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Full text of "History of the Presbyterian Church in the forks of Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., (Brandywine Manor Presbyterian Church,) from A.D. 1734 to A.D. 1885"

1™!.!?^ "^^ Presbyterian Church in th 




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Cornell University 
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http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924012522961 



HISTOEY 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



FORKS OF BRANDYWINE, CHESTER COUNTY, PA., 

(BBANDYWINB MANOK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,) 



FEOM A.D. 1735 TO A.D. 1885, 



BIOGEAPHIOAL SKETCHES 

OF 

THE DECEASED PASTORS OF THE CHURCH, 

AKD OF THOSE WHO FREFABED FOB THE CHBISTIAN MINISTBY UNDEB THE 
_,y. SIBECTION OF THE BET. NATHAN GBIEB. 



By jambs M'CLUNB, LL.D., 

MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY. 



"The Lord our God be with ua, as He was with our fathers; let Him not leave ub, nor 
forsake us."— 1 EiNOs Tiii. 6T. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

PRINTED BY J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY. 

1885. 



PREFACE. 



The preparation of the following work has been 
delayed by the difficulty of obtaining authentic data, 
no regular records of the Church having been kept 
until a comparatively recent period. The delay, 
however, has enabled the writer to state some interest- 
ing facts which otherwise would have been omitted, 
and to continue the work to a later period. The 
authorities on which he has mainly relied . are given 
at the close of each article. 

For the information of those who may not have an 
opportunity to consult works on Ecclesiastical History, 
brief historical notices of the Puritans, the Huguenots, 
the Scotch, and the Scotch-Irish have been prefixed. 

In order to prevent them from being forgotten, or 
to make them better known, several matters but re- 
motely associated with religious organizations have 
been stated in foot-notes and appendices. 

The writer thankfully acknowledges his obligations 
to the ministers of the Gospel and others who aided 
his researches and assisted him in placing on record a 
number of remarkable incidents connected with a 
" Pioneer Church" which has received many tokens 
of Divine guidance and approval. 

J. M. 

Philadelphia, June 8, 1885. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Academy, Brandywine 173 

Academy, Howard 174 

Academy, New London (Appendix) 232 

America, discovery of 9 

Bequests 198 

Black, Eev. Samuel ' . 57 

Boyd, Rev. Alexander 180 

Boyd, Rev. Adam 65 

Buchanan, Eev. James .' 131 

Bull, Rev. Levi, D.D 128 

Carmichael, Rev. John 79 

Central Presbyterian Church, Downingtown .... 169 

Coatesville Presbyterian Church 159 

Collins, Rev. Britton E 148 

Davidson, Eev. Patrick 119 

Dean, Rev. William 73 

Elders, Ruling 106 

Fairview Presbyterian Church 166 

Graveyards . 215 

Grier, Eev. John F., D.D 135 

Grier, Rev. John H. 140 

Grier, Rev. John N. C, D.D. . . '. . . . .99 

Grier, Rev. John W 142 

Grier, Rev. Matthew B., D.D 144 

Grier, Rev. Nathan 90 

Grier, Rev. Robert 8 137 

Grier, Rev. Thomas 122 

Happersett, Rev. Rees, D.D. 151 

Heberton, Rev. William . . ' 34 

Honeybrook Presbyterian Church 163 

Hood, Rev. Thomas 126 

Huguenots .14 

Kennedy, Eev. William 134 

Knight, Eev. Joshua 124 

5 



6 TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

PAHE 

Legislators 210 

Liggett, Eev. John A., D.D 178 

McCachran, Eev. Eobert 145 

Meeting-House, First 37 

Meeting-House, Second 39 

Meeting-House, Manor 41 

Meeting-House, New 47 

McOoU, Eev. John 35 

M'Conaughy, Rev. David, D.D., LL.D 118 

Moore, Eev. David W 177 

Nyce, Eev. Benjamin M 149 

Parke, Eev. Samuel ' . . . 138 

Parsonage 193 

Pew-Holders, 1792-96 201 

Physicians 211 

Pinkerton, Eev. John 157 

Pinkerton, Eev. William 155 

Puritans 11 

Quay, Eev. Anderson B 146 

Ealston, Eev. James G., D.D., LL.D. ....... 153 

Scotch and Scotch-Irish 17 

Seceder Meeting-House 52 

Session-Houses 196 

Sextons 115 

Sunday-Schools 188 

Temperance Societies 204 

Templeton, Eev. William H 156 

Theological Students 116 

Thompson, Eev. John C 176 

Trustees 114 

Umstead, Eev. Justus 152 

Walker, Eev. Eichard 150 

Wallace, Eev. Matthew G 12i 

White, Eev. Eobert . ' '. _ 132 

Woods, Eev. William lyj 



PASTORS 

OF 

BRANDYWINE MANOR PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



FIRST PASTOR. 



Rev. Samuel Black, installed November, 1736 ; pastoral relation 
dissolved July, 1741. 

SECOND PASTOR. 

Ebv. Adam Boyd (Old Side), installed August, 1741 ; pastoral 
relation ceased October, 1758. 

THIRD PASTOR. 

Eev. William Dean (New Side), installed May or June, 1745 ; 
died July, 1748. 

FOURTH PASTOR. 

Rev. John Carmichael, installed April, 1761 ; died November, 
1785. 

fifth pAstor. 

Rev. Nathan Grier, installed August, 1787; died March, 1814. 

SIXTH pastor. 

Rev. J. N. C. Grier, D.D., installed November, 1814; resigned 
April, 1869. 

seventh pastor. 

Rev. William W. Heberton, installed October, 1869; pastoral 
relation dissolved October, 1872. 

eighth pastor. 
Rev. John McColl, installed July, 1873 ; present pastor. 



DISCOVERY OF AMERICA. 



The believer in a Superintending Providence, and 
especially the Christian, cannot fail to perceive the 
wise arrangements of Deity in the period at which 
America became generally known to the inhabitants 
of the Eastern Continent. If it had been discovered , 
when tbe darkness of the Middle Ages enshrouded 
Europe, when the feudal system was strong in its 
enormity afld an intolerant church held unlimited 
sway, superstition, oppression, and bigotry would have 
been increased and strengthened. The credulous 
monk, the lord and his vassal, and the " persecutor of 
heretics" would have peopled the Western shores of 
the Atlantic, and re-acted on a wider arena scenes 
which History blushes to record. 

On the other hand, if this continent had not been 
discovered until a few centuries more had passed, 
thousands and tens of thousands who found refuge 
and a home in its wilderness solitudes would have 
perished by the sword or on the scaffold. The relent- 
less cruelty of rulers and prelates would have crushed 
the advocates of Truth. But God in His wisdom had 
determined otherwise. He had decreed that the 
crimes of Europe should be a source of blessings to 
America ; that those who had been subjected to fines. 



10 DISCOVERY OF AMERICA. 

imprisonment, mutilation, and banishment for His 
name's salie should lay the foundations of a Great 
Republic, which would afford a home to the exile from 
every land and protection to men of every creed ; 
that here a Christian nation should arise throughout 
whose wide domain the sound of the loom and the 
anvil and the hum of business would cease on every 
returning Sabbath, — a nation which would annually 
present to the world the sublime spectacle of its 
Chief Magistrate calling on its citizens to unite in 
giving thanks to Him, the Author of All Good, for 
blessings so freely bestowed, and so generally enjoyed. 

Will it, then, be irrelevant to advert, briefly, to the 
history of some of those who, like Hagar, were driven 
by persecution into the wilderness ; those whom the 
Angel of Mercy comforted and sustained during the 
whole period of Colonial weakness and despondency, 
and whose descendants have become more numerous 
than the posterity of Ishmael, but with the hand for 
not against every man ? 

Although every Protestant denomination has con- 
tributed to give tone and character to the civil and 
religious polity of our country, yet those to whom we 
as Presbyterians are chiefly indebted for liberty of 
conscience, for our doctrinal standards and our form 
of church government are the Puritans, the Hugue- 
nots, the Scotch, and the Scotch-Irish. Of these in 
order. 



THE PURITANS. 



The storm of religious persecution which swept with 
increasing violence over Europe during the Seven- 
teenth Century forced thousands of her best citizens to 
flee to other lands. The arbitrary measures of James 
I. of England caused the Pilgrims to seek a refuge 
first in Holland and finally on the bleak shore of New 
England. 

This colony, so feeble in the beginning, was rapidly 
increased by the despotic conduct of his son, Charles 
I., who abetted measures which the timidity of his 
father led that monarch to reject. The religious intol- 
erance of Archbishop Laud, and the disturbed con- 
dition of the mother-country until Charles perished 
on the scaffold, added yearly to the population of the 
New England colonies. 

But while their numbers were rapidly increasing, and 
they had built towns, subdued portions of the wilder- 
ness, and gathered around them the comforts of civil- 
ized life, they were not unmindful ' of the interests of 
learning and religion. In less than thirty years after 
the landing at Plymouth they had originated a system 
of public schools, established a college, now the oldest 
and best endowed in our country, and erected nearly 
fifty churches in which divine service was held every 

Sabbath. 

11 



12 THE PUEITANS. 

During the able sway of Cromwell. England enjoyed 
comparative quiet, and emigrants to the American 
colonies were few. Four years, however, had not 
elapsed after the death of the Great Protector before 
the Act of Uniformity drove upwards of two thousand 
Puritan clergymen from their pulpits, and placed such 
men as Baxter, Flaval, Howe, Allein, Calamy, Char- 
nock, and Bunyan under the ban of ecclesiastical 
censure. Fines and. imprisonment alike awaited the 
divine who proclaimed the truth and those who as- 
sembled to hear him. Under such circumstances, all 
that could obtain the means to do so sought a home 
among their brethren on this side of the Atlantic, and 
joyfully added to the wealth, intelligence, and prosper- 
ity of a country where there was " freedom to worship 
God." 

These oppressive measures, which continued until 
the accessiou of, the Gustavus Adolphus of England, 
William itl., peopled the Eastern States with those 
who have made the sterile soil of New England a land 
of plenty and the fixed abode of enterprise, activity, 
and , intelligence. 

But the benefits which the first settlers of New 
England conferred on the land of their adoption have 
not been confined within its narrow limits. Wherever 
the descendants of the Pilgrims have found an abiding 
place, whether in the valleys of the Ohio, the Mis- 
souri, and the Mississippi, or on the shores of the 
Pacific ; whether as miners, husbandmen, or manufac- 
turer, they have carried with them their ancestral 
love of freedom, and their reverence for the precepts 
of the Bible. The printing-press, the school, and the 



THE PURITANS. 13 

church have followed in the wake of their advance ; 
the wilderness has given place to cultivated fields, and 
cities have grown with magic speed beneath their 
plastic hands. 

If, as Hume has observed, the precious spark of 
liberty was kindled and preserved by the Puritans, — 
and to them the English owe the whole freedom of 
their Constitution, — the citizens of a republic which 
spans a continent are indebted to those God-fearing 
men and their descendants for much of the civil and 
religious liberty which they enjoy.* 

* Neal, "Hist, of the Puritans;" Baird, "Religion in America;" 
Bancroft, " Hist, of U. S. ;" Sanford, " Puritan Revolution ;" Calamy, 
" Account of Ejected Ministers." 



THE HUGUENOTS. 



Owing to the zeal and ability of Calvin, Beza, Co- 
ligny, and their coadjutors, aided by the patronage »f 
Margaret, Queen of Navarre,^ the principles of the 
Eeformation became widely known and were eagerly 
embraced by many of the inhabitants of France. 
And although the .bigoted opposition of her rulers 
and the fiend-like massacre of St. Bartholomew for a 
time diminished their number and forced many of them 
to obtain safety by flight, yet at the close of the six- 
teenth century they were sufiiciently numerous and 
powerful to extort from Henry IV. the Edict of Nantes. 
This Edict guaranteed to the Protestants the free ex- 
ercise of their religion. That it was often violated by 
the successors of Henry, even before it was formally 
revoked, the history of France during the Seventeenth 
Century fully attests. Nowhere in Europe did the 
spirit of religious intolerance exhibit greater malice or 
give rise to greater atrocities than in the persecution of 
the Huguenots, as the French Protestants were gener- 
ally called.* Hunted like wild beasts, exposed to 



* It is reckoned, says President Edwards, that there were martyred ' 
in this kingdom, Prance, for the Protestant religion, thirty-throe 
princes, one hundred and forty-eight counts, two hundred and thirty- 
four barons, one hundred and forty-seven thousand gentlemen, and 
14 



THE HUGXJENOTS. 15 

ignominy, torture, and death, they were fortunate who 
found in foreign lands the exile which their cruel 
rulers sedulously endeavored to prevent. England, 
Holland, Switzerland, Germany, and other portions of 
Europe, not only afforded them an asylum, but gladly 
welcomed them, and those countries owe many of the 
mechanic arts which have increased their wealth and 
importance to the orderly and industrious strangers. 

But the thousands of Frenchmen who were forced 
to abandon their native land did not find safety and a 
home in Europe only. A large number of them 
crossed the Atlantic, and sought a peaceful abiding- 
place among those who had planted the standard of 
civil and religious freedom in the Western wilderness. 
The colonists of New England and New York wil- 
lingly received and aided them, but the milder climate 
of the Carolinas being more congenial to those who 
had been reared amid the fertile plains and vine-clad 
hills of France, a majority of them became citizens of 
what are now the Southern States. There they dis- 
seminated and practised the religious principles which 
had caused their exile, and contributed, by their in- 
dustry, skill, and sobriety, to increase the wealth and 
prosperity of the country which they had made their 
home. 

Many who have held high positions ih 'our govern- 
ment, and who have discharged the duties of important 
trusts with uprightness and ability, could trace their 
lineage to the persecuted Huguenots. At the present 

seven hundred and sixty thousand of the common people, all within 
thirty years. 



16 THE HUGUENOTS. 

time the Presbyterian churches of New England, 
New York, and especially of the Carolihas, number 
among their most useful and influential members the 
descendants of the countrymen of Calvin, Beza, Mor- 
nay, and Saurin.* 

* Marsh, '' Hist, of the Huguenots ;" Browning, " Hist, of the 
Huguenots;" D'Aubigne, "Hist, of the Reformation." 



THE SCOTCH AND THE SCOTCH-IRISH. 



Although the Puritans and the Huguenots did 
much towards forming the religious character and 
implanting a love of liberty in the breasts of those 
who made America their home, they were not the 
only laborers in the important work. There were 
others who aided, by also diffusing a reverence for 
truth and a fear of God, the real foundations of 
national greatness. 

The Scotch and the Scotch-Irish, as those who 
came from the North of Ireland were called, qmi- 
grated to this country in large numbers, bringing 
with them their strong attachment to learning and 
the doctrinal standards of the Presbyterian Church. 

The Scotch had been subjected to every variety of 
suffering, not merely on account of their opposition to 
the dogmas of the Church of Home, but because they 
refused to subscribe to the doctrines and forms of 
, Episcopacy. The High Commission appointed by 
Charles II. exercised Inquisitorial powers, and even 
equalled the dread tribunals of Spain and Portugal 
in acts of oppression, malice, and cruelty. 

In consequence of these arbitrary measures many 
went from Scotland to Ireland, and others sought 
safety on this side of the Atlantic. But it was not 
until the, beginning of the Eighteenth Century that 

17 



18 THE SCOTCH AND THE SCOTCH-IKISH. 

the Scotch and their descendants in Ireland emigrated 
in large numbers to America. 

Driven from their homes by fanatical zeal and 
ecclesiastical tyranny, they naturally directed their 
course to the only two colonies, Maryland* and Penn- 
sylvania, in which toleration prevailed. 

In 1729, upwards of six thousand emigrants from 
Scotland and Ireland arrived in this State, and from 
that time until the middle of the "century as many as 
twelve thousand, it is said, came over every year. A 
majority of them made their way into the interior, 
and, on account of the early frosts in the valleys and 
the water being less pure, they generally settled on 
the higher lands. 

Their principal business was farming, though they 
were far from being skilful husbandmen. When the 
productiveness of the soil had been exhausted by fre- 
quent tillage, instead of resorting to fertilizers, they 
cleared the timber from another portion of their 
lands. If this resource also failed, they sought local- 
ities where the unimpaired soil of the wilderness 
gave a return for labor which their former possessions 
had ceased to afford. They therefore became the- 
pioneers in the, settlement not only of this State and 
of Maryland, but also of a large portion of Central 
Virginia and the western counties of North Carolina. 

Moving in the van of civilization, with the musket 
in one hand and the axe in the other, they had scarcely 



* Tribitarians only were tolerated in Maryland. No enactment 
abridging religious liberty has ever been placed on the statute books 
of Pennsylvania. 



THE SCOTCH AND THE SCOTCH-IEISH. 19 

repressed Indian hostility or subdued a small part of 
the wilderness, when they organized the church and 
the school. The meeting-house was generally built 
of unhewn logs, and a smaller, but an equally rude, 
structure, served, in most instances, for a session-house 
and a school-house. But in these rustic church 
edifices men proclaimed the words of Truth whose 
learning and whose familiarity with the Scriptures 
would astonish the graduates of our theological semi- 
naries, while the " schoolmaster from Ireland" faith- 
fully imparted the elements of knowledge. No daily 
mail nor weekly newspaper kept them in communica- 
tion with the • rest of the world. The wilderness was 
their honie. The broad Atlantic rolled between them 
and the land of their fathers. Want and danger 
were continually present. Nevertheless, their much- 
worn Bibles showed that, amid all their loneliness 
and privations, they sought and obtained consolation 
from the Holy Book which has brought joy to many 
a mourner and removed the shadow from many a 
hearth-stone. 

During the struggle for National Independence, no 
one whose ancestry could be traced to Scotland or the 
North of Ireland was found among the adherents of 
royalty. Their patriotism and unflinching bravery 
were so well known that Washington, in the midnight 
hour of the Revolution, expressed his determination, 
if all other resources failed, to make his last stand 
among the Scotch and Scotch-Irish of the frontiers. 

These races have furnislied eight Chief Magistrates 
of the Union, twenty Governors of States, and up- 
wards of thirty Presidents of American Colleges. 



20 THE SCOTCH AND THE SCOTCH-IRISH. 

They gave us Wayne, Mercer, Montgomery, Irvine, 
Knox, St. Clair, Sullivan, and Morgan, of the Conti- 
nental Army; the statesmen Hamilton, Madison, and 
Webster; the orators Patrick Henry, Calhoun, and 
McDuffie. To them the Presbyterian Church is 
indebted for the Tennents, the Blairs, the Smiths, 
the Allisons, Finley, Rodgers, Witherspoon, and 
others prominent in the annals of the struggles and 
the triumphs of the Church in America during the 
greater part of the Eighteenth Centiiry.* 

* Chambers, " Irish and Scotch-Irish JEarly Settlers ;" Proud, 
" Hist, of Pennsylvania ;" Gordon, " Hist, of Pennsylvania ;" Hodge, 
" Hist, of Presbyterian Church;" Webster, " Hist, of Pres. Church." 



HISTOET 



OP THE 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



"THE FORKS OF BRANDYWINE."* 



The first European settlers in what are now the. 
"Western and Central parts of Chester County were, 
with a few exceptions, natives of Wales. The name 
of a neighboring mountain and the names of several 
townships in this county and those adjoining would 
sufficiently prove this, even if history and tradition 
were silent.f Some of' these immigrants came on 
account of their attachment to the principles of Penn ; 

* The term " the Forks" in early colonial annals refers not only to 
the point at the immediate confluence of two rivers, but to the ter- 
ritory included between the two streams for some miles above. Thus, 
"the Forks of the Delaware" comprises nearly the whole county of 
Northampton ; " the Forks of the Susquehanna," the tract for some 
distance above Northumberland. (Day, " Hist. Col. Penna.") In 
this instance the Forks appears to have included all between the head 
waters of the Brandywine and the confluence of its two branches. 

f Tredyffrin, Uwchlan, and Nantmeal in Chester County ; Caernarvon 
and Brecknock, in both Berks County and Lancaster ; Cymry (Cumru) 
in Berks County. 

21 



■22 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

others, to enjoy the religious freedom accorded to all. 
Among them were several Presbyterian families, and 
as early as 1710 the records of Presbytery make 
mention of the church in Tredyffrin, or the Great 
Valley Church. 

This section, however, which was known by the 
name of Cain,* had but few inhabitants for several 
years afterwards.f The first township officer, a con- 
stable, was elected in 1720. From that date, however, 
and especially in 1729, the Scotch and Scotch-Irish 
arrived and settled in considerable numbers. They 
were nearly all Presbyterians, or in sympathy with 
the Presbyterian form of church government. At 
first they were too few and too much scattered to 
organize churches, and therefore depended, for the 
most part, on occasioiial visits from the pastors of the 
Welsh Presbyterian churches who could address them 
in English. 

Among those who itinerated through this section 
at that period, and preached in a grove or in private 
houses on the Sabbath, was David Evans, subsequently 
pastor of the church at Tredyffrin. J 

In October, 1824, the Eev. Adam Boyd was in- 
stalled pastor of the churches of Octoraro (Upper 

* It was divided into East and West Cain in 1728. 

f See Appendix P. 

J Samuel Evans, a son of David Evans, succeeded his father at 
Tredyffrin, but relinquished his charge without the consent of Pres- 
bytery, and was disowned by the Synod in 1751. His son Israel 
served as chaplain from 1777 to the close of the Eevolutionary war, 
and died in 1807. He published several sermons. His great-grand- 
father was a minister in Wales. 



IN " THE FOEKS OP BliANDYWINE." 23 

Octoraro) and Pequea. As these were frontier 
churches, Mr. Boyd, in compliance with the directions 
of Presbytery, visited and preached in portions of the 
country where Preshyterians had settled, but where 
no church had been organized. Many of the residents 
of these places in time came to be regarded as mem- 
bers of his congregation, and contributed to his support. 
This appears to have been the case with those who 
were subsequently organized as a church in this place, 
for, at a meeting of the Presbytery of Donegal, held 
at Octoraro, June 5, 1734,* the following record was 
placed on the minutes : " The people at the Forks of 
Brandywine, being a part of Mr. Boyd's congregation, 
put in a supplication to the Presbytery for liberty of 
erecting a meeting-house for Mr. Boyd to preach 
in when sometimes he comes to them, which was 
granted." 

It ought perhaps to be stated, in this connection, 
that the Synod or Presbytery for the limits of the 
authority of each were not well defined at that time, 
and for several years afterwards claimed and exercised 
the right to say where and when a meeting-house 
should be built. If one was erected without their 
consent they refused to send supplies or install a 
pastor; and even went so far as to censure any 
member of either body who conducted divine service 
in a building erected without their approval. A case 
of this kind occurred at New London, where the 



* All dates in the last century before September, 1752, are Old Style, 
or eleven days earlier than they would be by the present method of 
reckoning time, New Style. 



24 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Presbytery ordered the doors of a meeting-liouse 
which had been built to be closed. This caused 
several appeals to the Synod and the Presbytery to 
reverse their decision, gave rise to much angry feeling, 
and delayed the organization of the church and the 
settlement of a pastor for several years. The exercise 
of such authority to the same extent at present would 
be deemed arbitrary, but then it seems to have been, 
and still is, in a measure, necessary, in order to prevent 
the erection of buildings and the organization of 
churches unable to support a stated ministry. But, 
to return to the history of this Church. 

Having received permission to build a meeting- 
house, and, as they supposed, to organize as a distinct 
congregation, the members obtained a triangular lot 
of ground containing six and a half acres, built a 
house for public worship, elected elders, and applied 
to Presbytery at its meeting in April (4), 1735, held 
at Chestnut Level, for supplies. At the same time an 
application was made by the congregation of Octoraro 
" desiring the subscription of these people (those in 
the Forks of Brandywine) may be continued for Mr. 
Boyd's support." The Presbytery, after hearing the 
statements of the parties, came to the following, among 
other, conclusions : 

"First. That the said people (the people in the 
Forks) had quite mistaken the matter in deeming 
themselves already erected, whereas it is not so ; only 
they were granted leave to build an house for their 
more convenient enjoying the visits of Mr. Boyd." 

"Secondly. The Presbytery judge that said people 
be contented as part of Mr. Boyd's charge as formerly ; 



IN "the forks op bkandywine." 25 

and, further, Presbytery judge that said people have 
acted ungratefully towards Mr. Boyd and the congre- 
gation of Octoraro for his former kindness and care 
toward them." 

The Presbytery also ordered them to make a " list 
of all the people of our communion or profession 
dwelling in the confines of said designed erection 
next to the border of Octoraro, and send said list to 
Mr. Boyd." 

At a meeting of the Presbytery of Donegal, held 
June 10, 1735, Jno. Hamilton, as commissioner from 
the Forks of Brandywine, presented a " supplication" 
to be erected into a distinct congregation, a list of 
the people according to the order of Presbytery, 
and a paper, unsubscribed, alleged to be from said 
people, casting groundless reflections on Mr. Boyd. 
"With this paper the Presbytery find great fault." 

The Presbytery ordered the usual perambulations, 
and also selected two persons, who were directed to, 
choose a third, to act as arbitrators in settling the 
difficulty with William Craige, " who complained of 
being wronged in relation to his interest in a part of 
,the meeting-house." 

On the 15th of September, 17,35,* another " sup- 
plication" from the Forks of Brandywine was pre- 
sented to the Presbytery, and also a request that 
Presbytery would concur with them in endeavoring 
to procure a visit from some of the young gentlemen 
lately arrived from Ireland and connected with New 
Castle Presbytery, in order to give such visitor a call. 



* 26th of September, New Style. 
3 



26 HISTORY OP THE PKESBYTEBIAN CHURCH 

The Presbytery, after observing that they had been 
badly treated, and having received an apology from 
the Commissioners for their " misdemeanor," and an 
assurance that all arrearages to Mr. Boyd would be 
paid until the next November, " erected said people 
into a distinct congregation." 

The Presbytery also complained of the location of 
the naeeting-house, and recommended that no dead be 
buried there until the matter was finally settled. 

In April, 1736, Jno. Hamilton and James Ward 
appeared as Commissioners from the Forks of Brandy- 
wine, with a list of subscriptions and a call to Mr. 
Samuel Black, one of the young men above referred 
to. The Presbytery did not consider the call to be in 
proper form, and also disapproved of the sum of fifty 
pounds mentioned in the call, when the subscription 
was nearly sixty-six, but placed the consideration of 
it with Mr. Black. 

May 23, 1736, at a meeting of the Presbytery held 
at Nottingham, Bobert Hamilton and Edward Irwin,. 
Commissioners from the Forks of Brandywine, pre- 
sented a call to Mr. Black, with the amount increased 
to fifty-fi.ve pounds Pennsylvania currency ($1461). 
" The call was placed in the hands of Mr. Black, and 
he accepted it." 

On the 10th of November, 1736, the Presbytery 
met at the Forks of Brandywine, and ordained and 
installed Mr. Black as pastor of the congregation. 

No records remain of the number of members of 
the Church when Mr. Black became pastor. Nor are 
there any means of ascertaining the attendance on 
the Sabbath, or the interest manifested in the subject 



27 

of religion. That the members were few, and the 
weekly assemblages far from large, may be inferred 
from the condition of the country, which was still, to 
a great extent, a wilderness. This is shown by the 
report of the Commissioners who laid out the Paxtang 
Road* in ,1735-36. In that report they make no 
mention of farms or buildings of any kind, except the 
" Presbyterian's Meetirig-House," in the entire dis- 
tance from the Welsh Mountain, or Lancaster County 
line, to several miles northeast of this place. 

Indeed, even so late as the close of the Revolu- 
tionary war, the roads were little more than " bridle- 
paths" through the forest. Those, therefore, whom 
business detained to a late hour at Chester, then the 
"seat of justice," were often obliged to leave the 
"finding of the way home" to that sagacious animal, 
the horse. 

Mr. Black had been settled but a short time as pas- 
tor, when the difference of views which prevailed in 
the Presbyterian Church, and which finally led to the 
" Great Schism," caused dissensions between him and 
his people, and gave rise to - charges and counter- 
charges which were far from creditable to either the 
pastor or the members of his flock. This state of 
affairs, alike unfavorable to the growth of the Church 
and the promotion of piety, continued in this and 
other congregations until the Protest of June 1, 
1741, closed the controversy, and the Presbyterian 



* Peixtan, spelled Peichong, Pechetan, Paxtang, and Paxton, in old 
records, once an Indian wigwam or village where Harrisburg now 
stands. (Rupp, " Hist, of Lancaster Co.") 



28 HISTORY OP THE PKESBYTERIAN CHTJECH 

Church became two separate bodies with a distinct 
organization. 

Immediately after this event a majority of Mr. 
Black's charge withdrew, and, those who remained 
being too few to sustain weekly services oh the Sab- 
bath, the pastoral relation was dissolved. 

The minority. Old Side, either by an amicable 
arrangement or a determined' resistance, kept posses- 
sion of the meeting-house and ground, and obtained 
permission from Presbytery to engage the services of 
Mr. Boyd, of Octoraro, one-half of his time, at a 
yearly salary of twenty pounds, Pennsylvania cur- 
rency. 

Mr. Boyd was installed on the 12th of August, 
1741, and continued to be their pastor until a few 
months after the reunion. May 28, 1758, when he 
ceased to occupy their pulpit, although the pastoral 
relation was not formally dissolved. 

In the mean time, those who seceded. New Side, 
were not inactive. They purchased a rectangular lot 
of ground containing three acres, a little to the east 
of the former church property, and erected a com- 
fortable building for public worship. They were 
regularly supplied by the Synod of New Brunswick 
until May or June, 1745, when the Kev. Mr. Dean 
became their pastor. He remained until his death, in 
July, 1748. 

Of the condition of this church during his short 
ministry no record can be found,* but, from the tra- 



* The Minutes of the " New Side" Presbytery of New Castle are 
lost. 



m " THE FOKKS OF BKANDYWINE." 29 

ditional popularity and faithfulness of Mr. Dean, the 
conclusion may be drawn that it was highly pros- 
perous. 

After his death, although the congregation gave a 
call to a Mr. John Todd, and perhaps to some others, 
they remained without a stated pastor, but, as the' 
heat of the controversy cooled with the lapse of years, 
many of them attended the ministry of Mr. Boyd. 

From the withdrawal of Mr. Boyd, in the autumn 
of 1758, until the installation of Mr. Carmichael, in 
the spring of 1761, the pulpits of both the churches 
were vacant, and public worship seems to have been 
in a measure suspended. 

After the settlement of Mr. Carmichael, an almost 
immediate change took place. Energetic, zealous, and 
faithful, he soon acquired a commanding influence, 
which resulted in the erection of a large and con- 
venient meeting-house, the restoration of harmony 
among the people, and ' the addition of many to the 
congregation. 

During the struggle for National Independence, 
when, as happens in almost all wars, inroads are made 
on morals and piety languishes, the religious fervor of 
his people was not permitted to cool, nor the efforts 
to arrest the torrent of vice to become either few or 
weak. 

Believing with the Hebrew King, that he who win- 
neth souls is wise, Mr. Carmichael, after the close 
of the Revolutionary conflict, labored with increased 
diligence for the conversion of sinners, until his death 
left his congregation to mourn the loss of their beloved 
pastor. 



30 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

From the commencement to the end of his ministry, 
although there were few copious showers, yet the 
outspread fleece was always wet with the dews of 
heaven. 

A few months after the decease of Mr. Carmichael 
the church building was destroyed by fire. As this 
occurred at a period of financial depression and un- 
certainty, the hand of affliction seemed to be laid 
heavily upon the flock without a shepherd. Trusting, 
however, that the Great Head of the Church would 
temper His chastisements with mercy, they obtained 
supplies from the Presbytery of New Castle and also 
of Philadelphia, engaged energetically in the collec- 
tion of funds, and soon commenced the reconstruction 
of their meeting-house. 

Among those who supplied the vacant pulpit, was 
Nathan Grier, a licentiate of the Presbytery of Phil- 
adelphia. His preaching was so well received that 
before the building was completed the congregation 
gave him a unanimous call. This he accepted, and, 
having placed himself under the care of the Presby- 
tery of New Castle, to which the church belonged^ was 
ordained and installed the twenty-second of August, 
1787. 

Mr. Grier entered with zeal on the discharge of 
the duties of his pastorate, and the results of his in- 
dustry and faithfulness soon became manifest. The 
rebuilding of the meeting-house was finished. The 
difficulties which arose from the unsettled monetary 
condition of the country were overcome, and the 
burden of sorrow was lifted from the hearts of 
those who, adopting the plaintive language of the 



IN " THE FORKS OF BRANDYWINE." 31 

prophet,* had refused to be comforted on account of 
the destruction of the house of God and the death 
of him who had ministered at its altar. 

Having the reputation of an able divine, " apt to 
teach," members of his congregation and others who 
were preparing for the Christian ministry gladly 
placed themselves under his direction. They were 
faithfully traiiled, and near a score of young men 
went forth prepared to battle with the arch-enemy of 
souls. 

But the labors of Mr. Grier as a teacher and a 
pastor were unexpectedly ended. While his eye was 
scarcely dimmed and his natural force unabated, he 
was removed from his abode on earth to his Heavenly 
home. The grief on account of his death was wide- 
spread, and a greater number followed his remains to 
the grave than the most aged had ever seen assem- 
bled on a similar occasion. 

How many were connected with the Church at the 
commencement of the ministry of the Rev. Nathan 
Grier cannot be ascertained. ' At its close the num- 
ber of members was two hundred and thirty-two. 
A record of those admitted annually to the Church 
the last ten years of his pastorate has been pre- 
served. Taking the addition to the membership 
each year of that period as the annual average, not 
less than six hundred became connected with the 
Church during the nearly twenty-seven years of his 
ministry. 

Shortly after the death of Mr. Grier, a call from 

* Isaiah Ixiv. 11. 



32 HISTOEY OF THE PE.ESBYTEEIAN CHUECH 

the congregation was placed in the hands of his 
younger son, the Rev. J. N. C. Grier. This call he 
accepted, and on the twenty-fourth of November, 
1814, entered on his pastoi:ate of upwards of fifty- 
four years. 

At that period many of the customs and habits of 
the first settlers prevailed. The members of the con- 
gregation came on horseback or a-foot to attend the 
services of the sanctuary, a large number of them 
clothed in garments of domestic manufacture. Visits 
to the cities, or intercourse with the world at a dis- 
tance, w6re limited. There was no post-office nearer 
than Coatesville or Downingtpwn, and few religious 
periodicals. Sunday-schools were not organized in a 
single church connected with the Presbytery, and 
societies for the suppression of intemperance were 
unknown. But an increase of facilities for travel 
and the general advance of improvement wrought 
changes. A post-office was established at a convenient 
distance in 1816. A Sunday-school was organized in 
1820, a missionary society in 1829, and a temperance 
association formed in 1831. A religious newspaper, 
published at Wilmington, Delaware, was taken by 
several members of the Church, and the taste for 
reading created among the young by the publications 
of the Sunday-School and the Tract Society* led, a few 
years later, to the general support and perusal of the 
'Presbyterian, Presbyterian Journal, American Messen- 
ger, and other religious periodicals. 

In several of these movements Dr. Grier took an 



Organized in 1825. 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BBANDYWINE." 33 

active and in others a leading part, while all of them 
had his cordial support. 

But his labors were not confined to merely bettering 
the temporal condition, or in improving and increas- 
ing the facilities for acquiring knowledge. In the 
pulpit he faithfully preached Jesus Christ and Him 
crucified as the sinner's only hope of safety, and 
earnestly besought the impenitent to lay hold of the 
salvation offered in the Gospel. At every communion 
there was an addition to the church membership, but 
in 1822, and especially in 1831 and several yeai's 
immediately following, there was a copious " refresh- 
ing from the Lord," and a large number became 
members of his charge. Such was the success of 
his labors that, notwithstanding four Presbyterian 
Churches which "live and flourish," and ten belong- 
ing to other denominations were organized within 
what had been the bounds of his charge, the mem- 
bership of the Church at the close of his ministry 
was about the same as when he entered on the dis- 
charge of his duties as pastor. 

Although Dr. Grier was not called upon, as Mr. Car- 
michael had been, to aid in the struggle for National 
Independence, nor, like his father, to train young men 
as ambassador^ for Christ, yet he added by his faith- 
fulness to the number of those who went forth as 
heralds of the everlasting Gospel. During his pas- 
torate sixteen young men to whom he first broke the 
" Bread of Life" devoted themselves to the Christian 
ministry. Two of them, Mr. David Templeton and 
Mr. Matthew Brown, were removed to the "better 
land" before they had finished their theological 



34 HISTOKY OF THE PBESBYTERIAN CHTJKCH 

course. The other fourteen, of whom short bio- 
graphical sketches are given in this work, became 
faithful soldiers of the Cross. Eight of them have 
fought the good fight and finished their course re- 
joicing. One, after a successful pastorate of twenty- 
one years, was forced by ill health to withdraw from 
active service at the altar; another was the founder and 
for a long period the principal of a popular educational 
institution, and a third is the senior editor of a widely- 
circulated and influential religious newspaper. The 
remaining five are engaged in making known "the 
unsearchable riches of Christ" in each of the Middle 
and one of the Western States. 

But while Dr. Grier was zealously and earnestly 
engaged in the discharge of the duties of his sacred 
calling, the lapse of more than half a century brought 
changes. The members of Presbytery with whom he 
first met had passed away. A majority of his hearers 
on the Sabbath were the descendants of those who had 
invited him to take the spiritual oversight of the con- 
gregation. The infirmities of more than threescore 
and ten pressed heavily upon him, and, feeling that he 
was no longer able to labor in the Master's vineyard, 
he requested and obtained a dissolution of the pastoral 
relation.* 

After the retirement of Dr. Grier the congregation 
was dependent on supplies. Among those who oc- 
cupied the vacant pulpit was the Eev. Wm. W. 
Heberton, a licentiate of the Central Presbytery of 
Philadelphia. The services of Mr. Heberton were 

* Appendix H. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWINE." 35 

SO well received that a call made on the 18th of July, 
1869, by the congregation, to become their pastor, was 
placed in his hands, which he accepted, and was 
ordained and installed October 28, 1869. The 
pastoral relation was dissolved in October, 1872, by 
the Presbytery of Chester. 

During the ministry of Mr. Heberton the parson- 
age was built, twenty-nine were added to the member- 
ship of the Church, and three of the Ruling Elders 
were removed by death. 

In June, 1873, Mr. Heberton was installed pastor 
of the Presbyterian Church at Elkton, Md., where 
"the work of, the Lord has prospered in his hands." 
Near a hundred have united with the Church during 
Ms ministry. Christian harmony prevails, and the 
influence for good of both the pastor and his people 
is daily increasing.* > 

After the withdrawal of Mr. Heberton the pulpit 
was supplied by the Rev. Mr. Bingham, of Oxford, 
Pa., and by some young men who were candidates for 
settlement. Among them was the Rev. John M'Coll, 
a graduate of the University of Toronto, Canada, and 
of the Theological Seminary at Princeton. 



* Mr. Heberton is a native of Columbia County, in this State. His 
classical studies were pursued at Media, Delaware County, and bis 
collegiate at Lafayette, Easton, where he was graduated in 1865. He 
spent the next eighteen months after bis graduation in the study of 
medicine, and then entered the Theological Seminary at Princeton. 
He finished his preparation for the ministry in the spring of 1869, 
and was licensed in April of that year. His pastoral oversight of 
this congregation was his first charge. 



36 HISTORY OF THE PBESBYTEEIAN CHTJECH 

The ministrations of Mr. M'Coll were so satisfac- 
tory that he received a call from the congregation to 
become their pastor,, and was ordained and installed 
by a committee of the Presbytery of Chester on the 
24th of July, 1873. On that occasion the Eev. J. 
Collier presided, Rev. Mr. Totheroth preached the 
sermon, Rev. Mr. Pomeroy charged the pastor, and 
Rev. Mr. Collier the people. The trial-sermon of 
Mr. M'Coll was from Heb. iv. 12. 

The ministry of Mr. M'Coll has been successful, and 
the membership of the church under his discreet over- 
sight has increased. Two Sabbath-schools have been 
organized in the outlying districts of his charge. 
The new church edifice is filled on the Sabbath, and 
a growing interest in the subject of religion is daily 
becoming more manifest. 

The meeting-house having become scarcely safe for 
public worship and the congregation having resolved 
to build another, Mr. M'Coll aided greatly in the 
furtherance of the work by the collection and disburse- 
ment of funds, the arrangement of plans, and encour- 
agement at periods of difficulty and despondency. 
Finally, his efforts, seconded by the liberality of his 
congregation, were crowned with success. When the 
new meeting-house, free from debt, was dedicated to 
the service of the Triune God, he could thankfully 
and reverently have asked, in the words of the 
Psalmist, " Who am I and what is my people that we 
should be able to offer so willingly after this sort ?" 

May the pastorate so auspiciously begun be long 
continued, and on the Great Day may many, very 
many, whom he had gathered into the fold of the 



IN " THE rOEKS OF BRANDY WINE." 37 

Redeemer, shine as stars in the " Crown of his rejoic- 
ing."* 

MEETING-HOUSES.f 



FIEST MEETING-HOUSE. 

Of this building we have no authentic information, 
except such as some remains of the foundation which 
existed at a comparatively recent period afforded of 
its size and situation, and a few collateral statements 
which have escaped the ravages of time. In all else 
tradition is the only authority. But in this instance 
tradition agrees with the recorded description of 
buildings erected for the same purpose in the pioneer 
settlements of Virginia, North Carolina, and the 
western counties of our own State. 

This meeting-house, which was built either in the 
summer or fall of 1734, stood in what is now a part 
of the " upper graveyard," a few rods east from the 
northwest corner of the ground which the congrega- 
tion had obtained for church purposes. The size was 
about forty feet by twenty-five. It was placed, like 
nearly all buildings erected at that period, with the 
front to the south, and north of the Indian trail, then 
used as the highway. The material used was un- 

* Minutes of Presbytery of Newcastle ; Minutes of Presbytery 
of Donegal ; Dr. Grier's " Historical Discourse ;" Cburoh Records ; 
Local Memoranda. 

■f Buildings set apart for public worship by the early settlers, Bap- 
tists, Presbyterians, and Friends, were called meeting-houses, as they 
still are by the last-named denomination. In England the places of 
worship of the Dissenters are uniformly called meeting-houses. 



38 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHTJKCH 

hewn logs, ridged and notched at the corners, and let 
into what workmen call a king-post in the middle of 
each side. It was low, dimly lighted, unplastered, 
and without any means of obtaining heat. Logs cleft 
in two and smoothed on one side served as seats, and 
the pulpit was little more than a rough, elevated table. 
Rudely constructed and poorly furnished, it was also 
far from being a substantial building. This is shown 
by the fact that, although it was used, at least twice a 
month, during twenty-five years for divine worship, 
and considerable repairs must have been made, yet at 
the end of that period it was wholly unfit for the 
public services of the sanctuary. 

That comfortless structure would contrast strangely 
with the commodious edifice which has recently been 
built ; and yet many interesting events, events which 
ought never to be forgotten, are associated with that 
primitive meeting-house. In it those worshipped who 
organized a church in this portion of what was then 
a wilderness. There Samuel Black entered on the 
arduous labors of a pioneer minister of the Gospel ; 
and there Adam Boyd, during seventeen years, broke 
the Bread of Life to those who had come for Spiritual 
nourishment through pathless forests and from laumble 
homes, and who devoutly thanked God that they could 
worship Him without the dread of banishment, the 
dungeon, or the stake. 

More than a century has passed since Black and 
Boyd were called to their reward, and the features of 
all and even the names of the greater part of their 
hearers are no longer remembered ; but the germs of 
truth which they planted continue to flourish and 



39 

bear immortal fruit. The ground which they devoted 
to sacred purposes is still hallowed ground, and along 
the course of one hundred and fifty years are strewn 
blessed proofs that the Most High has had the Church 
then organized in His Holy Keeping. 



SECOND MEETING-HOUSE. 

This was probably built in 1744, and may have 
been one of the inducements which led the Rev. Mr. 
Dean to accept a second call from the New Side con- 
gregation. It stood on the vacant ground immediately 
above the " lower graveyard," with the front to the 
south. It was a well-constructed frame building, 
about forty-five feet by thirty-five, one story high, 
with a hipped or angular roof, and without a gallery.* 

There does not appear to have been any means for 
affording heat in the building ; but this inconvenience 
was probably obviated, to some extent, by the Session- 
House, which was placed near' the southeast corner of 
the property. This, like the Session-Houses built at 
an early period in other parts of this State, may have 
been furnished with a fireplace, where persons could 
have the benefit of heat before they entered the main 
building. 

When the union of the Presbyterian Church took 
place, in 1758, and the first meeting-house was aban- 

* The difference between the first and the second meeting-house 
shows the advance which had been made in ten years in the prepara- 
tion and use of materials. The first saw-mill in the vicinity, accord- 
ing to tradition, was built about 1Y40, on the West Branch of the 
Brandywine, above the Beaver Dam. 



40 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

doned, this building was too small to accomiitfodate all 
who assembled on the Sabbath, and after the erection 
of the Manor Meeting-House it was no longer used 
as a place for public worship. It remained unoccu- 
pied several years, until the members who resided in 
the eastern bounds of the congregation moved it to 
the ground connected with the new church edifice 
and placed it about sixty yards to the east of that 
building. There it served, partly as a shed for stand- 
ing horses, partly as a place for depositing saddles 
and umbrellas in stormy weather, and remained 
until the winter of 1812 or '13, when it was blown 
down and the materials used for fuel. 

Although this building stood upwards of two-thirds 
of a century, public worship was not conducted in it 
more than fifteen or sixteen years ; but during those 
years many incidents worthy of record took place 
within its walls. In it Dean performed his last 
labor ere he was called to his Heavenly rest; and 
Samuel Blair, John Blair, William Tennent, and 
others scarcely less eminent, dwelt with awakening 
earnestness on the condition of the lost. There John 
Carmichael was installed as pastor of the united con- 
gregations, and entered on that important relation 
which ended only .with his life, and from its sacred 
desk was diffused a warm, active piety, alike opposed 
to cold formality and a listless profession. 



41 



THIRD MEETING-HOUSE. " MANOB, MEETING-HOUSE."* 

The erection of this meeting-house, as is stated else- 
where, was due in a great measure to the energy and 
popularity of the pastor, Mr. Carmichael. The united 
congregations rightly judging that the number attend- 
ing on the services of the sanctuary would be largely 
increased, determined to erect a building which would 
accommodate all. They immediately made eflforts to 
obtain the means, and were so successful that the 
work was commenced in the latter part of the summer 
of 1761. Their recently installed pastor, whose labor 
in forwarding the undertaking had been unceasing, 
delivered an animated address when the corner-stone 
was laid, and at the conclusion of the ceremonies, in 
accordance with the custom of the time, threw a 
Twenty-Shilling note on the stone to treat the masons. 
The building was erected under the direction of 
Samuel Cunningham,f chief carpenter. No cut stone 

* It received the name of the Manor Meeting-House because it 
was placed within the limits of Springtown (Springton) Manor. 
This Manor was laid out in 1729, but its boundaries were not finally 
determined until near a score of years afterwards. It included nearly 
the whole of the present Township of Wallace, and portions of 
West Brandywine, West Nantmeal, and Honeybrook. The first set- 
tlers in this Manor were, with two or three exceptions, Scotch and 
Scotch-Irish. The misnomer, Brandywine Manor, given to the first 
post-office established near the Church edifice, gradually led to its 
being applied to the Church itself, by which name, except in ecclesias- 
tical records, it is now generally known. 

"j" Samuel Cunningham, whose remains were interred in the " lower 
graveyard," was a Member of the Assembly from Chester County in 
1776-77 ; a Delegate to the Convention which formed the First 
Constitution of Pennsylvania ; a Collector of the Excise, and many 

4 



42 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

was used in the construction, nor any lumber which 
was not obtained from the neighboring forests, except 
the outer covering of the roof. 

This Meeting-House was sixty-five feet by forty- 
five, two stories high, and at the time of its erection 
was the largest stone edifice in the northwestern part 
of Chester County. 

The Pulpit was placed in the South side of the 
building. There was an entrance at the East end, 
and another at the West, connected by an aisle which 
equally divided the lower part of the building or 
audience-room. Another aisle led from this to an 
entrance on the North side opposite the Pulpit. All 
the pews were arranged from North to South. Those, 
therefore, who occupied the pews North of the main 
aisle sat with a side to the Pulpit. There were no 
flues nor any arrangement made in the construction 
of the building for supplying heat. 

This Meeting-House was never completed accord- 
ing to the original plan ; the gallery and some other 
parts being omitted on account of a want of funds. 

In order to afford some degree of warmth vessels 
made of sheet-iron and shaped like a mill-hopper 
were placed in the aisles and filled with live coals. 
Some of the coals falling on the floor caused the 
destruction of the building in February, 1786. The 
sexton, it was said, saw the light when the fire might 
have been extinguished, but being a believer in ap- 



years a Justice of the Peace. His death occurred June 22, 1806, 
aged seventy-four. A great-grandson of Esqr. Cunningham, Matthew 
Brown, died while preparing to enter the ministry. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BE ANDY WINE." 43 

paritions, he did not venture near until others attracted 
by the light arrived, when nothing could be done to 
arrest the progress of the flames. 

The members of the congregation, deeply grieved 
by the recent death of their beloved pastor, Mr. Car- 
michael, were now subjected to the additional affliction 
of seeing all that was combustible in their Meeting- 
House reduced to ashes. They were dismayed but 
not disheartened. In the beginning of the next 
month, March, 1786, they addressed a well-written and 
earnest appeal* to their Christian brethren for assist- 
ance, and appointed agents to solicit aid. 

Among the most diligent of those engaged in 
collecting funds was Eider William Hunter. He 
called for that purpose not only at every house within 
a distance of several miles, but even accosted persons 
on the highway, earnestly requesting and thankfully 
receiving even the smallest amount. He also visited 
Chester, the Turk's Head, now West Chester, and 
Philadelphia, then the seat of the general government, 
where he obtained assistance from the following well- 
known citizens : 

Dr. Rush and Dr. Frankliuj Signers of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. 

David Rittenhouse, the celebrated mathematician, 
and the first Director of the Mint of the United 
States. 

Edward Shippen, the first Mayor of Philadelphia, 
and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of this State. 

William Shippen, a Professor in the University of 

* See Appendix A. 



44 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Pennsylvania, and the first who delivered a course of - 
Medical Lectures in America. 

William Bradford, Attorney-General of the United 
States. 

Colonel Andrew Porter, an ofiicer in the army 
of the Kevolution, and Surveyor-General of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Tench Coxe, an able writer on Political Economy. 

General John Potter, a distinguished officer in the 
Continental army. 

John Nicholson, the well-known land agent. 

Jonathan D. Sargent, at that time the leading 
member of the Philadelphia Bar. 

Mark Wilcox, an influential merchant. 

Joseph and Colonel William Dean, sons of the 
Rev. William Dean, and many others less known, 
but not less benevolent. 

These names are given to show that at a period 
when the country was impoverished by war, when it 
had only a depreciated and depreciating currency, 
and was without a stable form of government, men 
of all classes contributed to the fund for the restora- 
tion of the venerable building which withstood the 
storms of more than a century and around which so 
many hallowed associations clustered. 

But to return to the history of the reconstruction 
of the Church edifice. When sufficient funds had been 
collected, as the members of the congregation supposed, 
to restore their Meeting-House, the work was com- 
menced. The walls, with the exception of the gables, 
having been found on examination to be so far unin- 
jured as not to require them to be taken down, the 



IN " THE FORKS OF BKANDYWINE." 45 

reconstruction was confined mainly to roofing the 
building and restoring the interior. In doing this 
several alterations and some additions were made. 
A gallery was placed along each end and the side 
opposite the Pulpit. The pews North of the Main 
Aisle, which formerly ran from North to South, were 
arranged in a direction East and West, or at right 
angles to those South of that avenue. Flues were 
built in the gables, and ten-plate stoves, the gift of 
Colonel Grubb, of Lancaster County, were placed in 
the aisles. The Pulpit was remodelled, made to 
occupy less space, and furnished with a "sounding- 
board," or projection from the wall over the head of 
the speaker. At the base of the Pulpit and not un- 
like it, though smaller, a stand was arranged for the 
use of the precentors, or those who led the choir. To 
prevent accidents by fire in the same manner as had 
occurred, the aisles were laid with mortar or cement 
instead of boards. 

The reconstruction was done under the direction of 
Samuel Cunningham, Esq., who, as before stated, had 
the oversight of the building when it was first erected.* 
Although the work was commenced in the summer of 
1786, it progressed slowly, and the building was not 
entirely completed when the E.ev. Nathan Grier was 
installed as pastor, in August, 1787. The cost, as 
appears by the Treasurer's account, was a little more 
than a Thousand Pounds Pennsylvania currency, or 
about twenty-seven hundred dollars. 

* He superintended the erection of the second Meeting-House at 
Fagg's Manor, and probably of the third Meeting-House at Octoraro, 
built/ in 1769. 



46 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

This meeting-house remained without any change 
in the interior and with trifling repairs, except a new 
roof (in 1827), until 1839. In that year it was re- 
modelled and made to conform in a consideral^le 
degree to the plan adopted in the arrangement of 
Church edifices at the present time. As the alterations 
then made remained until the building was taken 
down, in 1875, it is unnecessary to state them ex- 
cept as matters of record. Suffice it to say that the 
door at the North side, and also the one at the East 
end, were walled up. Instead of these a door was 
made on the South side about twelve feet from the East 
corner. An aisle led from this door in front of the 
Pulpit, which was placed in a recess at the East end of 
the building. A gallery was constructed along both 
sides and the end opposite the Pulpit. This gallery 
was reached by a flight of stairs on each side of the 
vestibule, which adjoined the main entrance at the 
West end. Aisles with a row of pews on each side led 
from the vestibule to the aisle in front of the Pulpit. 

Such are the main facts connected with a building 
whose walls stood one hundred and fourteen years-, 
and whose size and situation remained unchanged 
during that long period. When it was erected there 
was no other house for public worship within ten 
miles in any direction except the Seceder Meeting- 
House, no longer in existence, and the Friends' Meet- 
ing-House "up on the hill from the valley," Old 
Cain, built in 1756. Now, in addition to -four other 
Church edifices belonging to Presbyterians, there are 
in the same bounds twenty buildings for Divine wor- 
ship, occupied by five different denominations. 



iw "the foeks of beandywine." 47 

It may be stated as a fitting close to the history of 
the Manor Meeting-House, that from the dedication 
of the building in 1761 until it was taken down in 
1875,* the congregations worshipping in it were not 
more than three years without a stated ministry. 
Also that during one hundred and five years of that 
interval its pulpit was occupied by three pastors only, 
— the Rev. John Carmichael, the Rev. Nathan Grier, 
and the Rev. J. N. C. Grier, D.D. An example of 
Christian harmony and of attachment between pastors 
and people which has few parallels even in the annals 
of the Presbyterian Church.f 

FOUETH MEETING-HOUSE. 

The Manor Meeting-House having become in a 
measure unsafe, and in need of extensive repairs, the 
question arose, whether it would be better to place that 
building in a proper condition for public worship or 
to erect another. On the one hand, it was evident 
that repairing it would only be a postponement for 
some years of the erection of a church edifice, and 
that, if refitted in the best manner possible, it would 
still be wanting in a lecture-room and other conven- 
iences, now deemed necessary in houses set apart for 
the services of the sanctuary. On the other hand, the 
expense of erecting a building at a period of pecun- 
iary embarrassment, and the desire of many to preserve 

* The last sermon was preached in the building June 13, 1875, by 
the pastor, Mr. M'Coll, from Jeremiah vi. 13. 

■j" Local Memoranda ; Records of Session ; Minutes of Presbytery 
of Newcastle. 



48 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

the meeting-house in which they and their fathers 
had worshipped, were subjects for earnest and thought- 
ful consideration. 

Several meetings were held, at which the matter was 
discussed and carefully examined in all its bearings, 
but without arriving at a definite conclusion. At last 
a committee was appointed to report on the condition 
of the meeting-house, and to state whether it would be 
best to repair or to build. 

On the 24th of March, 1874, the committee re- 
ported that after hearing the opinion of competent 
men, Messrs. Sloan and Bunn, of Honey Brook, who 
had examined the meeting-house, it had been unan- 
imously resolved to recommend the erection of a new 
church edifice. The report was accepted, and a reso- 
lution adopted to proceed as soon as possible in con- 
'structing a building. The pastor, Mr. McColl, was 
appointed to solicit funds for that purpose, and re- 
quested to report when, according to his judgment, an 
amount sufficient to warrant a commencement of the 
work had been secured. 

Having entered on the performance of the task 
assigned him with ancestral Scotch zeal and persever- 
ance, Mr. McColl was able to state at a meeting of the 
congregation, held the next September (15th), that 
in addition to many offers of labor gratuitously, up- 
wards of ten thousand dollars had been subscribed. 
It was therefore determined to commence the work 
early the next spring. At the same meeting Messrs. 
John Ralston, William Templeton, and Baxter B. 
McClure were chosen a committee to procure plans 
and have the general oversight in the construction of 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BEANDYWINE." 49 

the building. Mr. McColl was also appointed treas- 
urer of the funds collected for the " new erection." 

The members of the committee, in compliance with 
their instructions, examined several church edifices,' 
and engaged Mr. Samuel Sloan, an architect of Phila- 
delphia, to furnish plans. They likewise invited 
proposals from builders, and, after careful deliberation, 
awarded the contract for the greater portion of the 
work to Mr. William Poole, of Philadelphia." 

The masons began work on the foundation the 28th 
of June, 1875, and the corner-stone was laid with 
appropriate ceremonies* on the 7th of August in the 
same year. Owing, however, to unfavorable weather, 
the limited means of the contractor, and other causes, 
the work progressed slowly, and in the beginning of 
July, 1876, after all the stone had been laid, Mr. 
Poole abandoned the contract. The members of the 
committee were therefore obliged to take upon them- 
selves the completing of the building. They em- 
ployed Ulysses K. Beam, who superintended the 
carpenter work, Samuel B. Buchannan the plaster- 
ing, and S. B. Williams the painting. 

The building, with the exception of a part of the 
tower and the spire, having been at last finished, the 
14th of December, 1876, was appointed for the dedica- 
tion of it to the service of Almighty God. 

On that occasion Dr. J. N. C. Grier made the 
opening prayer. Dr. Matthew B. Grier read a portion 
of Scripture, Dr. N. G. Parke, of Pittston, Pa., led 
in prayer, and Dr. Dickey, pastor of the Calvary 

* See Appendix B. 



50 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

Church, Philadelphia, preached the sermon from II. 
Cor. iii. 18. Remarks were also made by Rev. J. C. 
Thompson, then of Hagerstown, Md., Rev. J. A. 
Liggett, of Rahway, N. J., Rev. Thomas S. Long, of 
Bloomsbury, in the same State, and Rev. David W. 
Moore, at that time a resident of McVeytown, Pa. 

As a considerable amount was still needed to pay 
the indebtedness, after the close of the religious ex- 
ercises>an effort was made to procure funds sufficient 
for that purpose. When about three thousand six 
hundred dollars had been subscribed, it was concluded 
to postpone the dedication until the next Sabbath, 
in order that the building might, if possible, be con- 
secrated to the service of the Most High free from 
encumbrance. 

On Sabbath, December 17, after a sermon by the 
Rev. J. C. Thompson, and addresses by the Rev. David 
W. Moore and the pastor, the amount needed to pay 
all arrearages was pledged. The dedicatory prayer 
was then offered by the Rev. Mr. Moore, and the 
congregation, after singing the 187th Psalm, was 
dismissed, rejoicing. 

The building thus happily completed and freed 
from debt stands a short distance south of the site 
occupied by the Manor Meeting-House, with the 
front towards the North and parallel to the public 
road. It is seventy-three feet by fifty-four feet, with 
a recess for the pulpit, and contains a lecture- and 
Sabbath-school-rooms below, and an audience-room, 
with a gallery at one end, above. The audience-room 
is sixty-eight feet by forty-nine including gallery, 
with a height of thirty-seven feet to the apex in the 



IN " THE FORKS OF BRANDYWINE." 51 

centre. This room is neatly and appropriately fur- 
nished, and the pews, which afford seats for about four 
hundred and fifty, are convenient and well arranged. 

A striking feature, and one which adds beauty and 
interest to the building, is the memorial windows. 
Of these, there are no less than nine commemorative 
of the Rev'ds John Carmichael, Nathan Grier, and 
J. N. C. Grier, D.D., Elder James Ralston, Elder 
James K. Grier, Joseph Mackelduff, Benjamin and 
Agnes McClure, the Manor Sunday-School and the 
Sunday-School at Eockville. 

The entire structure presents an imposing appear- 
ance, and, owing tp the elevated situation, is visible at 
a distance of several miles in almost every direction. 

The cost of the building and improvement of the 
enclosure may be jilaced at twenty-one thousand 
dollars. Of this, about one thousand dollars was con- 
tributed in labor. The ladies of the congregation 
raised nearly fourteen hundred dollars by festivals, 
a fair, and a su2i2>er. The memorial windows were 
presented by the members of the Sunday-Schools and 
by the friends or relatives of the godly persons whose 
names they are intended to perpetuate. 

Although .great credit should be given to the 
members of the Building Committee for the careful 
manner in which they j^erformed the duty assigned 
them, and also to those who so liberally contributed 
funds for the erection of the building, yet much is 
due to the popularity, zeal, and perseverance of the 
pastor, Mr. McColl. Like his predecessor, Mr. Car- 
michael, he has been instrumental in obtaining the 
construction of a large and substantial building for 



52 mSTOKY OF THE PKEBBYTEEIAN CHTJKCH 

public worship, which will remain long after he has 
been removed to a " house not made with hands." 

Such is a brief history of the Fourth Meeting- 
House. What the record will be when it shall have 
been so much impaired by the destroying hand of 
time as to require another in its stead, is known only 
to Him " who sees the end from the beginning." But 
trusting that He will watch over and bless the Church 
established in this place, in the future as He has done 
in the past, may it not be hoped that those who 
assemble the last time within this consecrated build- 
ing will be able truthfully to say, ' Here the Gospel 
has been preached with faithfulness and power. Here 
many have been brought to a knowledge of the Saviour. 
From these hallowed precincts an influence has been 
diffused whose beneficial results will never be fully 
known until the " Book of Remembrance" shall be 
opened, and all the descendants of Adam shall stand 
before their Final Judge.' * 

SECEDER MEETING-HOUSE. 

Messrs. Gellatlyf and Arnott, the first missionaries 
sent by the Seceder Church to America, arrived in 
1753. Being energetic, faithful, and well received, 
especially by those of the early settlers who had been 
connected with that denomination in the fatherland, 
and favored by the schism in the Presbyterian Church, 
they, Henderson, Mason, Annan, Smart, and others, 

* Minutes of Building Committee ; Records of Session ; Com. 
from the Pastor, Mr. McColl ; Local Memoranda. 
t Gellatly died in April (12th), 17G1. 



IN " THE PORKS OF BKANDYWIWE." 63 

gathered congregations and erected buildings for 
public worship. One of these was placed on the 
southern slope of the Barren Hill, where the Wagon- 
town Road intersects the road leading to Coatesville, 
and a few hundred yards from two Presbyterian 
Meeting-Houses. This building, erected in 1766 or 
'57, was poorly constructed, and had become so much 
out of repair in 1780 that a board tent was placed 
in front of it and used in its stead. Religious ex- 
ercises, were conducted in the tent by men of learning 
and ability until about the beginning of the present 
century, when the older members being dead and 
others having connected themselves with the Manor 
Presbyterian Church, those who remained were too 
few to support a stated ministry, and finally ceased to 
be a distinct organization. As a consequence the 
buildings were neglected and soon decayed. Owing 
to its being used as a school-house, and receiving 
some repairs, the Session -house, which was built of very 
small logs, remained a few years after the other struc- 
tures were in ruins. No traces either of it or of the - 
Church edifice and tent are visible. 

The graveyard, which occupies about one-eighth of 
an acre, is kept in repair by some of the descendants 
of those who obtained the site, and is still used as a 
burial-ground. It contains a number of graves, many 
of them unmarked. The first memorial stone placed 
in it bears the date of 1768, the last of 1880. 

John Gilleland, who owned the adjoining farm, 
probably gave the land occupied by the buildings and 
graveyard. His only son, who was murdered by 
some Hessian marauders shortly after the battle of 



54 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

Brandywine, was laid to rest in this enclosure, but no 
lettered stone preserves the name of the victim of 
hireling barbarity. A grandson of Mr. Gilleland, 
the Rev. James Buchanan, was long a faithful min- 
ister of the Presbyterian Church. Nathaniel Erwin, 
a soldier of the Continental army and a son of one 
of the first settlers, and several of his descendants, 
are buried in this graveyard. 

While the futility of attempting to support three 
churches, differing in non-essentials only, within a 
short distance of one another, is shown by their 
becoming merged in one, it nevertheless makes mani- 
fest the determination of our fathers to sustain a 
preached Gospel, and their adherence to the doc- 
trines and modes of worship which they had learned 
and practised before their settlement in the wilds of 
America.* 



* McKerrow, " Hist, of Secession Church ;" Buck, " Theological 
Dictionary;" "Reminiscences of James Dorian;" Local Memoranda. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 



OF THE 



DECEASED PASTORS OF BRANDYWINE MANOR 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



" And I will give you pastors according to mine heart, whicli shall 
feed you with knowledge and understanding."— Jer. iii. 15. 



EEV. SAMUEJ. BLACK. 

Born 1700. Died 1770. 

As has been already stated, the pulpits of the 
Presbyterian Church, during the first half-century of 
its existence in America, were mainly supplied by 
natives of Scotland and the North of Ireland. Some 
of ' them came in answer to the Macedonian cry, 
" comq over and help us," others actuated by the 
spirit which guided Martyn, Heber, Birney, and their 
fellow-laborers to the inhospitable regions of Asia and 
Africa. They were mostly young men, who left home 
and its comforts to share the privations and promote 
the spiritual interests of their countrymen whom 
penury or oppression had driven to the Western 
Wilderness. 

Among those who were led to devote themselves to 
ministerial labor on this side of the Atlantic was 

5 . 57 



58 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTEEIAN CHUKCH 

Samuel Black, who was born in the Highlands of 
Scotland, and educated at Edinburgh. 

Mr. Black came to America in 1734 or '35, with 
credentials, it is said, from the Synod of Glasgow, 
and was received, as a probationer, by the Presbytery 
of New Castle. 

The Presbytery of Donegal, which was formed 
October 11, 1732, consisted at first of but four mem- 
bers.* This necessarily left a number of churches 
within its bounds without any stated ministry. In 
order to afford these destitute congregations an oppor- 
tunity of hearing the preached word, the Presbytery 
of New Castle, in 1735-36, sent several of its proba- 
tioners and others to supply the vacant pulpits. The 
Presbytery of Donegal resented this, and required 
all who occupied pulpits within its jurisdiction to be 
members of that body or, if probationers, that they 
should be examined and licensed by the Presbytery. 
Accordingly, when the congregation in this place 
applied for Mr. Black , to preach for them as a can- 
didate for " settlement," he obtained his dismissal from 
the Presbytery of New Castle, and placed himself 
under the care of the Presbytery of Donegal. 

He was taken on " trials" May 23, 1736, preached 
before Presbytery on Romans viii. 31, lectured on 
the CXIX. Psalm, and read an Exegesis in Latin on 
De supremo judice contraversiam religionis. 

At the next meeting of the Presbytery, October 
27, 1736, after further examination and the delivery 

* They were Anderson, of Donegal ; Bertram, of Derry ; Orr, of 
Lower Octoraro (Nottingham) ; and Boyd, of Upper Octoraro. 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BEANDYWINE." 59 

of discourses on Romans v. 1, and also on Romans 
viii. 8, he was licensed to preach the Gospel. 

Mr. Black having accepted a second call from the 
Congregation in this place to become their pastor, the 
Presbytery, at the same meeting, appointed the second 
Wednesday in the November following for his ordina- 
-tion and installation. 

According to this appointment, he was ordained 
and installed pastor of the Presbyterian Church in 
the Forks of Brandywine on the 10th of November, 
1736. James Anderson, of Donegal, presided and 
preached from 1 Thess. v. 12 and 13. The only other 
ministers present were Alexander Craighead, of 
Middle Octoraro, and Ghelston, late the pastor of New- 
London, who had recently joined the Presbytery of 
Donegal, and was then supplying Pequea and other 
places. 

Mr. Black had been settled but a short time in the 
pastorate when the controversy which agitated and 
finally divided the Presbyterian Church caused dis- 
sensions among his people. Firmly attached to the 
doctrines and practices of the Old Side, he, perhaps, 
was not as reserved in expressing his opinions of the 
"Revivalists" as prudence dictated, nor as guarded in 
conduct as his position and the watchfulness of those 
who differed from him in their religious views de- 
manded. These mistakes, however, would scarcely 
have led a majority of the members of his church to 
bring forward and earnestly press rancorous charges 
against him if the flames of discord had not been 
fanned by some of his ministerial brethren. 

Foremost among these was David Anderson, who, 



60 HISTOEY . OF THE PEESBYTEKIAN CHTJECH 

in October, 1739, had been installed pastor of the 
church in Pequea. Being a zealous partisan of the 
New Side, and believing it to be his duty, as he said, 
to carry the Gospel to a people burdened with a life- 
less ministry, he intruded without hesitation within 
the bounds of Black's charge, and caused the es- 
trangement of many of his flock from their pastor. 
Black appealed to the Presbytery for redress, but An- 
derson refused to obey a citation to appear before that 
body. 

In consequence of these alienations and dissensions, 
twelve charges against Mr. Black were presented to 
the Presbytery at its meeting in September, 1740. 
The principal, of these charges were drunkenness, 
sowing dissensions among his people, and a neglect of 
ministerial work. In the beginning of the Novem- 
ber next following the Presbytery heard the charges, 
and rebuked, but did not suspend him. 

As the manifest intention of the accusers of Mr. 
Black was to have his pulpit declared vacant, and the 
decision of the Presbytery did not accomplish that ob- 
ject, the charges, accompanied by the assertion that 
much important testimony had been kept back, were 
renewed at the meeting of Presbytery, in May,* 1741. 
The Presbytery postponed the hearing until inquiries 
could be made on the spot, but, in deference to the 
importunities of his accusers, suspended him until the 
examination had taken place. 

In the mean time the Synod, then the highest ju- 
dicial tribunal of the Presbyterian Church, met in 
Philadelphia, the celebrated Protest, signed by Robert 
Cross and others, was read, June 1, 1741, the New 



IN " THE rOEKS OP BUANDYWlNE.'* 61 

Brunswick brethren withdrew and formed a separate 
Synod, and the Presbyterian Church was " rent in 
twain." 

In the following month the Presbytery met in this 
place, heard the testimony in support of the charges, 
and after a careful investigation, considered them 
unsustained, and restored Mr. Black. As a majority, 
however, of the congregation had attached themselves 
to the New Side, and those who remained were too 
few to support a stated ministry, the Presbytery dis- 
solved the pastoral relation. 

In October, 1738, the people of Conewago asked 
and obtained leave to be erected into a congregation. 
They also received permission to build a meeting- 
house in what is now the southern part of Dauphin 
County.* August 1, 1741, they presented a call to 
Mr. Black to become their pastor. This he accepted 
at the meeting of Presbytery in the October following 
(27th), and was installed on the second Wednesday 
of May, 1742. 

In 1743 he spent part of his time laboring in 
Central Virginia, then the missionary field of both 
branches of the Presbyterian Church. For reasons 
which have not been stated, he applied for a dissolu- 
tion of the pastoral relation in June, 1744, which the 
Presbytery refused. 

March 26, 1745, he received a call from the congre- 

* The congregation of Conewago remained but a comparatively 
short time as a distinct organization. The riiecting-house, which stood 
near to where the turnpike road leading from Downingtown to Har- 
risburg crosses Conewago Creek, has long since disappeared. Traces 
of the graveyard belonging to it were visible in 1852. 



62 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

gations of Nortli and of South Mountain, Virginia, 
and again asked to be released from his charge at Con- 
ewago, assigning as reasons for removal the weakness 
and fewness of the people. ' The next April Pres- 
bytery granted his request and assigned him to North 
and South Mountain. But his people at Conewago, 
desirous of retaining him, made proposals which were 
satisfactory, and he remained with them. The Pres- 
bytery, at its meeting in September, ordered him to 
be reprimanded for not obeying his instructions, but 
complied with the request of the Congregation of 
Conewago and reinstated him as their pastor. 

Owing to the loss of a part of the Minutes of the 
Presbytery of Donegal, it cannot be ascertained when 
Mr. Black left Conewago. He seems, however, while 
occasionally supplying vacancies in Virginia, to have 
remained until the death of Hindman, whom he suc- 
ceeded in the pastorate af Eockfish and Mountain 
Plain, Virginia. This was probably in the latter 
part of 1746, or early in 1747. During his connec- 
tion with Rockfish and Mountain Plain, he supplied 
several of the vacant congregations in North Caro- 
lina. 

' In 1756 the Presbytery of Hanover, New Side, 
appointed supplies for Rockfish, and directed them 
"not to interfere with Mr. Black and his labors." 
These orders availed but little, for at a meeting, in 
July, 1759, of the lately reconstructed Presbytery of 
Hanover, with which he was then connected, " Some 
charges were brought against him by portions of 
his congregations as reasons why the Presbytery 
should send them another pastor." The Presbytery 



IN " THE PORKS OF BKABTDYWINE." 63 

proceeded with great tenderness and caution, and the 
difficulties were in part adjusted, when he resigned. 
After this, although occasionally occupying the pul- 
pit, he appears to have remained without any stated 
charge until his death, which occurred August 9, 
1770. 

In justice to Mr. Black, it should be borne in mind 
that although his conduct on some occasions was 
blameworthy, yet his ministry was embraced in a 
period of extreme agitation, when the bitterness of 
controversy divided not only every congregation of 
which he was the pastor, but also every congregation 
connected -with the Presbytery of Donegal, and even 
the whole Presbyterian Church. A period when ac- 
cusations were preferred and placed on record which 
in " peaceful times" would never have been made. 

Dr. Foote, in his " Notices of Virginia," states that 
Mr. Black " was Orthodox in doctrine, and correct in 
his views of religious action and Christian principles, 
as was proved by the fact that a goodly number of 
pious people were found at Rockfish, and his succes- 
sors in the pastorate there saw evidence that God had 
blessed the ministry of His word by him." 

In 1740 he was directed to supply the church at 
Norriton once a quarter until the next meeting of 
Synod;* and in 1744 was appointed one of the 



* Norriton, the oldest Presbyterian Church edifice in Montgomery 
County, and now in ruins, was built about 1720. Like many of the 
Churches of that denomination, it was injured during the Revolutionary 
war, and money was raised to repair it by a lottery. It was probably 
placed on land which had been previously set aside and used as a 



64 HISTOKY OF THE PKESBYTEKIAN CHUKCH 

Trustees of the school established by the Synod at 
New London, Chester County.* He was reappointed 
in 1745 and 1746, and in the latter year was placed 
on the committee chosen to answer the letter of 
President Clapp, of Yale College, respecting the 
admission of students to that institution. The next 
year he, Thompson, and Craige were directed by 
the Synod " to have the oversight of the vacancies in 
Virginia." 

The remains of Mr. Black were interred on a farm 
which he purchased after his permanent settlement 
in Virginia, where his grave, with no other me- 
morial than an unlettered stone, may still be seen. 
The farm, now in the possession of his only surviving 
grandson, Thomas Black, lies in Albemarle County, 
Va., a few miles from the eastern base of the Blue 
Eidge. 

He left a family of four sons and two daughters. 
Some of them settled in Kentucky and other Western 
States. The youngest, Samuel, remained at the home- 
stead. Many of his descendants still reside in that 
part of Virginia, and it is due to them to state that 
a majority of them adhere to the church of which 
their great-grandfather was a Pioneer Minister in 
Pennsylvania, Virginia, and North Carolina.f 



graveyard. The Centennial Presbyterian Church, dedicated in 1876, 
was erected on ground belonging to the Norriton Church. 

* See Appendix C. 

f Minutes of the Synod of Philadelphia ; of the Old Presbytery of 
Donegal ; of the Presbytery of Hanover ; Com. from Rev. Hugh 
Henry ; Poote, " Sketches of Virginia, Second Series." 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWISTE." 65 



EEV. ADAM BOYD. 

Born 1692. Died 1768. 

During the closing years of the Seventeenth Cen- 
tury and the first quarter of the Eighteenth, a num- 
ber of emigrants from Scotland and the North of 
Ireland landed in New England. Owing, however, 
to the country being, to a considerable extent, pre- 
occupied by other denominations, and to some legal 
restrictions on religious freedom, the Irish and Scotch- 
Irish Presbyterians found a settlement there less con- 
genial than they had anticipated. Many of their 
clergymen, as a consequence, became dissatisfied, and 
either returned to their native land, or chose the la- 
borious duties of a pioneer minister, in comparatively 
unsettled colonies, where greater opportunities for the 
establishment of churches were afforded. 

Among the latter was the Rev. Thomas Craighead, 
who came to New England in 1715, but, near the 
close of 1723, removed to Southeastern Pennsylvania, 
now the State of Delaware. 

About seven years after Mr. Craighead's arrival in 
New England, Adam Boyd came as a probationer 
from the North of Ireland. Where Mr. Boyd was 
educated is not known, but as a majority of the Pres- 
byterian clergymen, who first emigrated to America 
from Ireland and Scotland, were graduates of the Uni- 
versity of Glasgow, he may have been an Alumnus 
of that venerable institution. 

He supplied, for some time, the pulpit left vacant 



66 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAIir CHURCH 

at Dedham, Mass., by the death of the Eev. Joseph 
Belcher, and also oflS dated in other churches near 
Boston ; but, having been disappointed in his ex- 
pectation of a settlement, he concluded to return to 
his native country. An attachment, however, to a 
daughter of Mr. Craighead caused him to relinquish 
his design and seek a pastorate near to that gentleman 
in Pennsylvania. 

In pursuance of this determination Mr. Boyd came 
to this State, and having presented , credentials from 
Ireland, and commendatory letters* from Cotton Ma- 
ther and other clergymen of New England to the 
Presbytery of New Castle, he was received as a licen- 
tiate by that body, July 29, 1724. At the same 
time he was sent as a supply to Octoraro, and di- 
rected to collect a congregation at Pequea. His la- 
bors at both places were so well received that at the 
meeting of the Presbytery in the September imme- 
diately following, Arthur Parke and Cornelius Ro- 
wan, Commissioners from Octoraro and Pequea, pre- 
sented a call for him to become their pastor. This he 
accepted on the 6th of October, 1724, and as the rep- 
resentatives of the congregations urged his immediate 
installation, the Presbytery appointed Wednesday of 
the. next week for that purpose. 

In accordance with this arrangement the Presby- 
tery met at Octoraro the 13th of October, 1724, and 
ordained and installed Mr. Boyd as pastor of the 
congregations of Octoraro and Pequea. 

Craighead presided, and Hook, of Drawers, preached 

* See Appendix D. 



m " THE FOEKS OF BEANDYWINE." 67 

the ordination sermon. The other members of the 
Presbytery, present, were Gillespie, Thomas Evans, 
and Hutchinson. 

The country being, at that time, sjiarsely settled, 
the ministry of Mr. Boyd extended over a large area. 
A score of Presbyterian Churches, and upwards of 
eighty belonging to other denominations are now or- 
ganized in what were the bounds of his charge. He 
was truly a pioneer minister of the Gospel ; in fact, 
the only stated pastor in all the territory now in- 
cluded in the Western part of Chester County, and 
what was then settled of the present county of Lan- 
caster.* 

In the large field thus intrusted to his care, his 
industry, zeal, and faithfulness produced abundant 
fruit. Donegal became able to sustain a pastor in 
1727. Middle Octoraro was organized in the same 
year, and Fagg's Manor in 1730. Bertram was set- 
tled at Paxson and Derry, and Thompson at Chestnut 
Level, in 1732. Craighead was installed at Pequea in 
1733, and the Forks of Brandywine obtained the ser- 
vices of Black in 1736. 

But while the bounds of his charge were diminished 
by the organization of churches, and the settlement 
of pastors over congregations which he had been 
largely instrumental in gathering, his labors were 
interrupted by the division of the Presbyterian 
Church, which took place in 1741. 

This Schism, which was caused chiefly by a diflfer- 

* At that time there were np settlements " over the river," tliat is, 
West of the Susquehanna. 



68 HISTOKY OF THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHUKCH 

ence of views in regard to revivals and the qualifica- 
tion of candidates for the ministry, though ultimately- 
overruled by the Great Head of the Church for good, 
retarded the progress of Presbyterianism in America. 
" Congregations were' divided. Two churches were 
established in many places where there was not sup- 
port for one. Clergymen personally esteeming one 
another were debarred from an exchange of pUlpits,"* 
while energy and ability which should have been em- 
ployed in the furtherance of the Gospel were wasted 
in needless debate and acrimonious controversy. 

But, in time, both parties saw their mistake. The 
New Side, or those who had considered a liberal edu- 
cation of minor importance as a qualification for the 
ministry, acknowledged their error by founding the 
College of New Jersey, with the avowed purpose of 
preparing young men to become heralds of the Gospel. 
On the other hand, their opponents, the Old Side, 
were convinced by the increasing number and ability 
of those who were leaders of the " great awakening" 
in the churches that learning, unaccompanied by 
earnest, vital piety, is insufiicient for the extension of 
the Redeemer's Kingdom. As a consequence, after 
seventeen years of separation, the breach was healed. 

In the mean time, Mr. Boyd ministered to the 
members of his flock who had not wandered from the 
fold, and on the 11th of August, 1741, accepted an 
invitation to preach one-half of his time to those in 
this place who had been left without a pastor by the 
withdrawal of Mr. Black. 

' * Dr. Miller's Life of Rodo;crs. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BRABTDYWINE." 69 

As a majority of the congregation had seceded, the 
number that remained was not large ; but after the 
death of Mr. Dean, and the failure of the New Side 
to obtain a settled pastor, the attendance on Mr. 
Boyd's ministrations increased. Indeed, it could 
hardly have been otherwise, since many of them had 
been brought to a knowledge of the Saviour by his 
preaching before the organiz;^ation of a church in this 
part of his charge. During his connection with the 
congregation upwards of one hundred and twenty, 
many of them heads of families, contributed toward 
the payment of his salary, and they may not have 
been a majority of his hearers.* 

In October, 1758, the pastoral relation was, as he 
has recorded, " dissolved in a most irregular manner." 
Why is not known. Perhaps some members of the 
church were displeased with his assent to the terms 
of the Union, and requested that another should be 
sent in his stead, or the Presbytery may have acted 
without being fully acquainted with the wishes of the 
larger portion of the congregation. But whatever 
may have been the cause of his irregular and abrupt 
dismissal, all will admit that it was undeserved. He 
surely was worthy of kind and respectful treatment 
who, during seventeen years, had travelled ten miles 
every other Sabbath and conducted religious services 
for the annual stipend of a little more than fifty 
dollars. 

After the close of his pastorate at "the Forks," 
the members of the Old Side congregation at Octo- 

* See Appendix E. 



70 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHTJECH 

raro agreed to pay for two-thirds of his time, instead 
of one-half as they had previously done. This ar- 
rangement continued until April, 1768, when Mr. 
Boyd, " by reason of his feeble health, requested the 
Presbytery to send supplies for his pulpit as often as 
possible." 

A few months afterward, the congregation united 
with the New Side in a call to the Rev. William 
Forster to take charge of bpth congregations. This 
call, which Mr. Boyd heartily approved^ Mr. Forster 
accepted, and on the 1,9th of October, 1768, was in- 
stalled pastor of the " United Congregation of Upper 
Octoraro." On account of his long connection with 
the congregation and his faithful services, the pastoral 
relation of Mr. Boyd was not dissolved, and his people 
agreed to pay him twenty-five pounds yearly during 
the remainder of his life. But the "time of his 
departure was at' hand." He died on the 19th of 
November, 1768, in the forty-sixth year of his min- 
istry. 

His remains were interred in the adjoining grave- 
yard, and the record on his tombstone states that he 
was " eminent through life for modest piety, diligence 
in his office, prudence, equanimity, and peace." 

He left a widow, five sons, and five ' daughters. 
His widow survived him nearly eleven years, or until 
November 9, 1779. His eldest son, John, studied for 
the ministry, but died shortly after his licensure. 

Thomas was settled by his father on an adjoining 
farm. He died in 1778. The property is still in the 
possession of his descendants. 

Andrew inherited the homestead. He was an ar- 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWINE." 71 

dent patriot during the Kevolutioiiary War, attained 
the rank of colonel, and acted as commissary for Ches- 
ter County nearly the whole of that trying period. 
■ Adam became a resident of North Carolina, was 
editor of the Cape Fear Mercury in 1767, a leading 
member of the Committee of Safety of that State, and, 
in 1776, chaplain of a North Carolina Brigade. 

Samuel pursued his preparatory studies at McDow- 
ell's School, Maryland; entered the Medical Depart- 
ment of the University of Pennsylvania in 1764, and 
settled as a physician in Virginia. 

Three of the daughters were married to clergymen : 
Janet to the Rev. Robert McMordie, then pastor of 
Marsh Creek and Round Hill, in Lancaster, now York, 
County ; Agnes to the Rev. Sampson Smith, pastor at 
Chestnut Level; and Margaret to the Rev. Joseph 
Tate, at that time pastor of Donegal. 

The Rev. Matthew Tate, son of the last mentioned, 
was licensed by the Presbytery of New Castle, and 
employed as a supply by that and other Presbyteries. 
He subsequently entered the Episcopal Church, and 
some years previous to his death, in October, 1795, was 
rector of a parish in South Carolina. 

The Rev. Andrew B. Cross, an able and popular 
clergyman of Baltimore, Mrs. Webster, widow of the 
lamented historian of the Presbyterian Church, and 
many of the most influential and respectable citizens 
of Sadsbury, and the adjoining Townships of Chester 
County, are descendants of Adam Boyd. 

In the management of his worldly affairs, Mr. Boyd 
was economical, exact, and careful. Although his 
salary never exceeded three hundred dollars a year. 



72 HISTOEY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAIiT CHTJECH • 

and was frequently less, and a part of that was paid in 
produce and some in labor, yet he acquired considera- 
ble property. His daughters received marriage por- 
tions, which were regarded as large " in those days." • 
Three of his sons were educated for the learned profes- 
sions, and his other sons were comfortably settled on 
farms which their father had purchased. 

Like pioneer ministers in general, Mr. Boyd was too 
much occupied with the discharge of his pastoral du- 
ties to prepare any of his discourses for the press. 
Some of his sermons have been preserved, but they 
are .written in a kind of short-hand, which is difficult 
to decipher. We are, therefore, without the means of 
knowing either the arrangement, style, or tenor of his 
pulpit exercises ; but his discretion, piety, and faith- 
fulness lead to the conclusion that his remarks in the 
pul|)it were well calculated to confirm the faith, arouse 
the conscience, and enliven the hopes of those whom he 
addressed. Following the example of the Apostle to 
the Gentiles, he, no doubt, " reasoned of temperance, 
righteousness, and judgment to come." But his hear- 
ers, unlike the profligate viceroy of the Roman Em- 
peror, were not ignorant of that blessed Gospel for 
whose sake many of them had abandoned the land of 
their birth and made the wilderness their home.* 

* Futhey, " Hist, of Upper Octoraro Church ;" Webster, " Hist, 
of Presb. Church;" Minutes of Donegal Presbytery; Com. from 
Rev. Andrew B. Cross. 



IN " THE FOEKS OF BKAWDYWINE." 73 



KEY. WILLIAM DEAN. 

Born 1719. ' Died 1748. 

The exciting controversies, self-denying labor, and 
severe trials of the Presbyterian Churches in Scotland 
and Ireland during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Cen- 
turies were succeeded towards the close of the latter by 
listlessness and a lack of earnestness. Warm appeals 
to the impenitent, and the zeal for the extension of the 
Kedeemer's kingdom, which characterized the earlier 
history of the church, gave place to doctrinal explana- 
tions and long sermons delivered in a cold and didactic 
manner. Learning and orthodoxy were more regarded 
in the selection of pastors than vital piety. As a con- 
sequence a laxity of morals prevailed. Intemperance 
became common, and profanity was often heard from 
those who were the professed followers of the Divine 
author of the command, " Swear not at all." 

This indifference to spiritual interests continued until 
the close of the first quarter of the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury, when both pastors and people were aroused from 
their lethargy by the faithful labors of the Wesleys 
and Whitefield in the British Islands, and of Whitefield 
and the Tennents in America. The Log College, es- 
tablished by the last mentioned, sent forth a number of 
young men, whose warmth, earnestness, and energy 
were in strong contrast with learned but frigid dis- 
courses which failed to arouse the conscience or amend 
the heart. Their hearers retired not to discuss the bear- 
ing and correctness of creeds or the errors of Roman- 



74 HISTORY OF THE PBESBYTEKIAN CHXJKCH 

ism, but anxiously inquiring, " What must we do to be 
saved ?" 

Among those who were deeply imbued , with the 
spirit and zeal of Whitefield and the graduates of the 
Log College was William Dean, who came from the 
North of Ireland to America in 1739 or '40. Where 
he was educated is not known. He probably received 
his academical training in his native country, and his 
theological under the direction of the Tennents. 

He was taken on trials by the Presbytery of New 
Brunswick, August 3, 1741, and assigned the following 
subjects "to found discourses upon." For an English 
sermon, Rom. iii. 19 ; and for an Exegesis, An homo 
justificatur ah eterno an tfimpore ? 

At a meeting of the Presbytery, held at Freehold, 
N. J., in October, 1742, he and Charles Beatty hav- 
ing passed satisfactory trials and exaniinations, were 
licensed (October 13) " to preach the everlasting Gospel 
where Providence may direct them." 

Mr. Dean was sent by the Presbytery, immediately 
after his licensure, to Neshaminy, Bucks County, and 
the settlements on the Forks of Delaware. These 
were made, in 1730 or '32, by Presbyterians from the 
North of Ireland. The one on the West Fork, the 
Lehigh, being called Craig's settlement, and the one on 
the North Fork, the Delaware, Hunter's settlement. 

The country was mostly a wilderness, inhabited by 
the Lenni Lenape, or Delaware Indians. Efforts were 
made by the devoted Brainerd and others to bring 
them to a knowledge of the saving truths of the Gos- 
pel, though with little apparent success. They were 
strongly attached to their favorite places of abode and 



m " THE FORKS OP BEANDYWINE." 75 

hunting-grounds, and did not abandon them until they 
were forced to remove by the " Five Nations." 

In 1743, Dean was appointed to supply Craig's and 
Hunter's settlements and Cape May, and in the Fall of 
the same year he wassent by the New Side Presbytery 
of New Castle, with which he was then connected, to 
Pequea and the " Forks of Brandy wine." 

In 1744 he was directed to preach at Cohansey, now 
Fairfield, N. J., and the Forks of Delaware, and in 
the following year he went, with Byram, of Mendham, 
N. J., to Augusta County, Va., where their labors 
were followed by a great revival. 

In 1745 he received and accepted a second call from 
the New Side Congregation in this place to become 
their pastor, and was installed in May or June of that 
year. But his labor in a field which seemed likely to 
produce an abundant harvest was soon ended. In a 
little more than three years his flock was left without 
a shepherd, and the New Side Presbytery of New 
Castle had sustained the loss of one of its youngest 
and most promising members. 

The invitations which Mr. Dean received to remain 
in the settlements to which he was sent as an occasional 
or a stated supply ; the revival which followed his mis- 
sionary efibrts in Virginia, and the regret expressed 
on account of his early death by some of the ablest of 
his contemporaries, confirm the uniform tradition that 
he was a popular, zealous, and faithful minister of the 
Gospel. 

In 1743 three calls for his services were presented 
to Presbytery, — one from the Forks of Delaware, an- 
other from the Forks of Brandywine, and a third from 



76 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHTJECH 

Cape May. These he held under consideration for a 
time and dedined. In May, 1748, a few weeks before ' 
his death, a similar request* was sent to the Synod of 
New Brunswick from Timber Bridge and the Forks of 
James River, Virginia. 

The Rev. Samuel Davies, afterwards President of 
the College of New Jersey, writing from Virginia to 
Dr. Bellamy, of Bethlehem, Connecticut, in 1751, 
speaks of the death of Mr. Dean in the same affec- 
tionate terms in which he records the loss of those 
" eminent men of God," William Robinson and Sam- 
uel Blair. He also states that the blessed effects of the 
revival which had followed the labors of Byram and 
Dean were still manifest. 

During his connection with the congregation in this 
place, Mr. Dean resided in a house which stood a short 
distance east of the dwelling of Mr. Francis Growe, in 
West Nantmeal Township. That house, which, like 
all in the neighborhood, was built of unhewn logs, the 
members of his church caused to be wainscoted and 
weather-boarded, thus making it superior, both in 
comfort and appearance, to the rude and unplastered 
structures which constituted their own places of abode. 

The remains of Dean were interred in the " lower 
graveyard," where his tomb, which bears the following 
inscription, may be seen : 

" Here lieth the Body of 

The Reverend William Dean 

Who departed this Life 

July 9th 1748. 

Aged 29 Years. 

* See Appendix F. 



IN "the forks of beandywine." 77 

In yonder sacred House I spent my Breath 
Now silent, mouldering, here I ly in Death 
These silent Lips shall wake and yet declare 
A dread Amen to truths they published there." 

It is, perhaps, worthy of remark, that this inscription, 
with the omission of the word silent in the line pre- 
ceding the last 'and the necessary change of name, 
date, and age, is the same as the record on the tomb of 
the Rev. Samuel Blair in the burial-ground at Fagg's 
Manor, also on the gravestone of the Rev. John 
Campbell in the church-yard at Providence, Mont- 
gomery County, and with a slight change on the tomb- 
stone of the Rev. Owen Thomas in Vincent burial- 
ground. It -was probably written by the Rev. Samuel 
Davies. 

Although all that was mortal of Dean has mingled 
with the earth in this " Country Church- Yard," far 
from kindred and his native land, yet He who never 
slumbers watches his dust, and the Church cherishes a 
grateful remembrance of one who was so quickly spent 
"laboring to save and to bless." 

Dean left a widow, four sons, Joseph, Benjamin, who 
died when near his majority, William, John, and a 
daughter, Sarah. After the death of her husband Mrs. 
Dean resided some years on the farm which they had 
patented, but probably on account of the education of 
her children removed to Philadelphia.* There, Joseph 
became a successful importing merchant and a noted 
actor in the stirring events of the latter half of the 
Eighteenth Century. He was one of the signers of the 

* Her name is on the list of taxables in West Nantmeal Township 
for 1753. 



78 HISTORY OP THE PEESBYTEKIAN CHURCH 

Non-Importation Resolutions adopted October (25th). 
1765, and at the beginning of the Revolutionary War 
loaned the General Government sixty thousand dollars, 
which were never returned. 

He was selected by the Assembly in December, 1776, 
to serve on the Committee of Safety, and was an active 
member of the Board of War from its organization, in 
March, 1777, until it was discontinued, in August of the 
same year. 

In January, 1781, Joseph Dean was appointed one 
of the auditors to settle and adjust the accounts of the 
troops of the State of Pennsylvania in the service of 
the United States, and in the Autumn of the same year 
a Warden of the Port of Philadelphia. 

John held the rank of Major in the Continental 
Army, and William as Colonel in the same service was 
actively engaged in all the battles which were fought 
in New Jersey. 

Sarah was married to the Rev. John Slemmons, a 
native of Chester County and a graduate of the 
College of New Jersey, who, in 1765, became pastor of 
Lower Marsh Creek Church in York, now Adams, 
County, Pennsylvania. Mr. Slemmons was subse- 
quently pastor of Piney Creek Church, Maryland, where 
he remained until his death, in 1814. Mrs. Slemmons 
died in June, 1823, and her ashes rest beside those of 
her husband in the Piney Creek graveyard. 

A grandson of Colonel William Dean, William F. 
Dean, Esq., a gentleman of wealth and influence, has 
long resided in Philadelphia.* 

* Minutes of Synod of New Brunswick ; Archives of State, vol. i. 
p. 9 ; Memoraiicja of Springton Manor ; Hist, of Piney Creek Ciiurch. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWIBTE." 79 



EEV. JOHN CARMICHAEL. 

Born 1728. Died 1785. 

Civil war had ceased in England and a stable govern- 
ment had been established in that portion of Great 
Britain more than half a century before discord and 
violence were repressed in Scotland. The attachment 
of many of the nobles to the " House of Stuart," the 
hereditary feuds of the clans, and the inroads of heart- 
less marauders were a continual source of disorder and 
bloodshed. The oppression and suffering which the 
inhabitants as a consequence endured led many of 
them to emigrate to countries where law and order 
were supreme, and where man could enjoy the fruits of 
his labor without annoyance from petty chiefs or the 
followers of royal pretenders. 

Among those whom the " troublesome times" caused 
to leave their native land were David and Elizabeth 
(Alexander) Carmichael, who came from Argyleshire 
to America in 1737. They settled first at Hackensack, 
New Jersey, but after a short residence there removed 
to Newark in the same State. 

Having been exemplary members of the estab- 
lished church in Scotland, Mr. Carmichael and his wife 
connected themselves with the Presbyterian Church 
in Newark, then or shortly afterwards under the pas- 
toral charge of the Rev. Aaron Burr. The preaching 
of this able divine, and especially his earnest appeals 
to the unconverted at the administration of the Lord's 
Supper, made a deep impression on the mind of their 



80 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH , 

eldest son, and induced a serious consideration of his 
condition as a sinner. The counsels of Christian 
friends, aided by the prayers and example of his pious 
mother, led him as an humble penitent to the Throne 
of Mercy, where he obtained pardon and peace. Anx- 
ious that others should be brought to a knowledge of 
the Saviour and share in the comfort and reconcilia- 
tion which he had found, he determined to devote him- 
self to the Christian ministry. He became a member 
of the College of New Jersey in 1755, and received 
the degree of A.B. in August, 1759. Where he 
pursued his studies previous to entering the College is 
not known. But as the institution was then located at 
Newark, he probably received .his preparatory train- 
ing under the direction of his pastor, the Rev. Aaron 
Burr, President of the College. 

Nine of the eighteen members of his class entered 
the Gospel ministry. All of them living at the time 
proved faithful to their country in its hour of trial, and 
the suffering patriotic efforts and tragic death of one of 
them, the lamented Caldwell, of Elizabethtown, have 
become matters of history. 

"Immediately after he was graduated Mr. Car- 
michael commenced the study of theology under the 
direction of the President of the College, the Rev. 
Samuel Davies." 

He pursued his theological studies with so much 
diligence and success that at a meeting of the Presby- 
tery of New Brunswick, held in May, 1760, he was 
licensed to preach the Gospel. 

Mr. Carmichael spent the remainder of that year 
in supplying vacancies by the direction of the Synod. 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BE ANDY WINE." 81 

Among them was the unoccupied pulpit of this church. 
His preaching here was so acceptable that on the 18th 
of September, 1760, the members of session ad- 
dressed him a letter entreating him to become their 
pastor.* This he seems, while continuing to occupy 
the pulj)it, to have held for consideration. The con- 
gregation, however, determined, if possible, to obtain 
his services, and on the 13th of April, 1761, presented 
a call to Presbytery, which was referred to him. 
Having sought Divine Guidance by fasting and prayer, 
he accepted it, and on Thursday, the 23d of April, 
1761, was ordained and installed pastor of the Church 
of the Forks of Brandywine by the Presbytery of New 
Castle. 

At that period the country was sparsely settled and 
the inhabitants for the most part in moderate circum- 
stances. One of the meeting-houses was no longer in a 
condition to be used as a place for public worship, and 
the other, though in a better state of repair, was too 
small to accommodate all who assembled on the Sab- 
bath. The efforts, therefore, of Mr. Carmichael, im- 
mediately after his installation, were directed to obtain 
the erection of a building suitable for the services of 
the sanctuary. Infusing his own zeal into every one 
with whom he came in contact, he succeeded, during 
the first year of his pastorate, in having the large and 
commodious meeting-house built which has recently 
been taken down. 

In the pulpit his manner was earnest and impressive. 
While he dwelt with frequency and power on the ter- 
rors of the law, he also faithfully reminded those who 

* See Appendix Gr. 



82 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHTtROH 

were weighed down by the burden of sin, " that there 
was balm in Gilead, and a Physician there." 

Although strongly attached to the creed and form 
of church government in his fatherland, he considered 
them of small importance in comparison with Godli- 
ness and an interest in the Atoning Sacrifice. His 
labors among the people of his charge were greatly 
blessed. Harmony was restored, the wanderers re- 
turned to the fold, and not a few who had been cavil- 
ling about points of doctrine were led to make the all- 
important inquiry, " How shall we be made partakers 
of the blessings of the Covenant of Grace ?" 

He visited the members of his congregation not only 
statedly but frequently. On these occasions the house- 
hold was called together for prayer, and the younger 
members of the family recited the Shorter Cate- 
chism, and happy were the little ones who could "say 
their questions" in a manner which received the ap- 
proving smile and kind words of Mr. Carmichael. 

As many of his people resided at a distance of seven 
or eight miles from the place for public worship, and 
buildings for school purposes were few, he frequently 
preached at private houses on the afternoon of the Sab- 
bath. He also made missionary journeys into parts of 
this and some of the adjoining States where no church 
was organized, besides frequently assisting his ministe- 
rial brethren at the administration of the ordinances, 
and by occupying their pulpits when sickness or other 
circumstances caused them to be absent from their 
charge. But these were not his only labors. 

The detail of kingly and ecclesiastical tyranny which 
Mr. Carmichael had often heard from parental lips 



83 

made him the determined foe of oppression in every 
form. Before the Revohitionary Conflict he observed 
the cloud of war which loomed in the horizon, and by 
a series of articles in the public papers warned his 
fellow-citizens of their danger. And when the storm 
did come, he was among the foremost to breast its fury 
and provide means to repair the devastation which it 
caused. In the pulpit and at the fireside, among the 
members of his flock and where he was known only 
by name, he was equally bold in the denunciation of 
tyranny and faithful in portraying the blessings of 
freedom. 

When the First Congress* met in Philadelphia he 
called on the members personally urging them to ac- 
tion, and after they adjourned he admonished those who 
remained and others from the pulpit, as is shown by 
the following extract from the journal of John Adams : 

"Sunday, March 26th, 1775, went to hear Mr. Car- 
michael preach at Mr. Duffield's church on Trust in 
the Lord, and do good ; so shalt thou dwell in the land, 
and verily thou shalt be fed."f 

In June, 1775, he preached a sermon from Luke iii. 
14, to the militia of Lancaster, in which he strongly 
advocated the lawfulness of self-defence. This sermon 
was published, had a wide-spread salutary effect, and 
soon passed to a second edition. J 



* The First Congress, composed of delegates from all the Colonies 
except Georgia, met in Philadelphia, September 5, 1774. It consisted 
of fifty-two members, and was in session fifty-two days. 

f Psalm xxxvii. 3. 

J It is the only production of his pen, except some articles in the 
newspapers, that was ever printed. 



84 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Mr. Carmichael delivered a spirited address shortly 
before their departure to the Volunteers from the 
upper part of Chester County, who left their homes on 
the 8th of July, 1776, to join the army near New 
York. As many of them were members of his church, 
and a number of them had been led to volunteer by 
his appeals to their love of country, he seems to have 
visited them not long after they had reached their des- 
tination, for he and the Rev. Robert Smith, of Pequea, 
were present at the battle of Long Island, which took 
place on the 27th of the next August. 

But if his ardor, activity, and influence were so fully 
required immediately after the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, they were still more needed in the following 
year, when his adopted State became the theatre of 
warlike operations. 

The cannonading at the battle of Brandywine was 
distinctly heard throughout all this section of the 
country. During the progress of that engagement 
wives, daughters, and mothers stood at the doors of 
their dwellings listening with fearful anxiety, and as 
the report of each discharge of artillery fell on the ear, 
were rendered almost frantic by the thought that it had 
caused the death of a husband, a father, or a son. 

T)xe disastrous result of that battle, the appearance 
of parties of British horsemen in search of forage, and 
the conveyance of a large number of wounded Ameri- 
can soldiers along the Paxtang Road to Ephrata for 
medical treatment, caused general consternation and 
terror.* Some whose fears were greater than their 

* Upwards of One Hundred and Fifty of them died and were 
buried at Ephrata. 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BRANDYWINE." 85 

patriotism passed over to the enemy ; others sought 
safety by flight ; while the loyal few that had remained 
at home, who were capable of performing military duty, 
hastened to join their brethren in the field. During 
this trying period, when there was a vacant chair at 
almost every fireside, the labor and the trials of the faith- 
ful pastor and ardent patriot were unceasing. At one 
time consoling those whose relatives had fallen in the 
conflict, at another reviving the hopes and dispelling 
the fears of many who were ready to exclaim, " All is 
lost." On week-days assisting aged men, women, and 
children in the out-door employments of the farm ; on 
the Sabbath fervently beseeching the Supreme Dis- 
poser of events to end the evils of war by the final 
triumph of the cause of Liberty and of Humanity. 

Mr. Carmichael visited the American army when it 
lay at Valley Forge, and having learned from Gen- 
eral Washington that the wounded were suffering from 
a want of linen for bandages, he returned home, called 
his congregation together, stated the fact, and earnestly 
besought the female members of his charge to furnish 
a supply, even if it should require an abbreviation of 
portions of their clothing. The appeal was successful. 
A sufficient number of packages of linen were obtained 
to fill two bags. These he conveyed on horseback to 
the camp. 

A letter is extant in which the Commander-in-chief 
thanks Mr. Carmichael and his congregation for the 
supply of clothing and other necessaries which they 
had furnished for the use of the army. 

The war was finally brought to a close, the inde- 
pendence of our country was acknowledged, and Mr. 



86 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHUECH 

Carmichael thankfully devoted himself to a discharge 
of the duties of his Sacred Office. But his physical 
system, never strong, had been weakened by his un- 
ceasing exertions in the cause of religion and of civil 
liberty. His health declined, and he became aware 
that the time of his departure was near. He arranged 
his temporal affairs,* and with increased zeal in his 
Master's service, preached a course of sermons on 
Haggai i. 10. " The design of these discourses was to 
show that there are times when the servants of God 
should more than ordinarily engage in the promotion 
of religion." 

In the latter part of October, 1785, he assisted the 
Rev. Dr. Smith, of Pequea, in the communion of that 
church. His efforts during the service, and the fatigue 
of the journey, brought on an illness from which he 
had not recovered when the administration of the ordi- 
nances to his own people took place. On that occasion 
his bodily weakness, increased by the exertion which 
he had then made, led him to express the opinion " that 
he would no more drink wine with them until he drank 
it new in his Father's Kingdom." An opinion whose 
correctness was too soon verified. Exposure to the 
rain on his return home, together with his previous 
debility, induced an attack of pleurisy, which caused 
his death on the 15th of November, 1785, when he 
had entered less than three weeks on his fifty-eighth 
year.f 

His last words were, " Oh that I had a thousand 



* See Appendix H. 

t He was born on the 28th of October, 1728. 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BRAND YWINE." 87 

tongues, that I might employ them all in bringing 
sinners to Christ !" 

His remains lie in the Upper Graveyard beside the 
ashes of his eldest daughter, and those of the two part- 
ners of his joys and sorrows, " who preceded him to 
the eternal world." 

The labors of Mr. Carmichael as a patriot and a pas- 
tor, his energy, faithfulness, and success, lead to the 
belief that, like holy men of old, he was raised up and 
specially prepared for the work which God had ap- 
pointed for him , to do. He seems to have combined, 
in a remarkable degree, the glowing zeal and vital 
piety of Whitefield and the Tennents, with the bold 
advocacy of civil and religious liberty which dis- 
tinguished Scotland's great reformer, "the fearless 
Knox." 

Mr. Carmichael was married in May, 1761, to Miss 
Phoebe Cram, of Newark, New Jersey, a grand- 
daughter of the Rev. Jonathan Dickinson, first Presi- 
dent of the College of New Jersey. She died Octo- 
ber 21, 1772, in her forty -second year, leaving a son 
and a daughter. Two other children having died in 
infancy. 

The son, John Flavel, studied medicine under Dr. 
Scott, of New Brunswick, New Jersey, practised for 
some time in this neighborhood with success, entered 
the army as a surgeon in 1788, and after holding the 
ofiice several years settled in the State of Mississippi, 
where he accumulated considerable property, and died 
in 1837. 

The daughter, Phoebe, for nearly sixty years an 
humble and upright member of the Presbyterian 



88 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHUECH 

Church at Cedar Grove, Lancaster County, died 
March 24, 1859, at the advanced age of ninety-two 
years and nearly two months. 

In June, 1773, Mr. Carmichael married Miss Cath- 
arine Mustard. But this union was of short duration. 
She died in August, 1774, leaving a daughter fifteen 
days old, who received the name of her mother. 
That daughter, on the death of her father, was taken 
in charge and kindly cared for by Elder William 
Hunter, a leading member .of the congregation. She 
subsequently resided with the Rev. Dr. Smith, of 
Pequea, and also in the family of Mr. Buckley until 
her marriage, in September, 1799, to the Hon. Robert 
Jenkins, a gentleman of wealth and refinement. 

Mrs. Jenkins closed a life noted for kindness to the 
poor, a liberal support of churches and benevolent 
associations, and a consistent Christian course, on the 
23d of September, 1856, in the eighty-third year of 
her age. Both of her sons had preceded their mother 
to the grave. Four of her daughters were married 
to ministers of the Gospel eminent for learning and 
ability. 

By his marriage, in April, 1775, to a daughter of 
the Rev. Samuel Blair, of Fagg's Manor, Mr. Car- 
michael had three children. Elizabeth, who became 
the wife of the Rev. Samuel Donnell, subsequently a 
pastor in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. They 
removed to Tennessee, where her death occurred 
shortly after their arrival. Washington Gates, born 
about the time of Burgoyne's surrender, and named 
in honor of the commander-in-chief and the hero of 
Saratoga, entered the army, but died soon afterwards 



IN " THE FORKS OF BE ANDY WINE." 89 

near the mouth of the Mississippi. Francina, the 
youngest, was married to a Captain Allan. 

Mrs. Carmichael survived her husband nearly a 
quarter of a century, or until May, 1810 ; and Mrs. 
Allan died in the latter part of December, 1870.* 

* Sprague, " Annals of American Pulpit ;'' Minutes of Presbytery 
of Newcastle ; of Synod of New Brunswick ; Dr. Leaman, " Me- 
morial of Mrs. C. M. Jenkins;" Local Memoranda ; Dr. S. Alexander, 
" Princeton College in the Eighteenth Century." 



90 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



EEV. NATHAN GEIER. 

Born 1760. Died 1814. 

Biography often aflPords manifest and instructive 
proofs that the Author of All Good watches over, 
guides, and blesses not only those who serve Him and 
keep His commandments, but also their children to 
the third, fourth, and succeeding generations. 

Among American statesmen tliere has been no one 
who was more upright in public and in private life 
than John Adams, and of him only can it be stated 
that the Presidential Chair, in which he was placed 
as the immediate successor of Washington, was also 
occupied by his son. Nor is this all. His son and 
grandson discharged with ability the duties of Min- 
ister Plenipotentiary to England, where ■ he had ap- 
peared as his country's first Ambassador. 

As might be expected, however, the lives of those 
who specially devote themselves to the service of the 
altar present numerous instances of the Providence 
of God in blessing their descendants, and not unfre- 
quently in making them " shepherds and bishops of 
souls."* 

A number of pulpits, both in the Presbyterian 
Church and those of other denominations, are occu- 

* Dr. Spring stated in 1849, that not less than seventy ministers 
in the American Church could trace their lineage to the elder Ed- 
wards, who was himself the son of a clergyman. 



IN " THE FOKKS OP BEANDYWINE." 91 

pied at the present time by the sons and grandsons of 
men who passed their lives in the same sacred calling. 

A notable example, however, of pious ancestors, 
and of children who trod in the footsteps of their 
fathers, is afforded by the parentage and descendants 
of the Rev. Nathan Grier. 

John and Matthew Grier came to America from the 
North of Ireland in 1732. Shortly after his arrival 
John married Agnes Caldwell, and settled in Bucks 
County, Pa. Like their Scotch ancestors, they were 
strongly attached to the doctrines and institutions of 
the Presbyterian Church, of which they were for 
many years exemplary members. Their children 
were trained " in the nurture and admonition of the 
Lord," and as a reward for their faithful oversight 
they had the satisfaction of seeing two of them enter 
the ministry, and all of them become worthy and 
useful members of society. 

Nathan, the younger of those who entered the 
ministry, was born in September, 1760. Naturally 
amiable and contemplative, while still quite young 
his thoughts were turned to the subject of religion, 
and, like Josiah, he early gave his heart to God. 

Having resolved to devote himself to the preaching 
of the Gospel, he passed through his preparatory 
training under the direction of his brother James,* 
who was also his theological preceptor, entered the 
University of Pennsylvania 'in 1781, and was gradu- 
ated in 1783. After leaving the University, he taught 
a school at Pitt's Grove, N. J., pursuing at the same 
time his studies in theology. 

* See Appendix M. 



92 HISTOBY OF THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHUKCH 

Mr. Grier was licensed by the Presbytery of Phila- 
delphia in October, 1786, and passed the remainder 
of that year and a part of the next in supplying 
■ churches without a pastor. Among them was the 
congregation worshipping in this place. His labors 
here led to a unanimous call from' the members of the 
church to become their pastor being placed in his 
hands and accepted. 

On Wednesday, the 22d of August, 1787, the 
Presbytery of New Castle, with which he was then 
connected, met here, and ordained and installed him 
pastor of the Presbyterian Church of the Forks of 
Brandywine. The Rev. Alexander Mitchell, pastor 
of Doe Run Church, preached the sermon; the 
other ministers present were Robert Smith, D.D., 
James Anderson, William R. Smith, Nathaniel W. 
Sample, John E. Finley, John McCreery, James 
Monroe, David Jones, and John Burton. 

Mr. Grier, at that time in the full vigor of his 
powers, was well adapted to carry on the work which 
Mr. Carmichael had so auspiciously begun. Ear- 
nest, impressive, and practical, his ministrations were 
greatly blessed. The attendance on the Sabbath 
rapidly increased, and his influence, aided by his pop- 
ular manners, soon reached far beyond even the 
large area contained within the bounds of his charge. 

Having early perceived that the services of the 
sanctuary are but a part of the duties of a pastor, he 
frequently called at the residences of the members of 
his congregation. These visits were not permitted, to 
pass unimproved, but were used as opportunities for 
pious instruction. Parents were mildly but faithfully 



IN " THE FORKS OF BRAND YWINE." 93 

reminded of the obligations resting upon them; the 
children were questioned in regard to their acquaint- 
ance with the Catechism and their knowledge of re- 
ligious principles ; and the whole household humbly 
and reverently bowed in prayer, while their pastor 
earnestly invoked the Divine Blessing on the heads of 
the family and their offspring. 

Instructed by the glimpse of the Eternal World 
afforded by the parable of Dives and Lazarus, he 
avoided the mistake which clergymen often make, of 
frequent visits to the mansions of the wealthy while 
the dwellings of those of stinted means are passed un- 
noticed. Such, too, was his amiability and warmth of 
feeling that he was equally welcomed at the homes of 
the poorest and the richest members of his congrega- 
tion. 

In addition to the weekly ministrations of the pulpit, 
he preached during the Summer, on the afternoon of 
the Sabbath, either in school-houses or at the residences 
of the aged and infirm. He also assisted his clerical 
brethren at Communion seasons and on other occa- 
sions, and frequently supplied the pulpit of congrega- 
tions without a pastor. Among the latter was the 
church at Upper Octoraro, during the fourteen years 
it was without a regular ministry, before the installa- 
tion of the Rev. James Latta. On these .occasions 
the house was crowded, the attention close, and the 
impressions made deep and often lasting. 

As his predecessor, Mr. Carmichael, adding the du- 
ties of the patriot to those of the pastor, labored with 
assiduity to aid the cause of civil liberty and enlist 
soldiers to combat the enemies of national independ- 



94 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEBIAST CHTJECH 

ence, Mr. Grier, combining the pastor and the theo- 
logical instructor, and working with equal zeal and 
watchfulness, prepared young men to engage in a 
holier war under the Great Captain of Salvation. 

It is well known that a hundred years were per- 
mitted to pass, after the establishment of the Presby- 
terian Church in America, before a Seminary was or- 
ganized and endowed by the Church for the special 
study of theology. Candidates for the ministry were, 
therefore, trained by eminent divines in schools opened 
for that purpose. The Log College, Blair's School at 
Fagg's Manor, Allison's School at New London, and 
Smith's School in Pequea, were established mainly 
with this object in view. 

/TVIr. Grier, a well-read theologian, following their 
example, received a number of young men, and espe- 
cially those of his own congregation, under his care, 
for the study of Theology. 

This Divinity School, though not formally known 
by that name, took the place of Dr. Smith's School in 
Pequea. It was commenced in 1792, when the in- 
firmities of Dr. Smith, who died in April, 1793,. 
rendered him incapable of directing the studies of 
young men preparing to enter the ministry. 

The following synopsis of the course pursued by the 
students under the supervision of Mr. Grier is from 
the pen of the most eminent of his pupils, the Pev. 
Dr. McConaughy : 

"Those who studied under his direction were ac- 
customed to divide their time between the study of 
the Scriptures, Ecclesiastical History, and a series of 
questions about One Hundred in number, in the 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWIIfE." 95 

usual order of the System of Theology. On these 
questions they were required to write pretty fully and 
submit the result to his examination and criticism. 
In like manner they composed sermons, on which they 
had his opinion as to matter and style. 

" Besides this, they had the advantages of his Chris- 
tian example, the genial influence of his well-ordered 
household, and his daily counsel and guidance." 

Of the twenty young men who studied Theology 
under the direction of Mr. Grier, one, Mr. John 
Ralston, died (in 1804) before the completion of 
his studies, and ill-health prevented another, Mr. 
John M'Clure, from entering on the active duties 
of the ministry. The remaining eighteen, as may 
be learned by the biographical sketches appended, be- 
came workers in the Gospel field. Seventeen of them 
were pastors of churches, and one passed upwards of 
thirty years as a Chaplain in the Navy of the United 
States. 

Three received the honorary title of D.D., and one 
of both D.D. and LL.D., at a period when collegiate 
honors were not so frfeely dispensed as they are at 
present. 

They occupied pulpits in six States of the Union, 
and all, with one exception, faithfully discharged the 
duties of their sacred office until they were unfitted by 
the infirmities of age or removed by death. 

But his fellow-laborers in the Master's vineyard were 
suddenly deprived of an associate and the congregation 
of its pastor. He died, after a short illness, on the 
30th of March, 1814, at the comparatively early age 
of fifty-three years and six months. 



96 HISTOKY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

The inscription on his tombstone, in the Upper 
Graveyard, closes with the following terse and beautiful 
lines of Goldsmith, which have seldom been so correctly 
applied : 

" But in his duty prompt at every call, 
He watched and wept, he prayed and felt for all. 
He tried each art, reproved each dull delay, 
Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way." 

Mr. Grier was punctual in his attendance on the 
councils of the church, in which he took an active, 
though not a forward, part. A leading trustee of 
Dickinson College during the latter years of his life, 
he watched over its interests with paternal solicitude, 
warmly advocated the establishing of a Theological 
Seminary, and ably sustained all the religious enter- 
prises of his day. 

Although his sermons, prepared with care, were 
evangelical and well illustrated by references to the 
Scriptures, they were practical rather than doctrinal 
or controversial. Gifted with a voice of more than 
ordinary power, Mr. Grier could be heard by a large 
audience, and he seldom failed to enchain the atten- 
tion of his heaj-ers by his earnestness, warmth, and 
direct appeals to the conscience. Indeed, if he dis- 
played greater power in the pulpit in one direction 
more than another, it was in his ability to call forth 
the finer feelings of our nature, and arouse the dor- 
mant sympathies of the heart. He, therefore, often 
made salutary impressions which the lapse of years 
failed to erase. As an instance of this, the writer 
may state that he has heard the aged relate, while 



IN "the foeks of beandywine." 97 

tears gathered in their eyes as the solemn scene came 
in remembrance before them, his touching appeals at 
the close of each Communion to the members of his 
church to live consistently with their profession, and 
the melting tenderness with which he besought those 
who " were strangers to the Covenant of Grace" to 
flee from the wrath to come. 

Mr. Grier was united in marriage, November 13, 
1787, to Miss Susannah Smith, daughter of Colonel 
Robert and Margaret Smith, members of his congre- 
gation. She was eminently worthy of his choice, and 
by her piety, prudence, and careful family oversight 
strengthened his hands and lessened his worldly cares. 
" But he was not permitted to enjoy her counsel and 
aid to the close of his life." On January 2, 1812, 
she exchanged the probation of time for the blessedness 
of eternity. 

Their children were two sons and three daugh- 
ters. Both of their sons entered the ministry, 
and stood as faithful sentinels for more than half a 
century on the watch-towers of Zion. Their eldest 
daughter was married to Mr. White, a quarter of a 
century the popular pastor of the church in Fagg's 
Manor. Another became the wife of Mr. Parke, 
who ministered with acceptance upwards of thirty 
years to the churches of Slate Bidge and Centre, in 
York County, Pa. ; and the third, the much-esteemed 
widow of Dr. Thompson, of Fagg's Manor, was for 
several years previous to her decease a member of this 
congregation. 

Six of the grandsons of Mr. Grier became minis- 
ters of the Gospel, and five of them are still engaged 



98 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN OHITKCH 

in proclaiming the glad tidings of Salvation. Those 
who survive are the eldest son of Mr. White, two 
of the sons of Mr. Robert 8. Grier, one of the sons 
of Mr. Parke, and the younger son of Dr. Thompson. 
Another grandson. Dr. Nathan G. Thompson, is now 
a Ruling Elder in this congregation, where his grand- 
f9.ther and uncle declared the whole counsel of God 
upwards of fourscore years. 

A discourse entitled " The Man of Bethany," com- 
memorative of Mr. Grier, was delivered shortly after 
his death by the Rev. William Arthur, at that time 
pastor of the Pequea Presbyterian Church.* 

* Sprague, " Annals of Pres. Church ;" Eev. J. N. C. Grier, D.D., 
" Historical Discourse ;" MS. Collections ; Minutes of the Presbytery 
of Newcastle. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BKANDYWINE." 99 



EEV. JOHN N. C. GRIEE, D.D. 

Born 1792. Died 1880. 

In the Presbyterian Churches of Ireland and Scot- 
land the settlement of a pastor in charge of a con- 
gregation is generally a settlement for life. The 
shepherd and his flock are seldom separated except 
by death. The hearers of " the man of God," ven- 
erable for years and piety, are frequently the grand- 
children of those who welcomed him as their youthful 
pastor. 

This unbroken, harmonious, and Christian rela- 
tion between the people and their spiritual adviser, 
from his entrance on his ministry until its close, has 
not been confined to the Eastern shore of the Atlan- 
tic. Instances of the pastor " who ne'er had changed 
or wished to change his place" are not uncommon in 
the history of the Presbyterian Church in America. 
The remains of James Grier, Nathaniel Irwin, John 
King, Robert Smith, John F. Grier, Robert White, 
William Latta, John Carmichael, Nathan Grier, and 
of many others, await the resurrection of the Just in 
the graveyards belonging to the congregations which 
were their only charge. 

Such long-continued labor in the same portion of 
Zion, which Dr. A. Alexander correctly regarded as 
a strong proof of ministerial faithfulness, is well exem- 
plified in the pastorate of the Rev. Dr. J. N. C. Grier. 
From his installation until weighed down by the 



100 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHUKCH 

burden of years he made known " the truth as it is 
in Jesus" from the pulpit of the same church. Surely 
much that is interesting and worthy of remembrance 
must have occurred in connection with him, and with 
the people among whom he " served God in the Gospel 
of his Son" for nearly sixty years. Shall the pages 
of history be crowded with the deeds of warriors and 
statesmen, and no place be found for even the names 
of those who have disseminated and impressed the 
precepts of that Holy Book, which are the sources of 
individual and national well-being ? 

John Nathan Caldwell, second son of the Rev. 
Nathan Grier, was born the 8th of June, 1792, on a 
farm in West Brandywine Township, then the prop- 
erty of his father, and now occupied by his daughter, 
Mrs. Louisa Parke. He received his classical educa- 
tion at the Brandywine Academy under the direction 
chiefly of the Rev. John F. Grier, and his collegiate 
at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa.,, where he was 
graduated in September, 1809. Shortly after his 
graduation he became the subject of Divine grace, 
and his thoughts being turned towards " the ministry 
of reconciliation," he began the study of theology in 
the school established for that purpose by his father. 
Having successfully applied himself to the prescribed 
preparation for a herald of righteousness, he was 
licensed to preach the Gospel by the Presbytery of 
New Castle on the 7th of April, 1813. 

Mr. Grier passed the next year and a half as a 
probationer, supplying vacant pulpits within the 
bounds of the Presbytery, and after the death of his 
father, received a unanimous call to become his sue- 



IN " THE FORKS OF BKANDYWINE." 101 

cessor. This he accepted, and on the 24th of No- 
vember, 1814, was ordained and installed by the 
Presbytery with which the Church had been long 
connected. On that occasion the Rev. Mr. Arthur, of 
Pequea, presided, and the Rev. Mr. Graham, of New 
London, preached the sermon. 

With the example of his godly father to guide and 
animate, and the fervent prayers of the congregation 
that the mantle of the father might fall on the son, 
the youthful pastor entered on the discharge of the 
duties of his sacred office. But although he made 
known the great truths of the Gospel with earnest- 
ness and power, and there were manifest tokens of the 
divine approval of his labors, yet there was no general 
awakening until 1822, when forty-one were added to 
the membership of the Church. 

This was followed by a dearth of spiritual blessings, 
but in 1831, seemingly in answer to the earnest wrest- 
ling with God in prayer by the members of the Pres- 
bytery of New Castle, there was a copious outpouring 
of the spirit. 

Like the revival which began in Freehold, New Jer- 
sey, a century before, " this refreshing from the pres- 
ence of the Lord" was not confined to this church in 
which its glorious effects first became manifest, but it 
extended to the neighboring congregations of all de- 
nominations. Under its blessed influence one hundred 
and twenty-seven were added in that year to the 
number worshipping here, and two hundred and 
thirty-three in the six years next following. 

Owing to the large increase the meeting-house was 
crowded on the Sabbath. This was relieved to some 



102 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHTJRCH 

extent in 1833 by the organization of a church, at 
Coatesville, made up in part of those who had been 
connected with this congregation. 

But in 1835, the number of members being nearly 
seven hundred, it became necessary either to enlarge 
the Meeting-House or to divide. After a discussion 
of the subject at several congregational meetings held 
for the purpose, it was finally resolved to separate. 
As a consequence of this determination a building was 
erected, and a church composed entirely of those who 
had been under the pastoral supervision of Dr. Grier 
was organized at Waynesburg, now Honeybrook. The 
large attendance was further reduced, in 1839, by the 
establishment of Fairview Presbyterian Church in 
Wallace Township. 

Thus in the short period of seven years three Pres- 
byterian Churches, which have grown and prospered, 
were organized by those a majority of whom had pro- 
fessed their faith in Christ, and united with the con- 
gregation worshipping in this place. 

During tlie remainder of Dr. Grier's ministry, 
although there was no special manifestation of the 
Divine presence, there was an ingathering at every 
Communion season, and notwithstanding the organiza- 
tion of a church at Downingtown in 1863, the mem- 
bership of his charge equalled that of fifty years be- 
fore. The whole number received into the fellowship 
of the church during his pastorate being about thirteen 
hundred. 

In addition to the preparation and delivery of up- 
wards of five thousand sermons, the baptism of nearly 
one thousand, infants and adults, pastoral visits, attend- 



IX " THE FOEKS OF BKANDYWI>"E." 103 

ance on the sick, conducting the services at funerals, 
and Sunday-school superintendence, Dr. Grier took an 
active part in the temperance reformation, and fre- 
quently addressed the public on that subject. A de- 
termined foe of intemperance, no one did more to 
guard both the old and the young against its insidious 
advance than he who stood for more than half a cen- 
tury on the watch-tower of human welfare and hap- 
piness. 

But the toil, the trials, and even the triumphs of 
his long ministry at last unfitted him for further labor 
in the Gospel field, and on the 14th of April, 1869, 
the pastoral relation was dissolved at his request* by 
the Presbytery of New Castle. 

His work was done, but not until the children and 
many of the children's children of those to whom he 
first ministered, had been brought by his faithfulness 
to know " th6 God of their fathers, and to serve Him 
with a perfect heart and with a willing mind." 

During the remainder of his sojourn on this side of 
Jordan, although enduring much bodily suffering, Dr. 
Grier patiently and prayerfully awaited the dividing 
of the waters, and on the- 16th of September, 1880, 
entered the promised land,f to which all, except two, 
of those with whom he first met at the " table of the 
Lord," had preceded him. His death cast a gloom 
over the community, and a large number assembled to 
pay the last tribute of respect to him whom they had 

* See Appendix I. 

■j" He was the last survivor of those who prepared for the ministry 
under the direction of his father. 



) 
104 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHtTECH 

often seen, on a like occasion, standing beside the un- 
closed coffin or the newly-niade grave, warning the 
impenitent or consoling the bereaved. The funeral 
services were conducted in the church. After some, 
feeling remarks by the pastor, Mr. McCoU, and the 
delivery of an impressive Commemorative Address by 
Dr. Bingham, of Oxford, Pa., the oldest of the six- 
teen clergymen present, the members of the congrega- 
tion, and many besides, took leave of the remains. 
They were then borne by the most aged pastors in 
attendance to their last resting-place in the Upper 
Graveyard. 

Dr. Grier firmly upheld what he believed to be right, 
was punctual in meeting his engagements, and aided 
the Councils of the Church, from which he was rarely 
absent, by his sound judgment and experience. He 
took a lively interest in the various religious institu- 
tions of his day, and every feasible plan for their 
extension received his cordial support. 

His manner in the pulpit was earnest and solemn, 
and his plain, practical discourses, decidedly evangeli- 
cal and pervaded by a tone of unaffected piety, " were 
blessed for the conversion of many." 

No productions of his pen have appeared in print 
except a Historical Discourse delivered in 1849, and 
an Address to those who had assembled to congratu- 
late him on the completion of the fiftieth year of his 
pastorate. In both of these publications, but especially 
in the last mentioned, many interesting occurrences of 
his ministry are given. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on 
him by Washington College, Pa., in 1841. 



IN " THE FOEKS OF BRANDYWINE." 105 

Dr. Grier was united in marriage, on the 9th of Sep- 
tember, 1813, to Nancy R., eldest daughter of Captain 
James Ralston, a leading member of his congregation. 
She died on the 7th of November, 1873, after having 
for more than sixty years contributed by her prudence, 
discretion, and piety to increase his means of usefulness 
and promote the beneficent operations of his charge. 
They had a family of four daughters : Susannah, the 
eldest, died while young ; Louisa was married to Rich- 
ard Parke, then a resident of Chester Valley ; Frances 
to Thomas G. Happersett, late of Baltimore, Md. ; 
and Agnes to G. Washington Neely, recently deceased, 
and long a resident of Ohio.* 

* Minutes of Pres. of Newcastle; Dr. J. N. C. Grier, "Hist. Dis- 
course ;" Obituary Notice, by Rev. J. C. Tiiompson ; by Eev. John 
McColl ; Local Memoranda. 



106 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



RULING ELDERS. 



Ruling Elders being the governing body in a 
Presbyterian Churcb, and tbose on whose prudence, 
zeal, and piety the prosperity of a congregation largely 
depends, it might be supposed that at least their 
names and the time of their ordination could be ascer- 
tained by the Church Register. But, unfortunately, 
no records of Session during the first eighty years 
of the existence of this Church can be found. It is, 
therefore, impossible to state many things which it 
would be desirable to know respecting the godly men 
who upheld the hands of the pastors during that 
long period, and whose faithfulness may be traced in 
the growth and vigor of the Church. 

The following list, gathered from a variety of 
sources, contains, it is believed, the names of nearly 
all who have been Ruling Elders since the organization 
of a Church in this place. But in regard to several 
of them the writer, after diligent inquiry, has been 
unable to learn the date of their ordination, and in 
some instances of their resignation or death. 

Earliest Periods at which they are hnown to have been Ruling Elders. 

1735. 

Edward Irwin Died about 1750. 

.John Hamilton, ceased to act in 1741 ... "in May, 1761. 



IJSr ' THE FOKKS OF BEAIfDYWIXE. 



107 



Robert Hamilton, ceased to act in 1Y41. 
James Ward, ceased to act in 1Y41. 

1741. 

John Henderson, ceased to act in 1759. 

Francis Alexander Died in Aug., 1778, 

1745. 
Thomas Reese, M.D. 
Matthew Robertson, resigned before 1760 . . Died July 30, 1792. 

1760. 

Samuel Allen, removed to Mercer County about 

1805. 
Thomas Brown. 

William Brown . Died in Jan., 1786. 

• . " Sept. 2, 1794. 



John Culbertson 
. William Denny, Sr, 
David Denny . 
Francis Gardner 
William Brvin . 



" Oct. 8, 1784. 

" Nov. 4, 1820. 

'' in Sept., 1783. 

" Dec. 18, 1794. 



1776. 
Samuel HoUiday, resigned in 1783. 
Colonel Robert Smith Died in Dec, 1803. 

1785. 

William Hunter Died Dec. 18, 1804. 

William Kennedy " Feb. 18, 1814. 

1787. 
Samuel Culbertson Died in April, 1788. 

. Died Nov. 4, 1846. 



1801 OR 1802 
John Robeson, resigned before 1814 . . 



1814. 
Joseph Grier Died Nov. 10, 1830. 



108 HISTOEY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

James Lockhart, resigned in 1829 ; removed 

in October, 1829, to the western part of 

Pennsylvania. 

Richard Templin Died in Nov., 1824. 

William Denny " Jan. 14, 1819. 

Joseph M'Clure, Sr., resigned in 1825 ..." Oct. 15, 1827.^ 
James Ralston, Sr " Jan. 28, 1834. 

Ordained. 

1815. 

Matthew Stanley, resigned in 1840 .... Died June 15, 1844. 

John Buchanan, resigned in 1837 . . . . " Aug. 22, 1856. 

William Templeton " Sept. 1, 1849. 

Robert Ralston " Aug. 14, 1844. 

1825. 

Dan Kirkpatrick . Died Sept. 19, 1829. 

John Templeton " July 27, 1865. 

William Lockhart, resigned in 1829 ; removed 

in October, 1829, to the western part of 

Pennsylvania. 

Robert Molntyre Died Feb. 18, 1844. 

David Buchanan, resigned in 1835 . . . . " Feb. 20, 1875. 

1830. 

Samuel Ralston Died Jan. 1, 1859. 

James H. Long " July 13, 1857. 

Joseph M'Clure, resigned in 1839 " Nov. 11, 1861. 

John M'Clure, resigned in 1839 "- Feb. 9, 1873. 

1844. 

John Ralston Died Apr. 21, 1880. 

William N. Long " July 13, 1862. 

David Williams « Feb. 7, 1849. 

Caleb Liggett » ' March 2,1876. 

1859. 

William Robeson Died Nov. 27, 1871. 

James K. Grier " Jan. 8, 1867. 



IX "the fokks of bkandywixe." 109 

John Dauman Died Oct. 5, 1871. 

Andrew Buchanan " Oct. 2, 1872. 

James Liggett. 

1869. 
John F. Templeton, resigned in 1876. 

1870. 
Gordon Lallock, resigned in 1871. 

1877. 

Baxter B. M'Clure, resigned in 1882. 
John Weber. 
Nathan Or. Thompson. 
Benjamin Kea, resigned in 1883. 

1882. 
F. H. Irwin. 
Charles T. Forrest. 
Lewis Worrall. 

Samuel Allen, Thomas Brown, William Brown, 
John Culbertson, William Denny, Sr., Francis Gard- 
ner, and Francis Alexander were members of the 
Session when Mr. Carmichael was installed. 

William Denny, Sr., Francis Gardner, and Francis 
Alexander died during his pastorate ; Samuel HoUi- 
day, who settled in the neighborhood in 1765, and 
Colonel Robert Smith were elders in 1776, and Wil- 
liam Hunter, William Kennedy, David Denny, and 
Samuel Culbertson in 1787. It is, therefore, altogether 
likely that Samuel Culbertson, Samuel Allen, David 
Denny, William Hunter, William Irwin, Thomas 
Brown, and Colonel Robert Smith composed the 
bench of Elders when the Rev. Nathan Grier be- 
came pastor. But owing to removal, resignation, or 



110 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHITKCH 

death, all of them had ceased to be members of Session 
before Mr. Grier's decease. 

When Dr. Grier was installied the Ruling Elders 
were James Lockhart, Richard Templin, James Rals- 
ton, Joseph Grier, William Denny, and Joseph Mc- 
Clure, Sr. During his pastorate he ordained twenty- 
one elders, and in the same period eighteen of those 
with whom he had taken such sweet counsel " in the 
household of faith" went to their graves in peace. 

When Mr. Heberton became pastor the members 
of Session were John Ralston, Caleb Liggett, Andrew 
Buchanan, William Robeson, John Dauman, James 
Liggett, and John F. Templeton. 

When he withdrew the members of Session were 
John Ralston, Caleb Liggett, James Liggett, and 
John F. Templeton. 

The Ruling Elders at the present time are James 
Liggett, John Weber, Nathan G. Thompson, Lewis 
Worrall, Charles T. Forrest, and Frederick H. Irwin, 
all of whom, except James Liggett, have been ordained 
by Mr. McColL 



Ill 



ADDITIONAL NOTICES. 



Edward Irwin was among the first who settled in 
what is now West Brandywine Township. He was 
one of the Commissioners sent by the congregation in 
1736 with the second call for Mr. Black. After the 
separation he attended the ministry of Mr. Boyd. 

John Hamilton, Robert Hamilton, and James Ward 
took an active part in the organization of the church. 
They withdrew with the New Side in 1741, and per- 
haps were members of Session in Mr. Dean's congre- 
gation. John Hamilton was one of the witnesses to 
Mr. Dean's will. 

John Henderson was a Ruling Elder in Mr. Boyd's 
church until 1757, which seems to have been the time 
of his decease. 

Francis Alexander was a supporter of Mr. Boyd 
during the whole of his pastorate, and probably a 
member of Session. 

Francis Gardner, a native of the North of Ire- 
land, settled near the Beaver Dam, in Nantmeal, now 
Honeybrook Township, in 1733. He was a Ruling 
Elder a part of Mr. Boyd's and nearly the whole of 
Mr. Carmichael's pastorate. Like all the Scotch- 
Irish, Mr. Gardner was an active patriot during the 
struggle for national independence. 



112 HISTOKY OF THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHTJKCH 

Matthew Kobertson (Robeson), who died at the age 
of ninety-two, was upwards of half a century a faithful 
member of the church, and one of those to whom the 
land first owned by the congregation was patented by 
the heirs of Penn. 

William Brown was a Ruling Elder more than a 
quarter of a century. His youngest daughter, Cath- 
arine, was married in 1776 to Dr. McMillan, and 
shared with him the trials and privations of life on 
the frontier, upwards of forty years. 

Colonel Robert Smith was an active patriot during 
the Revolutionary War, sheriff of Chester County, a 
Justice of the Peace, and a member of the State Legis- 
lature in 1785. 

William Hunter was a successful agent in collecting 
funds' for restoring the Meeting-'HoUse after it had 
been destroyed by fire ; a Justice of the Peace, and one 
of the executors of Mr. Carmichael's estate. 

Joseph Grier was a lieutenant in the Continental 
Army, and one of the "Thirty Men" who were left to ' 
keep up the camp-fires, near Trenton, while the Amer- 
ican army moved to the attack at Princeton. 

John Culbertson, Esq., and David Denny were 
active in arresting the suspected, and did good service 
by forwarding supplies to the " Continental Army" 
and assisting the families of those in the field. 

Matthew Stanley was a member of the State Legis- 
lature in 1829, '30, and many years a Justice of the 
Peace. 

Robert Ralston held the office of Prothonotary dur- 
ing Governor Wolf's administration, 1829-35. He 
took an active part in the organization of the Presby- 



113 

terian Church at West Chester, and was one of its first 
Ruling Elders. 

Andrew Buchanan was a member of the State Leg- 
islature in 1855, '56, and one of four brothers who 
were Ruling Elders in the Presbyterian Church. 

A son of each of the following Ruling Elders en- 
tered the Gospel Ministry : William Kennedy, Joseph 
Grier, Samuel Ralston, John Templeton, and Caleb 
Liggett. 

The fathers of the Ruling Elders whose names are 
subjoined were also Ruling Elders : William Denny, 
William Lockhart, David Buchanan, John McClure, 
Joseph McClure, John Ralston, Andrew Buchanan, 
John F. Templeton, and James Liggett.* 

* Dr. Grier, " Historical Discourse ;" Records of Session ; Penna. 
Magazine ; Local Memoranda ; OfiBce of Register of Wills. 



114 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



TRUSTEES. 



As it has been found impossible to obtain the names 
of many who held the office of Trustee, lists of them 
are given at those periods only when either, their ser- 
vices being most needed, or some incidental circum- 
stance caused their names to be placed on record. 

The Trustees when the Manor Meeting-House was 
built, in 1761, were E,ev. John Carmichael, John Cul- 
bertson, JUsq., James Moore, Esq., William Denny, 
Samuel McKinly, and Francis Gardner. 

When the Meeting-House was destroyed by fire, in 
1786, those who, as Trustees, took an active part in its 
restoration were Samuel Cunningham, Esq., John 
Culbertson, Esq., James M'Clure, David Denny, 
James Dunwoodie, William Anderson, and Robert 
Lockhart. 

In 1839, when the interior of the building was re- 
modelled, John Templeton, Esq., John Ralston, James 
Dorian, Thomas M'Clune, James K. Grier, William 
W. M'Clure, Joseph Mackelduflf, and John M'Cach- 
ran composed the board of Trustees - 
' James G. Templeton, Charles T. Forrest, John 
Weber, Lewis Worrall, James G. M'Clure, David 
Harris, Isaac Sahler, Zebulon W. Davis, and Baxter 
B. M'Clure held the office when the new church 
edifice was commenced in 1875. Three of them were 



IN " THE rOKKS OF BKAISTDYWINE." 115 

the sons of those who were Trustees thirty-six years 
before. 

The Trustees at the present time are James G. 
M'Clure, Charles A. Robeson, W. P. Moore, Charles 
T. Forrest, Zebulon W. Davis, Joseph P. Graham, 
Robert Shields, Samuel C. Mackelduff, and Francis 
Growe. 



SEXTONS. 



The Sextons, so far as can be ascertained, have been 
John M'Cachran, Isabella M'Cachran, James Neal, 
James Millegan, Sr., James Millegan, Jr., Joseph 
Sims, Samuel Parsons, John Sinn, Griffith Sinn, 
William Ballentine, and Robert Cairns.* 

* Local Memoranda ; Sessional Records in part. 



116 HISTOEY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 



THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS. 



"How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that* 
bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace, that bringeth good 
tidings of good, that publisheth salvation." — Isaiah lii. 7. 

Those whose names are appended prepared for the 
Christian Ministry under the direction of the Rev. 
Nathan Grier. The Biographical notices of them 
have been arranged 'in the order of their license to 
preach the Gospel.* 

Rev. William Woods Licensed in June, 1794. 

" David MConaughy,D.D., LL.D. . . " " Oct., 1797. 

" Patrick Davidson " " Oct., 1797. 

" Matthew G. Wallace " " April, 1799. 

" Thomas Grier " " April, 1800. 

" Joshua Knight " " Oct., 1800. 

" Thomas Hood " " Aug., 1802. 

" Levi Bull, D.D " " Sept., 1805. 

" Alexander Boyd ~ " " Sept., 1806. 

" James Buchanan " " Sept., 1806. 

" Robert White " " April, 1809. 

" William Kennedy " " April, 1809. 

" John F. Grier, D.D " " June, 1810. 

" Robert S. Grier " " Sept., 1812. 

" Samuel Parke " " April, 1813. 

" John H. Grier " " April, 1813. 

" John N. C. Grier, D.D " " April, 1813. 

" John W. Grier " " Sept., 1818. 

* Minutes of Pres. of Newcastle. 



IN -"the forks of beandywine." 117 



REV. WILLIAM WOODS. 

The Rev. William Woods, who appears to have been 
the first that pursued his Theological studies under the 
direction of the Rev. Nathan Grier, was a native of 
Lancaster County, Pa. His academical education was 
obtained at Dr. Smith's school in Pequea, and his col- 
legiate at Dickinson College, of which he became an 
Alumnus in 1792. He was licensed by the Presby- 
tery of New Castle, June 17, 1794, and spent some 
years after his licensure as a missionary in the western 
counties of this State. 

Mr. Woods accepted a call from the united churches 
of Bethel and Lebanon, in Alleghany County, Pa., 
as the successor of the Rev. John Clark, and was in- 
stalled as their pastor by the Presbytery of Redstone, 
June 28, 1797. The pastoral relation was dissolved 
in 1831, and he died October 17, 1834. 

Bethel, of which Mr. Woods became sole pastor 
some years before his death, was organized by Dr. 
McMillan, and is one of the oldest churches in West- 
ern Pennsylvania. " It shared largely in the blessed 
influences of the revivals of 1803-04."* 

*-Smith, " Old Redstone ;" Minutes of Presbytery of Newcastle. 



118 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHTJReH 



EEV. DAVID M'CONAUGHY, D.D., LL.D. 

Kev. David M'Conaughy, D.D., LL.D., was born 
in Adams County, then a part of York County, Pa., 
in September, 1775. He was graduated at Dickinson 
College, Carlisle, September 30, 1795, standing the 
first in his class. After the usual course in Theology 
under the direction of the jRev. Nathan Crier, he was 
licensed by the Presbytery of New Castle, October 5, 
1797. 

Having received a call from the united congrega- 
tions of Upper Marsh Creek (now Gettysburg) and 
Great Conewago, he was installed as their pastor in 
October, 1800. He continued in this relation, faith- 
fully and acceptably discharging his ministerial duties, 
until the spring of 1832, when the pastoral relation 
was dissolved at his request. 

In May, 1832, he was inaugurated President of 
Washington College, Pa., an ofiice which he filled 
with dignity and ability until October, 1849, when 
the infirmities of age caused him to resign. He con- 
tinued to reside at Washington until his death, Janu- 
ary 29, 1852. 

Dr. M'Conaughy was an early and zealous advocate 
of the temperance cause, and his influence, both as 
a pastor and as the President of a college, was wide- 
spread and beneficial. He left the congregations com- 
mitted to his oversight in a prosperous condition, and 
" every year of his administration added strength and 
reputation to Washington College." 



IX " THE FORKS OF BEAXDYWIXE." 119 

After his retirement from the Presidency, Dr. 
M'Conaughy published a volume of Discourses, chiefly 
Biographical, of Persons eminent in Sacred History ; 
a Brief Summary and Outline of the Principal Sub- 
jects comprehended in Moral Science; a few Bacca- 
laureate Addresses, and some Sermons. 

His style is generally vigorous, although somewhat 
diffuse, and his writings exhibit clearness in the state- 
ment of facts, a judicious selection of the subjects 
discussed, and an earnest desire to promote knowledge 
and religion. 

The degree of D.D. was conferred on him by Jef- 
ferson College in 1833 ; of LL.D. by the Trustees of 
Washington College on his retirement from the 
Presidency of that Institution.* 



KEY. PATKICK DAVIDSON. 

Patrick Davidson was born in 1775, and completed 
his collegiate course at Dickinson College, Carlisle, 
September 30, 179o.f He was licensed by the Pres- 
bytery of New Castle, October 5^ 1797, and passed 
the next twelve months in supplying churches with- 
out a pastor. 

In April, 1798, Mr. Davidson received a call from 

* Dr. Nevin. " Churches of the Valley ;" Sprague, " Annals of 
American Pulpit ;" Rev. Dr. Elliott's Com. Discourse. 

f Among his classmates were Chief Justice Taney, Judge Kennedy, 
of the Supreme Court of this State, Dr. McConaughy, President of 
Washington College, and Dr. Williams, President of Jefferson College. 



120 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

the congregation of Fagg's Manor, Chester County, 
Pa., which he declined on account of the smallness 
of the salary. The call, acconipanied by a promise 
of increased support, was renewed at the meeting 
of Presbytery in October of the same year, and 
accepted. 

He was installed in April, 1799, and remained 
about a year. He then applied for a release from his 
charge, alleging " that although the congregation had 
done all that was reasonable, yet certain unpleasant 
circumstances had occurred which destroyed his com- 
fort and hindered his usefulness." 

The Presbytery granted his request, and on the 19th 
of October, 1800, he was installed pastor of the church 
at Toms Creek, Maryland, by a committee of the 
Presbytery of Carlisle. In 1801 he also became 
pastor of the church at Piney Creek in the same State, 
giving to each of these churches one-half of his time. 

His pastoral relation with both congregations seems 
to have been harmonious and pleasant until the close 
of the summer of 1809. In August (15th) of the same 
year he was elected Principal of the Academy at 
Fredericktown, Md., and removed there shortly after- 
wards. This caused dissatisfaction among his people, 
who complained that the preaching of the Word 
was neglected, and at the meeting of Presbytery in 
the Spring of 1810, they asked for supplies. Mr. 
Davidson being absent, the Presbytery deferred action 
until its meeting the next September (26th), when the 
pastoral relation was dissolved. 

At the same meeting of Presbytery a number of 
charges against Mr. Davidson were presented by a 



IN " THE FORKS OF BBAWDYWINE." 121 

member of one of his congregations. A Committee 
of Presbytery, after a careful examination, considered 
them unfounded and censured his accuser. 

He was dismissed at his own request on the 25th 
of September, 1814, to the Presbytery of Baltimore. 
During his connection with the Academy at Frederick- 
town " he supplied the Presbyterian Church at that 
place, and preached occasionally at Pipe Creek and 
Creagertown in the vicinity." 

Mr. Davidson died October 9, 1824. He was the 
first that was called to his reward of those who entered 
the ministry from the Divinity School of the Eev. 
Nathan Grier.* 



EEV. MATTHEW G. WALLACE. 

The Rev. M. G. Wallace was -born about the year 
1774. Where he received his academical training 
is not known. He was graduated at the College of 
New Jersey in September, 1795, and succeeded the 
Rev. Mr. McPherson as principal of the Brandy wine 
Academy, where he remained about three years. 
While he had charge of the Academy he pursued the 
study of Theology, and was licensed by the Presby- 
tery of Newcastle, April 4, 1799. He removed im- 
mediately afterwards to Ohio, and was one of the first 
Presbyterian ministers who settled in that State. 

* Minutes of Presbytery of Carlisle ; Kev. W. Simonton, " History 
of Toms Creek Church ;" Eev. W. Noble, " History of Faggs Manor 
Church." 

9 



122 HISTORY OP THE PEESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

About 1802, Mr. "Wallace became pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Churcli in Cincinnati. Subse- 
quently he preached at Springfield, Hamilton, and 
other places in Ohio. In the latter part of his life 
he resided at Terre Haute, Ind., without a charge, and 
died there August 12, 1854. 

Mr. "Wallace was an excellent classical scholar, a 
sound theologian, and a faithful minister of the 
Gospel.* 



KEV. THOMAS GKIEE. 

Middletown, the oldest, and for nearly a century 
and a half the only, Presbyterian Church in what is 
now Delaware County, Pa., was established before 
1724. It seems to have been among the first organ- 
ized outside of Philadelphia. As the records are 
lost, its early history is obscure. A copy, however, 
of "Watts's Psalms and Hymns, presented to the 
church by the author, has escaped the ravages of time, 
and is justly regarded as an interesting memento of 
that eminent and godly man. 

In the latter half of the first year of the present 
century the congregation known by the name of 
Middletown presented a call to the Eev. Thomas 
Grier to become their pastor. This call he accepted, 
and was ordained and installed December 16, 1801. 

Mr. Grier was graduated at Dickinson College in 
1797, studied divinity under the Rev. Nathan Grier, 

* Dr. S. Alexander, " Princeton College in the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury ;" " Reminiscences of Rev. Dr. J. N. C. Grier." 



,g 



IlSr " THE FOKKS OF BRAND YWINE." 123 

and was licensed by the Presbytery of Newcastle, 
April 3, 1800. 

He remained at Middletown until the close of Sep- 
tember (30th), 1808, when he resigned and accepted a 
call from the church at West Town, Orange County, 
New York, in the bounds of the Presbytery of 
Hudson. 

Of his pastorate at Middletown little is known ; 
but taking his subsequent ministry as a guide, it may 
be inferred that it was faithful, laborious, and suc- 
cessful. 

He was installed at West Town, February 7, 1809. 
The bounds of the congregation were large, embrac- 
ing the territory now occupied by four churches. 
He labored with great diligence and acceptance until 
difficulties arose with some of the members of his 
charge on the subject of baptism. The matter was 
finally brought to the notice of the Presbytery, and 
in April (18th), 1827, the whole matter was referred 
to a Committee, which accepted his resignation in 
September (12th) of the same year. 

Shortly afterwards Mr. Grier became pastor of the 
church at Milford, Pike County, Pa., and remained 
about a year. He then settled at Centreville, N. J., 
where a meeting-house was built for him. After a 
pastorate of nearly three years in that place, he re- 
moved to Cold Spring, on the Hudson, where he 
continued to occupy the pulpit until his death. 

" He was taken sick while preaching from the text, 
' Weep not for me, but weep for yourselves and your 
children.' " 

Mr. Grier preached without the aid of notes, and 



124 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

with such earnestness and solemnity as frequently to 
melt his audience to tears. His sermons were practi- 
cal, sound in doctrine, and imbued with much of the 
spirit of his Divine Master. His labors, especially 
during his pastorate at West Town, were greatly 
blessed. 

In 1815 there was a copious outpouring of the 
Spirit among the people of his charge, one hundred 
and three being added to the church in that year, and 
j&fty-seven in the year immediately following ; all on 
a profession of their faith. In, 1820 a still greater 
awakening took place, and a hundred and ninety-four 
became members of the visible church. 

Mr. Grier married a Miss McCullough, of Little 
Britain, Lancaster County, Pa., and one of his sons, 
George W. Grier, resides in Goshen, Orange County, 
N. Y.* 



REV. JOSHUA KNIGHT. 

About the middle of the last century a number of 
Presbyterian families associated together and emi- 
grated from Connecticut to Southwestern Central New 
York. They purchased a quarter township of land, 
and settled on the Chenango River, a tributary of the 
Susquehanna, near where the town of Sherburne now 
stands. They arrived on Thursday, and by the next 
Sabbath they had built a log meeting-house, in which 
divine service was held every week. This building 

* Com. from Rev. T. Sheelar, Orange Co., N. Y. ; Smith, " Hist, 
of Delaware Co. ;" Minutes of Presbytery of Hudson. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEAXDYWINE." 125 

having in the course of time become no longer fit for 
public worship, they determined to erect another. A 
difference of opinion, however, about the site of the 
new meeting-house led to a division. A part of the 
congregation withdrew, organized as a second church, 
and built a house at some distance from the town. ' 

In 1802 the Rev. Joshua Knight, a graduate of 
Dickinson College in 1798, and a licentiate of the 
Presbytery of Newcastle in 1800, was installed pas- 
tor of this church. He discharged the duties of the 
office with acceptance until 1823. In that year he 
married the daughter of his first wife, step- daughter, 
and as a consequence was dejjosed from the minis- 
try by the Congregational Association of Chenango 
County. He removed shortly afterwards from Sher- 
burne to a farm belonging to his wife on the Mohawk 
River, in Herkimer County, where he spent some years 
in agriculture. He subsequently engaged in mercan- 
tile pursuits, but his property having been destroyed 
by fire, he was reduced to penury. His wife died of 
grief, and he, after having, as reported, officiated as a 
Universalist clergyman, closed his earthly existence 
as a pauper. 

That the evening of a life whose morning and noon 
were passed prosperously and respectably should have 
been clouded by poverty and disgrace, gives rise to 
many sad and monitory reflections. But the duty of 
the biographer is the stating of facts, not the j)enning 
of meditations on the errors and frailties of humanity. 

His children by the last marriage all died when 
young. A son by his first marriage, it is said, resides 
in Michigan. 



126 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

The second church at Sherburne was small, never 
numbering more than two hundred members. It 
shared largely in the revival of 1816. In 1830 it 
disbanded and formed another organization in a vil- 
lage five miles distant.* 



EEV. THOMAS HOOD. 

Thomas Hood was born on the farm now in the 
possession of the family of the late Matthew Stanly, 
July 2, 1781. He was awakened to a sense of his 
lost condition by the preaching of the Rev. Nathan 
Grier. After he had been connected for some time 
with Mr. Grier's congregation, he determined to enter 
the ministry. His preparatory training was received 
at the Brandywine Academy, and his collegiate at 
Dickinson College, where he was graduated in Sep- 
tember, 1799. He was licensed by the Presbytery of 
Newcastle, August 3, 1802, and spent about three 
years as an occasional supply in the central counties 
of this State. 

In October, 1805, Mr. Hood was installed by the 
Presbytery of Huntingdon pastor of the united con- 
gregations of , Buffalo and Washington, in North- 
umberland, now Union, County, Pa. At first he 
gave to each of these congregations half his time. 
But the congregation at Washington having been 

* New York Hist. Collections ; Hotchkin's " Hist, of Western 
New York;" MS. Com. from Rev. J. Chambers, Pastor of Cong. 
Church, Sheiburne. 



IN " THE FOEKS OF BKAFDYWINE." 1 27 

reduced by the change of residence of many of its 
members, they consented, in 1809, to an agreement for 
Mr. Hood to preach there every fourth Sabbath. 

At a meeting of the Presbytery held at Bellefonte in 
1810, the residents of Milton and vicinity, in North- 
umberland County, requested permission for Mr. Hood 
to preach for them one-fourth of his time. This 
request was granted by the recently-formed Presbytery 
of Northumberland, and he conducted religious services 
at Milton once a month as a stated supply until Octo- 
ber 7, 1812, when he was installed as pastor. 

On the 20th of April, 1819, he accepted an invita- 
tion to give the congregation at Milton one-half of his 
time. " This arrangement continued until he resigned 
the pastorate, April 21, 1835." Mr. Hood was noted 
for the excellence and solidity of his matter rather 
than for elegant diction or an attractive delivery. 

After his withdrawal from the active duties of the 
ministry, Mr. Hood resided for some years on his 
farm in Bufialo Valley, Union County, but he finally 
removed to Lewisburg, the seat of justice of the same 
county, where he died March 17, 1848. 

He was married in April, 1803, to j\Iiss Mary 
Hazlitt. His second wife was Miss Hannah M'Clure, 
to whom he was married in March, 1848, a short time 
before his decease.* 

* Com. from Kev. J. C. Wattson, D.D. ; " Hist, of Presbytery of 
Huntingdon ;" " Reminiscences of Ex-Governor Pollock." 



128 HISTOEY or THE PRESBYTERIAST CHURCH 



EEV. LEVI BULL, D.D. 

The Rev. Levi Bull was born in Warwick, then a 
part of East Nantmeal Township, Chester County, 
November 14, 1780. He manifested an aptitude for 
learning at an early age, and was graduated at Dick- 
inson College in September, 1798, before he had 
completed his eighteenth year. 

He commenced the study of Law in the office of 
James Hopkins, Esq., Lancaster, Pa., but before he 
was admitted to the Bar his religious opinions under- 
went a change, and he resolved to devote himself to 
the service of the Altar. With this object in view 
he passed through the usual theological course in the 
Divinity School of the Bev. Nathan Grier, entered 
the ministry of the Episcopal Church, and was or- 
dained by Bishop White in 1805. 

Instead of seeking a rectorship at a distance, he 
devoted himself to the preaching of the Gospel in 
the vicinity of his native place. His earnestness 
and faithfulness, together with his popular manners, 
caused his ministrations to be largely attended, and 
resulted in the organization of several Episcopal 
Churches, which still exist.* 

The possessor of ample means both by inheritance 
and marriage, Dr. Bull generously assisted every be- ' 
nevolent object, and the deserving poor never sought 

* Dr. Bull was rector in 1833 of St. Mary's Church, Warwick 
Township, Chester County; Bangor Church, Churchtown, Lancaster 
County ; and St. Thomas' Church, Morgantown, Berks County. 



129 

his aid in vain. Imbued by a truly Christian philan- 
thropy, he regarded ministers of the Gospel of every 
orthodox denomination as his brethren, and mingled 
freely "with men of every creed. He is the only 
Episcopal clergyman whom the writer remembers to 
have seen occupying a Presbyterian pulpit. At his 
death, which took place August 2, 1859, he was the 
oldest rector of the Episcopal Church in Pennsyl- 
vania. The degree of D.D- was conferred on him in 
1844 by the Western University of Pennsylvania, 
located at Pittsburg. 

The father of Dr. Bull, Colonel Thomas Bull, was 
a soldier in the " Continental Army ;"* a Representa- 
tive from Chester County in the State Legislature 
nine sessions, 1793 to 1801 inclusive, and a delegate 
to the Convention which framed the Constitution of 
Pennsylvania, adopted in 1776. 

The eldest son of Dr. Bull, Colonel Thomas K. 
Bull, a gentleman of liberal education and pleasing 
address, resides on the paternal estate. He was a 
member of the State Legislature three years, — 1846, 
'47, and '48. Another son, James, held the office of 
Prosecuting Attorney for Chester County, and a third 
son, William, recently deceased, was a member of the 
Philadeljjhia Bar. 

A grandson of Dr. Bull, the Rev. Levi Bull, is a 
rector in the Episcopal Church. 



* Colonel Bull was among those taken prisoners by the surrender 
of Fort Washington in November, 1776, and endured all the priva- 
tions and suflferings of that Libby of the Revolutionary War, the 
British prison-ship. He is said to have broken his sword rather than 
surrender it. 



130 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

A discourse commemorative of Dr. Bull was de- 
livered by the Kev. Dr. May in 1859.* 



EEV. ALEXANDEE BOYD. 

Alexander Boyd, a native of Cumberland County, 
Pa., was born about 1780. When quite young he re- 
moved to 'the vicinity of Pittsburg, and prosecuted 
his academical studies at Cannonsburg, before Jeffer- 
son College was founded. His collegiate course was 
completed at Dickinson College in 1799. 

Having spent some years in teaching, and passed 
through the usual course in Theology under the direc- 
tion of the Rev. Nathan " Grier, he was licensed by 
the Presbytery of Newcastle, September 30, 1806. 
In 1808 he was installed pastor of the church in Bed- 
ford, Pa., by the Presbytery of Carlisle. After labor- 
ing there about eight years he accepted a call from 
the Presbyterian Church at Newtown, Bucks County, 
where he was installed by the Presbytery of Phila- 
delphia in 1817. Owing to a difference of views 
between him and a number of the leading members 
of his congregation on the subject of temperance, he 
resigned his charge at Newtown, in 1838, and settled 
at Lock Haven, Clinton County, Pa. He remained 
there until a year before his death, which occurred in 
1845. 

Mr. Boyd " was a man of faithfulness, prayer, and 
power," and left an impression on the community at 

* Futhey, " Notae Cestriensis ;" May, Com. Piscourse ; Commu- 
nication from Colonel T. Bull. 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BKANDYWIXE." 131 

Newtown which is not yet eflFaced. During his Pas- 
torate the congregation was blessed with several re- 
vivals, and not a year passed without the addition of 
members to the church, and many of them on a pro- 
fession of their faith. 

Mr. Boyd was twice married. His^ first wife was 
Miss Margaret Watson, daughter of Dr. John Wat- 
son, of Lancaster County. His second wife was Miss 
Ann Beatty, daughter of Dr. Reading Beatty, of 
Bucks County.* 



REV. JAMES BUCHANAN. 

The Rev. Mr. Buchanan was a native of Sads- 
bury Township, Chester County, Pa., where he was 
born in 1783. He received his academical training at 
the Brandywine Academy, and his collegiate at Dick- 
inson College, where he was graduated September 28, 
1808. Having completed his theological course, he 
was licensed by the Presbytery of Newcastle, Septem- 
ber 30, 1806. 

In April, 1809, he was installed as pastor of the 
united congregations of Harrisburg and Middle Pax- 
ton, where he labored about six years with " faithful- 
ness and success." Failing health having compelled 
him to resign his charge, he spent some time in trav- 
elling. His health having been in a measure restored, 
he accepted a call in 1816 from the Presbyterian 
Church at Greencastle, Franklin County, Pa. He 

* Com. from Eev. J. C. Bush, of Newtown, Pa.; Com. from Rev. 
Dr. Watson, of Milton, Pa. ; Minutes of Northumberland Presbytery. 



132 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTEKIAN CHUECH 

sustained this relation upwards of twenty years, when, 
owing to ill-health and a belief that a change of place 
would be beneficial both to himself and the people of 
his charge, he resigned, and became pastor of a church 
at Logansport, Indiana. He remained in connection 
with it until his death, in September, 1843. 

Mr. Buchanan was much beloved by the members 
of the congregations of which he was pastor, and was 
highly esteemed by his brethren in the ministry. 

Dr. Elliott, who knew him well, states in a bio- 
graphical notice of him that his sermons in their 
structure were neat, systematic, and short ; in their 
matter solid, evangelical, and practical ; and in their 
manner grave, solemn, and earnest.* 



KEV. KOBEET WHITE. 

Robert White was born in Montgomery County, 
Pa., in 1783. He pursued his preparatory studies at 
Norristown, and was licensed to preach by the Pres- 
bytery of Newcastle, April 4, 1809. 

Shortly after his licensure calls were placed in his 
hands from Upper Octoraro, Fagg's Manor, and the 
united congregations of White Clay Creek and head 
of Christiana. He accepted the call from Fagg's 
Manor, and was ordained and installed December 14, 
1809. He continued to be the pastor of that church 
until his death, in September, 1835. 

His sermons were plain and practical, sound in 

* Dr. Nevin, " Churclieg of the Valley ;" Rev. David Elliott, D.D. 



133 

doctrine, and delivered in an earnest, impressive man- 
ner. Mr. White was well acquainted witli history in 
general, and lie frequently drew illustrations of the 
Providence of God from the records of the past which 
were both apt and striking. 

The only production from the pen of Mr. White, 
which the writer has seen, is a sermon entitled " ^lel- 
chisedek," delivered August 11. 1814. In it he ad- 
vances the opinion that Job and Melchisedek were the 
same pereon. His views are well sustained, and the 
whole discourse is, perhaps, as clear an exposition as 
can be given of a subject from which the veil of mys- 
tery cannot be removed. 

Mr. White married, in 1809, Xancy, eldest daugh- 
ter of his theological preceptor, the Rev.' Xathan 
Grier. Both of the sons of Mr. White entered the 
ministry. 

The eldest, Xathan Grier White, after finishing his 
theological course at Princeton, was licensed by the 
Presbytery of Newcastle, October 2, 1833. He was 
ordained and installed pastor of the church at ^NIc- 
Connelsburg, Bedford, now Fulton, County, Pa., June 
11, 1834, a relation- which he sustained "until the 
fall of 1864, when he accepted a call to Williams- 
burg, Blair County, Pa., where he is now laboring." 

The younger, Robert ]M. White, was graduated at 
Amherst College in 1834, standing the second in his 
class. Having completed his theological course in 
1837, he was ordained and installed pastor of the 
church at Fairview, West Virginia, in the autumn of 
that year. 

In September, 1 848, he became the pastor of the 



134 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHUKCH 

Presbyterian Church of Chartiers, Washington 
County, Pa. But his ministry there was short. He 
died on the 14th of December, 1848. 

A daughter, now deceased, of Mr. White was mar- 
ried to the Kev. John Moore. Another passed several 
years as a missionary in Northern India with her 
husband, the late Kev. Robert S. Fullerton.* 



EEV. WILLIAM KENNEDY. 

William Kennedy, whose father was many years a 
Euling Elder of the congregation worshipping in this 
place, was born July 4, 1783. Through the influence 
of his pious parents, aided by the faithful and earnest 
admonitions of his pastor, Kev. Nathan Grier, he was 
brought to a knowledge of the saving truths of the 
Gospel, and finally led to devote himself to the min- 
istry of Keconciliation. He received his preparatory 
training at the Brandywine Academy, and having 
passed the usual time in the study of Theology under 
the direction of the Kev. Nathan Grier, was licensed 
April 6, 1809, by the Presbytery of Newcastle. On 
the 3d of October in the following year he was or- 
dained and installed pastor of the united congrega- 
tions of Lewistown and West K^shacoquillas, Pa., by 
the Presbytery of Huntingdon. 

In April, 1822, charges were brought against him 
of conduct unbdcoming a clergyman. These charges 

* Puthey, " Notse Cestriensis ;" Kev. W. ¥. Noble, " Hist, of Pres. 
Church of Fagg's Manor ;" Kev. J. F. Collier, " Hist, of Chartiers 
Church." 



135 

the Presbytery considered unsustained, but he was 
induced as a consequence to resign his pastorate. 

" On the first of October, 1822, Mr. Kennedy was 
dismissed at his own request to the Presbytery of 
Erie, but finally settled within the bounds of the 
Presbytery of Clarion." 

He supplied the congregation of Mount Tabor, in 
Jefferson County, and of Mill Creek, in Clarion 
County, until a short time before his death, which 
took place November 2, 1850. 

Mr. Kennedy married, in 1809, Mary, third 
daughter of Benjamin McClure, an active member of 
this Church, and many years the leader of the choir. 
Four of their children, two sons and two daughters, 
reside within a ^hort distance of Brookville, Jefferson 
County. 

In regard to the charges which were preferred 
against Mr. Kennedy, it is no more than just to state 
that his contemporaries believed him to be a good and 
godly man, and that his subsequent lengthened min- 
istry " was without suspicion and without reproach."* 



EEV. JOHN F. GEIEE, D.D. 

John Ferguson Grier, only son of the Rev. James 
Grier, of Deep Run, Bucks County, Pa., was born in 
1784. He received his preparatory training at the 
Academy in this place, entered Dickinson College, 

* Gibson, " Hist, of Huntingdon Presbytery ;" Com. from William 
B. Kennedy ; Minutes of Presbytery of Newcastle. 



136 HISTOEY OF THE PEESBYTEKIAN CHUECH 

Carlisle, in 1799, and was graduated in 1803, at the 
head of his class. He subsequently taught in Pequea, 
was principal nearly five years of the Brandywine 
Academy, completed his Theological course under the 
direction of his uncle, the Rev. Nathan Grier, and 
was licensed to preach the Gospel by the Presbytery 
of Newcastle, June 26, 1810. 

Dr. Grier settled at Reading, Pa., where he was 
instrumental in gathering together and organizing the 
First Presbyterian Church in that city, of which he 
was installed pastor November 23, 1814. In addition 
to the conscientious discharge of his pastoral duties 
he conducted a Classical School, which obtained a high 
reputation and was well patronized. A warm friend 
of education, he was several years an active Trustee of 
Dickinson College, and it is altogether likely if his 
life had been prolonged that the College would have 
remained under Presbyterian control. The honorary 
degree of D.D. was conferred on him by the College 
at Meadville. 

Dr. Grier's manner in the pulpit was dignified and 
solemn, but close attention to his manuscript during 
the delivery of his sermons, which were models of 
diction and close thought, made them less attractive 
and impressive than their excellence merited. 

He died suddenly, January 26, 1829, during the 
progress of a revival which added many to the mem- 
bership of the church of which he had been the 
faithful and only pastor.* 

* Sprague, " Annals of American Pulpit ;'' C. B. Penrose, Esq., 
Commemorative Discourse. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BKANDYWINE." 187 



KEY. EGBERT S. GRIER. 

The eldest son of the Rev. Nathan Grier, Robert 
Smith Grier, was born May 11, 1790. In answer, no 
doubt, to the prayers of his godly parents, he was 
hopefully converted at an early age, and led to de- 
vote himself to the divinely-appointed work of win- 
ning souls to Christ. 

Mr. Grier passed, from 1802 to 1807, in prepara- 
tory studies at the Brandywine Academy, and in the 
last-mentioned year entered Dickinson College, where 
he was graduated September 27, 1809. He studied 
Theology under the direction of his father, and was 
licensed by the Presbytery of Newcastle in Septem- 
ber, 1812. 

He preached as a supply to congregations without 
a pastor until the winter of 1814, when he received 
a call from the churches of Toms Creek, now Em- 
mittsburg, and Piney Creek, Md. This call he ac- 
cepted, and was ordained and installed by the Pres- 
bytery of Carlisle, November 14, 1814. He remained 
in the pastoral charge of these congregations until his 
death, on the 28th of December, 1865, closed his pas- 
torate of fifty-one years. 

The Christian fellowship which subsisted between 
Mr. Grier and the members of the churches of which 
he had the spiritual oversight is shown by his long 
residence among them, and his faithfulness, by the 
number gathered into the fold at each communion 
season. In the sanctuary, his manner was earnest 

10 



138 HISTOEY OF THE PEESBYTERIAlSr CHUECH 

and solemn, his language plain and direct, and his 
discourses argumentative, practical, and convincing. 

It is worthy of remark that both the sons of the 
Rev. Nathan Grier, and also his sons-in-law, the Rev. 
Messrs. White and Parke, remained during the en- 
tire period of their ministry in charge of the congre- 
gations over which they were first installed. Like 
the pastor of Goldsmith's " Deserted Village," 

" Remote from towns, each ran his godly race, 
And never changed, nor wished to change his place." 

Both the sons of Robert S. Grier entered the min- 
istry, and are laboring with acceptance in West Vir- 
ginia. The elder, Smith F. Grier, as pastor of the New 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church, where the twenty- 
fifth anniversary of his installation has recently been 
celebrated, and the younger, Lafferty Grier, as pastor 
of the Elm Grove' Presbyterian Church, where he has 
been stationed the last eighteen years.* 



REV. SAMUEL PARKE. 

Samuel Parke was born in Sadsbury Township, 
Chester County, November 25, 1788. His parents 
being members of the Upper Octoraro Church, he 
was early brought to a sense of his lost condition, and 
having experienced a change of heart, resolved to 
devote himself to the work of the Gospel Ministry. 

* Rev. W. Simonton, " Hist, of Emmittsburg Pres. Church ;" Min- 
utes of Presbytery of Carlisle. ' 



IK " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWINE." 1 39 

After careful preparation, lie entered Dickinson Col- 
lege, Carlisle, and was graduated in September, 1809. 
Having completed his theological course, he was 
licensed by the Presbytery of Newcastle, April 7, 
1813. 

In August, 1814, Mr. Parke was ordained and in- 
stalled Pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Slate 
Ridge, York County, Pa., and also of Centre Church 
in the same County, giving to the latter one-third of 
his time. He ministered to both of these congrega- 
tions about thirty years, when he resigned the Pas- 
torate of the Centre Church, but continued to occupy 
the pulpit of the Slate Ridge Church. 

In 1857 the infirmities of age led him to obtain a 
dissolution of the Pastoral relation, and he remained 
without a charge until his death, December 20, 1869. 

Mr. Parke faithfully performed the duties of his 
sacred oflfice, and was much beloved by the members 
of his flock. During his ministry of more than forty 
years there were many tokens of the Divine approval 
of his labors, and the congregations of which he had 
the oversight annually increased. His manner in the 
pulpit was peculiarly solemn and impressive. Prac- 
tical piety rather than doctrinal controversy formed 
the chief subject of his discourses. 

Mr. Parke married Martha, the second daughter of 
the Rev. Nathan Grier. 

His son, the Rev. Nathan Grier Parke, D.D., was 
graduated at Jefferson College in 1840, completed his 
theological course at Princeton in 1844, and is now 
Pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Pittston, Lu- 
zerne County, Pa. 



140 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHtTKCH 

In 1867, Dr. Parke, with others, represented the 
Old School Presbyterian Church in the Assembly of 
the Free Church of Scotland, and also in the United 
Presbyterian Church of the same country.* 



EEV. JOHN H. GKIEE. 

John Hays Grier, the eldest son of John and Jane 
(Hays) Grier, was born about seven miles from 
Doylestown, Bucks County, Pa., February 7, 1788. 
When he was quite young, his parents, who were mem- 
bers of the Deep Run Presbyterian Church, removed 
from Bucks County and settled on the farm recently 
owned by their grandson, Elder Baxter B. McClure. 

Mr. Grier received his preparatory training at the 
Brandywine Academy, and completed his collegiate 
course at Dickinson College, Carlisle, in September, 
1809. Among his classmates were James Buchanan, 
late President of the United States, Robert S. Grier, 
John W. Grier, and J. N. C. Grier, well-known min- 
isters of the Gospel. 

Mr. Grier studied Theology under the direction of 
his uncle, the Rev. Nathan Grier, and was licensed 
to preach the Gospel by the Presbytery of Newcas- 
tle, April 7, 1813. He was installed pastor of the 
United Churches of Pine Creek and Great Island, 
Lycoming County, Pa., in the Fall of 1814. He con- 
tinued in charge of both these churches until 1827, 

* Futhey, " Hist, of Upper Oct. Church ;" Mioutes of Presbytery 
of Carlisle ; Presbyterian Banner. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BRAND YWINE." 141 

when he resigned the pastorate of Great Island, now 
Lock Haven, and divided the time previously devoted 
to it between a charge in Nij)enose Valley and an- 
other at New Berry, now included in the town of 
Williamsport. 

In 1840 the members of the Pine Creek Church 
built a house for public worship in the village of 
Jersey Shore, and the congregation was afterwards 
designated by the name of that village, the term 
Pine Creek being dropped. 

Mr. Grier resigned the pastorate of Jersey Shore in 
1848, but continued to supply the congregation in 
Nipenose Valley until 1863, when he withdrew from 
the active duties of the ministry. 

When he commenced his labors in Lycoming 
County it was sparsely settled, church buildings were 
few, and the opportunities for hearing the preached 
Word limited. At the close of his half-century of 
ministerial work the county was populous, churches 
were largely multiplied, and a band of devoted men, 
representing all the orthodox denominations, pro- 
claimed the words of truth in cities and villages, oc- 
cupying places where he had declared " the whole 
counsel of God" in an almost unbroken wilderness. 

Unassuming and genial, Mr. Grier was always de- 
servedly popular with the young people, not only of 
his charge but also of other denominations. This is 
evident from the fact that he solemnized a greater 
number of marriages than any other clergyman within 
the bounds of the Presbytery, being frequently called 
a distance of several miles to perform the interesting 
ceremony. 



142 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

After the dissolution of the pastoral relation Mr. 
Grier resided at Jersey Shore. He was probably the 
oldest Presbyterian clergyman in this State, and, 
although his physical and mental powers were some- 
what impaired, he entered on his ninetieth year in 
the enjoyment of comparatively good health.* 

Mr. Grier died February 3, 1880, within four days 
of having completed his ninety-second year. 



EEV. JOHN W. GRIEE. 

John Walker Grier was born in Bucks County, Pa., 
in 1789. When he was quite young his parents re- 
moved from Bucks County and settled within the 
bounds of this congregation, of which his father. Col- 
onel Jos. Grier, was upwards of twenty years a Ruling 
Elder. 

Having been hopefully converted during a season 
of refreshing in the church, Mr. Grier, in obedience 
to his own sense of duty and the wishes of his pious 
parents, resolved to devote himself to the work of the 
Christian ministry. With this object in view, he 
passed through a preparatory course at the Brandy- 
wine Academy and entered Dickinson College, where 
he was graduated in 1809. His theological studies 
were commenced in the Divinity School of his uncle, 
the Rev. Nathan Grier, and completed under the 
direction of Dr. Mason, of New York City, and in 
the Seminary at Princeton, N. J. 

Mr. Grier then turned his attention to teaching, 

* Com. from R. H. Grier ; Min. Pres. of Newcastle ; Personal Rem- 
iniscences. 



IN " THE FOKKS OP BEANDYWINE." 143 

reopened the Brandywine Academy, which had been 
closed since the withdrawal of Dr. J. F. Grier, and 
continued in charge of it until the Spring of 1822, 
when he resigned, and became principal of the Ches- 
ter County Academy. He retained his connection 
with that Institution until 1826, when he was ap- 
pointed by John Quincy Adams a Chaplain in the 
navy of the United States. This office his amiable 
disposition, gentlemanly manners, and uniformly 
Christian deportment eminently qualified hirn to fill, 
and he discharged its duties to the satisfaction of all. 

He held the position until 1857, when the infirmi- 
ties of nearly threescore and ten caused him to resign, 
and he passed the remaining seven years of his life 
in literary leisure and the enjoyment of the society 
of his numerous friends. 

During his connection with the navy, Mr. Grier 
visited nearly all of the commercial cities and many 
of the most interesting localities in both hemisjaheres ; 
and his stores of information gathered during his 
voyages and travels made his conversation highly 
interesting and instructive. He was an excellent 
Hebraist, a good classical scholar, and a well-read 
theologian. 

Mr. Grier was one of a Committee of eight who, 
in 1831, signed, in behalf of an association formed for 
the purpose, the contract for the publication of the 
first number of that widely-known and influential 
periodical the Presbyterian. He was also the first 
superintendent of the Manor Sunday-School. 

Mr. Grier was licensed by the Presbytery of New- 
castle, September 30, 1818, and ordained in 1826 by 



144 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHTJECH 

the Presbytery of Philadelphia, when he was about 
to enter the navy. 

His only surviving son, the Rev. Matthew B. Grier, 
D.D., well known as the senior editor of the Presby- 
terian, was licensed by the Presbytery of Newcastle 
at Wilmington, Del., in 1843, and ordained and in- 
stalled pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Ellicott's 
Mills, Md., by the Presbytery of Baltimore, in No- 
vember, 1847. 

The pastoral relation was dissolved at his request in 
November, 1852, and he accepted a call to the First 
Presbyterian Church, "Wilmington, N. C. Dr. Grier 
remained at Wilmington, laboring faithfully and ac- 
ceptably, until the outbreak of the Rebellion, when 
he was forced, on account of his loyalty to the Union, 
to withdraw to a Northern city. He has now been 
for many years the leading editor of the Presbyterian, 
and is at present supplying the church at Ridley Park, 
near the city of Philadelphia.* 

The following members of his Congregation became 
Ministers of the Gospel during the Pastorate of Dr. 
J. N. C. Grier : 



Kev. Robert M'Cachran. 

" Anderson B. Quay. 

" Britton B. Collins. 

" Benjamin M. Nyce. 

" Richard Walker. 

" Matthew B. Grier, D.D. 

" Bees Happersett, D.D. 



Rev. Jas. G. Ralston, D.D.,LL.D. 
William Pinkerton. 
William H. Templeton. 
John C. Thompson. 
John Pinkerton. 
John Liggett. 
David W. Moore. 



* Minutes of Newcastle Pres. ; Minutes of Pres. of PhiladelpTiia ; 
Cruise of the " Potomac ;" Personal Reminiscences. 



IX '' THE FOKKS OF BEANDYWINE." 145 



KEV. ROBERT M'CACHRAN. 

Robert M'Cacliran, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, was 
born and grew to manhood almost within hearing of 
the weekly services of the sanctuary. Having become 
hopefully pious, and believing it to be his duty to 
enter the Christian ministry, he commenced the study 
of the classics at the Brandy wine Academy, then under 
the direction of the Rev. John W. Grier. 

After the retirement of Mr. Grier and the discon- 
tinuance of the Academy, Mr. M'Cachran finished his 
preparatory training at the Rev. Dr. M'Graw's Acad- 
emy, in Cecil County, Md. His collegiate course was 
completed at Dickinson College, during the presi- 
dency of Dr. Mason, and his theological in the Semi- 
nary at Princeton, N. J. 

He was licensed to preach the Gospel by the Pres- 
bytery of Newcastle in 1827, and having spent some 
time in suj)plying churches without a pastor, he ac- 
cepted a call from the congregation of Big Spring, 
now Newville, Cumberland County, Pa., and was in- 
stalled in the Spring of 1830. He remained in this 
connection until October, 1851, when a chronic affec- 
tion of the chest compelled him to resign his charge. 

After his withdrawal from the active duties of the 
ministry, Mr. M'Cachran resided in Newville, and 
devoted a portion of his time to the superintendence 
of a classical school. The congregation at Newville 
during his pastorate received many tokens of Divine 
favor. While he had charge nearly five hundred 



146 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

members were added to the church, seventy -three of 
them the fruits of a revival which occurred the second 
year of his ministry. 

Mr. M'Cachran resided at Newville without a charge 
until his death, February 15, 1885, having been for 
some years the oldest member of the Presbytery of 
Carlisle, with which he had been connected upwards 
of half a century. He was the first member of the 
congregation who entered the ministry during the 
pastorate of Dr. Grier.* 



EEV. ANDERSON B. QUAY. 

Anderson B. Quay, a native of Chester County, Pa., 
was born in 1802. He had married and was engaged 
in business when a change in his religious views led 
him to consider it his duty to preach the Gospel. He, 
therefore, after due preparation in the Academy at 
Reading, Pa., entered the Seminary at Princeton in 
1827, where he remained until September, 1829. 

Mr. Quay was licensed by the Presbytery of New- 
castle, October 7, 1829. On the 6th of April, 1830, 
he was dismissed to the Presbytery of Carlisle, and 
passed the next two years as a probationer, supplying 
the united congregations of Monaghan, now Dillsburg, 
and Petersburg, both in York County, Pa. In the 
Spring of 1832 he was installed pastor of those 
Churches by the Presbytery of Carlisle. His labors 
among the people of his charge continued with in- 

* Dr. Nevin, " Churches of the Valley ;" Com. from James M'Cach- 
ran ; Minutes of Presbytery of Carlisle ; Local Memoranda. 



IX " THE FORKS OF BEAXDYWIXE." 147 

creasing benefit until the Autumn of 1839, when the 
pastoral relation was dissolved at his request, and he 
accepted an Agency from the Presbyterian Board of 
Education. 

In May, 1840, he became pastor of the First Pres- 
byterian Church at Beaver, Pa., continuing to act a 
part of the time as Agent of the Board. His pastorate 
at Beaver lasted until February, 1842, when he re- 
ceived an appointment from the Board of Foreign 
Missions and resigned his charge. The members of 
the congregation parted with much regret from the 
pastor whose services, owing to their pecuniary cir- 
cumstances, they were unable properly to recompense. 

Mr. Quay held the position of Agent of the Board 
of Missions about a year, when he accepted a call to 
Indiana, Pa., where he remained until 1849. In the 
last-named year, at the request of the Colonization So- 
ciety of Pennsylvania, he became their Agent, and re- 
tained the position until his death, which took place at 
Beaver in 1 856. 

Mr. Quay united with pleasing manners great firm- 
ness of purpose and warmtli of feeling. He faithfully 
discharged the duties of pastor to the congregations in- 
trusted to his oversight, and labored diligently for the 
promotion of Education, Foreign Missions, and Afri- 
can Colonization. His eldest son, ]Matthew Stanley 
Quay, was recently the able and popular Secretary of 
the Commonwealth.^' 

* Min. of Pres. of Newcastle ; Min. of Pres. of Carlisle ; Eev. J. 
J. Scatterfield, " Hist, of First Pres. Church of Beaver." 



148 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTERIAlSr CHUKCH 



KEV. BRITTON E. COLLINS. 

Britton Estol Collins was born in Philadelphia, 
February 2, 1802. Having settled within the bounds 
of this congregation, he was brought to a knowledge of 
Jesus Christ as the only Saviour, and led to devote 
himself to the ministry of Reconciliation by the 
preaching of the Rev. Dr. J. N. C. Grier. 

Mr. Collins pursued his classical studies under the 
direction of the Rev. John W. Grier, and in the Fall 
of 1824 entered the Seminary at Princeton, where he 
remained two years. He was licensed by the Presby- 
tery of Philadelphia in April, 3828, and passed the 
next two years preaching as a probationer. 

On the 7th of April, 1830, Mr. Collins was received 
as a licentiate by the Presbytery of Huntingdon, and 
in June (16th) of the same year was ordained as an 
Evangelist. He received a call from the church at 
Millerstown, Perry County, Pa., April 4, 1832, and 
was installed in October of that year. 

Mr. Collins resigned his charge at -Millerstown 
April 9, 1839, and the next October received a call to 
Shirleysburg, which he declined, but consented to act 
as a stated supply. He remained at Shirleysburg until 
October, 1853, when he retired, but continued to labor 
as a missionary within the bounds of the Presbytery 
of Huntingdon until the infirmities of age unfitted 
him for the active duties of the ministry. . At his 
death, which took place at Shirleysburg, April 12, 
1876, he was the oldest member of that Presbytery. 



IX " THE FORKS OF BRAXDYWIXE." 149 

A faithful servant of the Master, after a life of 
usefulness, with the petition on his lips, " Thy will be 
done," he entered into rest.* 



EEV. BENJAMIN M. NYCE. 

Benjamin M. Nyce was born near Pughtown, 
Chester County. While he was still a minor his 
father, John Nyce, removed and settled near Wagon- 
town, within the bounds of Dr. Grier's charge. 
Having become connected with the congregation wor- 
shipping in this place, Mr. Nyce was finally led to 
consider it his duty to make known the glad tidings of 
salvation. He passed some time in the study of the 
classics in the Brandy wine Academy, then under the 
direction of the Bev. John W. Grier, and entered Dick- 
inson College, where he was graduated in September, 
1829. 

He taught the next three years in the Deaf and 
Dumb Asylum, Philadelphia, and in the Autumn of 
1833 entere4 the Seminary at Princeton, where he 
remained one year. But of his subsequent history the 
writer after diligent inquiry has been unable to obtain 
any reliable information. The probability is that he 
died shortly after completing his preparation for the 
ministry .f 

* " Hist, of Presbytery of Huntingdon ;" Xecrology of Princeton 
Seminary ; Presbyterian Banner. 

f Records of Princeton Seminary ; Records of Deaf and Dumb 
Asylum ; " Reminiscences of Rev. R. M'Cachran." 



150 HISTORY OF THE PEESBt'TEEIAN CHTJECH 



EEV. EICHAKD WALKER. 

Richard, eldest son of Richard and Sarah (Hen- 
derson) "Walker, was born at Indian Town, "Wallace 
Township, May 1, 1812. He was engaged for some 
years in mechanical pursuits, but finally relinquished 
them to enter the Gospel ministry. After due prepara- 
tion he was licensed by the New School Presbytery of 
Philadelphia, and supplied for a time the church at 
"Womelsdorf, Berks County. 

In April, 1842, he was sent as a supply to the Pres- 
byterian Church at Allentown, Lehigh County, Pa. 
His ministry there was so successful that in May, 1844, 
he was installed as pastor of the congregation worship- 
ping in that church. He remained in charge until 
1859, when bodily infirmity compelled him to with- 
draw from continuous ministerial labor. 

He subsequently preached in different places when 
his health permitted until a short time before his death, 
which occurred at Allentown on the 10th of May, 
1882. 

Mr. Walker -was unassuming, earnest, and sincere, 
and the members of his charge parted with regret from 
the pastor whose unreruitted endeavors to promote their 
spiritual interests had rendered him incapable of any 
but partial labor in the Gospel field.* 

* Necrology of Princeton Seminary ; Obituary Notice, Graphic ; 
Com. from Samuel Walker. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWINE." 151 



EEV. REES HAPPEESETT, D.D. 

Dr. Happersett, the youngest son of Melchi and 
Rebecca (Graham) Happersett, was horn in West 
Nantmeal Township, Chester County, July 31, 1810. 
He became the subject of Divine Grace during the 
great revival of 1831 in Dr. Grier's congregation, of 
which his parents had long been members. His aca- 
demical studies were prosecuted at New London in this 
County, and his collegiate at Washington College, Pa., 
where he was graduated in 1836. He completed his 
theological course in the Seminary at Princeton, N. J., 
three years afterwards, and was licensed by the Pres- 
bytery of Newcastle in September, 1839. 

Shortly after his licensure. Dr. Happersett became 
pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Havre de Grace, 
Md., where he remained about a year. He then 
entered the service of the Board of Domestic Missions, 
and for upwards of twenty years was diligently en- 
gaged in increasing its means and usefulness. 

While he was connected with that Board, Dr. Hap- 
persett visited and preached in many of the Southern 
States. He also supplied, at different times, the vacant 
pulpits of several churches in Pennsylvania, among 
others the church, at Waynesburg (Honeybrook) 
upwards of six months. 

Having observed, during his visits to California, the 
scarcity of laborers in the Gospel field of that State, 
he determined to aid the efforts which were making to 
unfurl and uphold the banner of Presbyterianism in 



152 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

the settlements on the " Pacific Slope." He, therefore, 
resigned his office in the Board of Missions in the Fall 
of 1861, proceeded immediately to San Francisco, 
and passed the next six months preaching in that city 
and vicinity. 

In the Spring of 1862 he accepted a unanimous 
call to the pastorate of the Fii'st Presbyterian Church 
at Stockton, Cal., where he ministered with increasing 
acceptance and benefit until his death, in September, 
1866. 

The degree of D.D. was conferred on him by Jef- 
ferson College in 1856.* 



EEV. JUSTUS UMSTEAD. 

Rev. Justus Umstead, whose parents were members 
of Dr. Grier's congregation, is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, and of the Theological Sem- 
inary at Princeton, New Jersey. 

He was licensed by the Presbytery of Philadelphia 
in July, 1847, and settled shortly after at South Bend, 
Ind., where he remained about a year. He then 
became pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Musca- 
tine, Iowa, and after a successful ministry of three 
years removed to Keokuk in the same State. Mr. 
Umstead remained at Keokuk, in the faithful discharge 
of his pastoral duties, until the Fall of 1860, when he 



* Com. from the late Mrs. Agnes Happersett ; Minutes of Pres. of 
Newcastle ; Minutes of Board of Domestic Missions. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BKANDYWIXE." 153 

accepted a call from the diurch at Fagg's Manor, Pa., 
where he was installed in November, 1860. 

His labors at Fagg's Manor were not without en- 
couragement. In 1865 there was an awakening, by 
which one hundred and fifty-seven " were added to 
the Lord." 

In May, 1872, the pastoral relation was dissolved, 
and he took charge of the Presbyterian Church at 
St. George's, Delaware. He remained until 1876, 
when he resigned and became pastor of the church 
at Smyrna in the same State, where he is still engaged 
in ministerial work with marked success.* 



KEV. JAMES G. KALSTON, D.D., LL.D. 

Dr. Ralston, widely known as a successful educator, 
and a minister of the Gospel, was born in Wallace 
Township, Chester County. He united at an early 
age with the congregation worshipping in this place, 
and directed his attention to a preparation for the 
ministry of the New Testament. His academical 
training was obtained at- New London and Hopewell 
Academies in this County, and his collegiate at Wash- 
ington College, Pennsylvania, where he was graduated 
September 26, 1838. 

He taught the next two years after his graduation 
in an academy at Steubenville, Ohio, pursuing at the 
same time the study of Theology under the direction 
of the principal of the academy, the Rev. John W. 

* Rev. W. B. Noble, " History of Fagg's Manor;" MSS. 
11 



154 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHTJECH 

Scott, D.D. In June, 1840, he entered the Theo- 
logical Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, where he 
completed his studies for the ministry. 

Dr. Ralston was licensed by the Presbytery of New- 
castle, April 14, 1841, and accepted a mission to the 
Winnebago Indians. But his health failing before he 
reached his destination, he was obliged reluctantly to 
abandon the undertaking. His health having been in 
a measure restored, he preached for some months as a 
supjaly to the Church at Florence, in the bounds of the 
Presbytery of Washington. 

In October, 1841, Dr. Ralston entered on what 
proved to be the main business of his life, as principal 
of the Female Seminary at Oxford, Chester County, Pa. 
He remained at Oxford until the close of October, 1845, 
when he opened the now well-known Oakland Female 
Institute at Norristown, Montgomery County, Pa. 
There his industry, ability, and faithfulness as an in- 
structor soon resulted in a large and annually increas- 
ing patronage. The upwards of twenty-five hundred 
ladies who have been educated wholly or in part in 
that institution have exerted and are exerting an in- 
fluence whose usefulness can never be fully estimated. 
At the fireside, in the school-room, and the church, 
and among the benighted of heathen lands, the results 
of their judicious mental and religious training must 
be traced. 

In addition to the discharge of his onerous duties 
as principal of a large educational institution. Dr. 
Ralston frequently supplied the pulpits of churches 
without a pastor, and assisted his clerical brethren 
during revivals and on other occasions. He was also 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWINE." 155 

during the last seventeen years of his life an efficient 
member of the Board of Publication of the Presby- 
terian Church. 

The degree of LL.D. was conferred on him by 
Lafayette College, Easton, Pa., in 1865, and of D.D. 
by his Alma Mater two years afterwards. 

Dr. Ralston died !N^ovember 10, 1880, in the sixty- 
fifth year of his age.* 



REV. WILLIAM PINKERTON. 

William Pinker ton, an elder brother of the Rev. 
John Pinkerton, was born in October, 1809. Having 
been hopefully converted during the great refreshing 
from on High in 1831, he resolved to dedicate himself 
to the work of the Gospel ministry. 

His preparatory studies were pursued at New London 
Academy, Chester County, and his collegiate at Wash- 
ington College, Pennsylvania, where he was graduated 
in September, 1836. His theological course was com- 
pleted at Princeton in 1839. On the lOth of the next 
September he was licensed by the Presbytery of New- 
castle, and settled shortly afterwards as Pastor of the 
Cove Church, Albemarle County, Va. He also min- 
istered to the High Bridge Church, Rockbridge County, 
Va., and to Collierstown Church in the same county. 

During the last sixteen years of his life he had 

* Futhey, " Hist, of Chester County ;"' Com. from John K. Kalston. 



156 HISTOEY OF THE PKESBYTEKIAN CHURCH 

the pastoral oversight of Mount Carmel Church, 
Augusta County, Va. 

Mr. Pinkerton was a diligent worker in the Master's 
vineyard. Uniting a ready command of language 
with fervid piety, his services in the Sanctuary were, 
largely attended and blessed by the conversion of 
many. 

Besides the faithful discharge of his duties to the 
congregations committed to his care, he established 
and conducted a classical school, and also successfully 
labored in the revival of churches which had either 
grown feeble or been partially abandoned. Among 
these was Mountain Plain, where, more than a hundred 
years before, Mr. Black, the first pastor of Brandy- 
wine Manor Church, had spent the last years of his 
ministry. 

Mr. Pinkerton died March 13, 1875.* 



EEV. WILLIAM H. TEMPLETON. 

William H. Templeton, eldest son of John Temple- 
ton, Esq., who was upwards of thirty years a Ruling 
Elder of this church, commenced his academical studies 
at New London, Chester County, in 1841. He entered 
Washington College, Pennsylvania, in November, 
1843, and was graduated in 1845. He passed the next 
two years teaching, and then became a member of the 



* Futhey, " History of Upper Oct. Church ;" Com. from Frank D. 
Pinkerton; MSS. 



DSr " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWIXE." 157 

seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, where his theo- 
logical course was completed. 

Mr. Templeton was licensed by tlie Presbytery of 
New Brunswick in September, 1850, and the next 
October went as a missionary to the Creek Indians, 
Indian Territory. He remained in that Territory 
until 1857, when the death of his wife and his impaired 
health caused him to return to Pennsylvania. 

Being unable to endure the labor to which he had 
been subjected, Mr. Templeton withdrew from the 
missionary field ; but in 1858 settled in Illinois, where 
he is still engaged in ministerial labor.* 



EEV. JOHN PINKERTON. 

John Pinkerton, third son of John W. and Agnes 
Pinkerton, was born near Sadsburyville, Chester 
County, Pa., in November, 1811. When he was 
about six years of age his parents, who were members 
of the Upper Octoraro Presbyterian Church, removed 
to Honeybrook Township, and connected themselves 
with the congregation worshij)ping in this place. 

Mr. Pinkerton passed his early years, like many 
young men, without any serious thoughts on the 
subject of religion until 1831, when he was awakened 
to a sense of his lost condition during the remarkable 
revival which commenced in that year. His convic- 
tions were deep and pungent, and he was so weighed 
down by the burden of sin that his health became 

* Minutes of Presbytery of New Brunswick ; Com. from the late 
J. G. Templeton; MS. Collections. 



158 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHUKCH 

impaired. But obeying the Saviour's command, " Come 
unto me all ye that are weary and heavy laden," he 
found pardon and peace. 

Having determined to obtain a classical education, 
Mr. Pinkerton entered the Academy at Lewisburg, 
Union County, Pa., May 15, 1837. He completed his 
preparatory studies in it and the Academy at Mifflin- 
burg in the same county at the close of 1841, and was 
graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1843. After 
the usual Theological Course at Princeton, he taught 
some time in a classical school which his brother, the 
Rev., William Pinkerton, had established. 

The Presbytery of Greenbrier licensed him to 
preach the Gospel in October, 1849. He assisted the 
Rev. Samuel R. Houston, of Monroe County, Va., 
in teaching and ministerial labor until October, 1853, 
when he accepted a call from the congregation of 
Mossy Creek Presbyterian Church, Augusta County, 
Ya. Mr. Pinkerton was ordained and installed No- 
vember 5, 1853, and this relation continued until his 
death. May 31, 1871, left the people of his charge to 
mourn the loss of their zealous, beloved, and faithful 
pastor. 

The possessor of abilities and acquirements which 
would have enabled him to attain eminence in almost, 
any department of literature, Mr. Pinkerton devoted 
the talents committed to his dare to the service of his 
Divine Master, and instead of earthly honors, chose 
rather to be an humble disciple of Him " who went 
about doing good."* 

* Memorial by Kevi William T. Price ; Kecords of Lewisburg 
Academy ; Personal Reminiscences. ' 



IX " THE FORKS OF BRANDYWINE." 159 



COATESVILLE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



CoATESViLLE, though. Settled at an early period, 
remained without a house for public worship until 
1831. In that year the members of Baptist, Episco- 
pal, Friends', Methodist, and Presbyterian Churches 
residing in and near the village, with a Christian har- 
mony worthy of record, uniting their efforts and means, 
built a meeting-house. 

Among those who occupied its pulpit, on the part of 
the Presbyterians, when his other duties permitted, was 
the Rev. A. G. Morrisson, pastor of the congregations 
of Doe Run and Union. His services were so accept- 
able, and the number of his hearers increased so much, 
that in 1833 a petition was j^resented to Presbytery for 
the organization of a Church at Coatesville. The re- 
quest was not granted, but being renewed at the next 
meeting of Presbytery, it was favorably received and 
a Committee appointed, which met in September 
(4th), 1833, and organized the Presbyterian Church 
of Coatesville. 

The congregation, which had been gathered princi- 
pally by the care and faithfulness of Mr. Morrisson, in 
March of the next year presented a call for one-half 
of his time. This he accepted, and having obtained a 
release from the pastorate of the Union Church, was 
installed on the 24th of April, 1834. 

Under his ministry the number of members became 



160 ' HISTOEY OF THE PKESBYTEKIAN CHUKCH 

SO large that they found it necessary to have a meet- 
ing-house of their own. They therefore obtained the 
interest in the building and lot of those who had 
contributed funds for the .purpose.* 

Having increased facilities for public worship, the 
congregation became sufficiently numerous to sustain 
weekly services in the sanctuary, and a call was ac- 
cordingly presented to Presbytery on the 14th of April, 
1857, for the whole of Mr. Morrisson's time. The re- 
quest was granted, his relation at Doe Run dissolved, 
and he devoted the whole of his labor to the church at 
Coatesville. 

How faithfully he performed the duties of an " am- 
bassador for Christ" is shown by the increasing mem- 
bership of the church, the flourishing condition of its 
Sunday-School, its liberal contributions for benevolent 
purposes, and the warm affection which existed between 
the pastor and his people. 

But "the prophets do not live forever," and, in 
1868, the infirmities of nearly threescore and ten 
caused Mr, Morrisson to offer his resignation. The 
members of his flock, however, could not endure the 
thought of parting with the pastor who had been con- 
nected with the church from its beginning, and who, 
for a third of a century, had been to many of them a 
guide and counsellor, a " more than friend." They 
therefore generously resolved to provide a colleague 
and to continue to pay Mr. Morrisson a portion of his 
salary during his life. 

* They occupied this building until 1849, when it was replaced by 
a new church edifice, and this, in 1867, was enlarged to its present 
size. 



IN " THE FORKS OP BRAND YWINE." 161 

In accordance witli this resolution, the congregation 
gave a call in January (15th), 1868, to the present 
pastor, the Hey. James Roberts, who was ordained 
and installed May 28, 1868. The relation thus es- 
tablished between the aged servant of God and his 
younger brother continued " harmoniously and pleas- 
antly" until the death of Mr. Morrisson, October 27, 
1870. 

Dr. Roberts, who is a native of Montrose, Scotland, 
received his classical education at ]\Iedia, Delaware 
County, Pa., where he passed some time as an in- 
structor. He was graduated at Lafayette College, 
Easton, Pa., in July, 1865, and at the Theological 
Seminary, Princeton, N. J., a few weeks before his 
installation at Coatesville. 

During his pastorate the membership of the church, 
now upwards of three hundred, has annually in- 
creased. The Sunday-School, which was conducted 
many years by the same Superintendent, continues to 
flourish, and in numbers, influence, and liberality the 
Presbyterians, under the guidance of Dr. Roberts, are 
the leading denomination in that borough. 

Dr. Roberts, who is equally and deservedly es- 
teemed by his clerical brethren and the people of his 
charge, was sent as a Commissioner to the General 
Assembly in 1872, and also in 1877. Since April, 
1869, he has been the stated clerk of Presbytery, and 
in 1883 received the honorary degree of D.D. from 
Lafayette College, Pennsylvania. 

A centre of manufacturing industry, and situated 
on one of the great thoroughfares of trade, Coatesville 
must necessarily increase in wealth and population. 



162 IIISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

But from the nature of their occupations many of its 
inhabitants will be only transient residents. With- 
drawn from the kindly influence of home, exposed to 
numerous temptations, and often suddenly deprived of 
employment by the vicissitudes of business, they, above 
most others, will always need the restraining, consoling, 
and saving influence of the Gospel. It is, therefore, a 
cause for thankfulness that, in Coatesville, the oppor- 
tunities to hear the words of truth have kept pace 
with the growth of the population. Where, in 1830, 
there was not a single building set apart for public 
Avorship, the voice of prayer, admonition, and praise 
may now be heard, on every returning Sabbath, in 
six meeting-houses dedicated to the service of the 
Triune God.* 



* Minutes of Presbytery of Newcastle ; Dr. Roberts, " Pastoral of 
Coatesville Pres. Churcb." 



IN "the forks of beandywine." 163 



HONEYBROOK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



When Dr. Grier's congregation had become so 
large that it was necessary for a portion to withdraw, 
those residing near the western boundary of his charge 
obtained a site in the village of Honeybrook, erected 
a house for public worship, and having received 
permission from the Presbytery, were organized as 
the Honeybrook Presbyterian Church, November 28, 
1835. 

They were dependent on supplies until May, 1837, 
when the Rev. William W. Latta, who had been 
given a unanimous call to become their pastor, was 
ordained and installed. Mr. Latta remained, with 
increasing popularity and usefulness, until the Fall 
of 1858, when failing, health caused him to obtain a 
release from his charge. 

Unassuming, kind, and faithful, Mr. Latta was 
much beloved by the members of the congregation, 
and they parted with regret from the pastor under 
whose guidance many of them had found "joy and 
peace in believing." 

Mr. Latta was succeeded by the Rev. John G. 
Thorn, who was installed May 19, 1859. Mr. Thom, 
like the Apostle to the Gentiles, "was in labors 
abundant." Besides the services of the sanctuary, he 
preached and conducted weekly prayer-meetings in 
different parts of his charge, and was active in the 



164 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHTJECH 

furtherance of Sunday-Schools and temperance. He 
also aided his fellow-citizens by his counsel and ex- 
ample during the struggle to maintain the Union. 

Having declined several invitations to take the over- 
sight of congregations without a pastor, Mr. Thorn at 
last accepted a call to St. Louis, Mo., and was in- 
stalled in October, 1865. But he had scarcely entered 
on his field of labor when, enfeebled by his previous 
discharge of pastoral duties, he sunk under an attack 
of typhoid fever and entered into rest. 

The successor of Mr. Thorn was the Rev. J. H. 
Young, who became pastor in 1866, and remained 
until March 7, 1869, when the pastoral relation was 
dissolved by the Presbytery of Donegal. 

Mr. Young is a ready speaker, a sound theologian, 
and a good classical scholar. He is now professor of 
Languages in the Normal School in Indiana, Pa. 

The congregation next presented a unanimous call 
to the Rev. William Ferguson, of Dubuque, Iowa, 
which he accepted, and was installed in October, 1869. 

In the Fall of 1871, Mr. Ferguson was released at 
his own request by the Presbytery of Chester. The 
ministry of Mr'. Ferguson was not without its fruits, 
eighty-six having been added to the church while he 
had charge. 

He is now pastor of the Presbyterian Church at 
Pittsgrove, N. J., where his labors have met with en- 
couraging success. 

In June, 1872, the congregation gave a unanimous 
call to the Rev. William W. Totheroth, who was in- 
stalled by a Committee of the Presbytery of Chester 
on the last day of Octo'ber, 1872. In 1883, Mr. 



IX " THE FORKS OF BKATiTDYWINE." 165 

Totheroth received and accepted a call to become 
pastor of a Churcli at Le Roy, N. Y. 

The pastorate of Mr. Totheroth was eminently bene- 
ficial. His zeal, prudence, and industry promoted 
harmony, increased the membership of the church, 
and imparted renewed activity to its benevolent opera- 
tions. 

In the amount of its donations for charitable pur- 
poses, the number of its members, and of children at- 
tending its Sabbath-Schools, this church ranks among 
the first of the rural Presbyterian Churches in our 
State. It has contributed to the growth of the village 
in which its meeting-house is placed, and, like ortho- 
dox churches in general, is a nucleus around which en- 
terprise, refinement, and intelligence have clustered.* 

* Minutes of presbytery of Donegal ; Kev. Mr. Totheroth, " Hist, 
of Church ;" Local Memoranda. 



166 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHXJECH 



FAIRYIEW PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



On account of the distance which they had to travel 
in order to attend the services, of the sanctuary, and 
for other reasons which need not be stated, the mem- 
bers of Dr. Grier's congfegation who resided in the 
northeastern part of his charge resolved to erect a 
building , for public worship and obtain a distinct 
organization. Accordingly, having procured an ele- 
vated and beautiful site, easy of access, and convenient, 
they comm,enced in 1839 the erection of a meeting- 
house, which was completed and dedicated on the first 
day of the next year. 

In May, 1840, a Committee of the Third Presbytery 
of Philadelphia met and organized a church under the 
name of the West Nantmeal Presbyterian Church.* 

The same month (May, 1840) the Rev. Alexander 
Porter, who had received his classical and theological 
education in the College and Seminary at Princeton, 
N. J., was ordained and installed as pastor. Mr. 
Porter was released from his charge in May, 1843. 
During his pastorate forty-three were added to the 
membership of the church. 

Mr. Porter was succeeded, in October, 1843, by the 
Rev. William H. McCarter, a graduate of Jefferson 

* The name of the Township in which it is situated h'&ving been 
changed, it is now called Fairview Presbyterian Church. 



Ilf " THE POEKS OF BRANDYWIXE." 167 

College, Pennsylvania, and of Union Theological Sem- 
inary, Xew York. Mr. McCarter labored with fidelity 
and acceptance until October, 1849, when he received 
a call to the pastoral oversight of a Presbyterian Church 
at Edwardsville, Indiana, and removed to that State. 

The successor of Mr. McCarter was the Pev. B. B. 
Hotchkin, late pastor of Marple Presbyterian Church, 
Delaware County. While Dr. Hotchkin, who is well 
known as an author and an earnest, impressive speaker, 
had charge the church was highly prosperous. In 
June, 1869, Dr. Hotchkin, always desirous of enlarging 
his sphere of usefulness, accepted a call to his late pas- 
torate, where his ministrations were greatly blessed.* 

The next year the church was dependent on supplies, 
but in October, 1860, the Pev. D. C. Meeker became 
pastor. Mr. Meeker, who received his collegiate train- 
ing in the University of New York, and his theologi- 
cal at Union Seminary in Kew York State, remained 
until October, 1868, when he was called to labor in 
another part of the Master's vineyard. His relations 
with the members of his flock were harmonious and 
pleasant, and they parted with regret from their faitli- 
ful shepherd. 

After the retirement of Mr. JMeeker, the congrega- 
tion obtained the services of the Rev. A. Xelson Hol- 
lifield, who discharged his pastoral duties with much 
ability until the close of 1875, when he accepted a 
unanimous call to the Presbyterian Church of Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa., where he was installed in January, 1876. 



* Dr. Hotchkin died October 13, 1878, in the seventy-second year 
of his asre. 



168 HISTOKY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

During his ministry one hundred and thirty- three 
■were added to the membership of the church, and the 
meeting-house, which had become much impaired, was 
replaced by a large and commodious structure, at a 
cost of thirteen thousand dollars. 

In May, 1876, the Kev. William Boyd, who was 
graduated with honor at the University of Pennsylva- 
nia, and completed his theological course in the Semi- 
nary at Princeton, was installed. Young, ardent, and 
gifted, Mr. Boyd soon won the confidence of the com- 
munity, and his field of usefulness rapidly increased.* 

Besides a well-attended Sunday-School, conducted 
in the church building, another is maintained during 
the summer season in an outlying portion of the con- 
gregation, a short distance from Loag's Corner, where 
there is also stated preaching every month. 

Surrounded by a rural but thrifty and intelligent 
population, with a new church edifice, a parsonage, and 
a beautiful cemetery, all without incumbrance. Fair- 
view Church cannot fail to increase in numbers and 
usefulness, nor cease to diffuse the blessings of order, 
temperance, and piety.f 

* In March, 1883, Mr. Boyd, much to the regret of his congrega- 
tion, received and accepted a call to become pastor of the Second Pres- 
byterian Church of Camden, N. J. He was succeeded in September 
of the same year by the Rev. William P. Breed, Jr., a son of the 
Rev. Dr. Breed of the West Spruce Street Church, Philadelphia. 

■f " History of Fairview Church," by Rev. W. Boyd; Local Mem- 
oranda. 



IN "the forks of BKANDYWIjSTE." 169 



CENTRAL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, DOWN- 
INGTOWN, PA. 



DowiNGTOWN, one of the oldest towns in Chester 
County, was settled by members of the Society of 
Friends who had emigrated from Wales. The site 
was well chosen, being near to the "Indian Trail" 
leading from the Delaware to the Susquehanna, and 
in the midst of a beautiful and fertile valley. Besides, 
it was supplied by one of the main branches of the 
Brandywine with abundance of water-power, so im- 
portant in a new settlement. 

Possessing these advantages, it might have been sup- 
posed that the growth of Downingtown would be rapid, 
and that, like Lancaster, Reading, and other inland 
towns, it would, ere long, rise to the dignity of a city. 
But its inhabitants, satisfied with their possessions and 
pursuits, not only advanced slowly in the march of 
improvement, but even rejected proffered sources of 
wealth and importance; among others a proposition 
to make their village the seat of justice when Chester 
County was divided. 

There was consequently little opportunity or induce- 
ment for the active and enterprising Scotch and 
Scotch-Irish to make it their home and establish the 
church of their fathers. It should, therefore, not ex- 
cite surprise that near a century and a half passed 

12 



170 HISTORY OF THE J'EESBYTEKIAN CHUKCH 

after the first settlement of Downingtown before a 
Presbyterian Church was organized within its limits. 

In 1843 some God-fearing men, whom the activity , 
and business introduced by the Pennsylvania Railroad, 
and the spirit of enterprise in general, had caused to 
settle at Downingtown, adopted measures leading to 
the establishment of a Presbyterian Church. Neigh- 
boring clergymen of that denomination were invited 
to preach, and religious services were held at private 
residences and in school-houses and halls obtained for 
the purpose. Their number increased slowly, but in 
1860 they felt sufficiently encouraged to undertake 
the building of a church edifice. Accordingly, they 
obtained a lot and erected a meeting-house. 

Owing, however, to causes which it would be neither 
beneficial nor perhaps possible to trace, dissensions 
arose, many withdrew from the church, pecuniary 
difficulties increased, and the building was finally sold 
and occupied for secular purposes. 

But the Christian men and women who were at- 
tached to the doctrines and government of the Pres- 
byterian Church did not despair. Believing that the 
Most High would cause light to shine out of darkness, 
they faithfully and prayeifully continued the good 
work, and in October, 1861, had the satisfaction of 
seeing the Central Presbyterian Church of Downing- 
town organized by a Committee of the Presbytery of 
Newcastle. 

The congregation was dependent for some time on 
supplies, but in 1862 extended a call to the Rev. Mat- 
thew Newkirk, who was ordained and installed April 
24, 1862. 



IN " THE FOEKS OF BKANDYWiyE." 171 

Under his faithful oversight the membership of the 
church increased so much that it was determined to 
erect a house for public worship. The building was 
commenced in June, 1863, but, owing to unforeseen 
causes of delay, it was not completed and dedicated 
until August, 1864. 

Mr. Newkirk, who considered no labor too humble 
or too severe provided it furthered the interests of his 
people, remained until 1868, when he became pastor 
of a church in Philadelphia.* 

Mr. Newkirk was succeeded by the Rev. John Eae, 
a licentiate of the Western Theological Seminary, at 
Alleghany, Pa. Mr. Eae continued in charge until 
April, 1872, when he obtained his release and went 
as a missionary to "Washington Territory. 

The pastorate of j\lr. Eae, though short, was not 
without its beneficial results. While he occupied the 
pulpit fifty united with the church, several of them in 
the morning of life. 

The present pastor, the Eev. Francis J. Collier, a 
graduate of Jefferson College, Cannonsburg, Pa., and 
of the Theological Seminary at Princeton, succeeded 
Mr. Eae, and was installed October 7, 1872. 

Mr. Collier is a ready speaker, and his expositions 
of Divine truth are well calculated to arouse the con- 
science and impress the heart. Since his connection 
with the church its membership has continually in- 
creased. Seasons of awakening have occurred, in 



* Mr. Newkirk has recently resigned the pastorate of Bethlehem 
Presbyterian Church, corner of Broad and Diamond Streets, Phila- 
delphia. 



172 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

which many " have been born again." The well-con- 
ducted Sunday-School is becoming more and more 
efficient, and both the pastor and his people are earn- 
estly engaged in extending the blessed influence of 
the Gospel of Him at whose advent was proclaimed 
peace on earth and good will to men,* 

* " History of the Church," by the present pastor ; Minutes of Pres- 
bytery ; Local Memoranda. 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BEANDYWINE." 173 



ACADEMIES. 



BRANDYWINE ACADEMY. 

A SCHOOL was opened for instruction in the classics 
and the higher branches of science about 1792 in a 
part of the building, which stood until 1863, imme- 
diately West of the Upper Graveyard. 

This school, which was a necessary adjunct to the 
Theological School, was placed at first under the di- 
rection of the Rev. Mr. McPherson, a native of Ire- 
land, who was subsequently deposed from the ministry 
on account of intemperance and died in the Chester 
County poor-house. 

After the withdrawal of Mr. McPherson, Mr. Mat- 
thew G. Wallace, a graduate of the College of New 
Jersey in 1795, became principal. He remained, 
pursuing at the same time his studies in theology 
under the direction of the Rev. Nathan Grier until 
his licensure, in 1799, when the school was closed. 

In 1802 it was reopened by Mr. John Ralston, of 
Cumberland County, Pa., also a theological student. 
He died in the fall of 1804, and Dr. John F. Grier, 
who in the spring of that year had opened a classical 
school in Pequea, took charge of it. He discharged 
the duties of principal with much ability until his 
settlement at Reading, in 1809, when the school was 



174 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

suspended. It was subsequently conducted about 
three years by the Kev. John W.Grier, who resigned 
in March or April, 1822, and renaoved to the Chester 
County Academy. After the retirement of Mr. Grier 
the school was finally closed. 

At this Academy, which was the first institution of 
a higher grade than a common school opened in this 
part of Chester County, the Rev. Drs. D. Elliott, J. 
F. Grier, J. N. C. Grier, and the Eev. Messrs. Hood, 
Kennedy, J. H. Grier, J. W. Grier, R. S. Grier, J. 
Buchanan, J. E. Grier, M.D., Matthew Grier, M.D., 
Benjamin Grifiith, M.D., and the Hon. David Potts 
received the whole of their preparatory training in 
the classical languages and English Literature. 

The Rev. Messrs. A. G. Morrison, Robert M'Cach- 
ran, and Benjamin M. Nyce also passed some time 
in studying the Greek and Roman Classics at this 
Institution. 

So far as is known this Academy was well con- 
ducted, and its pupils exerted a wide-spread, bene- 
ficial influence.* 



HOWARD ACADEMY. 

This Institution was opened for the reception of 
pupils November 13, 1848, in the village of Rock- 
ville. It was under the direction of Elder John 
Ralston and his brother James, as proprietors, and a 
graduate of the College of New Jersey, who had 



* " Reminiscences of Rev. Dr. Grier ;" Com. from Rev. R. McCach- 
ran; MSS. 



IX " THE FORKS OF BRAND YWINE." 175 

spent several years in teaching, as principal. At 
first this school was regarded by many as a doubtful 
experiment. But it soon became favorably known, 
and attracted pupils from every part, not only of 
Chester County, but also from the cities of Lancaster, 
Reading, and Philadelphia. 

The instruction was thorough, and the course of 
study embraced all that is required for admission to 
our best colleges or for an entrance on the study of 
any of the learned professions. 

With the exception of three months, when his 
place was supplied by the E-ev. Mr. Ogden, of 
Easton, it continued with increasing patronage and 
usefulness under the superintendence of the first 
Principal, until September, 1855, when, having ac- 
cepted a professorship in one of our large cities, he 
resigned. 

After his withdrawal a select school was kept in 
the building by Miss Louisa Ralston, of Honeybrook. 
It was subsequently conducted as an academy by Mr. 
Watson, of Milton, Pa., who was succeeded by the 
Rev. Mr. Kirkland, a native of Scotland, noted for 
his superior classical attainments and his accurate 
acquaintance with history. But owing to the institu- 
tion having been several times discontinued and to 
other causes which it is neither important nor perhaps 
possible to trace, its popularity declined, and in Sep- 
tember, 1862, it was finally closed.* 

In addition to upwards of thirty who have been 
successful as teachers and others who engaged with 

'^ See Appendix L. 



176 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHXTECH 

advantage in agricultural, mechanical, or mercantile 
pursuits, the following members of the- learned, profes- 
sions received a part or the whole of their preparatory 
training in this Academy : 

KEY. JOHN C. THOMPSON. 

Mr. Thompson was graduated at Lafayette College 
in 1855, completed his theological course at Princeton 
in 1858, and was licensed by the Presbytery of New- 
castle in the Spring of the following year. 

Shortly after his licensure he accepted an invitation 
to supply the First Presbyterian Church, Nashville, 
Tenn., and resided in that city until the Rebellion 
forced him to withdraw. He then settled as pastor of 
the Presbyterian Church at Smyrna, Del., but in 1864 
took charge of the Presbyterian Church at Pottstown, 
Montgomery County, Pa. He remained there, ear- 
nestly and faithfully discharging the duties of his 
charge, until 1873, when he accepted a call from the 
Presbyterian Church at Hagerstown, Md. During 
his pastorate the church edifice was replaced by a 
beautiful and commodious structure, and his ministra- 
tions there as elsewhere were greatly blessed. 

On the 1st pf January, 1879, Mr. Thompson took 
charge of the Southwark Presbyterian Church, Phila- 
delphia. In June, 1880, he was called to the South 
Broad Street Presbyterian Church, and in 1885, by a 
union of Broad Street Church with the Scotch Pres- 
byterian Church, became pastor of the united church, 
which is rapidly increasing its membership and means 
of doing good. 



IN " THE FOKKS OF BEAjSTDYWINE." 177 

EEV. DAVID W. MOOEE. 

Mr. Moore received his diploma from the College of 
New Jersey in 1858, and was graduated at the Theo- 
logical Seminary at that place in April, 1861. On the 
5th of the succeeding May he was ordained and in- 
stalled pastor of the Lower Brandywine Presbyterian 
Church, Delaware. While he had charge of that 
church Mr. Moore passed some months as a chaplain 
with the Army of the Potomac, then lying near Pe- 
tersburg, Va. The pastoral relation was dissolved at 
his request in October, 1872, and he resided in the 
Southwestern States, chiefly in MississipjDi, until Oc- 
tober, 1873, when he accepted a unanimous call to 
become the pastor of the congregation at McVeytown, 
Mifflin County, Pa. In 1883 he resigned and became 
pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Kennett Square, 
Chester County, where he is laboring with great 
success. 

Mr. Moore has always taken a warm interest in 
education, and his plain, practical discourses prove 
him to be an earnest and faithful disciple of his Di- 
vine Master. 

EEV. THOMAS M. GEIFEITH. 

Mr. Griffith entered Dickinson College in the 
Autumn of 1854, and received the degree of A.B. 
four years later, standing the second in his class. He 
passed the next winter as a teacher at Chester, Pa., 
and in the Spring of 1859 was licensed to preach the 
Gospel by the Philadelphia Conference of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. 



178 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEBIAN CHURCH 

Since his licensure Mr. GriflSth has been engaged 
in the faithful discharge of the duties of his sacred 
office, with the exception of a part of one year, which 
he spent travelling through Europe, Egypt, and the 
Holy Land. He is one of the most popular pastors 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is daily in- 
creasing his reputation and usefulness. 

REV. JOHN A. LIGGETT, D.D. 

Dr. John A. Liggett, a son of the late Elder Caleb 
Liggett, entered Lafayette College, Easton, in 1853, 
and was graduated in 1857. His theological studies 
were completed in the Seminary at Danville, Ken- 
tucky. 

In 1861 he accepted a call to the Presbyterian 
Church at Crittenden, Ky., where he remained until 
1864, when he became pastor of the Second Presbyte- 
rian Church of Rahway, N. J. 

Since his connection with the church at Kahway 
there have been several outpourings of the Spirit 
among the people, and the membership of the church 
during his pastorate has been more than doubled. 

Dr. Liggett's discourses in the pulpit exhibit a ready 
command of language, a familiar but not unpolished 
style, and an earnest desire to promote the everlasting 
welfare of his hearers. 

The degree of D.D. was conferred on him at its last 
Commencement by Lafayette College. 

REV. ISAAC MAST. 

Mr. Mast was born near Morgantown, Berks County, 
Pa., October 14, 1835. After leaving the Academy, 



179 

in September, 1855, he entered the Ohio Wesleyan 
University, where he was graduated in the Autumn 
of 1859. He taught the next winter at Reading, 
Pa., and joined the Philadelphia Conference of the 
]\Iethodist Episcopal Church in 1860. 

In 1871 his health failed and he passed a year in 
California. Having returned with renewed strength, 
he engaged, with his usual zeal and faithfulness, in 
ministerial work until the winter of 1875-76, when, 
being unable to continue his pulpit labors, he spent 
some months in Florida. But the balmy breezes of 
the Peninsula did not reinvigorate his physical system, 
and in June, 1876, he sank the victim of that wide- 
wasting disease, consumption. 

While a student in the Academy, INIr. Mast was 
noted for the genial disposition, modesty, and earnest 
desire to do right, which endeared him in after-years 
both to his ministerial brethren and to the members 
of the congregations of which he had the pastoral 
oversight. 

He published an account of his observations and 
adventures while sojourning in California. This 
work, entitled " The Gun, Rod, and Saddle," may be 
read with advantage by all who desire to increase 
their knowledge of the land of gold and romantic 
scenery.* 

WILLIAM IRWIN, M.D. 

Dr. Irwin studied medicine under the direction of 
Dr. Josej)h Gaston, of Honey brook (Waynesburg) , 

* MSS. Collections ; Personal Keminiscences. 



180 HISTORY OP THE PRESBYTERIAN CHtTRCH 

and received the degree of M.D. from Jefferson Col- 
lege in 1856. He married a daughter of the late John 
M. Mullin, Esq., of West Brandywine, in 1857, and 
settled the same year as a physician at Smyrna, Lan- 
caster County, Pa. He remained at Smyrna with in- 
creasing patronage until 1865, when he removed to 
Christiana, on the southeastern boundary of the same 
County, where he soon obtained an extensive practice. 

Dr. Irwin continued in the active discharge of his 
professional duties until his physical system, never ro- 
bust, became so much impaired as to render him un- 
able to satisfy the increasing demand for his services. 
Such, however, was his attachment to his calling, and 
his desire to assist those who needed medical aid, that 
he did not relinquish his attendance on his patients, 
when his health permitted, until a short period before 
his death. This took place on the 13th of November, 
1877, in the fifty-first year of his age. 

Dr. Irwin was a diligent student, who spared neither 
time nor money to make himself familiar with the re- 
quirements of his profession. He died much regretted 
by those who had shared his friendship and experi- 
enced the benefit of his medical skill. 

H. CLAY MEREDITH, M.D. 

Dr. Meredith completed his classical course at Oak- 
land Institute and Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He pursued 
the study of medicine under the supervision of his 
father, the late Dr. Stephen Meredith, and was grad- 
uated at the Medical Department of the University of 
Pennsylvania in 1864. Immediately after his grad- 
uation Dr. Meredith entered the Army of the United 



IN "the forks op bkandywine." 181 

States as an assistant surgeon. He remained actively 
engaged until the close of the war, when he resigned 
and commenced the practice of his profession at Pugh- 
town, Chester County. 

Dr. Meredith, like his father, has the reputation of 
being a skilful, well-read physician, and his success 
justifies the confidence which is placed in his knowl- 
edge and ability. 

JOHN WELLS, M.D. 

Dr. Wells, after the close of his preparatory course 
at the Academy, entered the ofiice of Dr. J. Eode- 
baugh, Charlestown Township, Chester County, as a 
student of medicine. He commenced his attendance, 
on the lectures at the University of Pennsylvania in 
1852, and received the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
from that institution in March, 1854. 

Dr. Wells settled as a physician at his native place 
in Charlestown Township, and owing to his genial dis- 
position and acknowledged ability was soon largely 
patronized. He continued the practice of his profes- 
sion with increasing reputation and usefulness until 
his death, August 15, 1871. 

The decease of Dr. Wells while still in the prime 
of life cast a gloom over a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances, who esteemed him as an upright citi- 
zen, and appreciated his worth as an attentive and 
skilful physician. 

JOHN N. C. HAPPEKSETT, M.D. 

Dr. Happersett, a grandson of the Pev. Dr. J. N. 
C. Grier, read medicine with Dr. A. K. Gaston, of 



182 HISTOEY OF THE PRESS YTEBIAJST CHTJECH 

West Brandywine Township, Chester County. He 
entered the Medical Department of Jefferson College 
in the Fall of 1857, and was graduated in March, 
1859. 

Dr. Happersett commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession at Hollidaysburg, Pa., in the sj)ring of 1860. 
His skill as a surgeon brought him into notice, and 
he was soon largely patronized. 

On the outbreak of the Rebellion his patriotism led 
him to seek an appointment in the army. His appli- 
cation was successful, and in August, 1861, he was 
commissioned as an Assistant Surgeon. He served 
with distinction during the campaigns of the army of 
the West, and at the close of the war was assigned to 
the Department of the Carolinas. June 26, 1876, 
he was commissioned as " surgeon in full" and sta- 
tioned at Fort Hamilton, in the Department of the 
East. 

Dr. Happersett deservedly ranks high as a skilful 
surgeon and a successful practitioner, and the respon- 
sible position which he now holds in the army of the 
United States shows that he discharged the arduous 
duties of previous appointments with faithfulness and 
ability. 

EUGENE GASTON, M.D. 

Eugene, eldest son of the late Dr. A. K. Gaston, 
of West Brandywine, completed his classical education 
at the West Chester Academy. He read medicine 
under the direction of his father, entered the medical 
dej)artment of the University of Pennsylvania in 



183 

1863, and received tlie degree of M.D. from that 
Institution in March, 1865. 

Beheving with Horace Greeley that the West 
affords the best opportunities for the employment of 
energy and ability. Dr. Gaston determined to become 
a resident of the Great Valley of the Mississippi, and 
settled as a practising physician in Vermilion County, 
Illinois, near the eastern boundary of that State. 
His success has justified the choice of his location, 
and the extensive and increasing demand for his 
services, has exceeded the most sanguine expectations 
of both himself and his friends. 

If length of days should be allotted him. Dr. Gaston, 
when near his threescore and ten, will no doubt merit 
and retain, as his father did, the patronage which he 
received during the preceding forty years. 

ALFRED JOXES, M.D. 

When he withdrew from the Academy, where he 
had pursued his studies with diligence and success. 
Dr. Jones engaged in teaching a common school, but 
finally turned his attention to a preparation to enter 
the medical profession. Three years of close applica- 
tion were rewarded by the degree of M.D. from the 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Immediately after his graduation he commenced 
the practice of medicine, which he pursued with en- 
couraging success until the breaking out of the civil 
war, when his patriotism led him to enter the army. 
He received a commission as quartermaster from 
Governor Curtiu, and accompanied the expedition to 
Beaufort, South Carolina. In July, 1864, he was 



184 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTEEIAN CHTJKCH 

taken prisoner while bearing despatches to General 
Hartranft, and did not obtain his release till near 
the close of hostilities, when he was mustered out of 
the service. 

Before he resumed the practice of his profession 
Dr. Jones visited Europe, where he remained two 
years. While abroad he became a graduate of the 
Medical College of Paris, and attended the clinics of 
the hospitals of Vienna and Berlin. After his return 
he settled as a physician in Philadelphia, where his 
energy, perseverance, and faithful discharge of his 
professional duties have secured a large and lucrative 
practice. 

Dr. Jones stands high in the estimation of the 
medical fraternity as a physician of skill, ability, and 
great moral worth.* 

THOMAS BUCHANAN, M.D. 

Thomas Buchanan, the younger son of the late 
Elder David Buchanan, of Honeybrook, passed three 
years at Millers ville Normal School, Lancaster County, 
entered the freshman class of Amherst College, Mass., 
in 1864, and was graduated in 1868. He studied medi- 
cine under the direction of Prof. A. Pillou, of New 
York City, and attended the clinics in the hospitals of 
Paris, London, and St. Louis, Missouri. 

Dr. Buchanan practised medicine several years, but 
on account of failing health relinquished his profession 
and became connected with the manufacturing inter- 
ests of St. Louis, where he now resides. Like most 

* MS. Collections. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BRAND YWINE." 185 

patriotic young men, he passed 1861 to 1863 in the 
army. 

Dr. Buchanan has diligently employed the advan- 
tages which he enjoyed, and is a learned and able 
physician. His withdrawal from the practice of his 
profession is a source of regret to his medical brethren 
and a loss to the community.* 

DAVIS F. GROUSE, M.D. 

Davis F. Grouse was born , in Wallace, then a 
part of West Xantmeal Township, Chester County, 
April 29, 1836. His early instruction was received 
in the common schools, until the opening of Howard 
Academy, which he attended several sessions with 
marked diligence and improvement. In 1856 his 
parents removed to Illinois, where they had been set- 
tled but a short time when he commenced the study 
of medicine while teaching a public school. His 
studies were pursued with so much zeal and perse- 
verance that three years afterwards he received the 
degree of M.D. from the Medical College at Cincin- 
nati. In 1861-62 he attended the lectures of Belle- 
vue Hospital, New York. 

Dr. Grouse followed his profession with success in 
Carroll County, 111., and subsequently in Joe Daviess 
County in the same State, but finally removed tp 
Waterloo, Iowa, where he practised, in connection with 
a younger brother, until his retirement in 1878, after 
eighteen years of arduous professional labor. He then 
undertook the supervision of a nursery and a farm, in 

* MS. Collections. 
13 



186 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTERIAN CHUECH 

which he was engaged until his decease, in October, 
1880. 

Dr. Grouse's medical skill and attention to his pa- 
tients caused him to be liberally patronized, while his 
amenity, upright conduct, and general culture gave 
him a high place in the estimation of both the public 
and his professional brethren.* 

WILLIAM HUNTEB, M.D. 

William, only son of David Hunter, Esq., of Honey- 
brook Township, was born in July, 1833. Having 
completed his preparatory training at this Institution 
and the Academy at New London, he entered on the 
study of medicine under the direction of Dr. Atlee, of 
Lancaster, and received the degree' of M.D. from the 
University of Pennsylvania in March, 1864. 

Dr. Hunter settled as a physician at White Haven, 
Luzerne County, Pa., and pursued his profession with 
encouraging success and marked ability until the 
Spring of 1856, when he sunk under a chronic dis- 
ease of the alimentary organs. His early death was 
the cause of much sorrow, not only to his bereaved 
sisters, but also to the many friends whose seemingly 
well-founded hopes of his professional eminence and 
usefulness, were unexpectedly blasted. 

Dr. Hunter was the first of the students of Howard 
Academy who passed from the activity of professional 
life to the rest of the grave. His death, and the de- 
cease in less than thirty years of more than one-third 

* MS. Collections. 



187 

of those who were pupils of the Institution, are mel- 
ancholy proofs that youth is no protection against the 
shafts of the destroyer. 

Howard Academy to a large number afforded the 
means of obtaining a better education than otherwise 
they could have done, and its discontinuance was a 
source of regret to the friends of intelligence and cul- 
ture in Honeybrook and the neighboring Townships. 

Besides weekly lectures by the principal on histor- 
ical, literary, and scientific subjects, addresses to the 
students were delivered by the Rev. Drs. J. N. C. 
Grier, Lehman, Crowell, and Hotchkin, and the Rev. 
Messrs. W. W. Latta, Harry, Holland, Flowers, J. C. 
Thompson, and Dr. A. K. Gaston* 



* Reminiscences of First Principal ; Records of Academy ; Coms. 
from Elder John Ralston and others. 



188 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 



SUNDAY-SCHOOLS. 



EOCKVILLE SUNDAY-SCHOOL. 

In May, 1820, the first Sunday-School withiti the 
bounds of this congregation was organized in a build- 
ing that stands a short distance north of Eockville, 
and which was long known by the name of Walker's 
School-House. Elder James E-alston, Elder William 
Templeton, Thomas M'Clune, and Obadiah Robinson 
were chosen Superintendents. As the first three were 
Presbyterians and the last named a Methodist, it was 
not strictly denominational, but was what would now 
be called a Union Sunday-School. 

Elder John Ralston • and his brother James, Jno. 
Dorian, James Lockhart, Washington Righter, John 
Lockhart, Jos. Donnell, Master John W. Pinkerton, 
and perhaps some others, were selected as teachers. 
Master Pinkerton acted as Secretary. 

Two of the Superintendents attended every Sab- 
bath. One of them opened the School with prayer, 
and the other closed it in the same manner. The ex- 
ercises consisted principally of the recitation of por- 
tions of the Scriptures and of Psalms and Hymns. 
There was a generous rivalry among the scholars in 
regard to the number of verses which each could recite 
on a Sabbath, and this emulation was carried so far that 



IN "the forks of beandywine." 189 

upwards of three hundred verses of the Bible were 
repeated by some of the pupils at one time. 

The School assembled in the afternoon, and as it 
was somewhat of a novelty, the attendance was large, 
the children being accompanied in most instances by 
their parents. 

The School building often proving too small to ac- 
commodate the scholars and spectators, the exercises 
were not unfrequently conducted in a grove which 
stood West of the road leading from the School- house 
to Rockville. 

Dr. Grier, the pastor, occasionally attended, and 
gave the scholars some religious instruction and ad- 
vice ; but as he generally preached on the afternoon of 
the Sabbath, either in a school-house or at the resi- 
dence of some aged member of the congregation, his 
engagements seldom permitted him to be present. 

Tickets or cards with a text of Scripture printed on 
them were given to the scholars. Some of these 
tickets were printed on red paper, and others on blue. 
The recitation of a hymn, or of a fixed number of 
verses of Scripture, entitled a scholar to a blue card, 
and a certain amount of these could be exchanged for 
a red one. When the fortunate holder had obtained 
as many of the latter as were required, a book was 
given in their stead. 

As the School had to be closed in the Fall, the dis- 
continuance proved unfavorable, and when it was 
opened the next Spring the attendance was smaller, 
and the interest manifested much less. This became 
so apparent towards the end of the Summer, that those 
who were mainly instrumental in carrying it on were 



190 HISTOKT OF THE PRESBYTEKIAN CHURCH 

disheartened, and no arrangements were made for 
conducting it the next year. 

In 1828 the School was reopened with but partial 
success. After that no effort was made to revive it 
until 1832, when it was reorganized by Elder William 
Templeton, who continued to be its efficient and faith- 
ful Superintendent until his death, in 1849. Ever 
since that time the School has been regularly kept 
open during the Summer season. Messrs. Thomas 
Walker, William Rgbinson, John F. Templeton, and 
Lewis Worrell have acted as Superintendents. 



MANOR SUNDAY-SCHOOL. 

A Sunday-School was opened in 1821 in the School 
building which stood near the Upper Graveyard. John 
Templeton, Esq., James K. Grier, Joseph F. Grier, 
M.D., John McCathran, James McCathran, William 
Major, William Stanly, and some others performed the 
duties of teachers. James Hindman filled the office 
of Secretary. The Rev. John W. Grier, who was at 
that time the Principal of the Brandywine Academy, 
acted as Superintendent. This School was in opera- 
tion about two years, when it was discontinued. 

In the Spring of 1828 a number of young people 
of the neighborhood met at the residence of General 
Matthew Stanly and organized a Sunday-School, 
which was held in a large spring-house loft belonging 
to the-'' General. This School was mainly conducted 
by the same teachers as the one which had been kept 
in the school-house. It was continued during the 



IN " THE FORKS OF BRAND YWINE." 191 

Summer season of two years, 1828 and 1829, when, 
owing t6 the unsafe condition of the walls of the 
building, it was thought imprudent to reopen it in the 
same place, and no other suitable building could be 
obtained. 

After the lapse of several years a Sunday-School 
was opened in the Manor Church, under the superin- 
tendence of the Pastor, Dr. Grier. It was held in 
the morning, before the customary services of the day 
were commenced. Dr. Grier occupied a part of the 
time in explaining portions of the Scriptures and 
other religious exercises. This School, which was con- 
tinued during the remainder of his pastorate, has been 
watched over and aided by his successors in the 
ministry. It has at present 112 scholars and 16 
teachers and officers, with Mr. B. G. Ilea as Superin- 
tendent. 

Both it and the school at Rockville, which has 85 
scholars and 11 teachers and oflBcers, are regarded not 
only as important auxiliaries to the Church, but as a 
means of benefiting many who otherwise would receive 
no religious instruction. 

The superintendents, all of the teachers, and many 
of the scholars connected with those fii-st Sunday- 
Schools have passed away, while the survivors, with 
few exceptions, have numbered the allotted threescore 
and ten. But in reviewing the incidents of seventy 
years, there are scarcely any which they recall with 
more pleasure and gratitude than the associations and 
instruction of the weekly gatherings on the Sabbath 
which they attended more than half a century ago. 

How many those primitive Sunday-Schools led 



192 HISTOEY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

to become partakers of the blessings of the New 
Covenant, or how often the texts of Scripture and' 
Psalms of prayer and thanksgiving, then impressed on 
the memory, may have guarded against temptation or 
lightened the burdens and smoothed asperities in the 
pathway of life, the " Great Day" alone will reveal,* 
\ 

* Keminiscences of James M'Cachran ; of Elder John Kalston ; 
Local Memoranda ; Communication from Rev. Mr. McCoU ; from 
Samuel Hindman. 



193 



THE PARSONAGE. 



In Scotland the Manse is considered almost equally 
essential with the Kirk. As a majority of the minis- 
ters of the churches there are not the owners of any 
means for passing from place to place, it is deemed im- 
portant that he whose duties require him to be present 
in the House of God twice or thrice a week should 
reside near to the scene of his labors. 

For many years after the settlement of Presbyte- 
rians in America, in consequence of the necessity for 
every one to be provided with a means of conveyance 
of his own, parsonages were not considered absolutely 
essential. The funds of most of the congregations 
having been exhausted in building a meeting-house 
and a session-house, no provision was made for a 
pastor's residence. 

This was particularly the case with the churches 
first established. Hence it often happened that 
churches whose organization was but yesterday, when 
compared with those of an early date, were furnished 
with a dwelling appropriated for the use of the pastor, 
while the church of which they were in many in- 
stances colonies had made no provision of the kind. 

Of this the congregation worshipping in this place 
affords an example. The churches at Coatesville, 
Waynesburg, and Fairview composed, at first, either 



194 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

wholly or in part of members from this church, had 
each a parsonage before it was determined to erect one 
here. 

lyCr. Black having no family when pastor of the con- 
gregation, made his home with some of the members of 
his charge. The house in which Mr. Dean dwelt in 
West Nantmeal Township, as stated elsewhere, is no 
longer in existence, and Mr. Boyd, while supplying 
the Old Side, continued to reside near his church in 
Octoraro. Mr. Carmichael, with Scotch thrift and 
frugality, acquired considerable property, and passed 
his last years on a farm in West Brandywine Town- 
ship, which was long the residence of the late Squire 
M'Clellan. Mr. Nathan Grier, shortly after his mar- 
riage, in 1787, bought the farm now belonging to the 
estate of the late Richard Parke, and resided there 
until his death. When his son, the Eev. J. N. C 
Grier, succeeded him in the pastorate he purchased 
the homestead, and it continued to be the parsonage 
until 1841. In that year he erected, on land adjoin- 
ing the church property, the mansion in which he 
passed the remainder of his life. 

After the resignation of Dr. Grier the necessity of 
providing a residence for . the pastor became so ap- 
parent that efforts were made to accomplish it. With 
the energy and liberality which have always been 
shown by the members of this Church when they 
were convinced that any measure was needed for the 
prosperity of their beloved Zion, funds were collected 
and a suitable building erected in 1869-'70. The 
main structure, which is carefully and neatly finished, 
stands East of the Lower Graveyard, on a part of the 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWINE." 1 95 

land originally owned by the New Side. It is thirty- 
five feet in front by twenty-six feet deep on the East 
side ; forty-four feet deep on the "West side, and two 
and a half stories in height. The entire cost of the 
dwelling, out-buildings, and improvement of the 
ground was about four thousand dollars. 

The situation of the parsonage is retired, healthful, 
and elevated, affording an extensive view in almost 
every direction, and needs but a tasteful arrangement 
of the lawn, and the addition of trees and shrubbery, 
to compare favorably with buildings erected for a 
similar j^urpose by rural churches in general. 

Like " the ministers' home" in other lands, this par- 
sonage, in the course of years, will become closely con- 
nected with the remembrance of the pastors who have 
occupied it and passed away. Around it associations 
will gather scarcely less salutary and less solemn than 
those which pertain to buildings specially dedicated to 
the service of the Most High.* 



* MSS. ; Church Eecords. 



196 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTERIAN CHTTRCH 



SESSION-HOUSES. 



As the Presbyterians who first settled in America 
generally considered the Session-House or Study almost 
equally important with the Meeting-House, and seldom 
erected the latter, however rude, without, at the same 
time, placing the former near by, it is altogether 
likely that there was a Session-House belonging to the 
First Meeting-House. But as even tradition is silent 
respecting such a building, it would be futile to inquire, 
if it did exist, where it was situated, and whether it 
served both as a school-house and a place for the 
meetings of the members of Session.* 

The Session-House belonging to the Second Meeting- 
House stood near the Southeast corner of the ground 
belonging to Mr. Dean's congregation. It was placed 
with the front parallel to the Road leading to Down- 
ingtown, and was probably furnished with, a fireplace, 
This Session-House having become nearly unfit for 
use, and being inconveniently situated in respect to the 
Meeting-House erected in 1761, a log Session-House 
about sixteen by eighteen feet, with a large fireplace 
in one end, was built a few rods South of the new 
church edifice. The entrance was on the side most 
distant from the church. 

This building, like nearly all the Session-Houses of 

* Some remains of the foundation of what seems to have been a 
small building, recently noticed near the entrance to the Upper Grave- 
yard, may have been part of a primitive Session-House. 



IK " THE FOEKS OF BRANDYWIKE." 197 

the Presbyterian Churcli at tliat day, was used as a 
school-house. A man by the name of Bowser, who was 
not remarkable for the purity of his morals or his 
amiable disposition, taught a school in that Session- 
House upwards of one hundred years ago. The late 
John Strong, Major George Dorian, Nathan Dorian, 
Alexander Nesbit, and others whom some now living 
remember, were among his pupils. Both Bowser and 
Stephen Wray, who taught towards the close of the 
last century in the Session-House of the Seceder 
Meeting-House, were firm believers in the efficacy of 
the rod. Consequently the frequent applications of it, 
as an aid to discipline and a spur to mental activity, 
were a part of their daily programme. 

In 1827 the log Session-House was removed, and a 
stone building about eighteen feet by twenty, with a 
fireplace in the west end, was erected , on the ground 
occupied by the former Session-House, and stood, like 
it, with the front to the South. This served for the 
meetings of the Session until 1875, when it was taken 
down to afford room for the site of the recently-erected 
church edifice. 

In the construction of the New Meeting-House, a 
room was set apart in the basement for the transaction 
of all business belonging to the government of the 
church. The members of the congregation, therefore, 
instead of having their Session-House in one place, 
their Meeting-House , in another, and their Sunday- 
School room at a considerable distance from both, as 
was formerly the case, have these all conveniently 
arranged in the same building.* 

* Local Memoranda ; Church Records. 



198 HISTORY OP THE PRESBYTERIAN CHXTROH 



BEQUESTS. 



Although there has been a number of wealthy 
members of the congregation who contributed lib- 
erally for benevolent purposes and the keeping of 
the buildings and enclosures belonging to the church 
in a proper condition, yet many of them failed to 
make any provision for assisting to defray the ex- 
pense of repairs, improvements, and other beneficent 
objects, after their decease. The bequests, therefore, 
have been comparatively few and the amount small ; 
the whole sum not exceeding three thousand dollars. 
This is to be regretted, as not only the cost of pre- ^ 
venting the grounds and buildings from becoming 
impaired, but the purchase of books for t*he Sunday- 
Schools, the circulation of tracts and temperance doc- 
uments, and support of missions require funds which 
are often difficult to be obtained, and the smallness of 
which frequently confines these means of doing good 
within narrow limits. 

Those whom the bounty of Providence has blessed 
with plenty might be the almoners of that bounty 
when life has ceased by endowments for charitable 
purposes, the spread of. religious intelligence, and the 
extension of the Redeemer's Kingdom. 

bequests so far as known. 

Joseph Mackelduff", who died in 1750, left five 
pounds for the benefit of the Church. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BRAND YWINE. " 199 

Jolin Beaton, in 1776, bequeathed thirty pounds 
" for tlie use of the Meeting-House." This was ap- 
plied towards defraying the cost of restoring the 
church edifice after its injury by fire. 

Elder William Irwin, whose death occurred in 1794, 
devised a small sum, six pounds, for the purpose of 
renewing the fence around the Upper Graveyard. 

Hugh Morton, long an active member of the con- 
gregation, in 1811 left fifty pounds, which were ex- 
pended, under the direction of General Stanly, for 
the iron gate and marble posts at the eastern entrance 
to the Upper Graveyard. 

Isaac Smith directed about one hundred dollars to 
be placed by his executors in the hands of the trustees 
of the church to be applied towards keeping the Lower 
• Graveyard and the wall surrounding it in suitable 
order. A portion of this sum was used to purchase 
the gate and the pillars that bear the initials of his 
name which are placed at the entrance, and the bal- 
ance appropriated towards paying for the repairs and 
' extension of the wall in 1860. 

About one hundred and fifty dollars were directed 
by the will of John Craig, in 1825, to be invested by 
the trustees of the church, and the interest applied 
from time to time in keeping the Lower Graveyard 
in good repair. A part of this was expended for the 
extension of the enclosure on the South side, and 
the remainder (two hundred and twelve dollars) in 
restoring and flagging the wall. 

Peter Kurtz, who died March 19, 1880, left five 
hundred dollars for the benefit of the church, and 
a like amount was devised for the same purpose 



200 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

by Mrs. Elizabeth Christman, whose death took place 
in February of the same year. 

Mrs. Mary Ann Grier directed in her last Will 
and Testament that five hundred dollars should be 
invested by the trustees of the church, and the in- 
terest expended in keeping up the graves of herself 
and her husband, Elder James K. Grier. She also 
bequeathed five hundred dollars to aid the operations 
of the church. 

A bequest of one hundred dollars was made by 
Augustus J. Dowlin, who died in April, 1884. 

About one hundred and fifty dollars were devised 
by Thomas Lomas, whose decease occurred in 1883, 
for keeping the Lower Graveyard in repair. 

By the will of William Moore, his executors were 
directed to place five hundred dollars in the hands of 
the trustees, a part of it, or the interest accruing, to be 
expended in keeping his family burial-lots in repair, 
and the balance to be expended for the benefit of the 
church. 

The sums devised by Mrs. Kurtz, Mrs. Christman, 
and Mrs. Grier, together amounting to fifteen hundred 
dollars, less the collateral inheritance tax, were used 
for the payment of debts arising from the improve- 
ment of the enclosures and other necessary expenses 
connected with the church property.* 

* Records of Session; Local Memoranda; Office of Register of 

Wills. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BKANDYWISTE." 201 



PEW-HOLDERS IN 1792-96. 



In no part of the world are changes of residence 
more frequent than in the United States. New fields 
for adventure are continually being laid open. New 
enterprises which promise much are again and again 
presented, and real or fancied advantages foster the 
desire " to better their circumstances," which seems to 
be the leading idea in the minds of a large portion of 
our countrymen. As a consequence many abandon 
the homes of their childhood, and the places where 
their youthful years were passed, for more inviting 
and distant localities. 

Although this " disposition to wander" is more char- 
acteristic of the Scotcli-Irish, the Irish, and their pos- 
terity, than of any class of our citizens, yet an exam- 
ination of the following list of pew-holders will show 
that a considerable number of the supporters of this 
church at the present time are the descendants of those 
who sustained a Gospel ministry here fourscore and 
ten years ago. 

All whose names are comprised in this list, and with 
a few exceptions the generation which immediately 
succeeded them, are dead, but the Church still lives. 

The influence of their example and of their pious 

instruction has reached to the third and even to the 

fourth generation. How much of encouragement does 

u 



202 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 



this afford to those who are " never weary in well- 
doing," and especially to those who have aided in the 
construction of the building which has recently been 
dedicated to the service of the Great Head of the 
church. 

They, like their fathers and forefathers, are leaving 
a memorial of their good works and an influence, which 
will be seen and felt long after the " places which now 
know, shall know them no more." 

The following is a list of the pew-holders in 1792- 
96, as near as can be ascertained from imperfect 
Church Records and other sources : 



John Alford. 
Bphraim Allen. 
James Anderson. 
Margaret Anderson. 
William Anderson. 
Andrew Barr. 
Robert Beatty. 
William Blair. 
William Brown. 
Hannah Buchanan. 
John Buchanan. 
Matthew Buchanan. 
Samuel Byers, Sr. 
Samuel Byers. 
•Widow Byers. 
Adam Campbell. 
David Carson. 
Samuel Caruther^. 
John Craige. 
Samuel Craige. , 
Parmenas Crowe. 
Samuel Cunningham, Esq. 
Isaac Davis. 



Joshua Davis. 
Methusaleh Davis. 
David Denny. 
James Denny. 
Samuel Denny. 
William Denny. 
William Diven. 
George Dorian. 
Nathan Dorian. 
Samuel Dorian. 
John Dunlap. 
James Dunwoodie. 
John Dunwoodie. 
Elizabeth Elliott. 
William Elliott. 
Theophilus Erwin. 
Elizabeth Ferguson. 
James Forrest. 
Francis Gardner. 
Dr. Isaac Gibson. 
James Graham. 
Michael Graham. 
John Gray. 



203 



John Grier. 
Joseph Grier. 
Rev. Nathan Grier. 
Adam Guthrie. 
James Guthrie. 
Agnes Henderson. 
William Henderson. 
James Hood. 
Sarah Hughes. 
William Hunter, Esq. 
Ezekiel Irwin. 
Adam Jack. 
John Johnson. 
Robert Johnson. 
Mqry Kennedy. 
Samuel Kennedy. 
Thomas Kennedy. 
William Kennedy. 
John Lewis. 
William Loag. 
Alexander Lockhart, Esq. 
James Lockhart, Sr. 
James Lockhart. 
William Lockhart. 
William Long. 
Alexander Marshall. 
James McCachran. 
James McConnel. 
Samuel Mackelduff. 
James M'Clune. 
Benjamin McClure. 



James McClure. 
Joseph McClure. 
Bryan MoCune. 
Elizabeth McKinly. 
Paul McKnight. 
James Miller. 
David Moore. 
James Moore, Esq. 
William Moore. 
William Moore, Jr. 
Hugh Morton. 
William Neely. 
Robert Nesbit. 
David Pittsford. 
Charles Reed. 
David Robeson. 
James Robinson. 
John Robison. 
Matthias Shoenar. 
Col. Robert Smith. 
Andrew Stanly. 
Matthew Stanly, Esq. 
William Sterrett, Sr. 
William Sterrett, Jr. 
John Todd. 
John Strong. 
James Tarrance. 
Rachel White. 
John Winans. 
Jonathan Wynn. 



204 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEKIAN CHUECH 



TEMPERANCE SOCIETIES. 



The Lectures of Dr. Lyman Beecher and others 
had directed public attention in New England to 
the increase of intemperance, and measures had been 
adopted to arrest its progress before any means were 
devised to stay its ravages in the Middle States. The 
first Temperance Society was formed in Boston, Feb- 
ruary 13, 1826, and some years later a few associa- 
tions having the same object in view, were formed 
in Pennsylvania. 

The first Temperance Society within the bounds of 
this congregation, and among the earliest organized in 
Chester County, was formed in 1831. Towards the 
close of April in that year, a number of residents in the 
neighborhood assembled for that purpose, in what was 
long known by the name of Walker's School-House, 
near the village of Rockville. The meeting was or- 
ganized by calling the Bev. Dr. J. N. C. Grier to the 
chair, and the appointment of Master John W. Pink- 
erton as Secretary. After some remarks by the Chair- 
man, and an interchange of views on the subject, a 
Temperance Society was formed and a constitution 
adopted and signed, pledging those whose names were 
appended* to abstain from making, selling, or using 
intoxicating liquors. 

* See Appendix J. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWISE." 205 

Of the twenty-eight who then came forward and 
avowed their determination to aid in lessening or re- 
moving the manifold evils of intemperance, twenty- 
six are dead. Some of them were men whose heads 
were whitened by the frosts of time, and who had 
long witnessed and deplored the direful consequences 
arising from the use of spirituous liquors. Others 
were men of middle age, around whom families were 
clustering, and who desired to guard their households 
against a fruitful source of poverty and disgrace. The 
majority, however, were young men about to go forth 
to meet the trials and temptations which beset the 
pathway of life, and who wisely girded themselves 
with the armor of total abstinence before they engaged 
in the conflict. 

So far as is known no ooe violated the obligations 
entered into on that day, while some of them advo- 
cated temperance, both orally and through the me- 
dium of the press, with ability and faithfulness. 

Meetings were held and addresses on the subject 
delivered for several years, but although much good 
was accomplished the enthusiasm subsided, the most 
active workers became gradually dispersed, and the 
Society as a distinct organization ceased to exist. 

Before closing an account of the first temperance 
society, it ought to be stated that the use, or more cor- 
rectly the abuse, of intoxicating liquors was, at that 
time, far different from what it now is. Then, a la- 
borer would refuse employment unless he received 
a morning dram, and a building could scarcely be 
erected or a harvest gathered without the use of ar- 
dent spirits. Even aged and otherwise respectable 



206 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

men often found it difficult to preserve a steady gait 
when returning from vendues, elections, or other 
public gatherings. The smoke of five distilleries 
daily rose within the bounds of this congregation, and 
to get drunk occasionally was scarcely a disgrace. 

In 1851 a meeting for the furtherance of tem- 
perance was held at Howard Academy, Roekville, 
and a society formed, of which Elder John Rals- 
ton was chosen President. A large number signed 
the pledge. Public meetings were frequently held, 
and addresses delivered by the Rev. Dr. J. N. 
C. Grier, Dr. Lehman, Dr. Hotchkin, Dr. A. K. 
Gaston, Rev. George Chandler, Rev. William W. 
Latta, the Principal, and some of the leading students ' 
of Howard Academy. Finally, however, this society, 
like its predecessor of tw.enty years before, was per- 
mitted to languish and die, but not until, through the 
influence of it and kindred associations, the- distilla- 
tion of ardent spirits in Chester County had ceased, 
and intoxicating liquors were no longer furnished to 
those employed in the workshop or the field.* 



* Local Memoranda ; Records of Howard Academy ; Personal 
Reminiscences. 



IS THE FOKKS OF BKANDYWIXE. 



207 



A LIST 

OF SUBSCRIBERS TO THE FUND FOR ENCLOSING THE GRAVEYARDS 
BY A STONE WALL, IN 1794-95. 



Ephraim Allen. 
Hugh Anderson. 
Margaret Anderson. 
William Anderson. 

B. 

Eleanor Barker. 
Robert Beatty. 
Samuel Beatty. 
Sarah Brown. 
Thomas Brown. 
William Brown. 
Samuel Byers. 
Samuel Byers, Jr. 
Widow Byers. 
John Bachanan. 
Matthew Buchanan. 

C. 

Hugh Calhoun. 
Adam Campbell. 
John Campbell. 
David Carson. 
Robert Carson. 
Mary Carswell. 
William Christy. 
John Craige. 



Robert & Samuel Craige. 
William Culberson. 
Samuel "Cunningham. 
William Cunningham. 

D. 

John Darlington. 
Joseph Darlington. 
Isaac Davis. 
Methusaleh Davis. 
David Denny. 
William Denny. 
George Dorian. 
Nathan Dorian. 
Joseph Dougan. 
Daniel Dunlap. 
James Dunwoody. 
John Dunwoody. 

E. 

Margaret Elliott. 
William Elliott. 
Thomas Ewing. 



Widow Ferguson. 
Andrew Forbis. 
John Forbis. 



208 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 



James Forrest. 
James Fritz. 

G. 

Alexander Grillipsie. 
Peter Graham. 
John Gray. 
Dr. Isaac Gibson. 
Mrs. Goudey. 
Rev. Nathan Grier. 
John Grier. 
Joseph Grier. 
Adam Guthrie. 
James Guthrie. 
William Guthrie. 

H. 

Jacob Happersett. 
Abram Harler. 
Henry Harler. 
William Henderson. 
James Hood. 
Sarah Hughes. 
William Hunter, Esq. 
James Hutcheson. 

I. 

John Irwin, Jr. 
Mary Irwin. 
Theophilus Irwin. 
Thomas Irwin. 
William Irwin. 



Elizabeth Jack. 
David Jones. 
John Jones. 



K. 

William Kennedy. 
Samuel Kennedy. 
George Kennedy. 

L. 

John Lewis. 
Mrs. Lewis. 
Joseph Leviston. 
William Long. 
Alexander Lockhart. 
James Lockhart. 
William Lockhart. 

M. 

Richard Mather. 
Patrick Maitland. 
Samuel, Maitland. 
William Maitland. 
Samuel Mackelduff. 
Alexander Marshal. 
James McCachran. 
Benjamin McClure. 
James McClure. 
Joseph McClure. 
James McConnel. 
Alexander M'Conaughy. 
Patrick McRahey. 
Jane M'Crosky. 
David McCrony. 
Samuel McCullough 
Bryan McCune. 
John McFarland. 
James McGugan. 
Samuel McKinly. 
Paul McKnight. 
James Miller. 
James Moore. 



IN "THE FORKS OF BRANDYWrNE. 



209 



William Moore. 
James Morton. 

N. 

James Neely. 
William Neety. 
James Nesbit. 
Robert Nesbit. 



Stephen Pattup. 
Joseph Parker. 
Mark Peelor. 
Isaac Phillips. 
Nathaniel Porter. 



R. 

Charles Reed. 
David Robeson. 
Hugh Robeson. 
James Robeson. 
John Robinson. 
Nathaniel Robinson. 
William Robeson. 
John Root. 



S. 

Andrew Stanly. 
Matthew Stanly. 
Daniel Shenky. 
Widow Sherer. 
James Steen. 
William Sterrett. 
Robert Sterrett. 
John Smith. 
John Smith, Jr. 
Colonel Robert Smith. 
William Story. 



Widow Thompson. 

W. 

Robert Wallace. 
Jacob Waters. 
John Walker. 
Aaron White. 
Widow White. 
Nancy Wilson. 
William Wilson. 
Alexander Wilson. 
John Winance. 
Jonathan Wynn. 



210 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



LEGISLATORS. 



Legislators who resided within the bounds of the congregation* 

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS. 

Robert Jenkins was a Member from 1807 to 1811. Two terms. 
David Potts " " " 1831 to 1839. Four terms. 

Abraham Mclllvaine " " 18i3 to 1849. Three terms. 



MEMBERS OF STATE LEGISLATURE. 
Col. Robert Smith was a Member in 1785. 



James Moore, Esq., 
Col. Thomas Bull 
Methusaleh Davis 
Gen. Matthew Stanly 
Jesse James, Esq., 
Dr. Benjamin Griffith 
Bernard Way, Esq., 
Abraham Mcllvane 
Col. Thomas K. Bull 
James M. Dorian 
Andrew Buchanan 
Morton Garrett 
Capt. Levi Fetters 



" 1788. 
from 1793 to 1802. 

in 1802, 1803, 1804, 1805, and 1806. 

' 1829. 

' 1829, 1851, and 1852. 

' 1830, 1831, and 1832. 

' 1835. 

' 1836 and 1837. 

' 1846, 1847, and 1848. 

' 1850. 

' 1855. 

' 1857. 

' 1883 and 1885. 



* State and Congressional Records. 



IN " THE F.OKKS OF BKANDYWINE." 211 



PHYSICIANS. 



It is a matter of surprise and regret to every one, 
when examining the annals of the past, to find that 
so little has been placed on record of physicians, and 
especially of those who practised in rural districts. 
While much that is noteworthy in the lives of clergy- 
men, members of the bar, legislators, and military 
men has been preserved, materials for biographical 
notices of physicians, for the most part, must be 
sought by the dim light of tradition or gathered from 
the fading recollection of friends who have survived 
them. This is particularly the case with those who 
have practised medicine within the bounds of this 
congregation. 

The earliest whose name has reached the present 
time is Dr. Thomas Rheese, who appears to have been 
engaged as a physician previous to the middle of the 
last century and some years afterwards. 

Dr. Rheese was succeeded by Dr. John Flavel Car- 
michael, a son of the Rev. John Carmichael, and Dr. 
Joseph Gardner, a son of Elder Francis Gardner. 
Dr. Carmichael followed his profession in the bounds 
of his father's congregation until 1788, when he 
entered the Army of the United States as a surgeon. 
Dr. Gardner was engaged principally in the southern 
and western portions of Mr. Carmichael's charge. In 
1790, he removed to Maryland. He acquired a high 



212 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

reputation as a physician, and his professional en- 
gagements extended over a large area. 

About 1780, Dr. Thomas Harris, who was much 
esteemed for his medical skill, commenced the practice 
of his profession at Indian-town, in Wallace Township. 
He seems, after the removal of Dr. Carmichael md 
Dr. Gardner, to have had no competitor nearer than 
Dr. Sturgis, of Downingtown. 

Dr. Thomas Kennedy, the friend and pupil of Dr. 
Harris, succeeded to his practice in 1796 or '97. Dr. 
Kennedy soon became noted for his skill and attention 
to his patients. His practice consequently embraced 
a large extent of country. Several years before his 
death, in April, 1814, he was the only resident 
physician within the bounds of the Rev. Nathan 
Grier's charge.* • 

Dr. John E. Grier, a graduate of Dickinson Col- 
lege and of the University of Pennsylvania, began 
the practice of medicine in 1813. Being well edu- 
cated and having a good reputation as a surgeoq, 
he was largely patronized. Dr. Grier remained 
until about 1825, when he removed to the State of 
Ohio. He took up his residence in the Miami Valley, 
where and in other parts of that State, he remained 
until his death, in 1844. 

In 1814, Dr. Benjamin Griffith began the practice 
of medicine near Glen Moore, and continued in the 
active discharge of his professional duties upwards of 
forty-four years. He died May 12, 1858. Unas- 

* Dr. Todd was practising in West Brandywine Township in 1800, 
but in what part or how long, the writer has been unable to learn. 



ly "the forks of bkandywine." 213 

suming and attentive to those who needed medical 
aid, Dr. Griffith was much esteemed as a physician 
and respected as a friend and a neighbor. 

Dr. John M'Calmont, who, in 1810, settled near 
Waynesburg, in the Western part of the congregation, 
practised with much ability and success until a few 
years before his death, in 1870. Like his contempo- 
rary, Dr. Griffith, he enjoyed the entire confidence of 
the community. 

In 1818, Dr. Isaac Pennington, a well-read physi- 
cian, who had been a surgeon in the Army of the 
United States during the last War with England, lo- 
cated a little below Waynesburg. He soon obtained 
a lucrative practice, which he retained until his re- 
moval, in 1832, to one of the Southern States. After 
an absence of several years he returned, and remained 
in the practice of his profession until his death, near 
Compassville, May 6, 1849. 

Dr. Joseph F. Grier, a younger brother of Elder 
James K. Grier, finished his medical studies in 1828. 
Dr. Grier erected the building lately owned by Mrs. 
Agnes Happersett, in which he resided and gave the 
community the benefit of his medical skill, until the 
Fall of 1837. He then removed to Lewisburg, Union 
County, where he continued in the discharge of his 
professional duties until a short time before his death, 
in February, 1858. 

About three years after the withdrawal of Dr. Grier, 
Dr. A. K. Gaston removed from Easton, Pa., to where 
he lately resided, and engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine. Being not only an able physician, but also a 
gentleman of general culture, he was soon in the en- 



214 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

joyment of an extensive practice, which he retained 
until his death, December 22, 1882. 

Dr. Nathan G. Thompson, eldest son of the late 
Dr. Thompson, a prominent physician of Fagg's 
Manor, commenced the study of medicine with Dr. 
A. K. Gaston, and after his graduation, February 28, 
1852, engaged in the practice of his profession, in 
which he has been eminently successful. He is now 
the principal physician actively engaged within the 
bounds of the congregation. 

Dr. Isaac Gibson, about 1786, and Dr. Effinger 
Happersett, about 1816, commenced the practice of 
medicine ; but as neither of them had received a med- 
ical education they were not largely patronized. 

Such is a brief record of the laborious, self-denying, 
and, in many instances, gifted men, who have practised 
the healing art within the varying bounds of this con- 
gregation, during the last hundred and twenty-five 
years. 

It is a meagre and imperfect sketch, but should it be 
considered strange that it is so, when even the Medical 
Department of the University of Pennsylvania cannot 
furnish a complete list of its graduates prior to the be- 
ginning of the present century, when degrees began to 
be annually conferred ? * 

* MS. Collections. 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWINE." 215 



GRAVEYARDS. 



OwiKG to their situation at a different level along 
the Turnpike E,oad, the graveyards belonging to this 
church were named accordingly ; the one South of 
that Road being generally known by the name of the 
Upper Graveyard, while the one North of the same 
highway is usually called the Lower Graveyard. 

UPPER GKAVEYAED. 

Shortly after the erection of the first Meeting- 
House, a piece of land immediately to the East of 
that building was appropriated for a burial-place. 
This continued to be used as the graveyard until that 
Meeting-House was abandoned. The burial-ground 
was then enlarged, chiefly by extending it towards the 
South and East, and enclosed by a board fence. In 
1794. or 1795 it was again enlarged, and the board 
fence replaced by a stone wall. 

The entrance, which was on the North side, next to 
the public Road, remained there until 1822, when the 
marble posts and iron gate, still in use, were procured 
by the late General Matthew Stanly. The entrance 
was then placed where it now is, on the Eastern side 
of the burial-ground, and near to the church building. 

In 1853, mainly through the exertions of Elder 
James K. Grier, another addition was made to this 



216 HISTOKY OF THE PRESBYTEKIAN CHUECH 

graveyard. The wall was also repaired, and a gate- 
way placed on the Southwestern side. 

At present this burial-place is an irregular six- 
sided plot of ground, containing about two acres, and 
from the dryness of the soil and the absence of sub- 
stances which render excavation difl&cult, is admirably 
adapted to the purpose. 

For upwards of three-quarters of a century after it 
had been set apart as a burial-ground, the remains of 
a suicide were not permitted to be interred within its 
limits. But the custom, derived from a barbarous age, 
of denying the usual rites of burial to those who had 
died by their own hand, gave place to more enlight- 
ened and Christian sentiments. 

The first lettered headstones placed in this yard are 
those at the graves of Mrs. Jane Sterling and the in- 
fant children of Mr. Carmichael, although they were 
not the first persons buried within this enclosure. 
These stones were prepared at Burlington, N. J., then 
the rival of Philadelphia.* 

Until a recent period no record of the interments 
was kept, and many of those buried there sleep with- 
out even an unlettered stone to mark their last regting- 
place.f It is, therefore, impossible to ascertain how 
many have been buried in this graveyard. Taking 
the average at twenty-five annually, — and some years 
it was much greater, — the whole number cannot be less 

* The oldest tombstones are tliose which cover the remains of the 
first proprietor oi' Springtou Forge, Robert M'Conaughy, and of his 
wife and son. The first monument, except a very small one, was 
erected about 1840, by Gleneral Stanly, in memory of his wife. 

j" See Appendix R. 



IN " THE FOEKS OF BKANDYWINE." 217 

than three thousand five hundred. Among them are 
the remains of the Rev. John Carmichael, the Rev. 
Nathan Grier, the Rev. John W. Grier, the Rev. J. N. 
C. Grier, D.D., of more than twenty who were Ruling 
Elders in this church, and of several who fought, and 
some who fell in the Revolutionary and other national 
conflicts. 

Unfortunately, no plan has been followed in the in- 
terments, each member of the congregation having, 
in most instances, selected his family burial-place as 
he thought proper, and therefore the attraction which 
regularity would have added to the naturally beauti- 
ful site cannot be obtained. 

This burial-ground is now furrowed with graves and 
white with the memorials which affection has placed to 
perpetuate the names and the virtues of the departed, 
and only a few years can pass before another ad- 
dition to it will be required.* But whatever the ex- 
tension may be, or however great the number which 
will be laid there to await the Second Coming of 
the Son of Man, we have the pleasing assurance 
that it will never be desecrated. The recent erec- 
tion of a large and costly Meeting-House adjoining 
it, and the determination which has been shown by 
the present members of the congregation to keep the 
fire continually burning which was kindled on the 
altar in the wilderness by their forefathers, are guar- 
antees for its preservation. No greedy owner of ad- 

* It has recently been enlarged by an extension south. The new 
enclosure has been laid out in lots and arranged in accordance with 
the plan of modern cemeteries. 

15 



218 HISTORY OP THE PKESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

jacent land will be permitted to call it his own, nor 
the hand of an unfeeling husbandman be allowed to 
remove the memorials of the departed, and change 
places, often wet by the tears of sorrow and affection, 
into cultivated fields. That such an event might 
occur may seem to many the offspring of a highly- 
wrought imagination. An examination, however, 
would show them that covetousness and vandalism 
have removed every trace of several graveyards which 
belonged to Presbyterian Churches established at an 
early period in Lancaster, Berks, Dauphin, and other 
counties, 

LOWER GRAVEYARD. 

When those who withdrew from Mr. Black's con- 
gregation and placed themselves under the direction 
of the Synod of New Brunswick built their Meeting- 
House, they set apart a portion of the land which they 
had obtained for a burial-ground, and it is still used 
for that purpose. Among the first interred in this 
graveyard was their lamented pastor, the Rev. William 
Dean. The tombstone which covers his remains was 
probably placed there several years after his death. 
There are circumstances which lead to the conclusion 
that his age is incorrectly stated. It bears an earlier 
date than any memorial stone in either graveyard. 

This graveyard, which occupies a rectangular space 
of about half an acre, was enclosed by a stone wall in 
1796. It has remained without any enlargement, 
except a small extension on the Southern side in 1860, 
when the wall was also repaired and capped with 
flag-stones. 



IN " THE FORKS OP BEAJSDYWINE." 219 

In 1821 the iron gate and marble posts at the 
entrance were placed there, in accordance with the 
will of Isaac Smith, who also left a small sum for the 
purpose of keeping the yard and its surroundings in 
a proper condition. 

Like the Upper Graveyard, this burial-ground 
possesses the advantages of dryness of soil and of 
freedom from obstructions beneath the surface; but 
owing, probably, to its greater distance from the 
Church building, the interments in it have been much 
fewer than in the other burial-place. 

The Lower Graveyard, the Meeting-House which 
then stood near it, and the whole of the ground, for 
which payment was made by Mr. Dean only the May 
before his death, became after the Union the property 
of the United Congregation. It, together with the 
land previously obtained, still remains in the pos- 
session of the Church.* 

* Local Memoranda ; Eeminiscences of aged Residents. 



220 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHUECH 



U' 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 



Sixty years ago but four vehicles could be seen at 
the Manor Meeting-House on the Sabbath, and these 
were the old-fashioned two-wheeled gig, with leather 
springs. A majority of the congregation came afoot, 
the rest on horseback. For convenience in mounting 
and alighting, " upping blocks" were placed under 
almost every shade-tree or place suitable for the stand- 
ing of horses. Fans were commonly used, umbrellas 
were few, and parasols almost unknown. 

The pews until quite a recent period were personal 
property, and generally owned by those who occupied 
them on the Sabbath. Sometimes when the owner 
did not need the whole of his pew, he either sold a 
part or rented it to those who were unable to obtain 
sitting, as it was called, elsewhere. On one occasion, 
the creditors of a man, who, had become bankrupt, 
seized and sold his pew, but instances of such rapacity 
were rare. 

Owing to the nearness of the turnpike road to the 
meeting-house, the noise occasioned by heavy vehicles 
passing along the rough highway on the Sabbath was 
frequently a source of great annoyance. During the 
period that the turnpike road was the principal route 
for the transportation of merchandise to Pittsburg 
and other Western cities, the disturbance caused by 
the heavily -loaded wagons, often closely following one 



IN " THE FOEKS OP BKANDYWINE." 221 

anotlier, was so great as sometimes to interrupt public 
worship. A iiumber of the teamsters were arrested 
and fined for pursuing their occupation on the Lord's 
Day, but this proceeding rather increased than dimin- 
ished the evil, as after that many of them made it an 
object to pass along the road during divine service. 

In 1798 the school-house on the church property, 
on account of its size, and being near to the point 
where the three townships of West Nantmeal, Honey- 
brook, and West Brandywine joined, was selected 
for holding the annual election. As political contests 
were then conducted with a bitterness and a resort to 
personal violence now comparatively rare, much oc- 
curred on "election day" which ill comported with 
the sacredness of the place. Fighting was not un- 
common. Ardent Democrats and Federalists did not 
hesitate to use staffs and clubs as " knock-down argu- 
ments." The liquorrstands caused the steps of many 
to become unsteady. Boisterous and profane language 
was freely used, and altogether a scene was presented 
in sickening contrast with the precepts of that Gospel 
at whose advent was proclaimed. Peace on earth and 
good-will to man. Finally the impropriety of using 
any of the property belonging to the congregation for 
a secular purpose which was attended with disorder and 
contention, became so manifest that another place was 
selected where the citizens of the three townships 
could meet, wrangle, and cast their votes. 

The salaries of clergymen during many years were 
low, and after making allowance for the difference in 
the price of the necessaries of life, when compared 
with the cost of like articles at the present time, it is 



222 HISTOKY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHTJECH 

often difficult at first sight to understand how they ac- 
quired property as many of them did. .This difficulty 
■is due to overlooking tl;ie fact that the amount promised 
as salary was but a part, and frequently the smallest 
part, of what was received. The farmers in the Fall, 
especially, did not forget to furnish the minister with 
flour, potatoes, wood, meat, and in some instances 
material for clothing, sufficient for the greater part of 
the year ; those, too, who expected to call occasionally 
at the manse, generally included among their gifts a 
keg of peach-brandy, then a much-esteemed beverage. 

Another source of income was marriages. As a 
marriage performed by a magistrate was generally 
considered less respectable, and by some less binding 
than when it was solemnized by a minister, well- 
known clergymen were called upon to perform the 
interesting ceremony not only by members of their 
own congregation, but by many others. On these 
occasions,' although the bride frequently adjusted her 
attire by the aid of a pail of water as a looking-glass, 
and the thoughtful bridegroom carried in rude sad- 
dle-bags " a bite for the horses" during the delay at 
the parson's, yet those who rewarded the pastor with 
less than a one-pound note were commonly regarded 
as having made a bad start on the road to connubial 
happiness. 

Psalm-books being scarce and some of the congre- 
gation being unable to read, the precentor or clerk 
usually lined the psalm ; that is, he read two lines 
aloud, and when these had been sung, the next two, 
until the conclusion of the exercise. This man- 
ner of conducting the singing was continued long 



IN " THE FORKS OF BEANDYWIXE." 223 

after the necessity for it had ceased. During the 
pastorate of the Kev. Nathan Grier, Watts's Psalms 
and Hymns became the text-book, much to the dis- 
satisfaction of the older members of the congregation. 
This, as is well known, has been forced to give place 
in many churches to the Hymnal, for what reason is 
difficult to discover. If the sturdy founders of Pres- 
byterianism and their immediate descendants adhered 
somewhat tenaciously to an almost literal translation 
of the inspired anthems of the " man after God's own 
heart," the Presbyterians of the present day have 
gone to the opposite extreme in discarding even the 
title, and to a great extent the songs, of " the sweet 
singer of Israel." 

The names of but a few of those who " led the sing- 
ing" have been preserved. Mr. Benjamin McClure 
was precentor during a considerable part of the Rev. 
Nathan Grier's pastorate. Major George Dorian also 
officiated until near his decease, in 1829. He was 
succeeded by Mr. William Forrest. For more than 
thirty years the singing was conducted by Elder John 
Ralston. After the remodelling of the Meeting- 
House in 1839, the choir was seated in the front of 
the gallery, instead of at the base of the pulpit The 
introduction of the choir was considered quite an in- 
novation on time-honored custom, but within the last 
few years the departure from Puritan simplicity has 
been further increased by invoking the aid of instru- 
mental music. 

It has been said that a Presbyterian Church never 
dies. While this is true in the main, and especially 
in Chester County, where the number of Presbyterian 



224 HISTORY OF THE PEESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

Churclies has been nearly doubled during the pre- 
sent century, yet a change in the location of meet- 
ing-houses has become manifest. This iis seen not only 
in the erection of buildings for public worship where 
none previously existed, but also in the replacing of 
old meeting-houses by new. There being no villages, 
the first settlers generally erected their church edifices 
on high ground, and 

" The decent church that topped the neighboring hill" 

could be seen here as well as in the fatherland. But 
the march of improvement has caused the new meet- 
ing-house in many instances to be placed at a distance 
from the site occupied by the one first erected. The 
employment of water-power, the advantage of streams 
for navigation, and of railways which necessarily pass 
where the least grade must be overcome, have caused 
cities and villages to spring up in valleys and Jow 
grounds. Hence new meeting-houses, whenever it 
can be done, are placed wh^re easiness of access by 
the present means of travel is most readily obtained. 
This change of site, while it has often been a means 
of increasing the number in attendance, and in some 
instances has saved weak churches from being dis- 
banded, has also caused a neglect of the graveyard 
connected with the first meeting-house. New bui^ial- 
places are sought, and the enclosure where the re- 
mains of the founders of the church were laid is too 
frequently left with no Old Mortality to restore the 
time-worn epitaphs on its tombstones, or Nehemiah to 
rebuild the broken-down walls of the "city of the 
dead." 



IN " THE FOEKS OF BRANDYWINE." 225 

Before the Revolution, and years afterward, tlie 
cocked bat, knee-breeches, and silver shoe-buckles 
extending across the foot were the favorite costume of 
the elderly and middle-aged gentlemen of the con- 
gregation. The hat was three-cornered, one corner 
being on each side in front, and another usually 
adorned with a tassel behind. As breeches left the 
part extending from the knee to the ankle exposed, 
those who were not furnished with well-proportioned 
limbs frequently attempted to remedy the defect by 
placing a pad or bandage on the back part of the ex- 
posed member. But this, like many attempts at im- 
provement, sometimes failed. The pad would become 
displaced and mar the appearance, instead of adding 
to the proportions of the part which it was intended 
to aid. The face was close shaven, but a part of the 
hair of the head was allowed to acquire its full length. 
This was plaited or surrounded by a ribbon and per- 
mitted to hang down the back. It was not unlike the 
Chinese appendage euphoniously styled a pig-tail, ex- 
cept that it depended from the back of the head in- 
stead of from the top. As the hair in the queue, as it 
was called, required oiling occasionally, in the course 
of time it imparted a shining appearance to the upper 
part of the well-worn coat. 

The ladies generally attended meeting dressed in a 
short gown not unlike the modern sacque, and another 
article of dress which has given the prefix to the gov- 
ernment of those ladies who usurp the control of the 
household. On this part of the attire the most care 
was bestowed, and the variety and brilliancy of its 
colors was often the pride of the wearer. The hair 



226 HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTEEIAN CHURCH 

which was not permitted to fall over the back, was 
covered by a sufl&ciently capacious, plain bonnet, 
which added to instead of detracting from the mod- 
esty of the wearer. Rings on the fingers were not 
common, and appendages from the ears were rarely 
seen. Even after these fashions, derived from the 
fatherland, had passed away, almost every one was 
attired in clothing of domestic manufacture. The 
" Sunday suit" was made to last as long as possible, 
and when it had been obtained by those who had not 
reached their full growth, the care with which it had 
been preserved was shown by its failure to cover a por- 
tion of the arms and lower extremities of the wearer. 

From the organization of the Church until the es- 
tablishment of Sunday-Schools rendered them, in a 
measure, unnecessary, public examinations of the 
children whose parents belonged to the congregation 
were annually made by the pastor. These examina- 
tions, directed mainly to ascertaining the familiarity 
of the young with the Shorter Catechism, and their 
knowledge of religious truth, were occasions of inter- 
est and benefit to both the children and their parents. 
The latter being forcibly reminded of the duties de- 
volving upon them, and the former aided in becoming 
acquainted with the Scriptures and the doctrines 
taught and maintained by the Presbyterian Church. 

After the ingathering of the Summer crops, a day 
was appointed to return thanks for the blessings of 
plenty and the fulfilment of the promise that seed- 
time and harvest should never fail. The day of the 
month was not always the same, but the day of the 
week was invariably Thursday. Why Thursday and 



m " THE FORKS OF BRANDYWINE." 227 

no other day was selected is difficult to ascertain. , It 
is most likely connected with some of those linger- 
ing superstitions respecting lucky and unlucky days 
which held such a conspicuous place in heathen my- 
thology, and which have not been entirely banished 
from Christian communities. The number is not so 
small as many suppose who still regard Friday as an 
unlucky day, and it is but recently that the execution 
of criminals ceased to be ordered on that day of the 
week exclusively. It was probably owing to the cus- 
tom of the Puritans and Presbyterians that Governors 
of States and the Chief Magistrate of the Union* have 
always selected Thursday for the day of State and 
National thanksgiving. The custom so becoming an 
agricultural community of appointing a thanksgiving 
after the harvest has been gathered is still observed 
by the congregation. 

The Communion was held twice a year, in May and 
in October. The Sabbath immediately preceding the 
administration of the ordinances was called the prepa- 
ration Sabbath. On Friday of the same week, which 
was commonly observed as a Fast Day, there were re- 
ligious exercises, and also on Saturday and Monday. 
On the Sacrament Sabbath some pastor of a neighbor- 
ing congregation usually assisted, and after a sermon 
by the minister in charge the sacrament was adminis- 
tered. The communicants seated themselves at tables 
placed in the aisles, and, as the number was generally 

* A national thanksgiving was appointed by President Lincoln in 
1863, and his example has been followed by each of his successors. 
A thanksgiving was first appointed by the Governor of Pennsylvania 
in 1843. 



228 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTEKIAN CHURCH 

too large to be seated at one table, those first seated, 
after the elements had been served, retired, and others 
took their places, so that there were frequently three 
or four tables. Every one entitled to participate 
was furnished with a token, as it was called. This 
was a 'small square piece of lead with the letter C 
(Communicant) stamped upon it. These were taken 
up by the members of the Session after those desir- 
ing to commune had seated themselves in the aisle., 
Before commencing to serve the tables, an invitation 
was always given by the pastor to those who were in 
good standing in other orthodox denominations to unite 
with the members of his charge in commemorating 
the suffering and death of their common Saviour. 

During the division of the Presbyterian Church 
into Old and New School, Dr. Grier and his congrega- 
tion remained with the Old Side. Unlike the schism 
of 17:41, the division of 1837 was a division of 
churches, but rarely of congregations. 

In 1838 the Meeting-House was broken into, and 
the Communion Service, hymn-books, and whatever 
could be conveniently carried were taken, and the 
furniture damaged. The perpetrators of the sacrilege 
were never detected. 

For sixty years after the erection of the Meeting- 
House the congregation was dependent for water on 
a spring several hundred yards distant. , In 1794, 
chiefly through the exertions of the Rev. Nathan 
Grier, a well was sunk near the church building. As 
the situation is elevated and the well consequently 
deep, it was used for upwards of a quarter of a century 
as a draw-well. 



m " THE rOEKS OF BEANDYWINE." 229 

It is worthy of notice that last year a long-needed 
improvement was made by the erection, at a cost of 
but little exceeding one thousand dollars, of thirty-five 
sheds, each nine feet by twenty, for the sheltering of 
horses and vehicles. 

That the first settlers were consistent members of. 
the church, and esteemed by their neighbors and 
acquaintances in their native land, is shown by the 
following certificate, which is a specimen of many that 
were brought by those who came to America to better 
their circumstances and enjoy the liberty to worship 
God without " let or hindrance" : 

Whereas the bearers here of John long & his wife design for 
America, these are to Certifie that they have lived in this Congrega- 
tion the most part of their time and still behaved themselves Soberly, 
and now at their departure from hence are free of all publick Scandall 
known to us. as wittness my hand this 8th of July 1736. 

SAM'' DUNLAP. 
Letterkennt, Ireland. 

This closes an imperfect history of a church which 
during one hundred and fifty years has been a beacon- 
light guiding to the haven of eternal safety. When 
those who attend the weekly services of its sanctuary 
shall meet to celebrate the three hundreth anniversary 
of the organization of a church in this portion of 
Zion, one hundred and fifty years will have been 
added to the list of centuries, and all now living, their 
children, and their children's children will have made 
the pilgrimage journey from the cradle to the grave. 

That long interval now the unwritten future will 
then be the recorded past. A past in which they will 



230 HISTORY OF THE PKESBYTEKIAN CHTJECH. 

devoutly recognize, as we do, the guiding hand of the 
God of their fathers. , A past which will contain 
many memorials of faithful pastors, of sincere worship- 
pers, and of sons and daughters of the church who 
aided in diffusing the cheering light of the Gospel in 
the now benighted regions of Asia, Africa, and the 
Islands of the Ocean. 



APPENDIX. 



A. 

To all Charitable and well Disposed Persons to whom thes presents 
may Come : 

The Petition op the Presbtterian Congregation in the 
Forks op Brandtwine 

Humbly showeth : That your petitioners have lately ben brought 
as a Society, into afflictive and Trying Circumstances, By our Meet- 
ing house, an excellent and Commodious billding Beeing Reduced to 
ashes, Shortly after the Death of our Rev* Pastor — We wish to have 
the public worship of God, Decently and Profitable Conducted 
amonghst us, in order to which the Erection of a house of Worship 
is Necessary. But by reason of the Scarcity of Cash ; and the Sev- 
eral heave taxes we have paid and have To pay we ar Rendered unable 
to attain that valuable object without the assistance of our Christian 
Brethren in other places. We must hope for Success in our address 
to the Inhabitants of a Christian Country who know that Charity 
and compassion to the afflicted is the very Image of the Saviour, that 
God loveth a cheerful Giver and promiseth that those who Caste their 
Bread on the waters, shall find it after many Days : We therefore 
Relying on your Goodness and Generosity most Respectfully and 
Humbly request your kind assistance. 

Signed in the Name of the Society By us the Trustees of the Con- 
gregation. 

Samuel Cunningham, David Denny, 
Jno. Culbertson, Jas. Dunwodies, 

Jas. McClure, William Anderson, 

robt. lockhart. 

Porks of Bkandtwinb, March 7, 1786. I 

231 



232 APPENDIX. 



B. 



CEREMONIES AT THE LAYING OF THE CORNER- 
STONE OF THE NEW CHURCH EDIFICE, AUGUST 
1, 1875. 

The exercises were opened with an impressive prayer by the Rev. 
J. N. C. Grier, D.D. ; a Historical Sketch of the Church, prepared by 
a former member, was then read by the pastor, Mr. McCoU, and short 
addresses delivered by the Rev. Messrs. Roberts, Totheroth, Hollifield, 
and Collier, pastors of the Churches organized originally either wholly 
or in part by members of the Manor Church. 

The Box deposited in the Corner-Stone contained a copy of the 
New Testament, a Hymn-Book, Historical Sketch above mentioned. 
Historical Discourse, and Semi-Century Sermon of Dr. Grier, a list 
of the Church Officers, the Act of Incorporation, and specimens of 
the Silver Coins struck in 1875, presented by ex-Governor Pollock, 
Director of the United States Mint, the different Postage-Stamps, a 
Letter and Postal Card to our Children's Children, and a copy of each 
of the following periodicals : The Presbyterian Weekly, Presbyterian 
Banner, Woman^s Work for Woman, The Village Record, Jeffer- 
sonian, Daily Local, and North American Gazette* 



0. 

PLAN OF SCHOOL AT NEW LONDON. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1744 BY THE SYNOD OF PHILADELPHIA. 

1. That all persons who please may send their children and have 
them instructed gratis in the languages, philosophy, and divinity. 

2. That the school be supported by yearly contributions from 
the congregations under their care. 

3. That if any funds remain after paying the salaries of the Mas- 
ter and Tutor, they shall be expended in the purchase of books and 
other necessaries for the school. 

* Church Records ; Local Memoranda. 



APPENDIX. 233 

The Kev. Francis Allison, D.D.,* subsequently Vice-Provost of 
the University of Pennsylvania, and the successor of Andrews as pas- 
tor of the First Presbyterian Church, who had opened an Academy 
near the village three years before, was appointed Master at a yearly 
salary of 20£ ($53.33i) Pennsylvania Currency. 

This school became justly celebrated. Besides furnishing the 
church with well-educated ministers, it afforded instruction to many 
who became eminent as statesmen and scholars. Among its pupils 
were Charles Thomson, Secretary of the Continental Congress, and 
author of a translation of the New Testament remarkable for its 
fidelity; Rev. John Ewing, D.D., Provost of the University of Penn- 
sylvania ; David Eamsay, the Historian .; Hugh Williamson, M.D., 
LL.D., a distinguishe4 patriot and miscellaneous writer ; Rev. James 
Latta, D.D., an eminent divine and teacher ; George Reed and James 
Smith, signers of the Declaration of Independence ; Thomas McKean, 
nine years Governor of Pennsylvania, and one of the seven natives of 
Chester County on whom the honorary degree of LL.D. has been 
conferred. 

Although the school was under Presbyterian control, it afforded 
gratuitous instruction of a high order to all denominations alike.f 

* Dr. Allison died November 28, 1779, and his remains were interred 
in the burial-ground adjoining the First Presbyterian Meeting-House 
erected in Pennsylvania. That Meeting-House, commonly known by 
the name of Old Buttonwood, stood at the Southeast corner of Bank and 
Market Streets, Philadelphia. It was built in 1704, rebuilt in 1794, 
abandoned and sold in 1821-22. The burial-ground remained until 
about 1840, when the dead of a hundred years were removed and its site 
occupied by warehouses. The first Presbyterian Church in America 
was built at Snowhill, Md., in 1685. 

f Minutes of Synod of Philadelphia; Eev. E. Dubois, " Hist. New 
London Pres. Church;" " Biography of Eminent Pennsylvanians." 



234 APPENDIX. 



D. 



COMMENDATORY LETTER GIVEN ADAM BOYD BY 
COTTON MATHER. 

Boston, N. E., June 10, 1724. 

Our worthy friend, Mr. Adam Boyd, being on a return to Europe, 
it is hereby certified on his behalf, that for the years' of his late so- 
journing in these parts of the world, his' behavior, so far as we under- 
stand, has been inoffensive and commendable, and such as hath justi- 
fied the testimonials with which he arrived hither. And we make no 
doubt that he will- make a report of the kind reception which he and 
others of his and our brethren coming from Scotland and Ireland 
hither (whereof more than two or three are at this time acceptably ex- 
ercising their ministry in our churches), have found in this country, 
that will be very contrary to the misrepresentations which some dis- 
turbers of the peace have given of it. 

We implore the blessing of our gracious Lord upon his person 
and his voyage and hope that wherever he may be disposed of, he may 
have the rewards and comforts of a patient continuance in well doing 
to attend him. 



E. 

NAMES OF THOSE WHO SUBSCRIBED FOR THE SUP- 
PORT OF MR. BOYD WHILE HE WAS PASTOR OP 
THE CHURCH IN THE FORKS OF BRANDYWINE. 

COPIED EEOM HIS MEMORANDUM BOOK BY REV. A. B. CROSS. 

' When Subscription When it 

N*^®- was made. 



John Henderson Aug. 11, 1741 1757 

James Wilson " " 1758 

Joseph Mackelduff " " 1750 

" Paid to his death," in September, 
1750. "His brother, Samuel, paid 
up until 1757." 



APPENDIX. 235 

When Subscription When it 

Ifame. iiras made. ceased. 

Francis Long Aug. 11, 1741 1752 

Paid until 1752. The last two or three 
years by his brother Joseph, he being 
dead. 
William Dunbar " " 1746 

" When he moved over the river'' (the 
Susquehannah). 

Samuel McKinly " " 1758 

Edward Irwin . ". " " 1756 

" Paid by his widow to 1756." 
Eobert Irwin " " 1758 

" Paid by his widow to 1758." 
Patrick Lockhart " " 1758 

" Paid by his widow to 1758." 
John Bryan " " 1758 

" Paid by his widow to 1758." 
JohnMcDermid " " 1758 

" Paid by his widow to 1758." 

Francis Alexander " " 1758 

David Denny " " 1758 

" Subscription doubled last five years." 
Abraham M'Connell " " 1751 

" Moved over the Susquehanna." 
William Erwin 

" Increased his subscription in 1749 
and '50. Moved over the River." 

James Stewart " " 1758 

John Dunwoody " " 1758 

William Wilson " 

" October, 1747, moved with his friends 
to Virginia." 
Eobert Steel " " 

" Moved out of place." 

James Porter " " 1757 

Samuel Carroll " " 1750 

" Moved to Virginia.'' 
Andrew Donaldson " " 1758 



236 APPENDIX. 

When Subscription When it 

^*™®* wae made. ceased. 

James Mitchell ..... v , . Aug. 11, 1741 1749 

" Moved to Virginia." 
Joseph Carroll ......... " " 1755 

"Moved to Carolina." 

George Irwin " " 1757 

George Gordon " " 1747 

"Moved^October, 1748." 

Andrew Wilson ' " " 1758 

John White " " 1758 

James Love " " 1746 

" Moved." 
John Long " " 1757 

Paid by publications and riddles,* ex- 
cept one year, until 1757. 

John Little " " 1753 

Matthew McKorkell " « 1746 

Kemoved to Leacock. 

The above Thirty-one subscribers appear to have been those who 
guaranteed to Mr. Boyd the Salary of Twenty Pounds, when he took 
charge of the congregation in August, 1741. 

SUBSEQUENT SUBSCRIPTIONS. 
Hame. ^ Commenced, Ceased. 

John Lewis 1742 1758 

William Ferguson 1742 1758 

George Ahill Aug. 11, 1744 

" Died." Probably that year. 

John Elliott . Feb. 3", 1745 1757 

Joseph Poag . Sept. 1, 1745 1758 

Alexander Laverty Nov. 4, 1745 1746 

" Moved." 

George Little 1745 

"Removed." 



* The " publications" were notices of marriages, which the law re- 
quired to be publicly announced when performed by a clergyman. The 
" riddles" were sieves for winnowing mills. 



APPENDIX. ' 237 

Name. CommeDced. Ceased. 

Francis Gardiner 1745 1757 

David Watson April, 1746 

David Henderson April 14, 1746 

" In October, 1747, he moved to Vir- 
ginia." 
Alexander Maclean April 27, 1746 1757 

"Moved to Carolina." 

Mary Dariington Oct. 1746 1758 

William Mains 1746 1750 

" Moved to Carolina." 

James Jack 1746 1758 

William Irwin 1746 1758 

Andrew Wilson, Sen 1746 1756 

"Dead. Family Extinct." 

Dougal Melntire 1746 1752 

Thomas Wilson 1746 1757 

John Wilson 1746 

" Moved." 

John M'Clure 1746 1753 

William Nprris 1746 

« Moved." 

Isaac McKinly 1746 1752 

" Moved over river." 

John McCorkle 1746 1748 

" Moved." 

Hugh McCrary 1746 

" Moved to Virginia." 

Thomas Karson 1746 1751 

Elizabeth Graham (widow) 1746 1752 

James Scott 1746 1757 

Hugh Morrison 1746 1758 

James Watson 1746 1748 

" Gone to Virginia." 

Robert Woodrow . ., = 1746 

" Moved out of Congregation." 

Robert Smith 1747 1758 

John McHenry March, 1747 1757 



238 APPENDIX. 

Name. Commenced. Ceased. 

David Shearer 1747 

" Moved to Middle Octoraro." 
Thomas McNeal 1747 1751 

" Moved over the river." 
James Laird 1747 

"Kemoved." 
James Gibson 1747 1751 

" Moved out of Congregation." 

John Gibson ' ' . . . 1747 1755 

Frederick McCaskie 1747 

Alexander Maxwell 1747 

" Absconded." , 

1749. 

William Dunviroody ....... Sept. 1749 1758 

Fraley McKewan 1749 1752 

" Moved." 

John Gardiner 1749 1758 

James Koss 1749 1758 

John Harper 1749 

" Moved to Octoraro." 

Samuel Byers 1749 1757 

William Little 1749 1758 

James Koss 1750 Nov. 1751 

George Ligate 1750 Nov. 1757 

Thonaas Scott 1750 1756 

John Bell 1750 1754 

Hugh Shearer 1750 ' 1752 

Jane Jennings May, 1750 1751 

William Katchford Nov. 1750 1751 v 

"Moved to Carolina." 

John MoParlane : " 1750 1752 

George Robison ~ Oct. 1750 June, 1753 

1751. 

Ludwick Ligate y. April 20, 1751 1758 

Cormick MoDermond " " 

"Removed." 



APPEXDIX. 239 

Kame. Commenced. Ceased. 

Patrick Mairork April 26, 1Y51 1755 

"He is an apostate." 

1752. 

Robert Wilson 1752 1756 

EobertFuthey 1752 1758 

James Moore May 24, 1752 

No date given, probably paid untU 1758. 
Theophilus Irwin " « 1752 

No date given, probably paid until 1758. 
Matthew Harbison 1752 

No date given, probably paid untU 1758. 
Francis Gardiner, Jr 1752 

No date given, probably paid until 1758. 
James and Eobert McClure 1752 

No date given, probably paid until 1758. 

Joseph Long 1752 1757 

James Beatty 1752 

No date given, probably paid until 1758. 

1753. 

Thomas Hope May, 1753 

" Moved over the river." 

Eobert Eobinson June 27, 1753 1756 

William Eoss and Alexander Nesbit . . 1753 1757 

Andrew Spence 1753 1757 

"By work, etc., to 1757." 

Thomas Byle 1753 1758 

George Campbell May, 1753 1754 

" Moved." 

1754. 

William Allan 1754 

1765. 

Alexander Gorden 1755 1758 

" Part in work." 

James Spence 1155 1757 

Eobert Eobison Sept. 15, 1755 1757 

Alexander Donaldson May 26, 1755 1758 

Probably 1758. 



240 APPENDIX. 

Kame. Commenced. Ceased. 

Patrick Stewart May. 26, 1755 1756 

William "Wallace 1755 1758 

Probably 1758. 
John Withrow, , 1755 1758 

Probably 1758. 
John Craige 1755 

" One and a half years." 
John Patterson 1755 1758 

, 1756. 

John Smith May, 1756 1757 

Samuel Byers May 26, 1756 1758 

" Eobert Piersol paid one year." 

" John Young and his brother, Archibald, generally pay me with- 
out subscribing." Also Samuel Ross, Samuel Long, " and Thomas 
Eeah." 

" Received from the congregation in the Forks of Brandywine all 
I expected from them." 

" My relation to Forks of Brandywine dissolved in a most irregu- 
lar manner, October, 1758." 

It will be observed by the above list that during the last two or 
three years of Mr. Boyd's pastorate the names added to the list of 
subscribers for the payment of his salary were few. This was proba- 
bly owing to the fact that from 1756 or '57, when the " Seceder 
Meeting-House'' was built, three churches,^TMr. Boyd's, the New 
Side, and the Seceder, — were attempted to be sustained within a short 
distance of one another. 



APPENDIX. 



241 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS FOR MR. BOYD'S SALARY AT OOTORARO, 
SEPTEMBER 1, irsS. 



Daniel Henderson. 
William Henderson. 
Thomas Hone. 
John Brewster. 
Charles Gilkie. 
George Wilkins. 
James Fleming. 
William Fleming. 
Sarah Thompson. 
Robert Wilson. 
Peter Fleming. 
James Fleming, Sr. 
John Fleming. 
John Kincaid. 
Samuel Kincaid. 
Benjamin Wales. 
Samuel M'Clelland. 
Charles Eaches. 
William Morsel. 
Robert McPherson. 
John McPherson. 
John Shaw. 
Francis Alexander. 
Walter Gilkie. 



Robert Kincaid (carpenter). 

Arthur Patterson. 

Robert Gilkie. 

Robert Kincaid (weaver). 

James Keys. 

Richard Hope. 

Adam Hope (weaver). 

Alexander Rogers. 

Robert Kelly. 

George Campbell. 

John Miller, Esq. 

John Miller, Sr. 

Archibald Gay. 

Joseph Wilson. 

William Marshall. 

John Turner. 

Samuel Moore. 

John Maxwell. 

James Adaire. 

John Irwin. 

John Kincaid, Jr. 

James Davidson. 

James Heathrington. 

David Cowan. 



The above subscription was made when the Congregation at Octo- 
raro agreed to take two-thirds of Mr. Boyd's time. 



242 APPENDIX. 



F. 

EXTRACT FROM THE MINUTES OF THE SYNOD OP 
NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Maidenhead,* May 18th, 1748. 
A call was brought into the Synod to be presented to the Rev. Mr. 
Dean from Timber Ridge and Forks of James River, the Synod refer 
the consideration thereof to the Presbytery of New OaStle to which 
Mr. Dean doth belong, and do recommend it to said Presbytery to 
meet in Mr. Dean's meeting-house on Wednesday next upon said 
affair, and that Mr. Dean and his people be speedily apprised of it.f 



G. 

September 18th 1760 
Mr. Carmichael 

Deak S*, Circumstances of Brandywine Again Oblidge us to 
Renew our Adress. Sr. we have the pleasure to Inform You that 
your one Visit has been Remarkably Blessd for the Uniting this people. 
Each person upon All Occasions Expressing their warmest Sentiments 
& Close Attachmt & Looks upon You as the only Gentleman that has 
preached in this place soe Every way Adapted to its Sittuation & are 
Morally Assured that your taking the pastoral Charge of this people 
wile Under Divine providence have the Most Effectual Tendency to 
Remove all our Distractions & perhaps be one of the Most Able 
& flourishing Congregations Belonging to our Synad and if Settlemt 
I as a Vacent people is Attended with some particular Advantages 
& that few others in the Same Sittuation Can pretend to Viz it Ly" 
Near the Seat of the Synad as wele as the Bosom of ye Prsb' where 
You wile have a near Access & Correspondence with your Bretherin 
upon Every Emergency and has Been Ever Reputed one of the Most 
Healthy places As it is high Land & fule of good springs it is a Com- 
pact Congregation & few of Different Denominations Intermixed 

* Now Lawrenceville, New Jersey. 

t The Will of Mr. Dean is on record. It is a plain, well-written docu- 
ment, and remarkably free from the irrelevant verbiage so common at 
that time in legal documents, 



APPENDIX. 243 

You wile have but one people & one Meeting house & from a Long 
Acquaintance We are Morally Assurd You wile find a Loving Kind 
people that will Certainly be a pleasure to you and wile Exert the in- 
fluence to Render you Comfortable & if Distressing Circumstances 
wile be admitted a place of Argumt where is the Vacency but Bran- 
dywine wile Turn the Scale we have Been an Orderly Congregated 
people Near Thirty year & for Near Twenty a Body of us has Been 
a Destitute people Except three years that Mr. Dean Laboured 
Amongst us & Now has Been Twelve Years Vacent we have made 
Many Attempts for the Settlemt of a Minister which proved Abor- 
tive Which Influenced Some to Leave the place Discouraged & a 
general Indifierence took place Even in the Midst of all those Dis- 
tresses or Case was Not soe peculiarly Dangerous an now by Reason 
of the Ceceder's Unwearied Industry to propigate their Scheme & 
Make a party which in Some Measure they have Efi'ected and some 
has said that if we Cannot obtain your Settlemt Necessity wile oblidge 
them to Joyne the Ceceders & if this is the Case Brandywine has 
Done and we May only sit Down & Lament over the Ruins of the 
Congregation & Seeing the house of Grod turned to a Draught house 
& our Children left to Rove A Number of Meer Scepticks without 
any Regard to God or Religion A Dismel Reflection but Likely to be 
the Case if Mr Carmichael Shuts his ears to the Crye Throw Bran- 
dywine oiF as a Vessale of Distruction unless God Interposes in a way 
we know Not Now Dr Sr we wo" Unitedly Renew our Application 
to you in the Language of Ruth to Naomi Intreat us not to Leave 
you nor from following after you in Earnest Entreaties to take the 
pastoral Charge of our Souls & our Children. May You be soe im- 
prest with the Justice of our Needy Case soe as to determine your 
Settlemt hear & May God preside over the whole that his Glory May 
be advanced & his young Sern" Made to Rejoice in Seeing the pleasure 
of the Lord prosper in his hand May God be Ever at your right 
hand to Aid You in Every Attempt for his Glory & Beggs Leave 
to subscribe Yours Affectionately 

Samll. Allen francis Alexandke, 

Thos. Brown francis Gardner 

John Culbertson William Denny 

Wji. Brown William Irwin 
David Denny Ruleing Elders 



244 APPENDIX. 

H. 

JNO. CARMICHAEL'S WILL. 

In the name of God, Amen. I Jno. Carmichael, of this Township 
of East Cain, in this County of Chester, of this State of Pennsyl- 
vania, Clergyman, being Weak in Body, & very sickly, but in the 
proper exercise of my reason, and realizing my mortality, that it is 
appointed for all Men once to die : Do make this my last Will & 
Testament, in manner as foUoweth, (viz*) After committing my 
Soul to God who gave it, in hope of the pardon of all my Sins, and 
a gracious acceptance of ,it, through the merits, mediation, and 
imputted Righteousness of the Lord Jesus Christ, my dear and 
JBlessed Saviour : And my Body to the Grave, to be interred as my 
surviving friends shall see proper, in a decent manner, without any 
needless parade or vain show whatever, as I die in the Hope of a 
Blessed Resurrection to eternal Life for this my mortal Body in God's 
good time and way, according to the Articles of the Christian 
Religion, as professed by the Calvinists in these latter ages in the 
general, but by the Presbyterian Divines in perticular, whose system 
of Principles as expressed in our Confession of Faith & Catechisms, 
shorter & larger, made at Westminster, in England, by the Assembly 
of Divines appointed for that purpose, and have been and now is, 
adopted by the Synod of New York and Philadelphia, in America, I 
give my Testimony to, on this my Death Bed, as expressive of the 
mind & will of God, contained in the Holy Scriptures, with the 
exceptions the aforesaid Synod have ordinarily made, but more espe- 
cially & particularly, do I desire to give my Death Bed Testimony, to 
the necessity of an experimental knowledge of those Doctrineg, con- 
tained in the aforesaid Systems, called the Doctrines of Grace, to be 
applied to and impressed on the soul by the Holy Ghost, in a saving 
manner, to Prepare the soul for that eternal felicity which consists in 
the enjoyment of God in Heaven. But as to the few things of this 
Life or Worldly Substance with which God has blessed me, I Will 
to have them disposed of, for the good of my surviving Family, 
my Widow and Children, in the following manner : — I Will that 
that piece of Land which was Run out & measured by Thomas 
Haslet the survayer last Spring, which contains near One Hundred 



APPENDIX. 245 

Acres of Land & lies on the East side of this Plantation, joining the 
Land & Lines of William Wilson, Adam Guthery, William Headings 
& Widow Rachel White, be sold to the highest bidder and a good 
authentick tittle made to the purchaser by my Executors hereafter 
mentioned : and the Money that arises from the Sale of said Land, to 
be divided into three equal parts; one third part to my Oldest Son 
John Flavel Carmichael, as soon as the money can be got, the other 
third part to Washington Gates Carmichael, my second son, to help 
him in Education, and to be in the hands of his mother or Guardian 
for that purpose, as I desire this son may receive a good Education, 
fit for the Gospel Ministry, if he has a turn for it. And the other 
third part to be given to my oldest daughter, Phebe, when she comes 
to the Age of Twenty two years, to be hers forever. As to the rest of this 
Plantation, which contains the most valuable part of the improvements, 
such as the House, Garden, meadows, Barn & Orchard &c" my will 
is, that the premisses be apprized, together with all & singular the 
goods & Chattels of every kind ; and then a just estimate taken of 
the whole, and one whole third part thereof to belong to my dear and 
loving Wife, then a Widow, to be hers forever, which I will & appoint 
to her, in lieu of the whole of all her dower, be the same more or less. 
My Will further is, that the other two thirds of the whole apprized 
Estate, be divided equally among my Six Children, John Plavel, 
Phebe, Catherine Mustard, Washington Gates, Elizabeth Sarah, & 
Francina, Share & Share alike, be the same more or less, each child 
to receive his Share when come to the Age of Twenty one years ; the 
mother is to receive the benefit of the profits of the Minor Children's 
Shares, while they continue to live with her & no longer, whether 
her own or her Step Children. Also my Will is, that if any of my 
Children to whom I have thus divided my Estate, depart this Life 
before he or she comes to legal Age, to heir his or her portion, his or 
her Share be equally devided among the surviving Children, Share & 
Share alike. Also my Will is, that if my Widow and the Executors 
shall conclude & judge, that it will be better for the Widow & 
Children to sell these premises or plantation, and to move to some 
place such as Princeton, where the Education of the Children can be 
more easily assertained, or whereever they shall judge proper, in such 
case, let the place be sold to the best Advantage; and may the 
kind good providence of the God of Abraham, Isaac & Jacob direct 



246 APPENDIX. 

them. I do hereby appoint, & ordain & constitute, my very trusty dear 
& worthy friends to be Executors of this my last Will & Testament, 
(viz*) the Hon : William Clingan Esq', the Hon" John Beaton Esq', 
together with my Son John Flavel Carmiohael, hereby declaring this 
to be my last Will & Testament, and hereby cancelling and disanulling 
all preceding' ones as null and void. In Witness whereof, I have 
hereunto set my Hand & Seal, this I7th day of August, One 
Thousand Seven Hundred & Eighty-five. 

John Carmiohael [Seal] 

George Irwin, 

Barnabas Curly his V Mark 
Witnesses. 

I, John Carmiohael within named, continuing Weak & Sick in 
Body, but through the divine goodness, of sound disposing mind & 
Memory, do think proper to make this Codicil, or Addition to my 
last Will and Testament, in the manner following, viz' Whereas, I 
have certain sums of money in the Fund of the Corporation for the 
relief of Presbyterian Ministers their Widows & Children, which by 
the Rulps of the said Corporation, will be productive of a certain 
Annuity or yearly allowance to my Family after my decease. Now it 
is my Will and I order, that all the Monies that may be drawn yearly 
from the said fund, be paid to my beloved Wife, to be applied towards 
her support, and the support Education and maintenance of my 
minor Children, to wit, Catherine Mustard, Washington Gates, Eliza- 
beth Sarah & Franeina, during their minority, to be apply'd to her 
& their use afores* while She continues my Widow, and the said 
Children remain under her care and management ; but in case they 
the said Children should be taken from under her care by their Guar- 
dian or otherwise, In that Case I will & order that the said yearly 
Annuity be divided between my said Wife and Children in the fol- 
lowing manner, viz' One third thereof to my beloved Wife, and the 
remaining two thirds to be equally divided among my Four Children 
above named. I Likewise give and devise unto my Son John Flavel 
Carmiohael, all that my Ope undivided moiety or equal half part 
of Fourteen Acres of Valuable, Woodland, situate in the Town of 
Newark, in the County of Essex, in New Jersey, which came to me 
as a part of the Dowry of his deceased Mother ; to hold to him the 



APPENDIX. 247 

said John Plavel Carmichael & to his Heirs & Assigns forever, I 
Likewise Give & bequeath unto my said son Plavel, my wearing 
Apparel and Cane. And I do hereby declare this Codicil to be part 
& parcel of my last "Will and Testament, hereby ratifying & confirm- 
ing the same and every part thereof. In Witness whereof, I have 
hereunto set my Hand & Seal, this eleventh day of November, in 
the year of our Lord One Thousand, Seven Hundred & Eighty-five. 
Before signing, & sealing, I nominate & appoint Mr. "William Hunter 
of "West Nantmeal, to be one of the Executors of my last "Will & 
Testament. 

John Carmichael [Seal] 

Signed, Sealed, published & declared by the Testator as a Codicil 
to his last "Will & Testament in the presence of Us 

KOBERT FiLSON, 

George Ikwin. 



I. 
DK. GKIER'S RESIGNATION. 

Dr. Grier's request for a dissolution of the pastoral relation was 
brought before Presbytery for its action April 14, 1869. It was in 
writing, and as follows : 

To THE Moderator and Presbytery op New CaStle. 

Dear Brethren, — In the year of our Lord 1813, in the twenty- 
first year of my age, I was licensed by this Presbytery to preach the 
Gospel, and on the 24th day of November, a.d. 1814, 1 was ordained 
to the full work of the Ministry, and installed Pastor of the Congre- 
gation of the Forks of the Brandywine. 

Now, in the seventy-sixth year of my age, and having labored 
amongst you for fifty-four years and seven months, and paralyzed 
both in my speech and limbs, and no longer able to fulfil the duties 
of the Pastorate, I ask this Presbytery, not one of whom was a 
member of it when I was ordained and installed, to dissolve the pas- 
toral relation existing now between me and the Congregation of the 
Forks of Brandywine. 

J. N. C. Grier. 

March 30, 1869. 



248 APPENDIX. 

At a meeting of the Presbytery of Newcastle, held May 6, 1869, 
the subjoined resolutions were presented by the Kev. John M. Dickey, 
D.D., and adopted : 

Resolved, That in accepting the resignation of Dr. J. N. C. Grier 
of his charge of the Brandywine Manor Church, the Presbytery of 
New Castle desire to express their grateful acknowledgment of God's 
goodness and mercy in permitting this pastoral relation to continue 
so long ; reaching over more than fifty-four years, marked by many 
precious seasons of special religious interest, and by a continual in- 
gathering of souls, the Presbytery would note the fact ; and now as 
growing infirmity renders it necessary that Dr. Grier be released from 
his charge,- they ofier him their heartfelt sympathy, and pray that 
the joys of a faithful minister may, through the merits of our Lord 
and Saviour, be his now and in the church above. 

Resolved, That the above be entered on the minutes, and that a 
copy be handed to the Elder of Brandywine Manor Church, to be 
presented to Dr. Grier. 



J. 
CONSTITUTION OF THE HONEYBEOOK TEMPERANCE 

SOCIETY. 

The undersigned, inhabitants of Honeybrook and its vicinity, 
impressed with a sense of the incalculable injury resulting to society, 
in all its present and eternal interests, from the existence and preva- 
lence of Intemperance, in the use of intoxicating liquors, feel them- 
selves called upon as good citizens to make all the efibrts within their 
ability, by fair and honorable means, to lessen and if possible to ex- 
tirpate the vice. And for this purpose do associate together, under a 
pledge of mutual co-operation, according to the provisions of the 
following articles, viz. : 

I. To abstain from all use of intoxicating liquors, excepting when 
we conscientiously believe they are necessary as a medicine. 

II. To refrain from offering thetn to our friends and visitors, in 
our families, as marks of hospitality. 

III. Entirely to cease giving them to workmen and laborers, in 
harvest or any other season, excepting as above specified. 



APPENDIX. 249 

IV. To refrain under the strictest caution from selling, or giving 
them in greater or smaller quantities to persons known to be in the 
habit of making a bad use of them, except when known to be needed 
as medicine. 

V. That we will neither sell nor cause to be sold any of our grain 
for the purpose of distillation. 

VI. That we will hold the vice of intemperance in utter abhor- 
rence, and use every proper means to bring it into the disrepute and 
destruction due to its hatefulness, and yet regarding its victims and 
its advocates with deep compassion, and to use all our efforts to reclaim 
them. 

Any person making application, and being at the time sober, may 
become a member of this association ; and any person known to the 
society to have violated any of these articles shall be conversed with 
on the subject, and for a repetition of the oflFence shall be dismissed. 
John N. C. Grier, John Clemenson, 

Samuel Jones, John Btjohanan, 

John W. Pinkerton, William Ewing; 

John Ballentine, James K. Mendenhall, 

C. KoBiNsoN, James Quin, 

Thomas G-. Happersett, John Wright, 
David Skeen, Nathan G-rifpith, 

James M'Clune, Benj. Talbot, 

Joseph Brown, Joseph Crilet, 

John Stewart, Joseph Whitaker, 

Wm. Templeton, Geo. Cowan, 

James Ealston, David Buchanan, Jr. 

James Ralston, Jr. Wm. Kobeson.* 



K. 

COPY OF DEED FOE THE LAND FIRST OBTAINED 
FOR CHURCH PURPOSES. 

This Indenture, made the eighteenth day of May in the year of our 
Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty-one, between Matthew 

* The only survivors are Mr. Ballentine and he who records the fact. 

17 



250 APPENDIX. 

Robertson, of West Nantmel and John Smith the younger of East 
Cain in the County of Chester and province of Pennsylvania, Yeo- 
men of the one part and The Reverend John Carmichael, Clerk, John 
Culbertson, James Moore, William Denny, Samuel McKinley, and 
Francis Grardner, all of the said County of Chester, Yeomen of the 
other part. Whereas the Honorable The proprietaries of the s^id , 
province by their Letter Patent the fifth day of this Instant, May, did 
grant and confirm unto The said Matthew Robertson and John Smith 
in Fee, A certain piece of Land situated in their Manor of Springton 
in the said County of Chester, and Township of Westnantmell, Be- 
ginning at a post in the Line of the Manor afore"* Corner of the tract 
of land part of the said manor surveyed ,unto James McCoskry 
thence by said McCoskry's land and along the great road leading 
through the said Manor from Philada. to Harris's Ferry on the River 
Susquehannah called Paxtang Road North fifty five degrees, East 
fifty perches to a post and South fifty one degrees, East forty six 
perches to a post in the Manor Line — thence along the Manor Line, 
^rest seventy seven perches to the Place of Beginning, containing six 
acres and eighty six perches with the appurtenances (except as therein 
excepted) To hold to the said Matthew Robertson and John Smith 
theit Heirs and Assigns forever, to and for the Use of Intent and 
Purpose of erecting and continuing thereon a Church or House of 
Religious Worship for the use of the said Congregation of Presbyte- 
rians and their Desoendents and Successors for ever, in suoh Manner 
as the Minister, Elders, and majority of such Congregation for the 
Time being shall from Time to Time order, direct and appoint, under 
the yearly Quit Rent of one Shilling Sterling Money of Great Britain 
to the said proprietaries their Heirs and Successors for ever as in and 
by the said recited patent record at Philadelphia in Patent Book A. A. 
vol. 2, pa. 285, more fully appears. Now this Indenture witnesseth 
that the said Matthew Robertson and John Smith at the special in- 
stance and Request of the said Presbyterian Congregation and by and 
with the Privjty, Consent, Approbation and Direction of them or the 
major part of them who now statedly worship in the Church or Meet- 
ing House erected on the said described and granted piece of Land 
under the pastoral Charge of the Reverend the said John Carmichael, 
testified by his and the rest of the said parties hereto of the Second 
Part being the Trustees chosen and appointed by the said Congrega- 



APPENDIX. 251 

tion for that purpose signing and sealing the presents hereby acknowl- 
edge and declare that' the names of the said Matthew Robertson and 
John Smith were made use of in the said recited Patent or Grant and 
the same was so as aforesaid made or intended to be made to them, 
the said Matthew Kobertson and John Smith and their Heirs in trust 
only to and for the use, Benefit and Behoof^of the People who are 
and shall be members of the said Presbyterian Congregation accord- 
ing to the tenor and true meaning of these presents for ever. And 
the said Matthew Robertson and John Smith by and with the like, 
consent, privity, and direction of the said Congregation or the Major- 
ity of them as aforesaid and in consideration of the sum of five shil- 
lings apiece ^o them in hand paid by the said parties hereto of the 
second part (the receipt thereof, is hereby acknowledged) have granted,' 
bargained, sold, enfeofi"ed released and confirmed and by these pres- 
ents, do grant, bargain, sell, enfeoff release and confirm unto the said 
John Carmichael, John Culbertson, James Moore, William Denny, 
Samuel McKinley, Francis G-ardner and their Heirs and Assigns, 
All that the said herein before described piece or parcel of land con- 
taining six acres and eighty six perches of land be the same more or 
less, together with all the buildings, improvements rights members, 
and appurtenances thereto belonging and the reversions and remain- 
ders thereof, and the said sealed Patent to have and to hold the said 
described six acres and eighty six perches piece or portion of ground 
Hereditaments and premises hereby granted or mentioned or intended 
so to be with the appurtenances unto the said John Carmichael, John 
Culbertson, James Moore, William Denny, Francis Gardner, and 
Samuel McKinley their Heirs and Assigns forever In Trust and of 
intent and purpose that the said described and granted piece of land 
shall be and continue a place for the site of a House of Public Wor- 
ship and for a burial place, and that the whole of the said premises 
shall be, continue, and remain for the use and service of the said con- 
gregation of people called Presbyterians forever, who do or shall hold 
and continue to hold the system of Doctrine contained in the West- 
minster Confession of Faith and Directory agreeable to the present 
Interpretation of the Synod of New York and Philadelphia to which 
they are now united, but under and subject nevertheless to the follow- 
ing conditions and limitations viz. : Provided always that no person 
shall be deemed to belong to the said Congregation until he has 



252 APPENDIX, 

statedly attended upon the Public Worship of God in ,the said Con- 
gregation for the space of twelve months and shall have regularly con- 
tributed to the support of the ministry and other charges of the same 
according to the usage of Presbyterians, nor shall be deemed any 
longer a member thereof than he continues to hold and conform to 
the Westminster Confession of Faith and Directory aforesaid, and 
shall continue to attend statedly in an orderly manner upon the public 
Worship of God in the said Congregation and be ia Communion with 
the said Synod as before expressed. And provided also that neither 
the said parties hereto of the Second Part nor either of them nor any 
other person or persons succeeding them in this Trust who shall here- 
after fall from or change his or their religious Principles aforesaid or 
separate from the said Synod or depart from the said Congregation, or 
who shall refuse or neglect to contribute toward the support of the 
same, shall be capable to execute this Trust or stand secured to the 
Uses aforesaid nor have any right or interest in the said described or 
granted piece of land and premises or in the House or other buildings 
and improvements thereon erected or to be erected as aforesaid while 
he or they shall so continue but that in such cases as also when any 
of them or other person or persons who shall succeed in the Trust 
aforesaid shall happen to depart this Life ,that then it shall and may 
be lawful for the said congregation the time being and from time to 
time and as often as the occasion shall require to make choice of others 
to manage the said Trust instead of such that as shall fall away, se- 
cede, separate or be deceased. Provided further, in order to prevent 
law suits in case it shall be disputed in time coming whether any par- 
ticular persons or members of the said Congregation or any debate 
shall arise in relation to Pews iu the said House of Worship that all 
such debates and all others of a civil nature respecting the said Tract 
of Land and House of Worship shall be finally determined by a ma- 
jority of votes of the adult male members of the said congregation 
being such afore convened after Public Notice in which Public Con- 
ventions, the minister of the said Congregation for the time being if 
present, shall always preside as Moderator or by Arbitrators holding 
the Principles aforesaid chosen by them for the purpose aforesaid. 
And the said Matthew Robertson and John Smith or either of them 
do further acknowledge and declare by these presents that they neither 
claim nor have by virtue of the said Patent or Grant to them any 



APPENDIX. 253 

right, Title or Interest in the said described and granted piece or por- 
tion of Ground and premises or any part thereof, their own particular 
order and benefit but only to and for the Trust, Uses, Purposes and 
Services herein before mentioned and to no other use and service 
whatsoever and therefore in further accomplishment and performance 
of the Trust and Confidence aforesaid, they the said Matthew Rob- 
ertson and John Smith do for themselves and every of them and for 
each of their heirs severally and respectively warrant, promise, grant, 
and agree to and with the said parties hereto of the Second Part their 
heirs, executors, Assigns and every of them by these presents that 
they the said Matthew Eobertson, and John Smith their Heir and 
Assigns shall and will at all or any time or times hereafter upon the 
request of the said congregation or a majority of the male members 
thereof convened as aforesaid make, do execute and acknowledge all 
such further and other act and Acts conveyance and assurance what- 
soever in the Law as shall be advised by Council learned in the Law 
to be needful for the better conveying and vesting the said premises 
in the Succeeding Trust and further assuming of the said described 
Tract or piece of Land with the appurtenances to and for the Uses, 
Interests, and Purposes aforesaid. In witness thereof the parties 
aforesaid to these presents have hereunto interchangeably set their 
hands and seals the day and year first above Written. 

Wm. Denny Matthew Eobertson 

Samuel McKinlet John Smith 
Frans. Gardner John Culbertson 

John Carmichael James Moore. 

Sealed and Delivered 

Samuel Allen 
James McCoskrt 
Egbert Smith 

Chester ss 

Before me William Clingan one of the Justices for said County 
came the above named Matthew Robertson and John Smith, the 
above grantors who did acknowledge the above Instrument of Writing 
to be their Act and Deed by them signed, sealed and delivered for 
the uses and purposes above mentioned. 

Acknowledged Deo' 21st 1761 

William Clinoan. 



254 



APPENDIX, 



L. 
INSTKUCTORS IN HOWARD ACADEMY. 



Principals. 

James M'CIune, LL.D. 
Eev. Mr. Ogden. 
Rev. Mr. Kirkland. 
Mr. Watson. 



Assistants in Toung 
Men's Department. 
Mr. Isaac M'Dermond. 
" John C. Thompson. 
" Samuel JR.. Forrest. 
" John K. Ealston. 
" James B. Ralston. 



In Young Ladies' 
Department. 

Miss Gwenny Rowland. 
" Elizabeth Sims. 
" Alice Hotchkins. 
" Louisa B. Ralston. 
" Marion Thibeaudeaux.' 



M. 

REV. JAMES GRIER. 

The Rev. James Grier was born in Bucks County, Pa., about 1750. 
Where he received his academical training is not known. He was 
graduated at the head of his class by the College of New Jersey in 
1772, and passed a year as a tutor in that institution. He was 
hopfully converted by the preaching of Whitefield, and studied 
theology under the direction of Dr. Witherspoon. 

Mr. Grier was licensed by the Presbytery of Philadelphia in 1775, 
and installed as pastor of Deep Run Presbyterian Church, Bucks 
County, Pa., in 1778, where he remained until his death. He 
preached his last sermon November 18, 1791, and died the next day. 

Mr. Grier was an excellent scholar, a faithful and instructive 
minister of the Gospel. His only son, John Ferguson Grier, organ- 
ized and became pastor of the first Presbyterian Church in Reading, 
Pennsylvania. ^ 

Although fully competent both by learning and ability to prepare 
works worthy of remembrance, Mr. Grier, like nearly all of the 
Presbyterian clergymen of his day in the Middle States, gave no 
production of his pen to the public. This is the more remarkable as 
the press of New England, during the last century, especially, teemed 
with Thanksgiving Sermons, Funeral Orations, Patriotic Addresses 
and less ephemeral productions.")" 

* Eecords of Howard Academy ; Eeminispenoes of First Principal. 

f Sprague, "Annals of American Pulpit ;" Dr. S. Alexander, " Prince- 
ton College in the Eighteenth Century;" Elliot, "Biographical Dic- 
tionary." 



APPENDIX. 255 

]^. 
BEANDYWINE CKEBK. 

This stream, the Susquehanna of Chester County, retains the name 
given it by the Dutch, while they held possession of the country 
around its outlet. Brandywein Kill, clear-water river, is mentioned 
by the First Governor under the Duke of York in 1665. On account 
of the abundance of fish in its waters this stream was much fre- 
quented by the Indians, and its banks were among their favorite 
camping-grounds. Many of the sites for propelling machinery 
afforded by its rapid current were utilized at an early period. Several 
of the first grist-mills erected West of the Delaware Kiver were 
dependent on this water-course for their motive-power. 

Owing to the clearing away of the forests, giving rise to greater 
evaporation, and the removal of fallen timber and other obstructions 
from its channel, permitting the rain-fall to pass off more rapidly, this 
stream is much smaller than it was a century ago. A ferry was kept 
several years by Chadd at the crossing which bears his name, and 
when the Hessians attempted to force a passage at that place daring 
the ill-starred battle fought on its banks, they were obliged to carry 
their muskets on a level with the shoulder, and many of the wounded 
by Wayne's artillery were drowned. 

There are few streams of no greater length nor volume of water 
more noteworthy than the Brandywine. This is manifest whether 
attention is directed to the conflict which bears its name, the numerous 
factories for which it supplies the motive-power, or the well-tilled 
farms of the moral and intelligent communities which people the large 
portion of Chester County which it drains. 

The Presbyterians indicated the locality of their first Meeting- 
Houses and the religious associations connected with them by giving 
them the names of the nearest known natural objects, as streams, 
valleys, levels, etc. Thus G-reat Valley, Neshaminy, Deep Run, Head 
of Christiana, Octoraro, Doe Bun, Chestnut Level, and Porks of 
Brandywine, or in the quaint style and orthography of Adam Boyd, 
the Pforks. 

The Priends rejecting the Indian names as savoring of heathenism, 
called their houses for public worship after the Townships in which 



256 APPENDIX. 

tliey were placed, as Birmingham, Grosben, Uwohlan, Nantmeal, Cain, 
etc. That they did so is a matter for regret, as it has caused the 
original names of nearly all the streams in Chester County to be 
forgotten. In Lancaster, Berks, and other Counties a majority of the 
water-courses retain, with some modifications, the names they received , 
from the Aborigines, but in Chester County two streams only, the 
Pocopson and Octoraro, perpetuate the remembrance of the most 
friendly and unwarlike of the Indian tribes. 

While the annals of many portions of this State contain details of 
" Indian outrages," the history of one of the oldest Counties shows 
that the Lenni Lenape and their " white brothers" dwelt peaceably 
together along the Brandywine and other streams upwards of a 
hundred years.* 



o. 

NANTMELL TOWNSHIP. 

This Township, now divided into five, was formed and some set- 
tlements made along its Western limit by Welsh immigrants in 
1720-22. It included a large area, being bounded on the North by 
French Creek, West by the mountain (Welsh Mountain), Southeast 
by the Barren Hill, and Northeast in part by Marsh Creek. When 
Lancaster County was set ofi' from Chester, in 1729, the division line 
between the two Counties became the Western limit of Nantmell, 
while the Southeast boundary of Springtown Manor, laid out in the 
same year, separated it from Cain. 

Nantmell remained almost an unsettled wilderness until the Scotch 
Irish, who landed at Newcastle in 1729, and the years immediately 
following, passing up the Brandywine and along the " Indian Trail" 
which led from the Great Valley to Conestogo Valley, chose this 
township as their places of abode. 

The Scotch and Scotch-Irish were the poorest in worldly goods and 
the least refined of the first settlers, but being energetic, economical, 
and industrious, they soon dotted the Township with humble but 

* Smith, "History of Delaware County;" Day, "Historical Collec- 
tions;" " Hazard's Kegister of Pennsylvania;." 



APPENDIX. 257 

comfortable homes. As they, like all who came to America at that 
period, sought " freedom to worship God" rather than wealth, a church 
was soon organized and a building for public worship provided. The 
Manor Meeting-House, the first in Nantmell Township, and for a 
hundred years the only Presbyterian Church within its boundaries, 
was built in less than three years after records prove that those who 
erected it had become settled residents. 

The first dwellings were made of unhewn logs ; the barns were 
small and thatched with straw. The buildings were placed near a 
spring, no wells having been sunk until at least half a century after- 
wards, and the now common suction-pump unknown till upward of 
thirty years later. Coming from countries where timber was scarce 
and valuable, and not being skilled in wielding the axe, they spared 
the forests, making ditches the boundaries of farms, and using the 
privet for the separation of fields. 

The section of country included in Nantmell being elevated, and 
the currents in the streams rapid, the purity and abundance of the 
water, an object of particular interest with the first settlers, caused it 
to be named and settled sooner than many other portions of the 
Cdunty. As further evidence of this, it may be stated that the 
name of the Township, Nantmell, or good water, of the principal 
stream, Brandywine Kill, clear-water river, and Springtown, the name 
of the Manor, all refer to the water, and what is worthy of remark, each 
of these names was given by immigrants of difierent nationalities. 
Nantmell by the Welsh, Brandywein by the Dutch, and Springtown 
by the English. 

The Indians appear to have appreciated the advantages of the 
bracing air, pure water, and abundance of fish and game which 
Nantmell afforded, as one of their principal towns and burial-places 
was situated in this Township. 

The influence of the Manor Church, which, after the lapse of one 
hundred and fifty years, still flourishes, is manifest both in the general 
morality of the inhabitants and in the fact that eigl],t out of every 
ten of those who own the farms occupied by their forefathers are 
descendants of members of that church. 

Although Nantmell has produced few literary or scientific men, yet 
two natives of it have received the degree of D.D., two of LL.D., 
and at least four members of the Chester County bar, three editors of 



258 



APPENDIX. 



ably-oonduoted periodicals, nine physicians and two well-known edu- 
cators claim Nantmell as the home of their infancy.* 



p: 

As evidence of the sparse population at that period, the following 
list of those who settled between 1720 and 1740 in that part of Cain 
now included in East and West Brandy wine, is given : 



Edwin Irwin. 
Joseph Bldridge. 
Robert Mirach. 
John McDermond. 
Samuel M'Crary. 
Thomas Green. 
John Patterson. 
Andrew Cox. 
James Green. 
James Love. 
William Patterson. 
John Troak. 
William Smart. 
Samuel McKinly. 
Henry Lewis. 
Peter Whitaker. 
William Reese. 
Patrick Lockhart. 
John Morgan. 
Thomas Temple. 



Joshua Mendenhall. 
James McFarlane. 
William Litore. 
Andrew Elliott. 
John Green. 
John Byers. 
James McGlaughlin. 
John McParlan. 
Adam Guthrie. 
Francis Long. 
Joseph Wilkinson. 
James Batten. 
Richard Buffington. 
William Byers. 
Samuel Byers. 
Joseph Phipps. 
Henry Jones. 
George' Oglesby. 
John Walker. 
Peter Graham-. 



In 1722 there were but eight thousand inhabitants in what was 
then Chester County ; that is, all of Pennsylvania except the Coun- 
ties of Bucks and Philadelphia. 



* Local Memoranda ; Colonial Records. 



APPENDIX. 



259 



EXTRACT FROM MINUTES OF PRESBYTERY. 
SEPTEMBER, 1716. 

Meetings or Presbyteries constituting one annually as a synod, to 
meet at Philadelphia or elsewhere, to consist of all the members of 
each subordinate Presbytery or meeting for this year at least. There- 
fore, it is agreed by the Presbytery after serious deliberation, that the 
first subordinate meeting or Presbytery do meet at Philadelphia, or 
elsewhere, as they shall see fit, to consist of these, viz., Messrs. An- 
drews, Jones, Powell, Orr; Pradner, and Morgan, and the second to 
meet at New Castle, or elsewhere, as they shall see fit, to consist of 
these, viz., Messrs. Anderson, Magill, Grillespie, Wotherspoon, Evans, 
and Conn. The third to meet at Snowhill, or elsewhere, to consist of 
these, viz., Messrs. Davies, Hampton, and Henry. 

Of the above Fifteen Presbyterian Clergymen, only one, Andrews, 
was a native. All of the others were immigrants from Scotland, 
Ireland, or Wales. 



LIST OF THOSE BURIED IN THE GRAVEYARDS FROM 
MARCH, 1849, TO APRIL, 1863, FOURTEEN YEARS. 



Name. 


Date of Burial. 


Name. 


Date of Burial. 


Arthar Donegan, 


April 


25, 


1849. 


Alexander Maitland, 


Not. 13, 1849 


George W. Nelson, 


May 


1, 


tt 


John C. Thompson, 


Dee. 9, " 


William H. Lookart, 


tt 


9, 


It 


Joseph Arters, 


Jan. 13,1850 


Jacob Happersett, 


June 


16, 


" 


Child of J. Sheneman, 


" 26, " 


Margaret Conaway, 


July 


31, 


it 


" of Charles M'Cann, Feb. 11, " 


Robert Caruthers, 


Aug. 


2, 


" 


Sarah S. Sides, 


" 12, " 


Mary Bonegan, 


it 


9, 


" 


Jane H. Grier, 


Mar. 1, " 


Kichard Donegan, 


it 


16, 


tt 


Child of David Bunn, 


tt 24, " 


Child of Walter Lilly, 


i( ' 


26, 


11 


Ann Eobinson, 


April 11, " 


William Templeton, Sr 


,Sept. 


2, 


ii 


Kobert Brioe, 


" 29, " 


Margaret Donegan, 


u 


6. 


It 


Esther Smith, 


May 2, " 


Letitia Lewis, 


tt 


24, 


it 


"Magdalina Sbultz, 


June 16, " 


Child of John Grier, 


" 


26, 


tt 


Susanna S. Torbet, 


July 9, " 


Caroline Lapp, 


Oct. 


3, 


It 


Child of Wm. Guthrie, 


" 16, " 


Ann Maris, 


tc 


28, 


tt 


Eaohel Guthrie, 


" 30, " 


Suaan Haup, 


Not. 


3, 


tt 


Grenabaum Jews, , 


Aug. r, " 



260 

Name. 
Child of James Long, 
Josiah P. Dowlin, 
Elizabeth Molntyre, 
Theodore S. Torbert, 
Jesse Lockhart, 
Jane Brwin, 
Elizabeth Elliott, 
Child of John Bradly, 
Elizabeth D. Dorian, 
Daniel Campbell, 
Baehel Happersett, 
Margaret Eunn, 
Child of M. Osborn, 
Alice Long, 
John Umstead, 
Jacob Umstead, 
Child of Robert Neely, 
Hannah Freeman, 
Sarah Dorian, 
Soloman A, Smith, 
Robert Kerr, 
Elizabeth Buchanan, 
Elizabeth Swinehart, 
Child of Robt. Dowlin, 
it tt tt 

Child of R. Smith, 
Sarah J. McKim, 
Child of Jas. Millegan, 
Clarrissa Marple, 
Isabella Criley, 
Caroline Happersett, 
Mary J. Neely, 
Joseph Hughes, 
Jane Shafer, 
Child of James Way, 
Thomas Dorian, 
Susannah Stanly, 
Samuel Lewis, 
William Jackson, 
Parmenas Crowe, 
David Lockhart, 
John Arters, # 
Child of John Shingle, 
John H. Long, 
Joseph Dorian, 
Henry Shenemak, 
Walter B. Lilly, 





APPENDIX. 








Date of Burial. 


Nome. 


Date of B 


irial. 


Aug. 


8, 


1860. 


Elizabeth Carpenter, 


Mar. 


31, 


1852. 


u 


10, 


tt 


Evan Granger, 


April 


5, 


rt 


tt 


24, 


tt 


Child of Robert Dorian 


May 


], 


" 


Sept. 


27, 


tt 


Mrs. Robert Dowlin, 


tt 


9, 


tt 


tt 


27, 


tt 


Child of Jas. Millegan, 


July 


2, 


tt 


Oct. 


9, 


tt 


Andrew Morton, 


tt 


21, 


tl 


Nov. 


8, 


tt 


John Dowlin, 


Aug. 


3, 


tl 


t( 


14, 


it 


Elizabeth Gibson, 


tt 


9, 


tt 


t( 


22, 


tl 


Jane Marshall, 


it 


13, 


it 


Dec. 


6. 


a 


Sarah Rigg, 


" 


2Q, 


tl 


(( 


13, 


it 


Margaret Milnes, 


Sept. 


9, 


" 


ti 


19, 


" 


Hannah Johnson, 


tl 


13-, 


it 


u 


23, 


it 


B. Ralston, 


Oct. 


8, 


tl 


Jan. 


9, 


1851. 


Martha McAdams, 


it 


31, 


" 


" 


11, 


it 


Child of Wm. Watson, 


Nov. 


6, 


it 


tt 


11, 


a 


Child of Bzekiel Rigg, 


Dec. 


0, 


it 


ti 


11, 


tt 


Sarah Davis, 


Jan. 


9, 


1853. 


Feb. 


10, 


tt 


Nathan Dorian, 


Feb. 


15, 


It 


It 


9, 


" 


Child of Walter Lilly, 


Mar. 


15, 


It 


It 


11, 


tt 


Mary Ann Clour, 


tt 


20, 


tt 


tt 


26, 


it 


Ester Torbitt, 


It 


22, 


tt 


Mar. 


4, 


it 


Milo Gibbony, 


tt 


31, 


tt 


June 


2, 


It 


John K. Clour, 


April 


1, 


tl 


July 


19, 


tt 


William Allan, 


tt 


16, 


tl 


tl 


26, 


a 


Child of B. Baldwin, 


tt 


19, 


" 


Aug, 


5, 


tt 


Child of K. Clour, 


May 


9, 


tt 


it 


1, 


tl 


Martha White, 


(( 


11, 


It 


Sept. 


5, 


tt 


Sarah F*reeman, 


tl 


13, 


It 


a 


18, 


tt 


A. Child, 


tt 


22, 


tt 


tt 


21, 


it 


Elizabeth Allen, 


June 


23, 


tl 


tt 


26, 


It 


Matthew A. Stanly, 


July 


1, 


" 


tt 


30, 


" 


Caleb Pusey, 


tt 


10, 


tt 


Oct. 


12, 


tt 


Robert McWilliams, 


tt 


15, 


It 


(( 


24, 


it 


Catharine Grier, 


Aug. 


4, 


tt 


tt 


27, 


it 


Child of D. West, 


tl 


6, 


it 


Nov. 


10, 


it 


Joanna Bones, 


tt 


25, 


tt 


It 


21, 


tt 


John Hood, 


tt 


31, 


tl 


tt 


22, 


tt 


Child of J. Dauman, 


Sept. 


14, 


" 


tt 


25, 


it 


Child of Alex. Maitland 


, Oct. 


3, 


tt 


Dec. 


6, 


tt 


Samuel S. Barford, 


tt 


10, 


it 


Jan. 


31, 


1862. 


Hannah Stanly, 


tt 


11, 


It 


Feb. 


6, 


a 


Mrs. Buffington, 


It 


18, 


tt 


tt 


17, 


it 


Isaac MoGlaughlin, 


Nov. 


17, 


tl 


Mar. 


1, 


it 


Child of T. Matlaok, 


tt 


18, 


It 


It 


2, 


tt 


Samuel Barnet, 


» 


25, 


tt 


it 


5, 


tt 


Joseph Rhea, 


Deo. 


16, 


It 


tt 


27, 


it 


Child of J. Gibbony, 


Jan. 


9, 


1854 



APPENDIX. 



261 



Name. 


Date of Burial. [ 


Name. 


Date of Burial, 


Grier Russell, 


Feb. 


3, 1854. 1 


Francis Harris, 


Dec. 20, 


1865. 


Kaohel MoGlaughlin, 


(C 


7, 




Emma Mackelduff, 


Jan. 2, 


1856. 


Jane Parke, 


" 


18, 




Dorothea Yastine, 


" 3, 


tt 


M. Guiney, 


tt 


23, 




Hannah Kennedy, 


" 9, 


" 


Phoebe Kerns, 


Mar. 


6, 




M. Strong, 


Feb. 8, 


tt 


Child of T. Sellers, 


tt 


20, 




Mary Dorian, 


" 15, 


" 


Sarah Lewis, 


April 


3, 




Jane Caruthers, 


" 28, 


tt 


Rebecca Happersett, 


t( 


6, 




William Hunter, 


April 4, 


tt 


Elizabeth Clour, 


it 


9, 




J. Hammond, 


" 9, 


•• 


Maria Marshall, 


it 


12, 




Mary J. Walkinshaw, 


" 10, 


ti 


Hannah Granger, 


tt 


17. 




Child of R. Walkinshaw 


" 12, 


" 


Keziah TJmstead, 


May 


4, 




Child of L. Hammond, 


" 15, 


•' 


Child of S. Dorian, 


" 


9. 




Jane Moore, 


June 7, 


" 


Mary Smith, 


" 


10, 




Elizabeth McClellan, 


" 14, 


" 


Thomas M'Clune, 


" 


13, 




John Forbis, 


" 15, 


tt 


Martha Mackelduff, 


June 


13, 




Agnes Thompson, 


" 29, 


" 


Barbara Griffith, 


tt 


26, 




Joseph Rhea, 


July 23, 


" 


Jane Neely, 


July 


8, 




George Floyd, 


Aug. 7, 


tt 


Elizabeth Essick, 


(( 


9, 




James Williams, 


Sept. 2, 


" 


Harman Smith, 


a 


27, 




Elizabeth Ballentine, 


" 26, 


" 


Mary Smith, 


Aug. 


3, 




Child of L. Hammond, 


Oct. 2, 


tt 


Earner Umstead, 


Sept, 


26, 




Josiah Brewer, 


" i, 


" 


Harriet Dowlin, 


It 


26, 




John Sloan, 


Nov. 8, 


tt 


Archibald Campbell, 


it 


30, 




Child of C. Maffett, 


" 12, 


" 


Emma M. Martin, 


Oct. 


1, 




Melchi Happersett, 


" 22, 


tt 


Isaac Lewis, 


tt 


3, 




Lavinia Maitland, 


" 29, 


tt 


Child, of Wm. Dowlin, 


a 


5, 




Sarah Boyoe, 


Dec. 3, 


" 


Jonathan Benner, 


a 


14, 




Susan Lilly, 


" , 28, 


It 


Child of Wm. Dowlin, 


tt 


ir, 




Child of J. Sterrett, 


Jan. 11, 


1867. 


Child of James Neely, 


Nov. 


2, 




Mary Wilson, 


" 26, 


(( 


Sarah Aikins, 


Dec. 


7, 




Child of H. Swinehart, 


" 27, 


" 


Samuel Pergrin, 


Jan. 


9, 


1855. 


Rebecca Grier, 


Feb. 14, 


ti 


Joseph Martin, Jr., 


ti 


18, 




Sarah Brown, 


" 23, 


it 


Nancy Pinkerton, 


Mar. 


4, 




James W. Brown, 


Mar. 11, 


ti 


Jane Freeman, 


tt 


23, 




Samuel Caruthers, 


" 15, 


it 


Esther Loag, 


April 11, 




. Child of A. Martin, 


" 29, 


tt 


Isabella Divine, 


" 


16, 




Child of Clark Guiney, 


April 10, 


tt 


Child of Jno. Dauman, 


July 


11, 




Joseph Martin, 


" 26, 


" 


Rebecca Graham, 


" 


18, 




Joseph Kerr, 


May 10, 


" 


Child of Wm. Loag, 


tt 


21, 




Child of R. Mason, 


" 17, 


a 


Elizabeth Dorian, 


Aug. 


11, 




David Lockhart, 


" 24, 


tt 


Jane A. Galligher, 


tt 


26, 




John Kurtz, 


June 6, 


it 


Child of J. McCurd'y, 


Sept 


i, 




Benjamin Harris, 


" 7, 


ti 


Ann Forbis, 


tt 


16, 




Childof J. Williams, 


" 9, 


it 


Parke Moore, 


Nov. 


3, 




James H. Long, 


July 14, 


tt 


Joseph Britton, 


Dec. 


2, 




Alexander Gavitt, 


" 20, 


it 


Child of J. Mason, 


tt 


19, 




J. Neely, 


Aug. 4, 


tt 



m'z 




APPENDIX. 






Name. 


Date of Burial. 


Name. 


Sate of Burial. 


Samuel Dorian, 


Aug. 


26, 


1867. 


William Dauman, 


Jan. 3, 


1859. 


Mr. Gallagher, 


Sept 


6, 


it 


Mrs. Townsley, 


Feb. 19, 


tt 


Josiah Williams, 


a 


8, 


it 


Margaret Mills, 


" 24, 


" 


Nathaniel Pennington, 


it 


30, 


•• 


Margaret A. McKim, 


M^r. 2, 


tt 


Franklin French, 


Oct. 


2, 


It 


Child of S. Way, 


" 4, 


tt 


John Strong, 


It 


13, 


" 


Wilson Brown, 


" 15, 


tt 


Charles Umstead, 


Nov. 


H, 


tt 


Phoebe Carmichael, 


" 17, 


tt 


Jane R, Walker, 


" 


25, 


" 


Isabella Osborne, 


April 5, 


" 


William Williams, 


Dec. 


6, 


tt 


John Fernwalt, 


" 10, 


tt 


John Widener, 


t( 


r, 


" 


Margaret Stevenson, 


" 12, 


it 


William Roherts, 


(( 


11, 


" 


Mary Gibson, 


" 30, 


tt 


Nathan Pinkerton, 


Jan. 


5, 


1858. 


Child of R. Serril, 


May 24, 


" 


William W. Elliott, 


" 


12, 


" 


Eliza R. Thomas, 


" 30, 


tt 


M. McAdams, 


{< 


18, 


ft 


Frederick Wonderly, 


" 30, 


It 


Frances Williams, 


Feb. 


9, 


tt 


Jane Shineman, 


June 19, 


tt 


Boyoe, 


tl 


11, 


it 


Amy Marple, 


" 30, 


tt 


Daniel Welsh, 


a 


16, 


" 


Susannah Dorian, 


July 3, 


tt 


James Welch, Jr., 


<( 


18, 


tt 


Kate Hatfield, 


Aug. 4, 


tt 


Samuel Culbertson, 


Mar. 


3, 


" 


Mary Curry, 


" 4, 


•' 


Child of J. Strong, 


ft 


16, 


tt 


Cecilia Hatfield, 


" 10, 


tt 


Nancy F. Grier, 


11 


22, 


" 


Child of G. Wonderly, 


" 24, 


tt 


William Arters, 


(t 


28, 


tt 


Ruth Sterrett, 


" 29, 


tt 


Miss Rhea, 


" 


30, 


" 


Thomas G. Ralston, 


Oct. 3, 


tt 


Child of Wm. Kingj 


May 


6, 


tt 


John Forbis, 


Nov. 1, 


tt 


Nathan Dorian, 


tt 


6, 


■• 


Sarah McClellan, 


Dec. 28, 


tt 


Jacob Darkess, 


ft 


20, 


it 


John Dunwoody, 


Jan. 21, 


1860. 


J. Cain, 


It 


20, 


tt 


George Forbis, 


" 27, 


It 


Annie Maitland, 


" 


30, 


tt 


Mary Christin, 


" 31, 


" 


Joseph Williams, 


June 


4, 


tt 


John Umstead, 


Mar. 8, 


(( 


Elizabeth Athens, 


it 


27, 


tt 


Martha Maitland, 


" 14, 


tt 


Daniel Shnman, 


July 


2, 


tt 


Susan Russell, 


April 23, 


It 


Isaac Williams, 


U 


11, 


tt 


Mary Ballentine, 


" 30, 


It 


Child of J. MoCirdy, 


(( 


15, 


tt 


John Worrall, 


May 25, 


It 


Jane L. Grier, 


u 


19, 


tt 


Margaret M'Clune, 


July 8, 


It 


Child of J. Sterrett, 


tt 


27, 


tt 


Jane Templeton, 


" 17, 


It 


John Saffer, 


Aug, 


1, 


tt 


. Child of Chas. McCann 


, « 19,^ 


tt 


Child of A. Ludwick, 


« 


16, 


tt 


Child of Clark Guiney, 


" 27, 


It 


Margaret A. Weber, 


n 


21, 


tt 


Margaret Arters, 


Sept. 16, 


It 


Robert |L. Grier, 


Sept. 


6, 


tt 


Miss Dowlin, 


" 16, 


" 


Ann Thompson, 


(I 


10, 


tt 


Andrew Torbet, 


Not. 25, 


" 


Child of C. Guiney, 


it 


1.9, 


tt 


Child of John Dorian, 


Dec. 24, 


II 


Sarah Atkins, 


" 


24, 


tt 


Robert Graham, 


Jan. 4, 


1861. 


Sarah Miller, 


' a 


25, 


tt 


James M'Clure, 


" 8, 


tt 


Joseph Townsly, 


Oct. 


14, 


it 


George McKim, 


" 10, 


tt 


Joseph Smith, 


Nov. 


3, 


" 


Jane Jenkins, 


Feb. 11, 


tt 


Hannah Jackson, 


tt 


20, 


tt 


Child of J. Bssiok, 


« 16, 


tt 


Margaret Worrall, 


t( 


30, 


tt 


Isaac Long, 


'■ 18, 


it 



Name. 
Sarah Mardock, 
Emana McOonnel, 
Mrs. J. MeCurdy, 
Child of John Hughes, 
Ewing Lewis, 
Mrs. Riddle, 
Martha Gaston, 
William Himmelwright, 
Sarah West, 
Margaret McClure, 

Torbit, 

William Sterrett, 
Child of T. McAdams, 
Nancy Crowe, 
Philip B. TJmstead, 
Hannah Seeright, 
Sallie Hatfield, 
Son of B. Hatfield, 
Child of B. Hatfield, 
Jane Bntler, 
Child of J. G. McClure, 
William Stanly, 
James Lockhart, 
Child of J. Rice, 
Child of B. Stringfellow, 
Joseph Lomas, 
Michael Weber, 
Sarah Williams, 
Child of E. Dunwoody, 



APPEISTDIX. 


263 


Sate of Banal. 


Name. 


Bate of Burial. 


Feb. 21, 


1861. 


Marshall Weber, 


Mar. 19, 1862 


" 26, 


it 


Child of William Boyce, April 1, " 


Mar. 15, 


tt 


Mary Ann Walker, 


May 18, " 


" 25, 


" 


Huldah Shields, 


June 6, " 


April 8, 


tt 


John Gallagher, 


" 13, " 


8, 


ti 


Two children of T. Mc 


- 


May 24, 


tt 


Adams, 


" 20, " 


June 6, 


" 


William N. Long, 


July 14, " 


Ang. 9, 


" 


Jane Koseborough, 


" 24, " 


" 12, 


it 


Child of J. Dunn, 


" 24, " 


" 14, 


" 


Susannah Criley, 


" 25, " 


Sept. 25, 


tt 


Child of J. Dauman, 


Aug. 9, " 


Oct. ], 


tt 


Child of John Clonr, 


Sept. 4, " 


" 21, 


tt 


Margaret Lomas, 


8, " 


" 22, 


" 


James Murdock, 


" 8, " 


" 28, 


tt 


Child of Wm.Dowlin, 


" 12, " 


Nov. 11, 


tt 


Child of Geo. Dowlin, 


" 19, " 


" 12, 


tt 


Ida McFarlane, 


" 29, " 


Dec. ], 


" 


James Sims, 


" 30, " 


" 2, 


(( 


Child of S. Mendenhall 


Deo. 10, " 


" 10, 


tt 


James Lewis, 


Jan. 8, 1863 


" 12, 


tt 


Andrew Hatfield, 


" 22, " 


" 12, 


tt 


Robert Ralston, ' 


Feb. 10, " 


" 24, 


" 


John Clower, 


" 26, " 


" 31, 


•• 


Frank Ballentine, 


Mar. 1, " 


Jan. 12, 


1862. 


Jane Allan, 


tt 4^ „ 


" 25, 


" 


John C. Marshall, 


" 15, " 


Mar. 3, 


tt 


Samuel Mowdy, 


" 26, " 


" 12, 


tt 







NAMES OF THOSE BUKIED IN THE GKAVEYARDS 
BELONGING TO THE CHURCH, DURING NINE 
YEARS, MAY, 1876, TO MAY, 1885. 



Name. 


Sate of Burial. 


Name. 


Bate of Burial. 


James McFarlan, 


May 


1, 


1876. 


Grier Davis, 


Dec. 20, 1876 


Sonnocthon Essick, 


tt 


3, 


It 


Bber Thompson, 


Jan. 9, 18 


77 


Minnie Witte, 


" 


22, 


tt 


Child of David Brnner, 


" 17, ' 




Rebecca Mowdy, 


June 20, 


tt 


Jane Guiney, 


Feb. 20, ' 




Jane Long, 


Sept. 


7, 


tt 


Margaret White, 


April 4, ' 




Rebecca Pinkerton, 


tt 


14, 


tt 


Rachel Templeton, 


" 20, ' 




William C. Lewis, 


Oct. 


6, 


tt 


Harry J. McLaughlin, 


May 21, ' 




Norris Dowlin, 


tt 


1, 


" 


Esther M. Sinn, 


June 8, ' 




George Guiney, 


tt 


9, 


tt 


Lydia M. Thomas, 


" 26, ' 




Mary Davidson, 


Nov. 


6, 


" 


Child of Wm. Carpenter 


, Aug. - 7, ' 




John Kurtz, 


Dee. 


i. 


tt 


Elizabeth Guiney, 


" 14, ' 




Emma Saylor, 


tt 


9, 


it 


Child of George Ayres, 


" 24, ' 





264 

Name. 
Eliza G^rove, 
^Frances Dowlin, 
Eliza Lightfoot, 
Sarah A. Pinkerton, 
Child of J. M. Bavr. 
Isaac Williams, 
Emma Long, 
Elizabeth Gallagher, 
Howard C. Matlack, 
Jennie Ayres, 
Joseph Tregoe, 
Yearsly C. Matlaok, 
Charles Matlack, 
Mary J. Matlack, 
Benjamin Hatfield, 
Elizabeth Moore, 
Elizabeth Christy, 
Eva M. Granger, 
John Hughes> 
Margaret Hunter, 
Samuel Forbis, 
John Keibelin^, 
Mary A. Swinehart, 
John Criley, 
Mary R. Da.vis, 
John Dowlin, 
Charles Gillespie, 
Mary Gallagher, 
Margaret Martin, 
Anna B. Ballentine, 
William Ballentine, 
John Sailor, 
Mary Stringfellow, 
George Marshall, 
Robert Murduck, 
Child of John Guthrie, 
William Hammond, 
Margaret Sailer, 
Maria MoGlanghlin, 
William C. Long, 
Isaac Graham, 
Alexander Wilson, 
James Gallagher, 
Child of Wm. Tregoe, 
Mary Dowlin, 
Child of Dr. H. Evans, 
Ella Hatfield, 





APPENDIX. 








Date of Burial. 


Name. - 


Date of Burial. 


Oct. 


1, 


1877. 


Anna L. Amole, 


Dee. 


22, 


1879 


ti 


1, 


tt 


Agnes Happersett, 


« 


27, 


ti 


Nov. 


8, 


" 


Zaccheus H. Davis^ 


Jan. 


26, 


1880 


Dec. 


20, 


ft 


Margaret A, Strong, 


tt\ 


29, 


ti 








Elizabeth Christman^ 


Feb. 


21, 


tt 


it 


27, 


tt 


Joseph Mackelduflf, Jr., 


Mar. 


2, 


ft 


Jan. 


31, 


1878. 


Peter Kurtz, 


<f 


20, 


" 


Feb. 


7, 


it 


Ann Kennedy, 


it 


24, 


tt 


Mar. 


4, 


ft 


Harry Dowlin, 


tf 


27, 


tt 


tt 


T, 


Cl 


John Balston, 


April 25, 


tf 


" 


15, 


tl 


Harry Rea, 


May 


26, 


ti 


{( 


16, 


ft 


James C. Irwin, 


ft 


31, 


tt 


" 


22, 


ti 


Esther Kirkpatrick, 


June 15, 


ft 


May 


6, 


tf 


Emma M'lUegan, 


it 


23, 


tt 


ft 


28, 


" 


David Long, 


July 


2, 


tt 


June 


1, 


(( 


Frank Guthrie, 


ft 


8, 


" 


ft 


29, 


ti 


[ Elizabeth Hatfield, 


Aug. 


12, 


tt 


July 


u, 


It 


Cephas M'Clune, 


fC 


18, 


" 


Sept. 


5, 


tt 


. Rev. Dr. J. N. C. Grier 


Sept. 


15, 


ft 


ti 


5, 


ft 


Nathaniel Irwin, 


ft 


29, 


tt 


tt 


7. 


tt 


Sharpless "Widener, 


Oct. 


11, 


tt 


Oct. 


3, 


ti 


"Christiana Crowe, 


ft 


19, 


tt 


tt 


4, 


tt 


Fannie Lewis, 


Nov. 


1?, 


if 


tt 


9, 


tf 


Esther J. Baldwin, 


Dec. 


31, 


ft 


" 


IS, 


tf 


James McClure, 


Jan. 


18, 


1881. 


Nov. 


9, 


ft 


Sarah Linden, 


tt 


19, 


tt 


t( 


9, 


ti 


Mary Matlack, 


Feb. 


19, 


ti 


tt 


26, 


ft 


Joseph G. Maitland, 


Mar. 


19, 


ft 


Dec. 


10, 


if 


Esther A. West, 


" 


26, 


ft 


tt 


16, 


ti 


William Templeton, 


April 27, 


ft 


Jan. 


24, 


1879. 


James Brown, 


May 


i, 


tt 


Mar. 


14, 


ft 


John Carpenter, 


ti 


u, 


tt 


tt 


31, 


tf 


Sarah Miller, 


June 14, 


" 


Apri 


8, 


it 


A. M. Eachus, 


Aug. 


9, 


tt 


tt 


11, 


tt 


James M. Dorian, 


Sept. 


2, 


tt 


tt 


19, 


it 


Louisa Rea, 


ft 


21, 


tt 


May 


3, 


(t 


Catharine Crowe, 


it 


28, 


ti 


July 


3, 


ft 


Daniel Shields, 


Nov. 


12, 


" 


Aug. 


2, 


it 


Rachel Everhart, 


Dec. 


1, 


ti 


" 


31, 


tf 


iMary Lewis, 


ft 


28, 


" 


Sept 


15, 


It 


Daniel McKim, 


it 


31, 


if 


tt 


22, 


it 


Lydia E. Thomas, 


Jan. 


12, 


1882. 


tt 


23, 


ft 


Elizabeth Umstead, 


ft 


14, 


tt 


Oct. 


1, 


tt 


Sarah A. Thompson, 


a 


28, 


tt 


Nov. 


18, 


tt 


Tilla R. Forbis, 


Mar. 


10, 


tt 


Dec. 


1, 


ti 


Annie B. Moore, 


tt 


25, 


tt 


tt 


11, 


it 


Catharine J. Forbis, 


April 19, 


tt 



APPENDIX. 



265 



Name. 


Date of Bnrial. 


Name. 


Date of Bnrial. 


Child of P. H. Irwin, 


May 12, 


1882. 


Emma A. Vance, 


Dec. 


1]> 


1883 


Mary Ann Grier, 


June 8, 


tc 


Christiana Ralston, 


Jan. 


2, 


1884 


Benjamin Milnes, 


" 10, 


It 


John Guthrie, 


tl 


9, 


it 


SaTilla Hatfield, 


" 20, 


n 


Lewie V. Reeser, 


tt 


ir, 


" 


Zillah Robinson, 


July 1, 


tt 


James Davidson, 


tl 


19, 


ft 


Alexander Martin, 


" 4, 


it 


George Cain, 


Feb. 


2, 


if 


Ann E. Malin, 


Aug. 18, 


. tc 


Kugene Dowlin, 


t( 


26, 


if 


Anna E. dower. 


« 21, 


" 


Agnes Himmelwright, 


Mar. 


22, 


tt 


Daniel Harris, 


Sept. 9, 


tt 


Rebecca Robinson, 


It 


23, 


tt 


A. H. Umstead, 


" 16, 


tt 


Thomas McAdams, 


Apri 


5, 


if 


Thomas J. Dorian, 


Oct. 24, 


tt 


James Ballentine, 


it 


12, 


ft 


Liza M. Nelson, 


Nov. 1, 


tt 


Moses Emery, 


ft 


14, 


if 


James Roseboro, 


" 10, 


It 


Sasan Hammond, 


tc 


21, 


" 


John Guiney, 


Dec. 13, 


" 


Augustus J. Dowlin, 


May 


22, 


it 


Dr. A. K. Gaston, 


" 26, 


It 


Eliza A. M'Clune, 


tt 


28, 


It 


EUzabeth Guiney, 


Feb. 13, 


1883. 


Rebecca-Dorian, 


June 


i, 


tt 


Mary J. Graham, 


" 19, 


tt 


Harriet Thompson, 


July 


4, 


tt 


John Dunn, 


" 22, 


t( 


Samuel Mackelduflf, 


Aug. 


2, 


tt 


Susan Liggett, 


Mar. 1, 


" 


John M. Neely, 


tt 


8, 


" 


Mary Carr, 


" 11. 


tt 


Rachel Buchanan, 


tt 


9, 


(( 


Esther J. Pinkerton, 


May 16, 


tt 


Lizzie McFarlane, 


Oct. 


26, 


tt 


Joseph Briggs, 


" 9, 


ft 


Robert Neely, 


Nov. 


5, 


" 


Thomas Lomas, 


" 15, 


" 


Mrs, M^tland, 


tt 


10, 


" 


Benjamin McClnre, 


June 14, 


tt 


Ann Worrall, 


Dec. 


6, 


tt 


Elizabeth Gillespie, 


July 16, 


tt 


Mary Clevenstine, 


ft 


23, 


" 


James Stewart, 


" 29, 


ft 


William Moore, 


Jan. 


9, 


1886 


Mary H. Dunwoody, 


Aug. 1, 


tt 


Sarat Hatfield, 


Mar. 


10, 


ft 


Catharine Guiney, 


" 9, 


tt 


James Grant, 


Apri 


1, 


" 


Hannah Mclntyre, 


« 16, 


tt 


Sarah H. Gillespie, 


tt 


3, 


it 


Ethel M. McGlaughlin, 


Sept. 15, 


tt 


E. H. Melon, 


it 


r, 


" 


Harvey Milligan, 


" 16, 


tl 


Anna M, F. Reaser, 


tf 


9, 


tf 


Child of John Baldwin, 


« 18, 


tt 


Emerson Matlack, 


tt 


22, 


" 


Mary M. Dowlin, 


" 25, 


tt 


Charles McFarlane, 


May 


i, 


It 


William Growe, 


" 25, 


tt 


James G. Tenipleton, 


ft 


9, 


tl 


William Lightfoot, 


Oct. 22, 


tt 


James Ralston, Sr., 


tt 


22, 


tt 


Eddie Guiney, 


Dec. 1, 


it 


Alexander Morrison, 


tt 


26, 


It 


Child of Charles Ahmole, " 8, 


tt 











The above list includes every age, from the infant of !' a few days" 
to the " mother in Israel" of more than fourscore and ten. 

It is worthy of remark, as showing the healthfulness of the sur- 
rounding country, that more than one-eighth had reached ages vary- 
ing from seventy to ninety-one years. 



18 



266 APPENDIX. 

S. 

ACT OF INCOKPORATION. 

ACT TO INCOEPOEATE THE PEESBTTEEIAN" CONGEE- 
UATION OF BEANDYWINE, IN THE TOWNSHIP OP 
WEST NANTMEAL, IN THE COUNTY OF CHESTEE. 

Section 1. — Wheeeas, divers members of the Presbyterian Con- 
gregation of Brandywine, in the' township of West Nantmeal, in 
the County of Chester, have humbly petitioned the General Assembly, 
praying that the said Congregation may be incorporated, and thereby 
enabled to recover, receive, and hold bequests, legacies and donations 
which may be made to the use of the same Congregation, and that 
Samuel Cunningham, John Culbertson, Nathaniel Porter, Eobert 
Smith, David Denny, Robert Lockhart, James Dunwoody, James 
M'Clure and Wm. Anderson, members of the aforesaid Congregation, 
may be constituted the first Trustees by Act of General Assembly, to 
be passed for that purpose. 

And whereas, this General Assembly hath consented that the same 
Congregation be incorporated, and vested with such powers and privi- 
leges, as have been heretofore granted to other religious societies which 
have been incorporated by acts of the Legislature : Therefore, 

Section 2. — Be it enacted, and it is hereby enacted by the Repre- 
sentatives of the Freemen of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 
General Assembly met, and by the authority of the same. That the 
said Samuel Cunningham, John Culbertson, Nathaniel Porter, Robert 
Smith, David Denny, Robert Lockhart, James Dunwoody, J^mes 
M'Clure and William Anderson, and their successors, to be nine in 
number, and to be duly elected as hereinafter is directed, be, and 
they are hereby made and constituted one body politic and corporate 
in law and in fact, to have continuance forever, by the name, style 
and title of " The Trustees of the Presbyterian Congregation of 
Brandywine, in the township of West Nantmeal, in the county of 
Chester." 

Section 3. — And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid. 
That the said Trustees and their successors, by the name, style and 
title aforesaid, shall forever hereafter-be capable in law, as well to take, 
receive and hold all and all manners of lands and other real and per- 



APPENDIX. 267 

sonaJ estate, which have at any time or times heretofore been granted, 
bargained, sold, enfeoffed, released, devised or otherwise given, granted 
or bequeathed to the said religious society and congregation of Bran- 
dywine, in the county of Chester, or to any person or persons in 
trust for the said society and congregation. And the said Trustees 
and their successors, are hereby declared to be seized and possessed of 
such estate therein, and for the same uses and intents, as in and by 
the respective grant, devise or other instrument is set forth and 
limited. And moreover, the said Trustees and their successors, at all 
times hereafter, shall be able and capable to purchase, take, hold and 
enjoy for the use of the said Congregation, any real estate in fee 
simple or less estate, by gift, gran^, alienation, devise or other act or 
instrument, of and from any person capable to make the same. And 
further, the same Trustees and their successors, shall apply the rents, 
profits and yearly income of the said Congregation, for the time being, 
for repairing and enlarging, if need be, the house of public worship 
and the enclosure of the burying ground of the same, and to erect 
and repair the schoolhouse, and for such other pious and charitable 
purposes, as shall be directed by the major vote of the regular mem- 
bers of the said society and congregation duly assembled, upon public 
notice thereof the Sunday preceding, from the pulpit or desk of the 
said house of worship. 

Section 4. — Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid. That 
all and singular the powers, privileges, regulations, provisions and 
directions, subject to the limitations and restrictions contained in an 
Act of the General Assembly, entitled " An Act for incorporating 
the Presbyterian Congregation of Pequea, in the county of Lancaster," 
enacted on the fifth day of February, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, mutatis mutandis, shall be, 
and the same are hereby extended and applied to the said Congrega- 
tion of Brandywine and to the nine Trustees herein before mentioned, 
and their successors : 

Section 5. — Provided, nevertheless, That no sale or alienation of 
the real estate of the said Corporation, made by the said Trustees or 
their successors, bona fide and for valuable consideration, in case the 
possession thereof pass immediately to the purchaser thereof and 
continue in him or his assigns, shall be impeached or called in 
question, for want of the consent of the majority of the regular 



268 APPENDIX. 

memberB of the said society and congregation, ^ren as required by 
the Act aforesaid, unless the same be done within seven years from 
and after the sale and delivery of possession to the said purchaser. 
Signed by order of the House. 

Thomas Mifflin, Speaker. 

Enacted into a law at Fhila4elphia, on Friday, the first day of 
September, in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and 
eighty-six. 

Samuel Bryan, Clerk of the General Assembltf. 
A true copy from the original, by 

B. Griffith. 

January 14, 1831. 



ACT FOE INCOKPOEATING THE PEESBYTEEIAN CONGEE- 
GATION OP PEQUEA, IN THE TOWNSHIP OP SALIS- 
BURY AND COUNTY OF LANCASTEE. 

Section 1. — Whereas, the Presbyterian Congregation of Pequea, 
in the county of Lancaster, have prayed that their said Congregation 
may be incorporated, < and by law enabled as a body corporate and 
politic, to receive and hold such charitable donations and bequests as 
have been, or that hereafter may be made to their society, and vested 
with such powers and privileges as are enjoyed by other religious 
societies, who are incorporated within this State. And whereas, this 
house is disposed to exercise the powers vested in the Legislature of 
the Commonwealth for the encouragement of pious and charitable 
purposes : ' 

Section 2. — Be it therefore enacted, and it is hereby enacted by 
the Representatives of the Freemen of the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania, in General Assembly met, and by the authority of the same. 
That Isaac M'Calmont, Amos Slaymaker, James Armour, Thomas 
Slemons, Andrew Caldwell, Robert Byers, David Jenkins, Thomas 
Patton and the Rev. Robert Smith, and their successors duly elected 
and appointed in such manner as herein after is directed, be, and they 
are hereby made and constituted a corporation and body politic, in 
law and in fact, to have continuance forever, by the name, style and 
title of "The Trustees of the Presbyterian Congregation of Pequea, 
in Salisbury township and county of Lancaster." 



APPENDIX. 269 

Section 3. — And be it farther enacted by the authority aforesaid, 
That the said corporation and their successors, by the name, style and 
title aforesaid, shall forever hereafter be persons able and capable in 
law, as well to take, receive and hold, all and all manner of lands, 
tenements, rents, annuities, franchises and other hereditaments, which 
at any time or times heretofore have been granted, bargained, sold, 
enfeoffed, released, devised or otherwise conveyed to the said Presby- 
terian Congregation of Pequea, in the township and county aforesaid, 
or to the religious society or congregation worshipping therein, now 
under the pastoral care of the Rev. Robert Smith, or to any person 
or persons to their use or in trust for them ; and the same lands, 
tenements, rents, annuities, liberties, franchises and other heredita- 
ments are hereby vested and established in the said corporation and 
their successors forever, according to the original use and intent, for 
which such devices, gifts and grants were respectively made : And 
the said corporation and their successors are hereby declared to be 
seized and possessed of such estate and estates therein as in and by 
the respective grants, bargains, sales, enfeoffments, releases, devises, 
or other conveyances thereof, is, or are declared, limited or expressed : 
As also that the said corporation and their successors aforesaid, at all 
times hereafter, shall be capable and able to purchase, have, receive, 
take, hold and enjoy, in fee simple, or of lesser estate or estates, 
any lands, tenements, rents, annuities, liberties, franchises and other 
hereditaments, by the gift, grant, bargain, sale, alienation, enfeoffment, 
release, confirmation or devise of any person or persons, bodies politic 
and corporate, capable and able to make the same : And further that 
the said corporation may take and receive any sum or sums of money, 
and any portion of goods and chattels, that have been or hereafter 
shall be given or bequeathed to them by any person or persons, bodies 
corporate and politic, able and capable to make a bequest or gift 
thereof, such money, goods and chattels to be laid out and disposed 
of for the use and benefit of the aforesaid Congregation, agreeable to 
the intention of the donor. 

Section 4. — Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, 
That the rents, profits and interest of the said real and personal estate 
of the aforesaid corporation and congregation, shall by the said 
Trustees and their successors, from time to time, be applied and laid 
out by them for the maintainance and support of the Gospel Ministry 



270; APPENDIX. 

■ in the said congregation, for repairing and maintaining their house of 
public worship, lots of land, burial ground, and such other pious and 
charitable uses as shall be thought proper, by a majority of the 
Trustees and other regular members of the said congregation, on due 
notice met, to give their free vote in such case. 

' Section 5 Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, 

That when and as often as it may become necessary to rebuild, 
enlarge or otherwise alter the house of public worship belonging to 
the said congregation and corporation, or to erect any new building, 
or to make any new purchase for the use of the said congregation, 
then and in such case it may be lawful for the aforesaid Trustees and 
their successors to make sale of such part or parcel of the real or 
personal estate of the said corporation, as a majority of the Trustees 
and of the regular members of the said congregation shall by their 
votes direct, the money arising from such sale to be laid out and 
applied, agreeably to the vote of a majority met as aforesaid. 

Section 6. — Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, 
That the said Trustees and their successors shall not by deed nor any 
otherwise grant, alien, convey, or otherwise dispose of any part or 
parcel of the estate, real or personal, in the said corporation vested, 
or to be vested, or charge or incumber the same to any person or 
persons whatsoever, except in the manner and for the purposes herein 
before mentioned. 

Section 7. — Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, 
That the said Trustees, their successors, or a majority of them, may 
from time to time meet as often as they shall think necessary for the 
benefit of the said corporation, either on their own adjournment, or 
on public notice from the pulpit the preceding Sabbath immediately 
after divine service, and before the congregation is dismissed, or on 
regular notice in writing, left at the house of each of the Trustees, 
and that the said Trustees, or a majority of them, being so met, be 
authorized and empowered, and they are hereby authorized and em- 
powered to elect and appoint from among themselves a President, and 
a,lso to elect and appoint from among themselves, or other members of 
the said congregation, a Treasurer and Secretary, and to remove, 
change or continue all or either of them at their pleasure, as shall 
seem to be most for the benefit of the said corporation. 

Section 8. — Provided, nevertheless. That the meeting or meetings 



APPENDIX. 271 

of the said corporation be not called without the concurrence of two 
or more Trustees, or of three or more respectable members of the said 
congregation, with the President, or without the particular business 
and reasons of the meeting being specified with the notification. 

Section 9. — Be it further enacted bj the authority aforesaid, That 
the said Trustees, or a majority of them, met, as is herein before di- 
rected, shall be authorised and empowered, and they are hereby au- 
thorised and empowered, to make rules, by-laws and ordinances, and to 
do every thing needful for the government and support of the secular 
affairs of the said corporation and congregation : Provided that the said 
by-laws, rules and ordinances, or any of them, be not repugnant to the 
laws of this commonwealth ; and also that all their laws and proceed- 
ings be fairly and regularly entered in a book to be kept for that 
purpose. 

Section 10. — Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, 
That the said corporation and their successors shall have full power 
and authority to make, have and use one common seal, with such de- 
vice and inscription as they shall think fit and proper, and the same 
to break, alter and renew at their pleasure. 

Section 11. — Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid. 
That the said corporation and their successors, by the name of " The 
Trustees of the Presbyterian Congregation of Pequea, in the township 
of Salisbury and county of Lancaster," shall be able and capable in 
law to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded in any Court, or be- 
fore any Judge or Justice, in all and all manner of suits, complaints, 
pleas, matters and demands of whatsoever kind, nature or form they 
may be, and all and every matter and thing therein to do, in as full 
and effectual a manner as any other person or persons, bodies politic 
or corporate, within this Commonwealth, may or can do. 

Section 12. — Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, 
That the said corporation shall always consist of nine members, ex- 
cept as ia herein after provided, called and known by the name of 
" The Trustees of the Presbyterian Congregation of Pequea, in the 
township of Salisbury, and county of Lancaster," and the said mem- 
bers shall at all times hereafter be' chosen by ballot by a majority of 
such members (met together) of the said congregation as shall have 
been enrolled as stated worshippers with the said congregation for at 
least the space of one year, and shall have paid one year's pew rent, or 



272 APPENDIX. 

other annual sum of money not less than ten shillings, for the use and 
benefit of the said corporation and congregation, and shall not at any 
time of voting, be more than one half year behind or in arrears for 
the same : Provided, always, that the Pastor or Minister of the said 
congregation for the time being, shall be entitled to vote equally with 
any member of the said congregation, and also, that all and every per- 
son or persons qualified to vote and elect as aforesaid, shall and may 
be also capable of being elected as a Trustee as aforesaid. 

Section 13. — Be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the 
said Isaac M'Calmont, Amos Slaymaker, James Armour, Thomas Siem- 
ens, Andrew Caldwell, Kobert Byers, David Jenkins, Thomas Patton, 
and the Rev. Robert Smith, the first and present Trustees hereby in- 
corporated, shall be and continue Trustees aforesaid, until they be re- 
moved in manner following, that is to say : One third part in number of 
the Trustees aforesaid, being the third part herein first named and ap- 
pointed, shall cease and discontinue, and their appointment determine 
on the first Monday in the month of April, which will be in the year 
of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-six, and the 
second third part herein named shall cease and discontinue, and their 
appointment determine on the first Monday in April, which will be in 
the year one thousand seven "hundred and eighty-seven, and in like 
manner the last third part herein named shall cease and determine on 
the first Monday in April, which will be in the year one thousand 
seven hundred and eighty-eight, on which days in each of the afore- 
mentioned years respectively, new elections shall be held of other 
Trustees, instead and in place of those whose appointments shall have 
ceased and terminated ; which manner of discontinuance, determina- 
tion and new appointment or election shall be continued on the first 
Monday in April every year hereafter forever, so that no person shall 
be or continue a Trustee longer than three years together, without 
being re-elected, which may be done whenever and as often as the 
members of said congregation qualified to vote as aforesaid, shall 
think fit. 

Section 14. — Provided, always, nevertheless. That whenever any 
circumstance or concurrence of circumstances shall happen, to prevent 
the holding of an • election at the periods aforementioned, for Trus- 
tees instead and in place of those whose appointments shall have 
ceased and terminated, also whenever any vacancy shall happen by the 



APPENDIX. 273 

death, refusal to serve, or other removal of any one or more of the 
Trustees of the said corporation, an election shall be held as soon as 
conveniently can be done, in the manner before directed, for other 
Trustees in the stead and in place of those whose appointments shall 
have ceased and terminated, or for supplying such vacancies that may 
happen as aforesaid, and that the remaining Trustees have power to 
call a meeting of the electors of the Congregation for such purposes. 
Section 15. — Provided, always, and it is hereby enacted by the 
authority aforesaid. That the clear yearly value, interest or income of 
the lands, tenements, rents, annuities, or other hereditaments and real 
estate of the said Corporation, shall not exceed the sum of five hundred 
pounds, gold or silver money, at the present current value thereof in 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, exclusive of pew rent and other 
free contributions belonging to the aforesaid congregation, which said 
money shall be received by the said Trustees, and disposed of by them 
for the purposes and in manner herein before described and directed. 
Signed by order of the House. 

John Batard, Speaker. 

Enacted into a law at Philadelphia on Saturday the fifth day of 
February, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and 
eighty-five. 

Samuel Bryan, Clerk of the General Assembly. 

A true copy from the original, by 

B. Griffith. 

January 14, 1831. 



19