- 
'rigatly, about ten of them, all of 
iad been yotrosj men a veiy con- 
siderabV-" time, aud many of whom had 
younfPt ftKin and women at home, their 
childttP. ^ • " 

In f!ie (?jcs ofiho hpupe, liowevcr, any 
one ■^S"' a T'-'Ung nan nnJer sixty. 

i r'egiembeT tii.it office as a model of 
8taJd.TO&>n.im ^•nd gravity. Everything 
wentTO ■V"" 
time mr ■-■ ' 

in its'lme. A . _ 

i.veryTililig In ■ -c- I ornld have 
founrf it ea?v to believe that the very height 
of ba£t clerk's c-llar was regulated by 
ofBce^aj^. and the style of each chain 
and aSal by flj:e<specific4tlon. 

NoTtitr)^ hii« ever yet "b-jenuudo, how- 
evt;r,2p>i T" Ui^Tr.rr.'aJiCiiunot laugh in it; 
j»nd f^Q'^d Ucbl o( (iUiel fun went on 
amiJSi^ monotony of business. JIany 
a j<.»lJ^^-^ passed lounl from stool to stool, 
and l^ljjk I never called Uiere once with- 
out hearing some ntw wUticlflm or floaae 
latest iplu of Mr. K&sper's. 



^'Vy machinery. There was a 

'^hlAg, ai-id everything done 

Tor everything, and 



BoT u Z v^M, I dare hj moat ot thea^ 
had to be dilated to suit my comprehension 
before they were told to me, and Bufiored 
in the dilution ; but even yet, as then, I 
think of Mr. Rasper as a feilow Of infinite 
mirth. 

1 suppose hishumorrausthavedepfuded 
much on manner, tone, and little accidents 
of place which could not be rendered on 
paper; for it was generally understood 
that Mr. Rasper was an ill used man in 
that he could never get any of his good 
things into print. 

But not the less, whether his wit were 
up to or below the standard of the comic 
papers, he served that oflice with fun 
enough, and poor Mr. Bog with more than 
enough 

He did not often say ill-natured things ; 
but every wit must have his butt, his anvil, 
on which to hammer and sharpen his darts, 
and Mr. Bog did duty in that capacity. 

Jester and jestee were as unlitce in all 
respects as any two men well could be. 

Mr. liasp2r'3Work,andhi3way of doing 
it, were like his conversation, light and 
sprightly. He moved about with an elastic 
quick step as if he had a difBculty in re- 
fraining from dancing, lie adorned his 
writing with flourishes till it was hardly 
legible. And when Mr. Splutter tried to 
make him discontinue those embellish- 
ments, he gave such whimsical reasons 
for their continuance that he always 
laughed the manager out of his attempt to 
find fault. 

Mr. Bog was heavy and solid. His 
handwriting was as regular as engraving. 
His ledger had not a blot in it from begin- 
ning to end. And when any figure in it 
had to be altered it was done so neatly as 
to be almost an improvement. He was a 
ploddinrr, thoroughly reliable man; as 
punctual as the clock, and as grave in all 
bis ways ;— slow in all things, but happily 
above all things "slow to auger." 

Mr. Bog had never been known by any 
one in the office to make a joke ; and had 
not often, they said, been made to compre- 
hend one. 3Ir. Rasper never made anything 
else, and saw them where others intended 
no such thing. Mr. Bog made up, however, 
for his dullness by the frankness with 
which he admitted it, and by his invariable 
good temper 

It was quite impossible to put him out, 
and when the suspicion came across him, 
as it did now and then, that Rasper had 
been hammering at him for an hour or 
more, he bore no malice, which was, in- 
deed, a feeling into which he could not 
enter. 

There was, however, one matter in 
which all in the office concurred that they 
had a right to find fault with Bog. He 
was unmarried, and all the rest were mar- 
ried men. 

And on this shortcomicjr of his one and 
all were determined that he should have 
no peace. Not a day passed but some 
new hypothesis was started as to the rea- 
son of his continuing a Imchelor; not a 
day without some new name being sug- 
geited to him as that of a lady with whom 
he might yet have a chance. To all of 
which suggestions Mr. Bog persistently 
and good-naturedly turned a deaf ear. 

A respite came to nim twice a year 
(which must have been very welcome) 
from all this worrying. 

Twice a year Mr. Bog went on his trav- 
'^Is, for about a month at a time. For it 
was the custom of the house to let their 
traveling be done by the clerks, instead of 
keeping travelers to do nothing else. In 
this way one or two of them were always 
out, acd all of them in turn h<id a pleas- 
ant relief from the monotony of office life. 
"Now, Bof," Mr. Rasper would say, 
"you must really try and manage it this 
journey. Represent your case once more 
to that Leicester girl, and perhaps she'll 
change her mind." It was one ot Mr. 
liasper's friendly assumptions that Mr. 
Bog had been rtjected in every town he 
went to, and Leicester being m his round 
it was u.=iuaUy the Leicester girl who was 
rcc' )mmendal tor a second trial. 

Mr. Bog would answer in his stolid vroy 
that if she really did relent he would let 
Rasper know ; and so they would part, and 
though they all missed Bog when he was 
on his travels no one missed him more 
than Risper, or was so glad a? he to see 
hi'jLi b^ick again. 

And thus the joke wa.s repeated year af- 
ter year, until at l.tst Mr. Bog's case came 
to be considered by all of tUem so thor- 
oughly hopeless that if he had come down 
some miming in a pink vest and lemon 
colored tights no one would have thought 
it half so surprising as that he should real- 
ly take Mr. Rasper's advice. Mr. Bog, in- 
deed, at forty-five was lield by one and 
all to be utterly impervious to female 
blandish uients. 

Let tiic reailer judge, therefore, for him- 
self, with wlni ellect this borab-shell liell 
in the office four days after Mr. Bog was 
supposed to have started on one of his 
journeys. 

Tixe mL^sile cime by post, in the shape 
of a newspaper addressed to Sir. Rasper. 
It was !i provincial paper, not frum Lei- 
cester, but from a city in quite another 
cjuarter. 

Mr. Rasper had unfolded it and looked 
it carelessly over— had read several items 
of local news, town-council Equabblci., 
workhouse board meetings, and other mat- 
ters in which he took not the slightest in- 
terest, and was about to toss it into the 
waste basket, when his eye caught sight 
of a couple of crosses evidently made for 
the pirpose of attracting attention. 

But even then he did not at once hit the 
right column. *' Hunting fixtures for next 
week ;" what on earth do I care about 
them * " Hops two pounds a cwt. higher "; 
well, if they don't raise beer it doesn't mat- 
ter to me. What does the old goose mean 
by marking these':" 

At last, however, he did find it, and was 
struck for a moment speechless. 

" Well, by Jove," he said at last, " this 
is something. But 1 don't believe it. Here's 
Bog gone and put a notice in the paper ta 
make us believe he has got married. Lis- 
ten, here il is." 

" ' Slime dny, ut St. Ambrose In this city, by tho 
Ttev. Kdwaid Wheeler, the rector. Mr. Thoiaas 
Frederick lioi:, of Iliybnry, to Emily, only daugh- 
ter cf the laii' Theodore i'hiUipf, E;<q., of Kings- 
ton, Jaranica." " And then, as if that were not 
enough, here's a note appended, editorial appar- 
restlv. 

'•[I'nusual interest attached to this wedding 
from the fact of the bride being married— as we 
are pf rmitted to i:iate--on her tenth birthday.'J" 

"Very fair, indeed, Mr. Bog, said Ras- 
per, as he finished ; " very creditable for a 
first joke — only it's a little overdone. 
You'll do better next time. Now, my mer- 
ry men, what do you think of it >'' 

Nor. one iu the office believed a word of 
it, of course. " Neither do I," said Rasper ; 
" but it really is very fair for Bog. 1 must 
go and show it to Splutter." 

But at that moment Mr. Splutter came 
n, and on being tendered the newspaper 
waived tho offer, and said, "Ah, ah, I 
know all about it. Bog's wedding— that's 
what you want me to look at, isn't it ? 
Bless you, I've known it for more than a 
week. Bag told me and Mr. Charles, but 
made us promise to keep the secret till it 
was all over. He goes mooning with his 
bride for two or three weeks, and then he 
takes her with him on his round. You 
won't see him here again this six weeks. 
He was married the very morning after he 
left here. He asked me to be present, but 1 
could not go. Now, Mr. Rasper, how do 
you feel now ? Your occupation's gone. 
You will have nothing to chaU" him about." 
And Mr. Splutter, chuckling very loudly, 
and rubbing his hands with glee, was re- 
treating to his own apariment. 

" O, but stop a minute," cried Rasper. 
" Do you know all about, this, too r" And 
he read him the editorial note about the 
" tenth birthday." 

Il was Mr. Splutter's turn now to be sur- 
prised. 

•' Nonsense 1" he said ; " let me see." 
And, taking the paper, he read it for him- 
self. " It must be a mistake. It can't bo 
true.' 



Jamalaa.' Wha Ia 



she?" asked Rasper. 

" Some family connection, I understood 
him," said Mi-. Splutter. " They do marry 
very young, 1 have l)een told, in those hot 
cliiuales. But in Loglaud— il is impossi- 
ble; it would not have been allowed. 
And Bog would not have done such a 
thing, it is all nonsense— nonsense 1" 
And he shut himself into his own room. 

And, m short, that was the conclusion 
to which all in the office came to, namely, 
that this editorial note was a piece of very 
ridiculous fooling, which Bog had pur- 
posely had inserted for their mystificatitm. 
Considering which Mr. Rasper, who, so 
long as he nad dis<believed the marriage it- 
self, had pronounced the whole to be 'pret- 
ty fair for Bog,' said— now that the mar- 
riage was an established fact— that the 
joke about the bride's age was also quite 
inexcusable, though Bog's first. 

During the six following weeks of Mr. 
Bog's absence he furnished more conversa- 
tion to the office, and was the subject of 
more j )kes on the part of Mr. Rasper, even 
than it he had been present. 

Speculation exhausted itself as to the re- 
ality of this extraordinary editorial note. 
But I am sorry to say that at last the con- 
viction gradually established itself that the 
fact was literally true ; that Bog, havmg 
married some mere child from a boarding- 
school— having, in fact, probably run olf 
with her for the sake of her money, and 
knowing that he could not possibly con- 
ceal the fact of her beluga child, had im- 
pudently deicrmined to brazen his mis- 
deed out in this way before them and the 
world. 

And poor Mr. Bog accordingly fell not 
a little ia the opinion of his fellow-clerks. 
They wore agreed, one and all, that he had 
done a thing which, in a man at his lime 
of life, was unpardonable — positively im- 
moral — and surely must also be illegal ; a 
thing, iu short, fur which it. would behoove 
them all on Mr. Bog's relui-n to give him 
the cold shoulder and the cut. 

" I'll be bound he'll bring her down to 
the office in a short frock," said Mr. Ras- 
per, " and carry her in on h;s arm." 

In anticipation of which very remark- 
able advent I wil', for a little while, leave 
Mr. Rasper and the office. 

IL 

While his own character was thus suf- 
fering, and while his fellow-clerks were 
thus discussing the chances ot their find- 
ing in him on his return any small re- 
mains of honor and morality, Mr. Bog's 
travels with his bride were drawing near 
to an eaJ. 

The reader would, indeed, have been 
able. to infer this much had we, without 
explanation or comment, merely com- 
menced this closing chapter with the fol- 
lowing letter which Mr. Bog wrote from 
one 01 his resting-places. 

•'M.ydear Mr. Splutter, — I purpose being in 
town again on Tuesday evening nest, but shall 
noti come back to busirese until the begbining oJ 
the following week. Will you oblige me and my 
wife by giving ui« your company on Friday eve- 
ning, and by invitiu<: for me all ray confreres of the 
oflice ior the same evening. I hate tlie ceremony 
of carding, and calling, and eittiog in btate to re- 
ceive visits from old friends, and so does my wife. 
If they will all take it, therefore, in this Informal 
way tnat we shall be gliid to see them,— well, t'lad 
we shall be ; and if they won't, we shail be corry. 
" Friday evening at seven ; for what we will call 
our ^rnall and early'; being, iu fact, for oflice 
people only. Yonrsever. T. F. B." 

This letter, which came on Monday 
morning, was dealt with by Mr. Splutter 
in his usual prompt and business-like way. 
He simply turned up one corner of it, 
wrote on the back of that corner in red 
ink, " I shall go, and hope you all will," 
and sent it out to Jtlr. Rasper to be handed 
round. 

The decision come to unanimously, in 
spite of the sentence ot condemnation 
piisscd on poor Bog, was that they would 
go, all who could, if it were only for the 
sake of haviug an early sight of the bride, 
and giving the bridegroom one chance of 
reinsiating himself in their good graces. 

When the eveniag came, rhorelore, they 
took a couple of cabs, and all went down 
together— Mr Splutter, my lather. Rasper, 
Qibbs. and all the rest of them— they 
haviug agreed on a convenient point of 
meeting before Ihey left the office 

it WHS Mr. Bog hims'jU who received 
his company in his cos}-, well furnished 
drawing-room up «;tairf, ior he was a innn 
of some little meanp, and had everythin;^ 
Very comfottabie about him. 

" Well, Rasper," ho said, af er the first 
hand-shakinL:s, "your constant dropping 
has worn away the stone at last. I could 
not stand it auy longer, you see. Is it to 
be peace between \n now, or war?" 

"I don't ciuiie k-jow," sai.i Raspcr,.;augh- 
ing : " we shall sec." 

" Vou had better not make it war," said 
Mr. Splutter, "for Bog's holiday seems to 
have put Lim iu rare fighting order; bet 
ter say peace." 

Whereupon Bog, in his clumsy way, 
sparred at Rasper on tho hearth-rug, as if 
to demonstrate witi what ease he could 
d tuble him up. 

" I shall think about it," said Rasper ; 
" and, before deciding, yiiould like to see 
the ULuiima causa bdli, if that is what my 
old Latin grammar used to call another 
fair one." 

" Here," siid Mr. Bog, " in good time 
she comas. Friends, allow me. .My wife, 
Mrs. Bog, and her cousin, Miss Wheeler." 
And in came the two ladies as he spoke. 

One was of middle age, or apparently 
somewhat over the middle age, wearing 
spectacles, with a matronly look and a 
good-tempered face that was very pleasant 
to look upon. "The cot^sin," said Mr. 
Rasper, "who comes to keep hou.se till 
the child w if J is of age. Just as 1 thought." 
The other was a merry, laui^hing young 
girl, seemingly of sixteen or soveuteen, 
though possibly she might be younger. 

Rasper shook his head and looked grave 
at sight of her. "Exactly as we pre- 
dicted," he said to his neighbor; "she's 
quite a cLild. Really this is a bad busi- 
ness ; b-.'.t it's always so whpn men put oil" 
too long. Ah, Bog, Bog, She'll be a hand- 
some young widow, my old friend, when 
you and I are gone." 

He went over, revertheleas, and made 
small talk to the young girl by the piano. 
" Been long in England?" he asked htr, 
among other thincs. 

" No," she said ; " only about a month 
before the wedding." 

" Known Mr. Bog before V" Mr. Ra«per 
supposed. 

" No ; she had only seen him for the 
first time when she was up in London with 
her cousin about a fortnight before the 
wedding. Her couiin had known him 
many years." 

" You will find England very different, 
I suppose," went on Mr. Rasper, "from 
Jamaica?" 

"Jamaica?" she said, laughing ; " I dare 
say I should if I had ever been there. I'm 
only from Edinboro'." 

" O, indeed," he replied ; " I beg your 
pardon. Then 1 suppose the late Mr. — " 
" I say. Rasper," called out Mr. Bog from 
the other side of the room, " I want you 
to come and say scmclhing clever to my 
wife." 

"Your wife?" exclaimed the startled 
Rasper, " I thought I was — " 

"Not talking to her>" said Mr. Bog. 
" Don't Fay, now tli*t you thought I hsid 
married little Rosy," and ue went oft" into 
a fit of laughter ot onp dijx»>.>"n- " Rasp- 
er," h^ said, on geuitg ui-» breath again, 
" you reall/ did not think that— O, O, O," 
and then went ofi" into a longer laugh than 
ever, iu which we all joined him. 

"Then what on earth," said Rasper, 
brought to bay, " v.hat on earth was the 
meaning of that newspaper note?" 

"Eii, wiiat? No? Now you really 
don't mean to say you've never guessed 
what that meant? You don't mean_ to 
say that when vou read ' same day at ' so 
and so, you never earned your eye up to 
look what d.ay that was ? " 

" No," said Air. Rasper ; " but what mat- 
ter could that make ? " 
" All the matter," said Mr. Bog. " We 



wes'd nifcrvled 6U iLo tW6Sity.nlath of 
February; that i« my wife's birthday, 
and you know it only comes onco in four 
years." 

"Well, Bog, npon my word I never 
Uioughl of that ; and I have been nursing 
all manner ot wrath a^inst you." 

"Splendid!" said Bog, "splendid! I 
did not think it possible to swindle the 
swindler so completely. The longest life 
I hoped for my joke was a life of about 
five minutes ; and in the hope of that I 
got my friend the editor to print me that 
one copy of the paper with a note special- 
ly intended for you." 

" O ! then Mrs. Bog's age is not pro- 
claimed to all the world," said Rasper. 

" Not exactly," said Bog ; " though for 
that matter she would not in the least have 
cared if it had been." 

" Not at all," said Mrs. Bog ; " I'm 
long past caring who knows how old 
I am." 

That is the story of how Mr. Bog mar- 
ried his wife on her tenth birthday. 

" Really, Rasper," said Mr. Splutter, as 
they walked home together, "that was 
very good indeed tor Bog." 

And Rasper admitted unreservedly 
that it really was very clever, indeed, 
considered as Bog's first. — London Society. 



ConfcrcuH 



and the 
Court. 



tiiapreBae 



clefense 



The running debate in the House on 
Saturday— chiefly between Mr. Boyer and 
Mr. Schenck— respecting the legislative 
trick by which the decision of the Su- 
preme Court in the ^loGardle case is at- 
tempted to be forestalled, chiUenges 
tention. Schenck's jeering 
amounts to nothing; nor does his irank 
confession of the purpose of the trick de- 
serve even the poor credit of boldness 
The purpose is so apparent, that denial 
would have been ridiculous ; and it is not 
boldness but impudence that makes a 
frhamiless avowel of what cannot be con- 
cealed. Mr. Schenck said he had "no 
confidence in the majority of the Supreme 
Court ; " which means that he had no ex- 
pectation that the Supreme Court would 
sustain the Reconstruction lacts. Those 
acts are so clearly, so flagrantly unconsti- 
tutional, that no tribunal at once honest 
an<l independent could fail to declare them 
void ; and this sudden trap has been 
sprung to prevent a decision which 
would foil the designs of the Republican 
party. 

Schenck's attempts to smooth over the 
trick were wholly unsuccessful. The bill 
for giving the Collectors of Internal Rev- 
enue the same rights in the Supreme 
C. urt as the Collector of Customs was 
entirely proper and unobjectionable ; and 
when Mr. Schenck asked for unanimous 
consent to take it from the table and put 
it upon its passage, there was no objection. 
But Schenck knew, and all his accom- 
plices in the trick knew, that no Demo 
cratic member would have consented, if 
he supposed it was designed to tack on an 
amendment for taking the McCardle 
case out ot the Supremo Court. The ap- 
pe.;l to the courtesy of the Democratic 
members was Iraudulent, and the abuse 
of their courtesy alter consent was given, 
disgraceful. It is not correct to siy 
that the tries was of little consequence 
inasmuch as the Republicans have majority 
enough to have passed the amendment in 
any event. They could have passed the 
amendment; but without the unanimous 
consent obtained under false pretences, they 
could not have pa-^std it so soon. In this 
stage oi the controversy time is a vital 
element, as much so as It is in militaiy 
operations when a few hours dillerencein 
the arrival of troops may decide the fate 
of a battle. The McCardle case is already 
in the Supreme Court ; it ha.s already been 
argued ; the Court is deliberating on their 
decision ; and if it should be announced 
before tuis amendment becomes a law, the 
Reconstruction scheme topples to the 
«rnind. A single day may make all the 
diflerence between succesaand total defeat. 
The President is entitled to ten days to 
prepare a veto, and every day which might 
have been added to those teu would have 
increased the peril impending over the 
Republican party. If the Democrats had 
not given their consent to take up the in- 
nocent bill upon which this sinister amend- 
rosnt was so sudden!}' and dishonesty 
clapped, it must have gone over under the 
rules, and the Republicans might have lost 
time enough to insure tue death of their 
policy. The asking for unaiiimous consent 
was as deceptive a trick as was ever prac- 
ticed. The amendment ia entirely f reign 
to the purpose of the original bill. What 
connection has the McCaidle case with suits 
to which Collectors of Internal Revenue 
are parties ? Who could have suspected 
that two subjects so totally unrelattd would 
be jumbled together in the same bill? 
^Vhen unanimous consent to take up the 
bill had been obtained, there was no possi- 
bility of heading ofi' the amendment, a fact 
which would have prevented men of honor 
or fairness from obtaining the consent by 
fraud. 

It remains to be seen whether the Re- 
publican party gains ar.y immediate ad- 
vantage by this dishonest trick. So all de- 
pends now on whether the Supreme Court 
announces its decision be lore the expira- 
tion of the ten days allov.ed the President 
to consider t he bill. We suppose the Court 
will neither hasltn nor delay its judgment 
in consequences of this legislation ; but if 
the bill becomes a law before the judg- 
ment is pronounced, the silence imposed 
upon the Com twill have the usual effect 
ot an adverse det i«ion. Such a bill is a 
confession that the Reconstruction acts are 
unconstitutional, and that the Supreme 
Court, if permitted to decide, would de- 
clare them 90. 

When Mr. Schenck saya he has " no con- 
fidence in the majority of the Supreme 
Court," the country will understand him 
as admitting that the legislation of Con- 
gress is repugnant to the Constitution. 
This implied admission is bottomed upon 
solid reasons. The Reconstruction l!iw 
Bibstitutcs trial by military commissions 
for trial by jury. It rtquires no learning 
in the Supreme Court, but only honesty 
and independence, to adjuge these ir.ili 
tary commissions inconsistent with the 
declaration of the Constitution that "th^ 
trial of aU crimes, except in eases of impeach- 
ment, .SHALL BE BT JURY ;" and inconsistent 
with the further declaration that "tn fdl 
criminal prosorutiona, the accused hhnll en joy 
the rigJU to x spekdy and piiu.ic tuial 
BY -VN IMPARTIAL JURY qftheStrite and dis- 
trict wharein the crime shall have been com 
mined." No honest court can decide that 
these plain declarations of the Constitu- 
tion are not contravened by a law which 
takes away trial by jury in criminal prose- 
cutions. Schenck's want of confidence in 
the Supreme Court is easily accounted for 
on the principle that "no rogue e'er felt 
the halter draw with good opinion of the 
law." The Republics party is a fugitive 
from justice, and, like all fagilivts from 
justice, it has no confidence in courts. 

Schenck said, in his remarks on Satur- 
day, that the Supreme Court has no right 
to decide j)oii<icaZ questions. The question 
whether persons accused of crime are en- 
titled to a trial by jury is not a political 
question, but a question of criminal law. 
What SoheLck probably meant wa°, that 
courts had no right to stand between the 
Government and citizen?, but only to 
decide casts in which the Government has 
no interest. Such a maxim is the very 
essence of tyranny. Even the infamous 
Jell'rie.'^, whose name has so long been the 
synonym of judicial disgrace, was an up- 
right jadge in private controversies. The 
judicial iniquity for which Jeflries is 
•* damned to everlasting fame " consisted 
only in lending himielf to be the tool of 
the Government in prosecutions against 
private eubjicta. The same remark is true 
of all the infamous jadges under the Stuart 
dynasty. 
Tixe most characteristic mark by which 



duspoliam differs from fjc-cdom. is found 
in the relation of the judges to the Gov- 
ernment. Justice between private parties 
is as fairly administered by the judges of 
France under Louis Napoleon, as it is in 
England or America. It is only when the 
Government has an interest that rights 
are insecure in the courts of a despotitm ; i 
and Mr. Schenck's maxim that our courts 
have no right to decide a case against the I 
wishes of the political department of the 
Government, will, if accepted, reduce this 
country to a condition as abject as that of 
England when the infamous Jtflries was 
the abettor.of regal tyranny. The framers 
of our Constitution, with this portion of 
English Ixistory fresh in their minds, in- 
tended to make the judiciary a barrier 
against governmental oppression as well 
as a dispenser of justice in private cases. 
What but jealousy of the Government led 
them to give a life-tenure to the judges 
and to protect their salaries against dimi- 
nution ? And even with these safieguards 
they feared the subserviency of the courts 
to the Government, and guaranteed a trial 
by jury ui all criminal cases. And these 
barriers are all to be swept away, because 
Congress is impatient of any judicial re- 
straint on its absolute will !— iV. T. World, 
lijth. 

The Poison ol* Uattlesnakes. 

Dr. 8. W. Mitchell, of this city, has just 
completed a second carefully conducted 
series of experiments upon the venom of 
the rattlesnake. The principal conclusions 
to which he arrives are as follows: 1. 
There is no antidote to this poison, the 
remedies usually applied being nearly or 
entirely useless. Carbolic acid, applied 
externally, sometimes delays the fatal re- 
sult—merely, however, by affecting the 
local circulation. Used internally, it, as 
well as the sulphites oi liyposulphites of 
soda, so much recommended, have no anti- 
dotal power. 2. The poison is absolutely 
harmless when swallowed. It is even given 
internally to many different animals with- 
out any tflect whatever; while several 
cases are known where scientific (we 
might, perhaps, add foolhardy) men have 
taken it themselves without injury This 
iimocuous result is due to the fact that the 
poison is incapable of passing through the 
mucous surface, as well as that it is so 
altered during digestion as to enter the blood 
as a harmless substance. Applied to the 
rectum of a pigeon or the conjunctiva of 
animals, it had no eflcct. o. The poison is 
not injurious to the rattlesnake it£elf,or to 
any other of its own species. 

This confirms the conclusions of Guyon, 
corroborating also the testimony of Chas. 
Waterton, who made a venomous South 
American serpent bite itself, Aithout inju- 
rious result to it. It is to be regretted that 
Dr. Mitchell pronounces against the value 
ot any internal remedies, after a careful 
discussion of those most generally accepted. 
For the best treatment of a case ot serpent 
poison we must refer to his memoir, mere- 
ly remarking that he attaches considerable 
value to alcoholic stimulants, especially 
where the patient was not intoxicated 
at tho time of being \i\iXQXi..— Philadelphia 
Ltdijer. 



.^lore Abont Alabama ^'otlngf. 



paw 
and 



A correspondent of the New York 
World, who attended the polls in Alabama 
during the voting there, and who has been 
collecting information in regard to the 
manner in which the election was conduct- 
ed in different portions of the State, pre- 
sents the people of the North with this 
pleasant reminiscence : 

" Something like a third of the entire 
vote cast in the State was received on no 
better evidence than affidavits of registry 
in other counties, and, for my own 
part, I saw several administered. This 
was the process. Enter Timbucloo. 

" ' What's your name 5 ' 

" • Pomp.' 

" • Pomp what ? ' 

" ' Pomp Jones, sah.' 

" * Show your ticket,' and a great 
would reach out a ragged sleeve, 
thrust a dirty scrap under the judge's nose. 
No such name as given would be found 
upon the list, and then would come the bal- 
ance of the formula. I quote from the 
printed document: 

•"I. , do Bolemnly swear that I am duly 

reglBt«red ae a quulltied voter in the county of , 

iu tnis State; that 1 now reside iu this county, 
and that I have not voted at this election, 80 help 
me God.' 

" Pomp, or Cuff, or Cudjo would swal- 
low il all, meekly taking off his hat as he 
was bidden, and holding up his hand and 
noJding like a toy mandarin at every 
other word m the oath. In would go his 
vote ; and now take him out and ask him 
what • solemnly ' meant, or ' qualified,' or 
' reside,' and Pomp's big mouth would 
open and his eyes would fctretch, and nine 
times in ten would tell you, * Fore God, 
mas'r, 1 dunno nuffln 'bout all dis yer, but 
dey tole us we mus' come and put de tiiig 
in de box or dey would tine us or put us in 
de jail.' " 

And these aie the kind of people the 
Radicals wish to make the rulers of the 
Southern States ! 



HOllfEi PAKM Anil> i3>ARl»£!«. 

It is said that bees will nr»t build comb 
on a painted surface. 

Thk State Fairs of Ohio and Illinois 
have both been appointed lor September 
21st to 25th. 

Experience is one of the best teachers; 
yet we ought not to allow ourselves to be- 
come its slaves, as is the great tendency of 
farm life. 

Making wagon wheels of thoroughly 
seasoned wood, and soaking the felloes in 
linseed oil, are recommended as the best 
preventives of trouble from loose tires. 

A coRiiEbPOXDEKT of the CountTj Oen- 
/J«?wn urges the establishing of a "Wheat 
Growers' Association," something of the 
plan of Dairj'men's Associations. 

Cream Cake.- Break two eggs in a 
coffee cup and fill the cup with sour 
cream; one cup sugar, one and a half 
cups flour, oneteaspoonful soda, one cream 
tartar; to be baked in layers, whipped 
cream or frosting to be put between each 
layer. 

To Frt CmcKEN's.— Cutup the chickens 
and let them lie in salt and water twenty 
minutes, drain and season with salt and 
pepper ; prepare six eggs well beaten, and 
five crackers, rolled fine, stir well together, 
roll each piece in this, and fry brown in 
hot lard. 

The Rev. W. T. Wylie, of Newcastle, 
Pa., recommends grape culture as an em- I 
plojment suitable and profitable for I 
women. He says that an apt and diligent 
woman could earn ten limes more money 
in a year by raising grapes than by plying 
her needle. 

Asp.vRAGCS, in order to produce large 
shoots, should have plenty of room in the 
bed, the crown of the root be kept six 
inches below the surface in very rich, loose 
soil, and the shoots cut deep in the ground 
when the tops are not more than an inch 
or two above the surface. 

Ventil.vtiox. — Every warm and clear 
day, at this season of the year, should be 
taken advantage of to throw open doors 
and windows, to give thorough ventilation 
to apartments that have been closed almost 
constantly during the long winter m.mths. 
Many houses need ventilation in the spring 
as much as the hold of a ship after a long 
voyage. 

Cement.— Alum and plaster of Paris, 
well mixed with Vi'ater, and used in a 
liquid state, will form a very useful cement. 
It will be found handy in the laboratory 
for many purposes. It forms a very hard 
composition, and for fixing the brasses, «Lc., 
paraffin lamps, niithing could be better. — 
American Farnur. 

To M.MiE Touon Beef Tender.— To 
those who have worn down their teeth 
masticating poor, tough beef, we will say 
that carbonate of sod* will be found a 
remedy for the evil. Cut the steaks the 
day before using into slices about two 
inches thick, rub over them a small ciuan- 
tity of soda, wash the next morning, cut 
into suitable thicknesses, and cook to 
notion. The same process will answer 
for fowls, legs of mutton, etc.—KxcIiavge 

Test your Kerosene. —In view of the 
many lamp explosions resulting almost in- 
variably from the use of bad kerosene we 
urge upon the heads of families the im- 
portance of testing their oil before U£e in 
the lamp. This inay be readily done by 
any man, woman, or child, by means of a 
thermometer, a little warm water and a 
tablespoonful of the oil. Fill the cup 
with warm water, the temperature of 
which is to be brought to 110 dec. Fab. 
Pour the oil on the water ; apply flame to 
the floating oil by match or otherwise. If 
the oil is unsafe it will take fire, and its 
use in the lamp is dangerous, /(>r it isluib'e 
to expliyde. But if the oil is safe and good 
it will not takci fire. All persons who sell 
kerosene that will not stand the fire test at 
110 degrees are liable to prosecution. — 
Scientific American. 



before he will again turn his attention o 
scientific researches in the pulverization oi 
powder. 



THE MARKETS. 



1888. 
f .45 

11.10 




Nbw Toas, March 23, 

COrrON— Middling J .24^© 

FLOUK— Extra Western. 9.60 & 

WUEAT— Spring 1(0. 9 4 30 O 

KYU-WeJlern l.W ® 

CORN— New Western Mixed.... 1.2-3 ^ 

OATS -New Weatem : . .h-iii 

B.VULKY— Western »-30 

POKK-Mess »3 5l) 

LARU— Good to Pilm« i^h^ 

GOU)--1.3S-v,. 

CsiOAaO, March 33, 19bS. 

BEBVSS— Fair Grades $600 0$~ 

HOGS-Live 6.00 

Dressed 9.60 

BUTTBK— Choice 40 

KGQS— Fresh 22 «» 

FLOUK- White Winter 1000 a 

Spring Extra 625 O 

QKAIN— Com-5s'ew 82^4® 

Barley-No. i »45 ^ 

Oats— No. 1 6754© 

Hye-No.l 1.60 O 

Wheat-Spring, No. 1. 2.00 & 

" » No. a. i.siwa 

LARD 154 

rOlUt-Mess 33 60 



O 



.00 

8.85 
10.00 

.43 

.23 
13.6U 
lO.OO 
.825i 

2.4U 

1.66 

1.92 

.1« 

34.IX) 



CxKonniAn, March 23, 1868. 

FLOUK-Famlly 110.75 ft $11.00 

WUKAT— Red Winter 2.46 O S.BO 

CORN— New Bar 86 O 

OATS— No. 1 70 O 

KYB-No 1 1.75 & 1.73 

BARLBY-Fall i 2.70 ® 2.75 

POHii-Mess 2400 © 84.t0 

l.ARIi .15 O .16X 

8t. Louis, March 23, 1868. 

FLOUR— XX $10 00 ©$11.50 

WHKAT— Winter ».60 © 2.70 

CORN— Shelled 87 © .80 

OATS 71 «t .75 

RYB 1.65 O 1.70 

BARl.BY-SpriDg 2.85 & 

POKK— Mess 2400 © 24.60 

LMiD 15 & .15^ 

MiLWAnsx, March 23. 1R88. 

FLOUR- Spring Extra $8.75 0$ 9.75 

WHEAT— Spring l.!>7 & 1.94 

CORN— Now 64 © 

OATS-No.2. 59 @ .60 

KY'B-No.l 1.68 & 1.69 

BARLEY 9.40 © 

CLxrtujro, March 23, 1868. 

FLOUR-XX Spring $10.00 & $n.2ft 

WHEAT— No 1, Spring 2.30 & 

CORN— No I, Shelled 1 CO & 

OATS— No 1 70 & 

BARLEY— Nol 2.50 © 2.00 

RYB— No. 1 1.66 a 1.60 



It Is Amazinflc 

That the feeblest should totter, with uncertain 
steps, over the face of the earth, in danger every 
day of falling Tictlms to the morb'.d inflaencea hj 
which we are all surronnded, when a tested and 
proven vegetable tonic, capable of endowiiig them 
with the vigor they need, is procarable in every 
city, town and settlement. It might reasonably 
be thought that after the twelve years' experience 
which the world hns had of nOSTETTBR'S BIT- 
TERS, ILL wonld know that its effect Is to pre- 
vent disease. 

At this season the atmosphere is surcharged 
with the seed* of Intermittents, remittents, rhue- 
matism, pulmonary disorders, bilious complaintB 
and the like. Persons whose nervous systems are 
relaxed aic the first to succumb to these distem- 
pers. Brace up tho physical energies then with 
this potential vegetable tonic. It is the moe* 
powerful recnperant which the botanic kingdom 
has ever yielded to patient research and experi- 
ment. Tur IT. The blindest disciple of tho old 
medical dogmas will at leaat admit that a tonic 
and alterative, compounded of approved hert>e, 
roots and barks can do no harm, while the testi- 
mony of thousands Invites a trial of ita virtuea. 

Vigor is the thing most needed in these cases as 
well a!» in dvcpeptia and nervous affections, and 
HOSTETTER'S BITTERS is the safest, surest and 
mo»t wholesome strengthening preparation that 
human c kill has yet concocted. 

Hundreds of physicians have abandoned all 
the officiual receipt and prescribed this harmless 
tonic as a preventive and cure for all cases ol 
CWlls and Fevers. 



Time tor ^Tlllklns Cowm. 



TO coNKuraprivBs. 

The Bev. KDWAim A. WILSON will sead (free of 
charse) to all who desire it, tlie pregcrlptlon with lUe 
directions lor makliis and using the simple remedy by 
wSlch Ue was cured of a lung affection and that dread 
dlgiase, Consurajition, His ouly oblect Is to benefit the 
Bifllcted, and he hopes every gr.ffexer will try bis pre- 
scription, as It Mrill co(>t them nothing, and may prove a 
hiesslng. Please addresa R«v. KUWAliD A. WtLSON. 
No. 160 South i'jcond street. Williaii.8burgb,Kew Yorlr . 



INFORMATION. 

Infbrmallon guaranteed to produce a InxurlaLt 
growth of hair npon a bald bead or beardless Uice, aiso 
a recipe lor the removal of Pimpleg, Blotches, Ernp- 



tlous, etc., on the skin, leaving the same soft, clear and 
beantiral. can he otitKlned wTthont charge by i " " 
Itijr rUOS. K. CHAPMAN. CaxMieT. 833 Broad w 



Ag^c oi'Aniiuala. 

The average of ca»s ia 15 years ; squir- 
rels and bares, 7 to 8 years ; a bear rarely 
exceeds 20 years ; a dog lives 20 years ; a 
wolf 20 ; a fox 14 to 16 ; lions are long-lived 
the one known by the name of Pompcy 
lived to the age of 70 ; elephants have been 
known, it is asserted, to live to the great 
age of 400 years. When Alexander the 
Great had conquered Poius, kingof India, 
he took a great elephant and named him 
Ajax, dedicated him to the sun, and let 
him go with the inscription : "Alexander, 
the son of Jupiter, dedicated Ajax to the 
sun." The elephant was lound with this 
inscription 3j0 years after. Pigs have 
been known to live to the age of 20, aud 
the rhinosceros to 20; a horse has been 
known to live to the age of 63, but aver- 
age 25 to 30 ; camels sometimes live to the 
age of 100; stags are very long-lived; 
sheep seldom exceed the age of ten ; cows 
live about 15 years. Cuvier considers it 
probable that whales sometimes live 1,000 
years ; the dolphin and porpoise attain the 
age of 30 ; an eagle died at Vienna at the 
age of 104 ; ravens frequently reach the 
age of 100; swans have been known to 
live SfO years. Mr. Marlerton has the 
skeleton ol a swan that attained the age of 
200 years. Pelicans are long-lived ; a tor- 
toise has been known to live 107 years. 
» ■ » 

Not Profane.— "Just what a tinker's 
dam is I have no means of knowing ; but 
I believe it to be something very worth- 
less indeed," says Mr. Thom. White, in his 
" Little Sermon," in Putnam's tor March. 
Mr. 'Thorn. White's ignorance can, per- 
haps, be enlightened, and his belief shown 
to be sound. The tinkers used to tramp 
about England mending pots and kettles. 
They masticated and moistened a morsel of 
bread, and used it as a dam aroimd the 
hole to be repaired to prevent the solder 
from running rff. After being thus em- 
ployed what value remained in the " dam ?" 
Can anything be imagined more worth- 
less? Ilence the proverb. If this expla- 
nation, definition, or conjecture be not sat- 
isfactory, let somebody favor an inquiring 
world with a better. — Boston Transcript. 

— A Southern clergyman who officiated 
at a Cincinnati church two Sundays ago, 
stopped in the middle of a long and tedious 
discourse, and raiaed hia hands as if to 
pronounce the benediction, to which the 
congregation responded by rising, kneel- 
ing, &c. But the motion was made only 
to adjust his surplice, which beisg done 
he resumed his discourse, aud the congre- 
gation, with a general giggle, resumed its 
position for listening. 

—A young man, discharged from the 
Ohio Penitentiary, went to a book-store 
and bought a Bible and hymn book. 



Thp question, " How ofcen shall cows be 
milk'd, daily?" has been agitated from 
time to time, from the fact that when calves 
are running with their dims, the times 
of milking are more frequent than under 
the common, artificial system, which is 
twice a day, ordinarily, while it may be 
four or five times a day when the cows are 
sucked by their progeny, and of'enor, evtn, 
when there i.s a shortness of supply, as iu 
poor milkers. 

Cows, il is said, by an English writer, in 
a luxuriant pasture, where they can soon 
till their bellies, invariably feed four times 
a day, first, early in the morning, again 
before noon, iu the afternoon, and late in 
the evening, and the calves suck on these 
several occasions, on the cows risini? from 
rumination, to replenish their cxliausted 
stomachs. This order will vaiy in less 
luxurious pastures. 

The writer referred to gives the follow- 
ing in regard to artificial management : 1st, 
when coVs and calves are separated and 
brought together morning and evoning ; 
2 J, when separated as above and bioughl 
together morning, noon, and evening ; 3d, 
when cows are milked twice by hand, 
morning and evening ; 4th, when milked 
three times a day, morning, noon and 
evening; 5th, four times a daj', making 
seven hours between the night and morn- 
ing milking, or a little more, and about 
five hours and a half between the others. 
Of the first four times of milking, our 
author says he has had varied experience. 
The writer wished it borne in mind that 
his observation was conliutd to cows 
highly led, his query be Int? whether cnws 
thus treated are more liable to grow fat 
and dry up, v/heii milked only twice, than 
il milked thice times a day? According 
to his experience, there are 14 hours be- 
tween evening and moriiiug with but 
two milkings, and 10 between morning 
and evening; in summer, I'o and 11 hours 
between milkings. 

In further discussing this suljec's he 
says, it should be borne in mind, that the 
manufacturing of meat, as it were, and of 
milk, arc continuously going on in tlie 
healthy cow, so that it does not retiuire 
much force to turn the balance either way. 
especially when there is a tendency to the 
secretion of fat ; in such cases it must be 
adverse to the secretion of milk. Ilence, 
with healthful cows, with proper and high 
feed, three miikings a day are better than 
two, provided milk ii desired, in its brgest 
quantity. 

The present system of milking but twice 
a day took its rise when cows were less 
highly fed than now, and gave much less 
milk per day ; hence, its inapplicability to 
deep milkers of the present day. Four 
times a day is better, even, than three, 
when cows are kept on luxuriant feed, as 
intimated above, when milking should cor- 
respond with "the periods of healthy 
rumination, digestion, secretion of milk 
and rest." What objection can be raised 
with regard to dairies kept for their milk, 
called in England, "Commercial Dairies," 
to milking three, or even four times a day, 
when cows are kept and fed especially for 
their milk, whether fbr the supply ot the 
milk market, or for making butter and 
cheese, either or both?— the cow in such 
cases being regarded as a milk making ma- 
chine, whose use ia to convert forage into 
good milk. — Boston Cultivator. 

—A shrewd man in West Penn Town- 
ship, Pa., the other day, undertook to 
grind some coarse blasting powder in hia 
coffee-mill. He had not made many revo- 
lutions ot the crank before there was a 
noise heard, and the room was filled with 
flying fragments of ccflee-mill, window 
glass, furniture, crockery ware and Dutch- 
man. The ingenious experimenter was 
not killed, but he was badly burned, and 



STIiflPSON'S SCIICNTIFIC PKN. 




1 'lor.. PersfasPorted point.';), anu niK retaining Hold- 
er mailed preiiaul, on receipt of 50 C' nla. 

A. S. BaHNKS * CO., New York. 

8AVE MONEY AND TIME 

By uslns tie nien^vKi) SiLVRU'o PATENT BROOM. 
A''!4i)ted to clly or couiary him* w rrHntea ihp CHhAP- 
>bT, HEST, aud MOSf BEACTIKCL BROOM In 
Amerioa. It is so sixfLi tu*t a cuii-d o*n put rr 
TOO mi KB, and the brush is su 
elastic thai it wears twice as 
loui;u8the old fasliioned ttod 
bro ims. sweeps with half the 
eflort, and di.es not wear the 
carpet oni'-lourth as faal, thus 
^AVI^•o Mosay and tuhk. 

Hon. Horace Gret-ley says : 
" I predict IW 8ui'ro>8." The 
Ainerlciiu Agrlculturi.st says : 
"Thuy are adopted as a fami- 
ly liiRtitution." The An.8ricaii 

Insiliute Karmrra' Club says: 

A'^MBKSBSK^^k. " ^^''^'' Oliver's Patent, a child 
/BSSmSSsB^^/f '^i' years old c»n make it 
^ '"tgiUtiaaK^^^' ,„.w broom in ten minutes." 
The Patent Kraw Metallc part*, which last a lifetime, 
sent ( wiiere we have no AgenU). with full InstructlonB 
forp'ittln;;tOKetbor, by mall, pre-paid for »1..3. or the 
agent's complete outfit, by express, tor ».'. An Azent 
wanted in evnry county. Last year 850 aBt^Jf„yfere 
Fcllmi it. making »5 to»,5 per day. At onr KEDLCtD 
rillCKS. e\ery xgentean doasweUibisypjir. 

For full particular* send for our pew illustrated cir- 
culars, n*mine the first, second and tuird cbolM of 
counties, to C. CLEGO A CO.. 207 1; ultou street, (P. O. 
Box D9S5) Kew York^ 

[iimis & [inn uids. 




The Illinoll C^'ntral Railroad Compar 



any h^ve for sale 
In tracts of 40 acres and upwards, "50.10'. acre* of choice 
funiiluK and fruit lar.de. nil lying adj»cent to their road. 
For crain-erowlnp. Htock-r»l*ilnE, aud every purpose of 
pro'itible HSriculture. these lanus possess ev»»ry re- 
quisite 01 soil and climate. 

FRi;iT REGIO^r 



THE 



of Southern Illinois Is noted for Its wonderful rertllity 
In the profloiUon of apples, peara. peaches, asd all 
kinds 01 fruit». Durlnc tbe sfeason ollS'^i. the ap«cial 
Fruit Kipreca Train broueht over 600.000 boxes pj 



ppaohe^ and .*,0.000 bu«hels of strawtwrrles to Chlcaeo 
alone, from thenc.i furnishing the fli^jt Jriilta of the 
season v> all the norlhern m»rketB. 3X),000 acres of 
thi«se fruit lands are how offered for sale on favor- 
able terms. 

Title in Fee from the State. 

fW All station aj^cnts are provided with plata, ahoti- 
Ids; the lands for sale in their vicinity. 

Inlormailon Riven upon all points at the omce of the 
Land Department, r.8 Michlean Avenue, Chicago, or r 



for 



de8(>rlptive pamplilet, with maps showing the exact lo 
callly of nil the lands, sent to any person writing 
the saaie, in aay luaguage, to 

JOHN B. CALHOUN, 

Land CommlBaioner, Chicago. 




"Water Proof Eooflng, 



BILTIK* » UAMMMm rAPBB, 

■Md SUmy hr Cimlu amA SkBfU *t 
U« Pa par. 

C. J. FAT A CO., 

I U * TlM SIS., Caodsa, V. i t m^ 



Important Atuaoniiceinent 1 

A Beautimi, liluttrated Bocl:, worth a Thousand 
dollars, sent free to tny address ou receipt of 25 cents, 
by aidr«'8sing Profesaor JOHN VANDKRfOOL, Ko. 
Z(S Winihrop Place, Kcw York City. 



WEBSTER'S PLA.N8 FOR LAYING 
Out and Beaa'lfylng Gardens and General 
Cntaloiue^of Sliruh*, Rjses, OrnamenUl Plants, and 
Seeds, for the spring ol 186R. is now ready for mailing 
to customers frte. audio all others on receipt ot ten 
cents. Address WM. WEBSTEB, 149 State St., Rocii- 
ester . K. y. 

Greenwood's 

Machinery, forjrigfct 



PARREL MACHINERY 

i-> Patent Stave and Heading M 



and black Work. O 
Wheels. !or GummiuK i 
eREENWOOD, Uoche 
KocUeater, N. T, 



L. Benlou's Patent Couvex EniOTV 
JOHJi 



and Siiarpenine Saws, 
eater Barrel liacUlne Works 



HORSE - OWNER'S FRIEND; OR 
Help In Time of Need : a complete irork of 3W 
paKes, on the Horse, Disease* and Cure, mallad to any 
ftddr^. post-paid, on receipt of price. Bound 
cloth. 15 cents ; paper, 50 cents. Agenta wantM. 

Ann Arbor, Mlekl^aa 



In 



1>JEW 

X^ ease 



MEDICAL BOOK ON DI8- 

... . eases of imprudence, and their mnm xnaBiH. 
■worth a tonmey to New York on foot to obUln. Bend 
tree uLder seJ by Inclosins a postage stamp to Db- 
tAWKKN'CK. Rl K»«t T enth stiwit. N»w YnrV. 

l?OR SALE, CHEAP— One Lamb Knit- 

i^ tine Machine, entirely new. price 170- tor »•!• for 
»55 ; oife GroT^r & B«ker Sewing Machine, nerer UMd, 
rice fOS— will be sold for »56 ; oue Grover t, Baker 



, ILuTii'S^aclVlnV, neVw' used, pnce t62— for ISO. Ad 

we have no doubt that some tune will elapse dreM L m. KXilotiQ, loi waa^d&gtou at., cbie»a(» 







INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPQSURE 




I 
( 















• 








- 












1 

• 




■ 





[ 



mam' 



•yi^ 






K'liu ■- 



. ' - ^i 



• 1 



« » 



-^ ■■■ m^^^ ^.i— lyi 




C THE SUREST REMEDY 

For Coughs, Colds, St-rofala, Cocsnmptlo*. 
Bheumatlsm, General DcMUty 4e. 

ColMvtT OH. T»h(>n perfectly rnro. U of SQch vaJuo 
»s a mriiUve iutcut In tlio tnatiiient of SchofuLa 
[.JiAciATKiN, KcofcciiiTis UKUKaAt Dkbilitt nuJ 
iTUto.VAhY A^-PBCTioN-p, na to imdcr oil couiiDcnla 
niUMWKwar)"- Tte great HCKrtorlty of our l.nunl ,.f 
t»ll, conbLsto In Its U^lnji pn-partnl wiu» conw-l.niious 
care, from TiciB Cod Livb;s<, In o mmincr tli^it d.^ 

krtvcs tho oil from all Impurldt-p, aiul the UTii.li-i»ti:uit 
ttvortwiuUly exl5tln;.Mn alloUior Irandij. U Is ^ijwiivs 
fAHTBi.KH>. and cjui be tAkru l,y Uio yonngc^t cI.ll'iL 
elthfr OA a nutrluient or iiifMllcltie. IjrvALina ami tie- 
bllltaU\l ncrb..ns, to lf^om thlrt oil Js unkDovm, will 
nr.il i^n-al \\nuo In tt« tw«. PhtsicIjins aiiJ tlielr 
ixitlonta can rely npon UUe oU as belus CjuoucjlU,* 
t uid M KniciNALLY pure 

IWtVjM In CnicAOO. by nil Dbcooistb and by 
dtialcrs \a Medicine everywhere 

• JOHN C. BAKER & GO'S 

CITRATE MAGNESIA 

I.U.r^wh'rv.^'^" ''^•'^"»c»"-. *'^1 th.th.aciu'u, . , U.e 




^ilV'^i^I' ^'■'"••' "■■' «'rf'»i»>i«'*'-lo guaranteed to h.- i.crm.i- 
Uruaii Jts ''"'^'^ 'iUl'pUv;J ffuui LUlcai;o by all ft 'uuksak- 

JOHN C. BAKEH & CO., 

PROPRIETOne, 

718 Market Stkbkt, ruiLADKLruiA. 

NOTICK OF MORTGAGE SALE. 

Names of MoRTCAcaRK — Jumea Epan, and 
Mary hgxia, Lis wife, of Sibicy Coaaty, 
Minnesota. 

Namr of Mobtgaorb— Mathia3 Marty, then 
of Monroe, WitJCDosin. 

Datk of MaBTUAGR — May 30Ui, A. D. 1863 

Baid Mobtoaok waj recorded in the olfit-e 
of the llcgwter of Deeds of Scott 
4Joanty, ut tioveu o'clock in the fore- 
noon of the 4th day of Juria, in the 
year 1863, io Book "'£" of Mort^'ages, 
page 115. 

Tas DsaoRipnoN of the naortpairRd promis- 
es is the Sonth Half of the Southwest 
Qaartf;r of Section Ten, and the Sooth 
Wottt Quarter of the Sooth Kaat Quar- 
ter of Suction Ten, all in Townabip One 
Hundred acd Fourteen, of Uango 
Twenty-one, contaiuiog one hundred 
and twenty acres, situato lying and be- 
ing in the County of Scott ulorudaid. 

Sato Mostuaoe was made to aecure the 
paymeut of the sum of Eighty Dollars, 
witb iuteriist at the rate of tvielve p'r 
cent, por annum, payable in one year 
from date, according to the promissory 
note of the said Janies Egan, payable 
to the said Mathios Marty, and bearing 
even date with &iid Morigage. 

No Action or proceedings have been insti- 
tuted at law, or otherwise, to lecover 
tbtj sum securt.'d by said mcrtgagc or 
any part thereof. 

Tut: Amol-nt claimed to bo due on said nolo 
ot the date of this notice is the sum of 
One Hundred and Six Dollars and Forty 
Ceut<5, togethor with the sum of Ten 
Dollars solicitor's fee secured to be 
paid by said mortgage. 

Now TiiF.KKFOBB, notice is hereby given, 
that by virtue of a power of sale con- 
tained in said mortgu^ qi d recorded 
therewith and of the provisions of the 
Statute in such case made and provi- 
ded, the said mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of said mortgaged 
premises to be made by the Sheritf ol 
Bttid County of Scott, ut public vendue 
ut the front door of Uia Court House 
io Shakopec in said County of Scoit. 
State of Aiinnesota, at ten o'clock in 
tho forenoon of the ISrii day of April, 
in the year 1 USS, and the i)roceeds o f 
eoch sale will be applied to tlie payment 
of the sum then due on said note and 
mortgage, and the conts and charj^es of 
foreclosarii and said sum of ten dullars 
solicitor's fee^t provided by Baid raort- 
giige to bo paid out of the proceeds of 
each sale. 

Dated March 2d 1853. 

MA Tin AS MARTY, 
IlilNRY riwDo, Mortgagoo. 

Attorney for Mortgngeo. 
- JACOB THOMAS, 
n7.7t Sheriff of Scott County, Mian. 



'mm km tomTi. 



SIIAKOPKE, MAH/JH 20, 186«. 



Shalcoi>ec 

Haj — per ton, 
Pork — per hundred, 
Wheat — por bushel, 
Corn — •* " 
Wood — dry, por oo';!^. 
Lime— per barrel/ 



f.larket. 



$6.00 to ^«.00 

6.00 to 8 00 

1.40 to 1.45 

•»;> to 1.00 

• 3.00 to 3.50 

1.00 



TAX rVOTlCE. 

Notice^ is hereby given that all Personal 

P.oixrty Ti.x Is itilnlnHl by law to bo paid Intoth" 
I'oniiiy Tie;v-iiry on „r bffure the Klr»t "lar of .March 
Alter the Ttiit;i dHy of Ainll. 1 ^llaI| j)r.K:n-.l to collect 
Bll I'wTsMial Proport.v Tax then remalidnjj unpaid. by 
levy una sale of iMt8(.rial prtpoly. Ai> tQih procepd- 
liiss w.)uM creHte a to«.l deal of coeu. 1 hopo peraoual 
Uxos will be pal.l U-fore the lUtu of April 
Dated March J9lh, lo4,d. 

JOHN EDERT. Conn«y Tnaenrtr. 



— Filly-two leading business men iu St, 
Peter have resolved to cot their business 
connections in future with St. Paul, owing 
to the iuterference of the Chamber of Cum 
merce of that city, in the railroad iutervsta 
of St. Peter. 



^S' Ou Friday nighl last a steam grist 
mill at IlendersuQ was destroyed by fire. — 
Loss about $20,000; insured for $10,000. 



Proposals for Boarding the County 
Paupers. 

Pursuant to a resolution of the Boanl of 

County ConimUsloBereol Snjtt Ct-utity, p.wi-.l „i ih«ir 
Sli.-c'.ai S.sKion on .March 12lh. isr^s. Sealed PropowiU. 
will Ik- r.clved at the Oflice of tlie County Auditor, up 
to Five oMock In the aflerniM-ii of the l\tk day qf April, 
ISC'*, for taklr.R care of and boarding the conntv pan- 
pirs, and wahhinu and nieudliiK for them during the 
year. cotnni.ncInK on the 17tli day of April. It>«a. 

The coiitraetor will have the use of the bwldlng and 
uterslls belontflnjr t.j the Coanly. and now Itj the Poor 
Hou.se. but no new be.ldlug or hottsehold g(<odB Will 
be ftirulslied by the County. Kach bid must t.Ute the 
prtco per wi«k for each adnti pauper, and tbo price 
pur week for each child under ten years ofaRe. Xhe 
Coninilsaloners retervo tho right to accept a bid for 
either of thtae clarisea of paupero, and reject his bid 
for the other, provided hU bid U lowest forouecUiai 
and not for the other. Tho board tawt It, with good 
and healthy food, and uo extra charge allowed for core 
Iu caae of sicknetis. 
D-lud ilafvh IBtU, Ic«8. 

M. OESS DONAND, 

County Auditor. 

4^" A Democialic Town Caucn.<i of 
Shttkopee will be held at the Court JEirnise 
ou S;aurday eveiiiiig, at 7 o'clock, to nonii- 
uale Town officers. Let the nuterrified 
attend and malie good uouiiualiona. 



Farm for Sale. 

RODERICK O'DOVYlT^iilsell bis Farm 

at a barcatn. The farm Is fonrmlleg .«onth of Shtko- 
P'P. on the SprlnK Lake Roail ; contulMieo acres; 20 
acres nmler cultivation, 30 acre* of good meadow ; 80 
acres of tlmN-r; 4S acn-a fenced ; roo<1 water, jrtM>d loe 
hoDSc, and cattle shed.s. Will m-U In parcuU to anlt tl e 
buyer,— part caah, and balunr« on time. ii9 3iu 

FOE BALE, 

By WILLIAM HAMILTON, 

A SPLENDID 

Young Stallion, 

Five yiarsolti. color dapob' t>.ty, weltfht 12 hotidnrt Bw. 
.■^lre,l bj •' YOUNO OIUtBKT" from French Can«dljin 
Mure. Is well broke, km I and K^ntle, and . f a good 
ijirlua'-, imd will 'w nokl at u Imrsaln. Cnn be he. n at 
lib furui In y.uHle Cre«k, tbroo ailled from Bhafeoptt. 



HOOFUND'S 




BITTERS 



HOOFLAND'S GERMAN BITTERS, 



AND 



{gT" A lot of fine Seed Oats for sale by 
W. G. Briggs. 

Jl^We have printed a supply of blank 
Town Oi-ders, which Town Clerks ot the 
dill'erent towns can procure by making ap- 
plication at the Argus office. 

^3^- The Democrats of Eagle Creek have 
made the following Dominations lor town 
officers: Supervisors— P. Condon, Chair- 
man, It. G- Murphy, M. Dean ; Town Clerk, 
L. D. Dent ; Justices of the Peace, N. M. 
D. McMullen and David Kinghoru; for 
Treasurer, F. Stemaier j Assessor, L. D. 
Dent. 



BSfTho school Meeting of the East 
Shakopce School District will bo held at 
the School IIouso on Saturday evening, at 
7 o'clock. It is hoped there will be a gen • 
eral attendance. 



NOTICE OF EXECUTION SALE. 

Notice is hereby given, that on the 8th 
day of February, A. D. 1SG8, I levied upon 
the following described real estate, lying and 
being in the Coanty of Scoit, State of Min- 
nesota, as the property of Jauies Armstrong, 
under and by virtue of an execution i.ssucd 
out of and uadet the seal of the Supreme 
CJonrt, of the State of Minnesota, bearing 
date on the 28th day of January, A. I). 1808, 
to the ShcriO" of tho Couuty of Scott afore- 
said, directed and ddivcred on the Sth day 
of FcSruary, A. D. 1^68 ; which saiil exe- 
cution wosissacd npon a judgment rendered 
In said Supreme Court of the State of Min- 
uosota. On the Elevcotli day of October, in 
the year 186.T, in an action therein pending 
between James Armstrong, respondent and 
Henry Iliud.s, appellant, in favor of said 
JippoUant .ind against s-ud rospoudeot, for 
the sum of Thirty :one dollars and eighty-five 
cents; which said judgment was docketed 
with tho (Jierk of the District Court of the 
Fifth Judicial District, iu and for tho Couu- 
ty of Scott aforesaid, on the 27th day o 
January, in the year lb6G, by which ouid 
esecatioD tho Sheriff of said County ot 
Scott ia comiaanded to satisfy the said 
jadgment with interest and cotsts out of the 
personal property of tho said judgment 
debtor not exempt from execution within 
the said County of SiJOtt,"or if eofficient 
persooal property could not be found, then 
out of the real property not exempt from 
execQtioD in said Oonoty of Scott, belong- 
ing to too s.'iid jodgtaent debtor on the day 
when the said judgment was so docketed as 
aforesaid in the said County oi Scott, or at 
any time thereafter; 

Now, therefoce, further notice is hereby 
Riven, that under and by virtue of said o.xe- 
oQtiaa. I, Jacob Thomas, Sheriff of said 
Oounty of Scott, at 10 o clock in the fore- 
noon of the 2Bth day op Marcu, iu the year 
1868, at the front door of the Court House, 
at Shakopce, iu said County of Scott, will 
Boll to the highest bidder, the real estate so 
levied on under au<l by virtue of of said 
execution, which is de.scribcd as follows, to 
wit : Lot Four in Block Twenty-five in 
the plat of Shakopce City, on file in the 
office of the liigistcrof Deeds of said Coun- 
ty of Scott, to satisfy tho sura then duo on 
t»aid judginent and execution, with costs. 
Dated, February 1 Ith, 1868. 

JACOB THOMAS. 
Sheriff of Scott Couuty, Minn. 
riE.vRr Hi.vnfl, 

Attorney for Appellant in person. 



It VANLsnETU Away. — Do our readers 
all understaud that tho genuine Ch<mical 
Saleratus, made by D. B. De Lund & Co., 
i.s never eaten ? Iu tho process of baking 
it all evaporates, leaving the bnad liglit 
and puro. It has been imitated but the 
counterfeit ia not ea.sily di-sposod of. Use 
it instead of Soda. It weighs 16 oonces to 
tt»e paper; others weigh 14 ounces. For 
sale by D. M. Storer. 

^^3- Tho annual School meetings are to 
be bold on Saturday, the 28:h iust. 

J!SS^ The ferry at Shakopce is rauoing, 
and has been for aboot a week. 




Dentistry. 

oi}. p. 4. mm 

Will return from New York, and com- 
mence bnslni'i>.<! Id Shokopee tho tulddlu of Jauoar'-, 
IseS. Any In nepil of 

FIRST-CLAIMS WORK, 

cat) bo supplied wltnoutgolngtoSt. Pnal, and at more 
eabouuble rates. uSl^Smo 








THE B B O A D GAUGE— DOUBLE 
TRACK ROUTE TO 

And IVcw England Cities. 



Tins BAFLWAT KXTK.ND.-* FROM 

Dunkirk to New York 460 Miles, 

Buffalo to New York 423 Miles, 
Salamanca to New York 415 -Miles. 

AKI) Id PROM 

J^ 22 to 27 Miles the Shortest Route- 



AU Ihilnt rtm Oirretlv thrttuffh Iu AV«. rnrk, 

.^^360 Miles without change of Couches. 



B©k-On Tuesday evening occurred the 
firdt thunder storm of the season. There 
was but little rain, but the di.-<play of light- 
Ling was brilliant. This ii rather earlier 
than we Mre accustomed to Lm'o thunder 
bhowors. 



lS6.^The Minnesota River ia entirely 

free from ice, but the first boot baa uot 

made its appearance yet. 
» • « 

jST" The Pioneer has information from 

E. F. Drake, President of the Valley Rail- 

road, that he has .sccnred iron enough to 

lay the track to St. Peter, and that it will 

be sent forward without delay. 



Wild geese and ducks have made 
their appearance iu large numbers in cur 
numerous lakes. Our sporteainen are shoot- 
ing the ducks with great success, but they 
find it more difficult to get a :;ood shot at 
iho geese. Notice is hereby given that we 
prefer canvass-back ducks. 

B^ Tho bright sun and warm winds of 
this week have entirely dried up our streets 
and walks, and swept away tho snow ex- 
cept where there were large driAa. 

iS^* A barge loaded with wood passed 
dowu tho river on Tuesday to the St. Paul 

market. 



From and aftor NoveuiiKir 25lh. Icifi7, Trains will leav. 
Iu connection with all We.sieru lines, lu IolKlw^ : 

From Dunkirk anw Salamanca — By New 

York 'J'ime from Union Depots: 
7:30 A. M. Exprkbs Mail, from Dunkirk, 

(Sundays ejtc-ptoil). Stops at Sulunianca in wj a' 
U. and couneith at IlorncllavlHi- ami Coriiliij. 
With tho »M A. M. Kxpre(i» Mall from Builulo 
aud urrlveb In New Vurk utT.ui A. M. 

2:35 P. M. LiouTNiNo Kxprk-ss, from 

;JaUinanca. (5oi)dui8 t:;ocp<»'d). t^L.p.s ut llnr- 
ne!Uvlllo3:25 I'. .>l., (.»np.) iMt-rseetlnt; w'tlitlK 
2Ja)l'. M. l'raliitr>iii Uuilalo, and arrl. es In New 
\orkat7.0rt A. .>l. 

4:15 P. M. Nkw York Nioiit Express, 

fi-Oin Dunkirk, (cuudays excepted). Blopg al 
balaniaiiea « 40 P. W.; OLun, 7:Z', V. il^ (Sui>.) 
Turner's »:V. A. M. (U'kft.).an.l arrlve.s in Nt » 
York ut li:*) P. >!.. ct.nn.-vlliu.' with Aft.riiooi, 
Trains and bleaiuerK for Iluoiou and New Knij- 
land Cities. 

9:50 P. M, < "iNOLVATTl E.xprrrs from Dun- 
kirk, (Snndays excepio.1;. Stnp.< at Salomanra 
11.55 P. M., and connects al (lornellavUle with 

NcVYort 3;« r.M:'"' '""" ^"''^"' *"''"^ '" 



From Bcpy.ao— By New York time from 

Depot corner ExctiMijte and Michigan .streets : 

5:45 A. M. Nkw York Day Exprks.*), 

(Bnndays excoptcKl). stof.s at Uorneiuville k.imi 
A. n, (Bkfl.). t)ni<in*huna» 2.17 p.m. (Dtne) • 
Turner's 7JS6 p. m. (Sup.;, and arrlvB Ui Ke» 
Jork 10 JO p. m. Corineci» at (Jreat liend with 
Doluwarc. Lackawanna & W.riern Kallroa I arol 
at Jersey City with .MMdIkM Kxpre^.s Tr«lii ..I 
New Jersey Railroad for Phlla<U.lphla, Baltluior. 
aad Wa6htnt;ton. 

3:00 A. M. ExPRR8.s Mail, via Avon and 

nomolUvUIe. (.'Ju.i.layH c«ceptud.) Arrlvee In 
Sic w York at '.- u a. m. 

2:29 P. M, Lkjittnlvo Exprkwi, (Sundays 

excepted.) f tups ot Il«meli«viUe.'..2a p.m.. gap. 
and arrlrcslii N. w York 7.0il a. tii. (Tonnects al 
Klt.ilr* with Northern Central Hallway for llar- 
rteburrr. I'MlaU Iphlaand the iV>uth. At Jersey 
City wltii Mornlnif Kxpn iid Train of New Jersey 
Railroad for Ualtiniorc, and WaxMn^rtiin, and ei 
New York with Uornlnn KxpreiiaTrulii for Doolon 
and Now Knglaod Cltlct;. 

3:10 P. M. Nkw York Nionx Expres.^, 

DAILY. Stops at Pcrt««<cs.35 p.m. (Sop. 1 1nter- 
aecttngat Uornillgvtlle with lhe«.lip tn. Train 
from Danktrli. aud arrlvu>la New York at ii:t' 
p.m. 

11:20 P. M. CwoiNNATi Fxprkss, (Sao- 

dars exceptetl.) Stop-t at 8nj!qiiehanria 7:|(i a. ni. 
(B'k/t.): Turner'a 1J7 p. ni., (Uloe,), and arrives 
InNew YorkS.49p.nj. Connects at Kliiitra with 
Northern Central Railway for UnnliiburK, Phli.'i- 
dvlphla. Italtlnioro, Wubhln^rton and points South. 
At Great Bend with Dclawan-, l.acku»iinnu and 
■Western Rallrnod fhr Scratiton, Trenton atid 
Phll*lciphlu. and al New York with Afurnoon 
Trains aod Steamers for Ijoc^on and Now Kucland 

CItlOR. 

Only Uue Train Eoiit on Sunday, leaving nafTalo at 
S:10 P. U., and reachlag New York at 11:30 P. M. 

Boston f>nd New England Passengers, 
with their Baggage, arc transferred rB££ 
OF CBAROB in New York. 



AS* To pleasure travelers the lino of the Eric Bai:- 
vay presents many ottlccta of Interest, paasing through 
the beautlfal valleys of the CbcmonK. Susquehanna- 
Delaware and Rama po river*, an evercliat^as pai>o 
rania of Nature's bcautlu« commanda attetitlon . 

TKt Ittt VnUHaUd and MoaC Ijuxwiamt SUepiiv 
Coae/tes tat IJf THM WOHI.D'iM acoompamw all 
Jffighi TruM* om Uti* SMiwa^. 



The Minnesota River is still on the 
rise. Since the spring opened, it has risen 
at this place about twenty fe«t. The water 
is now within about six feet of the top of 
the banks. 



Groat Discovery! 

EVERY MAN 1118 OWN ARTIST 

A SCIENTIFIC WONDER. 

An in.'^trampnt by which any person can 
lf\ke correct Likcne8.sea or Photograph.s. 
Thir< iiMtrumont with full instructions oei:t 
by mail lor one dollar. Addross, 

C. B AMES & ro . 
1>*1 Broadway, Now York. 




— W. n. Dill has purchased the interest 
of John R. Oile, in the Winona Democrat. 

— The last issue of the Siili water Mes- 
senger contains the valedictory of Mr. A. J. 
Van Vorhes, who has disposed of his busi- 
ness to Mr. Willard S. Whitmorc, a gradu- 
ate of tho office. 

^SD^ A new edition of Hewitt's Pamphlet 
on AHunesola is to be issuod. It is a good 
immigration document and will Ut sent 
free to any name. 

— Over one hundred new buildings are 
to be erected iu Le Sueur this year. 

— Tho Auditor's office at W^abashaw was 
broken into on Saturday night and robbed 
of the tax duplicates, statements and settle, 
mcnts for tho years 1863 to 1866. The 
burglary was by persons well acquainted 
with the premises- 

— Gov. Marshall boa gone to Washing- 
ton. 

^g- J. B. Ilubbcll, of Mankato hux Imen 
appointed U. S. Collcttor of internal 
{ Keveuue tor Maiikato. 



BAGGAGE CHECKED THROUGH 
And Fare aluatf$ at Loto om fry any 
otker Route. 



J^Ask for Tickets via Erie Kail> 
way,'iea 

Which cau be obtained at all PrltKlpal Ticket Offices 
In tbe West and Soatli-H aet. 
a-KIDDLB. WM. R.BABR. 

Oea'l Sup't (Scn'l Pa^. Ag't, 

NEW 

PR OVISION STORE 



tha nnderalgned ha* opened a now Provlrton pjore on 
SECOND STBEJtT. (OPPOSITK TIIK DBPOT.)SUAK. 

UPEE. .MINNKSOTA. 
Wliore ho tnlcnd* keeping a ireneral assortment of 

Crrocerics and Provisions, 

At prices aa low as any In Bkakopec— and as good 
artlsles. CirtilTome acait. 

OBO. n. SPEWCCP, 
P. 9.— I win endeavor tokee;) n„ i,,nd aconsUnl 
SBpply of Oreen Qroccrlesand Poultry. 

uJO-lf o. II. «. 

Xtolx, XtolXy Xtolx ! 

SCRATCH t SCRATCH!! SCRATCH!! 

In from lOto 4.sbour(. 
^heaton'fl Ointment cures The Itch* 
Wheaton's Ointment cun« Salt Hhoum. 
Wheaton's Ointment cores Tetter. 
W'heaton's Ointmpnt cures Barbers' Itch, 
Wheaton's Ointment euros Old Sores. 
Wheaton's Ointment euros Every kind 
of Humor like Magic. 

Price. 'fl onta a b'i\ . bv mall, an rents. A''drf 
WKKKS * PO''Ti;H. Nv. " irn W«sl,i...fon gtu 
Boston M.S.. ai' K>r .-ale In all Ilrugglstk, 

Boston Sept. U«r,— 4>. uutlcc I yr. 



HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIC. 

Proparod by Dr. C. M. JACILSON, 

PUILAUKLPUIA, PA. 

is GreatRemsfc fir aB Diseases 

OP Tua 

LIVER, STOMACH, or 
DIGESTIVE ORGANS. 

Hoofland's German Bitters 

iroc»mtxr««I of the pure jnli-o« (or. as thoy are ia»<li- 
ciDAlly temw-<1, /::br mm I Ij> m J tnirLt) i:( Roots, 
□erbs and Harks, ffi '""Jlll luakini; a prepnnt- 
tlon, highly cumx-ii ri|fiC^^^L tratwl, Hodenllraly 
fref. from Alculwlic lulinixiurt '/ ukv 

\cind. 

HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIO 

(s » cotnMnation of all tho ln«re<lient« of the Bitters, 
with the parent (juiility of .SunU CYux Hum, Oriiage, 
etc, nyiklng one of tlio rn^ot plc:i«int and agrc-cabla 
rciiitulles ever offered to the i>uIj1Io. 

Tlioao pniforrlng a MutUdoe tree Crom AlooboUc 
wliulxturo, will use 

Hoofland's German Bitters. 

In caHcs of nervous dcprodsioD, when some alouboUc 
■tiluutuA is ueceieau-y, 

HOOFLAND'S GERMAN TONIO 

should to nsod. 

The Bitters or tho Tonic are both oqnalty good, cad 
CoDtnln flic Bjune medirlniU vlrtm^. 

The stomach, from a variety of ciuiwis, such a» Indl- 
ll^tioD, DysjK'psla, j^^^f^ Nervous I)ebillty, 
etc., U very apt to tSBl l|a have Itfl functions 
deningud. There- ^^^j^ milt Of which is, that 
tlio patieut sufTor« from several or uioru 

of the following ditK.-.'we*: 

Constipation, PlatnJonoe, Inward Piles, 
Fulness of Blood to tho Ilea*:!, Acidi- 
ty of the Stomach. Nausoa, Uonrt- 
burn, Diagrust for the FooJ, 
Pulnees or Weight In the 

Btomach, Sour Eructa- 
tions, Sinkina or Flutter- 
ing at the Pit of the Btoraach, 
Bwimminft of tho Iload. llurriod 
or DiUloult Broathlng. F-iittoriug at 
the neart. Choking or Uufibofitlnic Son- 
BfttioQfl when in a Lying Poaturo, 
Dimness of Vision, Dots or Webs 
before tho Sight, Dull Pain in 
the Head, DeHciency of 

Perspiration, Yellow- 
ness of ,^e^Sli^ the £kin 
and Eyes. « JjB ^^'n in the 
Bide. Hack. ^^^^W Ghost, 
Limbs, etc.. Sudden 

Flushes of Heat, Burning In the Flosh, 
Constant ImnRinings of Evil, and 
Great Deprossion of Spirits. 

TliMo reu'.ediiH will effiTliially rnro l.I\er 
r«pn>|.laint, ,laucidii-e, Dyspepsia, Chronli- or Nervous 
lli'bility, ("lironie Diarih.e.i, l»ist«so of the Kidneys, 
niid uli l)ise.t«<'ri HtNing fi'oui a Di*<>rdereJ Liver, 
Su>m;ic)i, or Intent intvs. 

RoHnltinz fri>in iiiiy <':in'*o whatovor ; 

jPito.sru.v'ri<».\ OF riiF, nvstkm, 

IixIiiclmI by Novcro l.i»lH>r, IliMr<l- 
HiiliM, Kx|M»Hiir<', l-"over»,€'t<r. 

T1i>Te l.s nonn liiinrexlJint e<)ual tJlt!ll-^o ri"jii«'i(« 
In suih c;isvv^. A l..iie mid ji^'.ir i-i Inipnrl.il to the 
wholu i^vsteni, the Hmm^'^tt Ap| etitois Slieniith- 
cihhI, ^h«1 is eu |K^ Ji-ycsl. the Htoniii.li 
di^'ivitrf promptly, ,JBL" the Mootl is piiiili.-<l. 
the conplexlon be ■^' comes fmiuA and 

herdlliy, th.) yellow tinge Is cradioj»ted fioni th.< 
ey»-H, a Wooui U ):iven to the eheeks, an<l the wenk 
and nervous iuviUid boo'iiiud a strung aud hi^.dtliy 
being. 

JVraonji Aileanced itt Zif>', 
And fueling tho haml of time welghlns heiivlly upon 
them, with all its attendHnt Ills, will ftml in the n»> 
of lhw«<' BlTTKIl.S,ortlie 11).\1(;, an eli.xir that wil 
In^itill ni!W life into thoir veins, restore in a nusisurt 
the CTierjjy .md ardor of nioro yonthfnl days, l.nlli 
up their shrnnkon fl>rm8, and givu hwUth aud bappi 
seas tu thUr rouialniug yours. 

NOTICE. 

It Is a wcll-wt-iljllsbed Dtct th.it fiilly f>n«»-na1f of 
the female ixirt ion of iMBiil o«r {mimlatiun Hro 

H'ldom in the enjoy [H nienl>>[K.iii>i h"<ilih; 

»r, to n.s<' their o»u Jj^^^^t vpror^ioii, "never 
feel Well." Thevaro liuitfuid, devoid ..f all 

enerny, e.itieniely nervons, !uid have no >ip|>etite. 

To thl» clasd of pero'US the RITTi:Ubi, or tko 
TUNK'-jaxu ettisa'ially rou>nii>ie:ided. 

WEAK AND DELICATE CHILDREN 

Are nirwle strxmg by tho uso at either of ll»»^e reiiio 
dliw. They wUl euro uvvty cuw> of MAU.<VSMt;S, 
withoni fail. 

Thoufnjiils of rerflfl'-.iteH have nccumnliitHfl In tho 
hand-i of the i«-<ipri<>tiT, but fi»ue will ulliiw • f tlio 
pilblli-jUlirti uf but a few. riix^e. It wi'.l Is- i.l~.rvd, 
ari- nun "fnole tutd t.'f buoh ^lul•t!lIl4; Ukit they niuct 
Im believul. 



TESTIMONIALS. 

nOX. UrAt. W. \Ti»OI>U ABI>. 

Cfti/ Jitiiice qf f/tf .fnjfrmf fimH qf iU.. write*: 
Jfiilaiielphia, Marrh 10, I**.;. 



" I fln.1 'IloofJnnd'a 
a ip-ini touir. useful 
dli^Mtlve iirptnts and 
cuiMK of dehllity, and 
•ctlou In the syitciu 



Uertnan Itittem' is 
In ilis<«)tM-s of tlio 
Kit Kreiil ls.'ni'fll In 
wiuit of uervi-us 
Yours tmly, 
OEO. W. WOOnWAKD." 
HO!V. MAMTS TIIOMPSOX. 

Ah(^ qf IA< Suprem* Omrt rif f\nnry1r>in!a. 
VhiUulclphia, April "is 1**^^ 
"I consider 'Unofl.-uiil's German llltt.'nj' a mluafia 
tnnliriitr. In ciwh- of attacks of Indi)<o«lion or PyjjHji- 
ala. 1 can certify this from my eT[>ericucc of iL 
Youis, with ru>i]s<ct, 

JAMK.S T!IOMrSO\." 

rrom n^T. io«. ir. Kr?r!f .\nn. n. »., 

Pr. J<Kkmn—\>*»t Sir : I h.-ive l>t>on fre<jueiitlY r»- 
qtiMtn) to nKincct my name with rocoiiimenilalions 
of different kirxls of niediciues, litit ro>?ir.linK tho 
eractice «<> out of my lafMt,'"*' apjiropriafenphere, 
I haro Id all csms IIIa I ducUnvd ; hut with 
a clear proof l:i vuri |g|g^||J ous instancm and 
particularly In niy ewn finiily. of tho 

a.<wftiln«fii of Dr. lloiif!.tnd'sGeniian Hitteis, I depvt 
lor once from my usual onurw, to expri»«» my full 
eonrirtiun that, /or /jnu-riU lUlnlUg n/Uu tyitm. (f'lj 
trjtm-iU'j fiT ZirvT hittftliiint, ilua fxi/f ii/«/t«; «<»'•/« 
nrrparatujit. In aonie catH* It may fill ; hut usually, 
I diinht uot. It will lio very U-ueQcial Ut thuae who 
fuSet t^ni the atsive caupcd. 

Yuors, very rwsperfftiTlT, 

J. II KENNARD. 
Eighth, below Coatua St. 

Vr^m Jlfr. F- I». FKXOAMh 

Jutittant tH't.ir Ckriftian fhratticU, J'liihirlrlphi'n. 
I liave derive.1 dtyrliltNl U'nuflt from the use . 1 
noofloiHl's Oerraan llitt<Ti», and feel It my prlvllnre 
to rreommend them as a nnvt vUanlile tonic, to all 
vho ore giiOeriiig fr'iii ceiieral ileMlllr or from J'i»- 
aruiug from dvnuigenient of the livvr. 
Yount trtily. 

& It. irEKDAIJ. 



CAUTIOlr. 



' Haofland's Grrmao llera'nliea arc enoaterfHfrd. 
Boo that the slgnnt ftfBFgift^ nre of 0. M. .lAPK- 
BON is ou tho wrap M jW per of oacU N'ttlc. 
All others are coun JH^W terfeit. • 

PrIncipiU Office """"^^ aod M.imifsff-ry 
at the O.rraan Medicine Store, No. ftll AKCil gtr.«t, 
Vbiiadeh'Uia. 

CnARI<F,«l W. trVA^fi, 
tieriuan l,riio:I--t, Propnelur, 
Formerly C. M. Jac£Sos A Co. 

noi>fl.ind's Genuaa lUttor^ i>er lx>ttla $1 00 

" •• " half d'>r.en 6 tX) 

noofland'st>rmanTotili-.pnt up In luart l»iltlaJ.l 60 

|«r Utttle, or a half il<«eu f-T 7 60 

#^ iKi not f >rt;et to exKioino wWl the article yuu 

tiny, hi order to get the genuine. 

For Hale by nU Drag3!»t« ""d tKntl- 

•t ne«U«Jae«. 



II o o f 1 a n d ' s 

GERMAN 



TON 




For .S.'ile hi >hp 
NKW DRUG JfTORi:, bllAKOI'LK 



NEW YORK 

CLOTHINGHOUn. 

Tpring Manufacture, 




THE lABQEST STOCK OF 

MEN'S 

In New York City. 



^ are prepared to exhibit to the merchants of 

this kectlon the best selection of Clothing 

ever olfered In the New York 

.Market, conihlnliii; 

Cheap. Medium and Fine Goods, 

MADK IN TIIK MO.ST fUrKKltm .MAN.NtU. 
Ani </ the J try L<it,st Stt/lts- 

V>'c shall sell nptm liberal terms iwd atj 

ANTE-WAR PRICES. 



We fiivlte the atletitl >n of buyers anil prcmls • 
to make It to their Interest to exninUie ourllu- 
ineiise ftock before luaklii.c their i«:rr!i;>i«>s. 

EIEfUi. Mgcaill & ililSi. 

45 & 47 Chambers St., 



uS-2mu 



ALDRITT & WOODBURY'S 




O .A. H H. I .a. C3- E 

Wagon Eliop. 

Kaackfsiuitliin^, Shoeing, 

Rep airing, and 

CAnniAGE pAmTmo 

Carrinpco and Wagons, of till descrip- 
ions, Hob.s Hloighs, Cutters, Sec, inaiiu- 
acturod to ortlcr at nliort notice*. 

Painting niid Kc'i^airing promjitlj' antl 
sati.<*tactoriIy iloiio. ^7^V- All wmk war- 
ranted to bo of tho best tiuality, ami 
prices reaaoiiablo. '^§58 

N. r,.— GL'.\S.MlTjn.X(J done in 
connection with onrivstaljli.ihnicnt. 
Shop on the corner of 

KlOCoN'f) A- LEWIS PTS., 
Between the resitlcncc of T. J. Diiffv 
and tlic Railrontf. 

J?*?~ Ilcincuiber the place, and eive u.'- 
a call. ^ J. S. Ai.DJtiTT, 

n-lT \ F. WooDiiL'KV. 



fmmi ST. m 



A .N D 

MINNEAPOLIS 



^MHti 



r-j....,:!?.!™' a— I 






RAILWAY 



Via ^McGregor & Milwaukee. 

TlIK O.XLV ALL EAIL LINK 

And the only roiile by \»hl.li IlAGGACiE 15* 
CUIX'KLD TllKUUGtl to 

m]lWm]{'Es €H]CAfiO 
i\ K w \ o K u, Bo.^mo .^ 

AND ALL i:A.«ri:KX POINTS. 

I'ussrnirirs ehiinvie ears only at fennlnnl i.<iln«.s 
fills s- iiirlns si-alitlfi eleaii eoo.his and full liiKlit'? 
rest III sl.-e(rln„- ears on n1j;ht trains. 

I'lissentr-T tralio leave and arrive at Webt S t 

Paul as loi|i'W» : 

K A S T K It N K X V 11 i: S S 

AKajvF. rirxKT. 

7 45 p. M. 6.35 A. M. 

Minneni>ulis & St. Paul Accommodation 



ARItlVE. 
ll:to A. M. 

n-M I- n. 
7:J.'> i: a . 



DErART. 

9:ii.' .\. .M. 
1 4> I-. M. 
*Ai P. M. 



V. C. SMKPAUP. Sup.rlnleiidcnt. 
A. V. U.CAHPKNrKK, .-. .•*. .HKUt>:iL, 

Oeu'l l'a».>en,-er AsJei.t. U> a'l Manager. 

CIIAS. TUOMP:>t.>N, Ticket Ajfeut. Union . illco 
foot of Jackson street, and on LcVee.St. Paul. 



FI N K I^ K ,<c LYON 

I.OCK-bTUH 

Scujiuci iHacljtuc. 



The OM.v Machine .«hj jicr-'cctcd that 
entire sati.st'aclion is gnarautcid or tbc 
purclia.'e inoiiey refunded. 

WIrtc we linvc no Agent a sample 
.Machine will be stdd at \iry low price, 
and n Loral Agent ajtpointttl on the 
most favorablu t( rms, 

N. K.— Send for (3irciil.Tr, Traveling 
Agents wunted. Saliiiy, liberal. 

Fluids a L;/&tjS, M.CJDa 

, i>Hl liuoApWAy New York. 



( DR. SCH1?NCK'3 

IIANDRAKE FILLS. 

A Sahsfitfife fot' CnJouirt, 

TbCMe P.lla are eomp.) e 1 9t various roorn, harinf 
i!ie pownr to Tffir^ the f.'.r>><:oni of the liver ai 
0.»n.pil>- and erfeeti-.aily ti b.'oo p:il or mmrnry, 
lod wlilieiu pnxlucin/uuy or thoeo <!ifr.;ic?»ble or 
danirrroui v9>.cl« ivUxU oiiou lollow llw cac ai tlio 

In all lii:i<»n^ aisorder? Ilvve Pilh maybe we^wilh 
ecu.'. ; 111 e. e< ;!iey prot:ioie il-j discharce of vitial.id 
bile, and rsniere Ibora aUti-uctloni from the Hrcr 
and UIiar> d^.5i^ niiich ar* the caa.;o of biliotu 
affertionii In general. 

flf;ilKNOKS UAXnnAKE PIT,T,3 ctire 8!ck 
Uca-lartie, auda'l ii<n>r<iereo< tho Liver, iudlcated by 
•allonr »khi, coved tonjue, cortivencea, drowalnoai, 
and a (ein-ral (i-elln;? At woa-ine^ii and laiw'ludn, 
<!ioalns liiai UisUver is In a torpid or oUuuetcd 
eond llc«(. ^ 

In fhort, lTe« Pill, m-\r ho nscl w'th advan- 
tace In all «s.-» wUlu a par„aiive or a'U;i-ali»e 
uir jivii.e is re|d.r>'-1. 

Pevc a'k Icr -MV. grS-ncVg Mandratco PiHs," 
Mid oU*rvo that liie tivo likenesaee 01 the fHjetor 
ire on ilie i^oTemn cni itamp— o>,c n hou in the last 
•xtfC of (;oiisnn,p(ibii. aiidliie aUicr in bia pi oieal 
liotlth. 

80M b.i all Vnvf'"^ and itea'eT". Prco ii cents 
fv r-»x. Prf*,,*, OllK*. No. 1.1 North Ulh Sueet, 
nii.a!.:;>h a. Pa, 

•irneri;. W'lio.ciht'c A.'ren'f: Demai Dames ft Cc_ 
i\ Pnrk Knw New V..rk. 8. S. Ilincc, ltt< Ralt'- 
m«r* tM.. Ifallior. . Md. • .lohu u. Park, N. E. 
oor. 01 I'stirih and >Valt»n» tt'. Otne'noati, Ohio 
Wa'kcT h Tavlnr, \.A and IW >Vai4»b Avenue 
t;li<ca-o. Hi.: t)llii< Urii<lior', mfiiihireet rewtc- 
Ccie >•' I \ukc C'.., 01. I.^>ii ». Mo. ^ 

^ U-o Aatli w. CA,&i./,l^t 



NEW DRUG STORE 



X 3V S» 



'• . .• 



EDWARD G. HALLE, 

NEXT DOOR TO GEYERMANN'S STORE. 

KcspcctfuU}'' announces to the citizens of Shakopee, and Vicinity 
that he has just opened a complete stock of 

Drugs and Medicines, Perfumery, Patent Medi- 
cines, Toilet Articles, Combs, Brushes, 
Stationery, Lamps, Pure Wines and Liquors, 
and all other articles usually found in a 
Drug Store. 



1S^3^ Petrolcne Fluid constantly on hand and 
for sale. -^'gSgS 



Pr. L. B. Morrow keeps his office at the New Druir Store. 



T. J. DUFFY, 







lf\lRE, 



AHD CUTLERY DEALER, 

COKNKl^ OF lIOLMi:.S AXD FIRST STREETS, SIIAKOPER, MINNESOTA 



J. li. HUNTSMAN. ;- 



-fs. D. now 



J. B; Hmitsmazi & Co., 

SIIiVKOPEE MINNESOTA. 



PKAl.rRS 15 



DRY G00B8& CLOTHING. 

L&dics Tress Goods, etc. 
Don't lorgct the place — Cor Holmes & First Sis. 



»* X 3FI 



II. S. llOLTOX.j 



fCII.VS. I1.\RICK\3; 




LTON & HARKENS, 

Corner of Kolnics €l First Sts., Shakopee, Minnesota 

Dealers in 

Dry Good^Sj Dress Goods, Clotliingf, 

Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Uats and Caps, 

/Jl3^ The liighost nir.rkct jincc ])uid for ^Yhcat, Furs, and U. 
kinds of country jnoduce. 

j^^Cnil nnd s.c. Wo arc BOUND NOT TO UE UNDERSOLD by any firm io tk» 

Miiuigsota Vulic\-. 






q» 



JACOB IIOFFERT, 



— DIALER I.V- 



^^^^T 




Saddlery Hardware, 

Ilorsc Collars, 

CARRIilGE TRIMMINGS, 



&e,, kc, 

LEWIS STREET, 



Ac, 



Shakopee, Min. 



J» 



Farm for Sale, 

In tho Town of Belle Plaino. 

The Siik-;< Tiber will .sell one of bi.< farriLS 
of 120 acres of first rate land, all fenced; 
:>0 acres of limber 20 nore.s of good mea- 
dow. 14 nero.« nnder cullivstion, lug hi)iisc, 
sta'do, and good water. Situated 1 mile.s 
South of Iblle I'laiiie. For sale rhe.ip : 
pail cash, jiart on iltne. .'>J:.;m 

JOHN HANLY. 



haLls 

Vegetable Sicilian Haii Renewa 

I fas xfood the testofseren ffeara 
irifU by tfte uublic ; and no prepm 
ration for the hair pet discovered 
will produce t/te same beneficial 
re.stUtif. It i» a new eetettUfie dHo» 
cover}/, eonibining the most powers 
ful and restortUive agents <n tho 
VEGETABLE KINQOOM. Jt reetoreo 
GRAY HAIR TO ITS (MUGINAL YOUTN^ 
FUL COLOR. It makea the aoaim 
white and dean ; emree damdmr 
and humors, and fallinf out vf ni^ 
hair ; and wUi make it grow npom 
bald heads, except in very agmui 
persons^ as it furnishes the nuir^. 
tive principle by which the hair 
is nourislied and supwtrted, 
makes the hair moi^, soft, a* 
glosity, and Is unsurpassed as m 
HAIR DRESSING. It is'tf^ ohfapM|^ 
preparation ever offeryedf te ^M 
public, as one bottle uiiU, a a e mtk i ^ 
plish more and Itut loriger. t^tam, 
three bottles of any other pfyepwrmr 
tion. 

It isreeommended andi us^klL 
the First M«dleal AatlMrHy. 

The wonderftU r es m lt e pmdmtmd, 
by our Sicilian Hair Mtmeum^ 
have induced manu <• 
Uwe preparoHone fiar 
undor various names f 
order to induce the trad 
public to pnrehaee their 
pounds, they have reo9v4ed H 
floods, by OalmimM they 
fortner partners, or had some 
ncctlon uHth our Mr. JBatt, -w^ 
ttieir preparation was similmr to 
ours. Do not be deceived by them? 
Purchase the original : iihm^ 
never Iteen equalled. Our Treamo^ 
on the Hair, with eertiflcaies,\ 
free by mail. See tftateaiA 
has our private Kevenue 
over ttte top of the bottle. AU oti 
ers are ifuitations, 
R.P. Hall b. Co., Pr«p*«, NmIim, N. I^ 

Hold 6.y all PruffffiM* and Dealert tn . 



r3£ 



C. A. COOK, CNICAOO, IU. ir 

A.||c«tf*r Ut« 9lertk-W«.t«ra Btata^ 



DEFECnyEPACE 



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